35 Burst results for "50 Years"

White House gains partners to end US hunger within a decade

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 17 hrs ago

White House gains partners to end US hunger within a decade

"The Biden administration is getting some partners in its bid to end hunger in America within the decade President Biden today will host The White House's first hunger nutrition and health conference since 1969 That one led by president Nixon influenced the nation's food policy agenda for 50 years including a big boost for the food stamps program The White House says several private sector partners have committed more than $8 billion to the goal of ending hunger by 2030 but while the president's touting that support the bigger hurdles likely lie in the increasingly partisan Congress which would have to approve proposed policy changes like expanding free school meal access Sagar Meghani Washington

Biden Administration President Biden White House President Nixon America Congress Sagar Meghani Washington
 Biden's strategy to end hunger in US includes more benefits

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 1 d ago

Biden's strategy to end hunger in US includes more benefits

"The Biden administration is laying out its strategy for meeting an ambitious goal ending hunger in the U.S. by 2030 The plan includes boosting monthly benefits that help low income Americans buy food and highlights the need for access to healthier food and exercise This week President Biden will host The White House's first hunger nutrition and health conference in more than 50 years The last one under president Nixon aimed to end American hunger for all time and led to a greatly expanded food stamps program and helped for babies But cuts to federal programs and other changes have led to declines in access to food The FDA says about 10% of American households suffered food insecurity last

Biden Administration President Biden President Nixon U.S. White House FDA
Why the Biden Administration Is Getting Worried About India

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:45 min | 6 d ago

Why the Biden Administration Is Getting Worried About India

"The Biden administration is very concerned about India. Why? Because India seems to be tilting or tilted in a pretty pro Russian direction. The Indians are not marching to the Biden street band. And this is causing the Biden people a lot of discomfort. Now, obviously, India is not alone. There are many other countries that aren't marching either. But those countries are not so much of a big surprise. Iran, of course, is in the Russian orbit, China is along with Iran kind of an adversary of the United States and therefore doesn't mind making common cause with Russia, even some of the other Arab countries are kind of in the same boat. But India has been moving in a pro American direction. The Indian people. I sometimes say, and I don't mean this scientifically because I haven't seen any real evidence of this, but it seems on the ground that there's a very strong pro American sentiment in India. Now, when I probe it further, I realize that the pro American sentiment is really aimed at the America of 50 years ago. It's not aimed at the America of today. It's not as the Indians are saying, yeah, we want more LGBTQ. Oh yeah, we want our, you know, we want our kids to get pregnant out of wedlock. Oh yeah, we'd like to see the trans phenomenon come big time to India. Oh yeah, we want abortion on demand. No, the Indians want none of this.

India Biden Administration Iran Biden Indians America Russia China
Donald Trump: The FBI, Democrats Worked With Russia

Mark Levin

01:21 min | Last week

Donald Trump: The FBI, Democrats Worked With Russia

"Here's Trump on the FBI and Youngstown Ohio cut 18 go We'll also have to move quickly to fix the rot at our federal law enforcement and intelligence agencies just this week It was revealed that Igor then Cinco I think that sounds like a slightly Russian name The foreign national fabricated some of the most ridiculous smears and lies in the phony steel dossier It was all phony How would you like to be me and go home and explain that one to my wife Darling it wasn't true I swear it wasn't Remember that one with the hookers from Russia Darling I'd like to explain this to you It was all phony It was all a phony made up corrupt thing by the Democrats working with a paid informant of the FBI Remember we were supposed to be working with Russia It was the FBI and the Democrats that were working with Russia and now it's all coming out And I hope they make a big deal out of this not sweep it under the carpet because I think it's one of the biggest stories in 50 years If that were a Republican set of a Democrat it would be the biggest story it would never end In other words the FBI was paying a Russian who made false smears to try and take down the president of the that's true Can you believe that

FBI Youngstown Russia Igor Ohio Darling
Professor Walter Hooper Recounts a Story About C.S. Lewis

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:19 min | Last week

Professor Walter Hooper Recounts a Story About C.S. Lewis

"When you first came to Oxford, I remember story that you went to maybe it was the bob land. I'm guessing, and you asked for anything by Lewis, but the term you used was Lewis, Louisiana. Can you do you remember that story? I don't think it's exactly as I told it. I may have asked for Louisiana, but I think together we worked it out. I worked so long in the bodleian over 50 years. And I was always working on Louis. So people who worked there called the readers by not by name, but by the name of the person they're researching. So I've called mister C is Lewis when I'm there. And I know a man who is Civil War Robert E. Lee and Hitler. Mister Adolf Hitler. You're kidding. Well, actually, one of the things about Hitler's. Is that the people that I work with have work with for years, these Curtis Brown, agents, literary agents and London. Well, they were Hitler's literary agents. And they have you're not kidding. No, I'm not. Curtis Brown where Hitler's literary agents. Some have they inherited they have the rights to they control the rights to mein kampf. But and all the children's stories that he wrote. Well, I understand that the royalties of mein kampf have been around for 50 years, and they built up quite a lot.

Bob Land Lewis Louisiana Hitler Mister Adolf Hitler Curtis Brown Oxford Robert E. Lee Louis London
Down With Sweden

Dennis Prager Podcasts

00:51 sec | Last week

Down With Sweden

"I've never been an admirer of Sweden. There was neutral during World War II. And it was worse than neutral during the Cold War. It was more pro Soviet than pro American. It presented itself as a great new socialist utopia. Boy, I read a book almost have come out from 50 years ago. 40 years ago, I'm going to look it up the new totalitarians. And it was about sweet it's one of the first hard covered books I ever bought. And then lo and behold, never give up on a country, I guess.

Sweden
Christen Limbaugh Bloom on Jesus Using Evil for Good

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:51 min | 2 weeks ago

Christen Limbaugh Bloom on Jesus Using Evil for Good

"Kristen for your father and I were of a certain generation to say, oh dear, everything's awful. Youngsters today, et cetera, et cetera. Talk to us from your perspective. Shouldn't we be a little bit buoyed by recent events, especially if I look at the pro life versus the pro abortion movement. I just see young faces at these events. What do you seeing? I completely agree. And I think that when the pendulum sways one way, the good thing is that Jesus uses evil for good, oftentimes. And so so many people are waking up to the real spiritual forces that are at work right now in our society. And people Christians in particular have been praying for the fall of roe versus wade for 50 years and here we are in 2022 and roe has fallen. And so I think that it's so important that we take time to recognize that God did this, that at the end of the day he is the one who brought this forward. And there's also so much work that has been done. For example, I believe there are 9 times as many pregnancy centers as there are abortion clinics. And that's all thanks to the hard work of Christians and conservatives in this country. And so I think that we have to remember that there are so many of us in this country who still believe in the goodness of the founding fathers, vision for America. It being a nation based on Christianity. And we have to continue meeting together praying together and raising up our children with these values and not giving in to the different influences and culture that we try to muddle these ideas and confuse us from the purity of our founding father's vision for America.

Kristen Wade America
Why We Can't Forget the Communists

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:15 min | 2 weeks ago

Why We Can't Forget the Communists

"I'm just reflecting the last part of my last conversation of the previous hour with professor de Lorenzo, who wrote the politically incorrect guide to economics. That at a university he taught at a Republican student posted at some fair that the campus, I guess, fear of clubs you could join. One page from one of the most important books written in the last 50 years. The black book of communism shockingly published by Harvard University press, I wonder if it would publish it today. It was originally produced by French professors. It gives you an idea of how many people were murdered and tortured by communists. And he said, there wasn't any student for whom this was not news. How could you go through a college education or a high school education? And not know the communists with the greatest mass murder movement in modern history.

Professor De Lorenzo Harvard University
The March of Leftism Across South America

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:52 min | 3 weeks ago

The March of Leftism Across South America

"Want to talk about the march of leftism across South America, very troubling development, and we've seen it happen in recent months and in recent years. Now, of course, we know a lot about Venezuela. I talk about it in the podcast W, of course, talks about it a lot as well. But a number of other countries, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, even Chile, and Chile was kind of the most unkindest cut of all. And what I mean by that is that Chile has actually enjoyed an economic boom because of capitalism because of free market policies. In fact, free market policy is put into effect. With the advice of American economists like Milton Friedman and going back, almost 50 years or 50 years or more now. Chile created a pension system that produced a decent provision for people as they got into old age. Again, it was a pension system, not like America's social security plan, but a pension system that's invested in the market and as the market went up people saw their fortunes become a lot more comfortable and be able to provide for them when they needed it. And your Chile of all places pivoted to the left by electing a real far leftist. In fact, somebody who has in the past been associated with communism, a guy named Gabriel borik. An activist who came marching in promised a kind of new Chile. In fact, said that he was going to rewrite the Chilean constitution. He says the constitution was put into effect onto a dictator Augusto Pinochet. We're going to redo the whole constitution. There was a referendum in 2020 Anna majority. In fact, a decisive majority of chileans voted, yes, we do need a new constitution.

Chile South America Venezuela Ecuador Colombia Milton Friedman Peru Gabriel Borik America Augusto Pinochet Anna
The Founding of the FBI Was Accidental

Mark Levin

01:13 min | Last month

The Founding of the FBI Was Accidental

"The Democrats of course are going to support and defend the FBI because it's their FBI now I regret to say When I served at the Department of Justice the FBI as a collective was a straight shooter Really was But there have been many many examples in the past of abuses at the FBI even before J. Edgar Hoover And the FBI's founding was almost accidental It was founded under Theodore Roosevelt Did you know that mister producing And he created the FBI Because he didn't trust the Secret Service And it was the Secret Service that had much broader powers back then And it does even today So he didn't trust the Secret Service So he he created within the Department of Justice which had only been created about 40 50 years before the FBI This FBI And he put some loyalists in charge of it the early directors and then eventually Hoover I think was the third or fourth director and he was there almost half a century

FBI Secret Service Department Of Justice J. Edgar Hoover Theodore Roosevelt Hoover
John Fetterman: Minorities Are Poor, Wouldn't Have Their Voting IDs

Mark Levin

00:59 min | Last month

John Fetterman: Minorities Are Poor, Wouldn't Have Their Voting IDs

"He also said that the people of color are less likely to have a voter ID Because they're poorer This guy grew up with a platinum spoon in his big mouth He didn't stop living off mommy and daddy till he was 50 years old 50 But he knows all about the inner city knows all about minorities and you know you minorities out there You can't possibly be expected to have an ID Driver's license none of you have cars none of you have driver's license none of you have identification of any kind You're just poor minorities who don't know any better you see And this is how the radical left lily white Democrats look at you folks Look at all of you folks All of us But particularly minorities

NASA presses toward moon rocket launch after fuel leak

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | Last month

NASA presses toward moon rocket launch after fuel leak

"I'm Julie Walker It's launch day at NASA with a mission to blast off a new moon rocket that will eventually carry a crew for the first time in 50 years Despite fuel leaks and a possible crack discovered during final liftoff preparations along with weather holds NASA is hoping to launch Artemis one from cape canaveral this morning at 8 30 That window closes at ten 30 and another launch attempt won't take place until Friday at the earliest Darryl nail with NASA communications Kind of a whack a mole situation at the moment The 322 foot rocket is the most powerful ever built by NASA out muscling even the Saturn 5 used by the Apollo program that carried astronauts to the moon a half century ago I'm Julie Walker

Julie Walker Nasa Cape Canaveral
Mets retire Willie Mays’ No. 24 as Old-Timers’ Day returns

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | Last month

Mets retire Willie Mays’ No. 24 as Old-Timers’ Day returns

"It was a promise that went unfulfilled for nearly 50 years but on Saturday that all changed in a surprise move during old timers day the mets retired baseball great Willie Mays is number 24 fulfilling a promise that late Metz owner Joe and payson had made to the say hey kid in 1972 Maize did not make the trip to queens but his son Michael said that it was his close relationship with payson that made his time with the mets so special Her promises to him more important so a coming foolish like this is you know it's just something undone is done all the time coming Maze played for the mets from 1972 to 1973 Krishna Arnold New York

Payson Mets Willie Mays Metz Maize Baseball Queens JOE Michael Maze Krishna Arnold New York
Russia blocks final document at nuclear treaty conference

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | Last month

Russia blocks final document at nuclear treaty conference

"Russia has blocked agreement on the final document at a conference reviewing the UN nuclear treaty I'm Ben Thomas with a look at what happened The nuclear non proliferation treaty is 50 years old and considered the cornerstone of nuclear disarmament aimed at curbing the spread of nuclear weapons and ultimately achieving a world without them 191 countries are party to the treaty and spent four weeks reviewing it But that produced criticism of Russia's military takeover of Europe's largest nuclear power plant and its invasion of Ukraine Russia and Ukraine have accused the other of shelling the zapper Asia plant the conference's final document which required unanimous approval would have had the party's express grave concern for the military activities at or near the facility and other nuclear plants Russia maintains there was no consensus and insists many countries objected to a host of issues I'm Ben Thomas

Russia Ben Thomas UN Ukraine Europe Asia
Caller: The Split Amongst the Republican Party

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:42 min | Last month

Caller: The Split Amongst the Republican Party

"Just wanted to call about the fundraising and all that you say are done and I wanted to talk about when the two biggest conservative talk show host in the country, I believe or as you and Shaun Hannity. And when you and shown kind of went your separate ways y'all don't agree on stuff anymore. And that's obvious but the peak that Shaun put up that you didn't agree with and by the way I agree with you. But my point is, what did that do to Conservative Party in that sale? How many people lived in the old daily and they've been split now? Well, go ahead. Well, what would you recommend that I do? So Hannity is out there and he is, it doesn't matter whatever president Trump says, he will follow. I'm just not that person. You know, I saw that doctor Oz was a flawed candidate. Supported abortion and Chris, I just, I got to tell you, man, I can not support anybody who supports abortion. Can't do it. And I'm and I'm with you there. I'm with you. Here's what I don't understand. Why would they do that if they want to win? You need to talk about Mitch McConnell, Kevin McCarthy. I wouldn't give a dime to the Republican Party because they are Democrats. They are Democrats. I vote. But why would I give any money to the Republican Party? Look what they've done to us. I'm 50 years old and my whole life are voting from 18. I've seen the Republicans what they've done. This is not a democratic problem. This is not. This is a Republican problem.

Shaun Hannity President Trump Conservative Party Shaun Hannity OZ Republican Party Kevin Mccarthy Mitch Mcconnell Chris
Fewer Americans file for jobless benefits last week

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | Last month

Fewer Americans file for jobless benefits last week

"Fewer Americans filed for unemployment benefits last week The jobs market continues to stand out as one of the strongest segments of the American economy The Labor Department reports applications for unemployment benefits for the week ending August 13th fell slightly down by 2000 to 250,000 And last week's number was revised downward The number of Americans collecting unemployment benefits is hovering at 1.43 million Employers scrambling to find workers after an unexpectedly strong pandemic recovery added nearly 530,000 jobs in July more than double what forecasters had expected and the unemployment rate dipped back down to a 50 year low at three and a half percent Its one bright spot amid clouds including higher prices rising interest rates and a slowing home sale market I'm Jennifer King

Labor Department Jennifer King
The True Purpose for the Trump Raid

The Officer Tatum Show

01:34 min | Last month

The True Purpose for the Trump Raid

"I know a lot of people are excited when they hear your accent 'cause you're just so very unique, but your take on these things. I listen to your show just what was yesterday. I listened to your show before I went on and I thought you did a tremendous job you had a guest on and you guys were explaining all the nuances of what's going on with president Trump in this FBI raid that I think is a complete force. But let my audience know Sebastian, what you think about the raid and president Trump's personal home and what does this mean on a political scale from a political perspective? Well, first things first, every president has a legacy clearance, even if you leave The White House, you maintain the top clearance till the day you die, Jimmy Carter who hasn't been president for 50 years. He still has a top secret SCI highest level Q clearance. That applies to president Trump. So there's no question he's authorized to read any classified information. He wishes to read. Secondly, the president's records act the presidential records act has no criminal aspect to it. Many presidents since the act was created after Nixon left office have had lengthy arguments with the government as to what is their personal property and what has to go into an archive. And that is a function of negotiations between U.S. lawyers and the lawyers of the president's estate Nixon, but Nixon it took over 20 years for those negotiations to finally bring fruition. You don't read somebody's private residence with armed federal officers.

President Trump Sebastian FBI Donald Trump Jimmy Carter White House Nixon U.S.
Kimberley Johnson on How Trump Ruined Bipartisan Mainstream Media

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

02:08 min | Last month

Kimberley Johnson on How Trump Ruined Bipartisan Mainstream Media

"We you pointed this out, but it's just this mainstream media stuff just drives me insane. You were saying, I don't even hear them cover. They've covered Democrats doomed so many times. I know you're missing the Democrats and pulled ahead in generic polling. There's new polling showing Biden and Harris beating Trump beating desantis showing Harris beating desantis. And they just don't, they're so hard. They never report on that. Yeah. They're just so we D to this storyline, right? And meanwhile, like you said, I think roe is a huge thing, but I think it's not even the only thing. Like, look at the most legislatively successful president since LBJ with a 50 50 Senate. I mean, it is truly every barometer 50 year low in jobless. I mean, the jobless numbers just came out Friday. I mean, I don't know how you can spin it anymore that Biden is an incredibly successful. What do you make of the approval numbers for him because to me it's just this relentless mainstream media coverage that I don't know how we overcome it? Yeah, I mean, I think I know CNN, the guy who wants CNN is like Friends with Donald Trump. Obviously, these people who own, I don't know how many there are who own the major cable. And then obviously the big papers. You know, they're wealthy and unfortunately in some cases wealthy business owners, which prefer Republicans because they get all the tax breaks. And you know, and then they have the friendships and whatever. And I don't know the behind stories, but yeah, there's, you know, the fairness doctrine going away. Right. And 24/7 news that is reliant on views clicks and attention. I think that's where it's coming from an unfortunately people are more concerned about clicks and dollars than they are about just getting the news out. What we used to be as a country where it came to news and we could all no matter what party you were in, go to that ABC News NBC News CBS world news tonight, whatever it was. And we could all just, you know, we might not agree, but we all believed them. Right. No longer happened. We killed that. Right.

Desantis Biden Harris CNN Donald Trump Senate Abc News NBC CBS
"50 years" Discussed on Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

03:48 min | 5 months ago

"50 years" Discussed on Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

"That's where we kind of went wrong. I just want to piggyback on something that Graham said. And that's I did a interview with supernal supper. Which is the Hyundai advanced air mobility division. And one of the things that they found was that in hiring people, they started out looking for the same thing that aerospace had always looked for and ended up having to rewrite job descriptions because they didn't want that pedigree what they wanted was that aspirational mind that that curiosity and seeking versus merely the same old that looked the same. So I wanted to move us along and it's really about right now because we have two questions left. Right now and the future. So if you were going to say right now, what do you see as the most significant innovation challenges facing the industry? What would those be, John? Well, I would say it's getting the best students entering into aerospace and defense. And that's twofold. One is to make it as Graham said to make it exciting for them to want to enter. But I say the other part is if you look at PhDs that are being graduated from leading universities in the U.S., many of them are foreign students. And that means they're restricted from defense and a lot of air space to begin with. So John sulfur, who was the director of MTO at darpa, about ten years ago, told me, you know, we ought to do is hand a U.S. citizenship application to every foreign PhD in the U.S.. I think the other one is doing being able to do a classified work from home. You can't do that today. If you're going to get the best people, they're not going to want to work in a room that doesn't have windows, and so you need to do that..

Graham Hyundai John sulfur U.S. John MTO darpa
"50 years" Discussed on Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

04:35 min | 5 months ago

"50 years" Discussed on Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

"Are there other ways of getting the funding instead of just consolidation into very, very few companies? Yeah, and I have some thoughts on that. I mean, one of the results of consolidation is the either of the consolidation or the actual outright disappearance of corporate labs that would be, I mean, and I'm not talking about the top of the corporate. I'm talking about sometimes labs within divisions. As they consolidate these laps get sort of rolled together. And then the consolidated corporations aren't de priorities kind of get led on top of all these units and I think the end result is a loss of diversity in R&D within aerospace. And a lot of the outsourcing of innovation to now we have got a healthy startup ecosystem that comes along and it's very tempting to reach into that healthy diverse ecosystem. But I think that that's also a challenge to justifying the corporate R&D. It comes down to it's not just money decisions. You have to really decide what thing you can do as a corporation that will differentiate you. You can't go and buy from a startup or whatever or something like that. And I think that has the industry suffered from that over the years because I think it's just hollowed out some of the degrees of diversity of approaches being researched within companies that John's experienced this. I mean, he's gone through many, many corporate transitions. And I'm sure he's had to every time that's happened. He'd have to go back to the table and justify his technology decisions saying as company X, these are things we must focus on. These are the differentiators. And then he's got somebody now from corporate Y that's in charge, saying yes, but we can go get that somewhere else. What about this? This corporate this company Z we bought over here wants to spend money on this. And I think that consolidation, I think, has made it really, really hard for aerospace to know where to invest. The customer sometimes hasn't helped. The DoD is not provided strong enough technology pulls.

John DoD
"50 years" Discussed on Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

01:43 min | 5 months ago

"50 years" Discussed on Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

"With us to discuss this, our John borghese and Graham Warwick. John recently retired from Collins, aerospace, capping off a 50 year career that began with the drawdown from the war in Vietnam and through today's world where we are seeing all of these innovations and challenges. John is also been a member of the NASA aeronautics committee since 2011 and was its chair from 2017 to 2021. With us too is Graham Warwick, aviation weeks executive editor for technology. In this role, Graham has worked with John several times, including an aviation week study of innovation across the industry, as well as on technology developments. Graham graduated in aeronautical engineering just a bit after John and worked in advanced design at hawker city aviation in the UK before becoming an aerospace journalist. He's won a lot of awards and as you all know, he leads to us as a mentor as well as journalist. Between the two of you, you've seen a lot of change and a lot of innovation. John over the course of this half century and that sounds weird even saying it to you because you're young at heart. What has been the most significant technological change you have seen? Thank you, Carol. Good to talk to you again. And thanks for asking. I really have two items for you. With the first being the move from analog to digital, which has been driven by advances in semiconductor technology. When I first started in 1972, I actually worked on two systems, anti skid and rad altimeters, but both of them were analog systems..

Graham Warwick John borghese John NASA aeronautics committee hawker city aviation Graham Collins Vietnam UK Carol
"50 years" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"50 years" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Service committed to whether any nation work with them. They'll take you as far as you wanna go. And that's that's unfortunately where we have to end. I could talk louis for for hours on him. He's a great colleague. Someone that has served as a mentor for me as a friend is todd. League confident in our roles is am presidents and colleagues in the field. And i'm certain. I said this before he came on. I'm louis holds the record for the most appearances on whether he says the podcast and the tv show. So i'm gonna take host. Live up the privileges here. This week's gig of the week is dr louis utility. Dr each lady received his bachelor's degree a degree at university of wisconsin master's and bachelor's so he is a triple badger. As i see it. I believe became the sixteenth director of the national weather service in two thousand thirteen. Who's am as president in twenty twelve twenty. Thirteen director inset for fourteen years and has published more than seventy peer reviewed articles and chapters in books on numerous including severe weather outbreaks snowstorms gravity waves jet streak cycles of the satellite data in applications and more recently the basis for the joint center for satellite data simulation. Wmo base grand challenge for seamless prediction and the restructuring of the national weather service to build a weather ready nation. Dr jalili has been a driving force behind transition. Transitioning this nation. And we thank you for your service. Louis thank you for joining us and thank you for also giving us this opportunity on web geeks to to speak with you in this really pinnacle moment in your career always a pleasure. Marshall thank you. And i am dr marcia shepherd. We'll see you next time on weather geeks a..

dr louis louis national weather service todd joint center for satellite dat university of wisconsin Dr jalili Wmo Louis dr marcia shepherd Marshall
"50 years" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

06:33 min | 1 year ago

"50 years" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Again bicameral bipartisan support. You saw this in the weather act. It was passed unanimously doth. I mean this was really incredible. The people who help that happen actually are the partners hours talking about that linked in with two whether any nation emergency manages water resource manages the other ones canvassing at the state and local levels not just the federal level. It is every every emergency manager. Every organization is arguing for us right. Well kids every house district in the united states. So the point is we that connection. Connectivity allowed that happened. 'cause i can't go on a hill argue for anything but the president's budget i can't lobby the hill. So you gotta recognize that to make it work and same thing with sequestration. It turned out the the may two thousand thirteen Tornado outbreak out there. Near more oklahoma and elry i l l now i think we already know case know The hill senate at that point whether service no we're not going to be sequestered but we didn't get out of the budget constraints until two thousand fourteen But the fact that we never had to do sequestration based on our performances during the tornado outbreaks and the seriousness of the impact. It would have had on our weather offices. We made that clear and it wasn't just for the during the hurricanes there was the fire season. Had actor you plan for preparing for that so we never did get sequestered but we had some rough budget periods there just from the how long we had a wait before it finally opened up yet and the weather service is one of the greatest values in the federal government system if you look at their budget to value ratio a couple of final questions. When i saw the article that you said you prepared to be fired after sharp Itchy stood by your your point. Is that i had to do what i did. From a leadership perspective Of and careful about exactly what he said but not with respect to having the backs of the birmingham forecast office. And i knew that the service your i got a courtesy call when before ten minutes before they the that message was released And i knew at that point what. I had to do that following monday. Because i was giving a keynote address at the. Nfc way Was you know back to a very office no matter what the consequence and you know Do an executive branch so that were at. I'm not it's not a political position. But i still work in the executive branch. I had the back at forecast office. They did the right thing. Everybody during during did the right thing In terms decisions that were made but especially The the birmingham office. I thought i think that Your leadership i've always been a big huge backer. The weather service. And i think your leadership i think people Within the weather service definitely resonated with your leadership and again you're a louis people personalities also former trout president of the american meteorological society. What do you. What do you see the weather service looking like in ten twenty years. I mean how will look different than it looks. Well one of the interesting things is you know if you look at what we do in our mission statement from producing Opposite the weather water climate observations forecasts and warnings and for the protection. And this is something that. I wrote up in the paper in the paper with john ten. Hove is that there's like. it's like an hourglass. The bottom part is the production. Part that lends itself to more centralisation More of you know. It based approach now but when you get for the protection of life and property and you gotta do the ids at every government level especially the local level in this country where mostly all the decisions are made for. Public safety is at the local. You gotta spread out so that lends itself to a decentralized we got do both okay we gotta have not only accurate messaging. We have to have consistent messaging. So what i see is an improvement and advancement by t- that allows us to extract. The relevant information. Were already producing. Observations and models are really extracted information in a much more effective way. Because we're probably just using about twenty to thirty percent of the information content and we need to extract but we gotta need that local presence. It's essential for decision making in the villages of of alaska southwest pacific states throughout conus the continental united states and puerto rico virgin islands. I mean you've got to have that local presence that understands what's happening on the ground as it's happening and understands the human factors of getting people make decisions in those locations. So i see the i see the footprint remaining the same the services being a lot more extensive in terms of the earth system. It's not just going to be the weather. It's going to be helpful. Boom which is already doing and really seeing through who forecast offices as the outlet. I mean things like the dad being environment. Prediction is going to be much more obvious from space weather to the oceans You're going to see this and it's gonna be it's gonna be through the national weather service it's going to be a center to see as we all ambition it already seconds or less louis. Someone's getting a call soon or maybe already About the succeeding us. National weather service director. What are some quick pieces of advice. You'd give well. I made up my mind. That if i only give advice to the next director if i math and it'll be in private right but i would say you've got the best workforce in the world. We know that mckinsey has done three analysis on us over six years. We got the best workforce committed to mission committed. The public.

birmingham john ten united states oklahoma american meteorological societ senate Nfc federal government puerto rico virgin islands Hove southwest pacific alaska National weather service mckinsey
"50 years" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

07:31 min | 1 year ago

"50 years" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Service might chesterfield. who has the outstanding executive producer of weather geeks and someone. I know that you've met. And when you've come down and do the tv show He text me literally in real time. While we're doing this. He had a couple of questions that i want to honor my gun. Loud him nastier. A couple of questions be attacks. He was curious about. What did you wish you would accomplished. But didn't while you're the director of the national weather service and then he also wants to know what's the future of the national weather. So what what is there as we get -ccomplish that you wanted or had a real goal of getting accomplish about laci. They're you're still near. Yeah the The the rate at which we can improve the infrastructure The rate in which we can improve the models is certainly of something that Yeah everybody wishes and everybody in certain respects complains about right But we had such a usage infrastructure issue to deal with With respect to the budget as i noted but also with respect to how we receive data how we process it in a in general how we process for the models getting the computing capacity. Which we have. I mean i started with but to girly. And we're now up to you know we're going to be up to like you know Increased by four flops. The new i mean you know we're really exponentially increasing our computing power which is important part of this but the rate which he can do this Through the budget process even with the full support of the hill is not as fast as what i think people would like. We want to know is what i would like but it is what it is you gotta you gotta do what you have But i wish we could. Have you know got not done. But i wouldn't have done that at the expense of the focus. We had on the last mile because it's the delivery of the services that are really really important factor in saving lives and mitigating property loss. And that's what that focus. I wouldn't take away. It's just that getting that infrastructure built Took a bit longer than i even. I would have hoped for. Louis wear we. I mean i need to talk with me. And we we you know we hear about things coming forth you were just talking about the computing and i know they were sort of increase on funding after sandy and so forth where we in the great model race the for you. You hear about this all the time. I thought i always think it's a bit overblown out there. And sort of the weather social media world because the s. models world-class model at european models a world-class model. We use them both effectively. Where are we on that. Yeah the the european center Certainly has You know a great modeling system and they have a more restricted mission so they can really focus their compute power on that one Global model we have the forecast space weather to the ocean surface and down. We're now getting into our system. Science approach you fully couple miles chrysler so we got really short range. Very high resolution you. The researchers are clamoring for Gregory saw resolvable convective in sambas yell so boy anti talk about a huge challenge for national weather service. Yes while the thing is it's very exciting aspect to be working right but what we are doing is we're we're really redoing. The whole structure of models to make it more efficient building. The new dynamical core build in the bed of physics representation. I think our biggest weakness is is the Data assimilation yeah. We talked the choice. We made for multi model and samples. Wanted if we did that. It was very clear that our trip down the road for four dimensional variation analysis for data assimilation. Was going to be impeded you. We couldn't do both. We chose the multi model and sombor route right and we have a data assimilation system. Today that's built off of those in samba. approach that hybrid variations escape. But there's but there's a lot of work on optimizing code forty bar and we're involved in at work. And i believe that's another part brick in the wall of us moving forward in his whole modeling continual. But you know something you said. Was we all use. The the whole group model we have partnerships with the european centre with the uk met with canada. We've we exchange what we're doing right because our forecasters use them all us. All those mobs. It isn't one model against the other. Right pull them together and the forecast is have access to them. All and that's critical. And if you look at the verification i keep on telling get diversification of the at the age lately. Hurricane center forecast the best of all amazing. So so that's what we want to see right access to all these models a global effort in a partnership again a team International team trying to advance prediction now today. Even as we speak from an earth system science perspective fully couple applied from the measure scale all the way up to the sub seasonal seasonal scale with one functional system that leaves us room on a computer to do all kinds of research with it. So i think that this is what the futures pointing to and i think it'd be a very exciting time for who are does get the job After me i got cut. We'll have a lot of time left. But i got a couple more questions. Gotta get to one. I think is an important question warrior successor. Because i'm curious. In what advice you give to whoever steps into that role. But i'm particularly interested in how you louis have successfully navigated a political waters a sharpie gate. Sequestration government shutdowns. Sandy you you navigate all of this and your longevity in this role Suggests that you did it effectively. So how did you do it. And then what generally by the for your successor going. Well the simple fact with respect to managing within government that one has to accept is that appropriation law is what you live by. The budget process the executive ban can offer a proposal comes back is what you operate off of. That's appropriation. that's what comes from the hill. So you worked at. And i one of the things that i was blessed with as a period of time..

european center laci sambas national weather service european centre Louis chrysler Gregory samba Hurricane center canada uk louis Sandy
"50 years" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"50 years" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"And it's working still work do right but it's really working and And this is. This is the pathway now for the future is going beyond the forecast warning. Can i think with With the decision makers in the atmospheric type things like tornadoes etc and in water flooding. Still a big challenge as we say so. That's that's it that was it. Those are the things and and everything that came along with because we didn't lose sight of the science and technology that we would need to move the forecasts and warnings for but the job doesn't end there and i think that we saw that recently with ida off the national weather service forecast were amazing the remnants and an initial stages but getting that last mile there was clearly information that you won't put out a deal with significant flooding in the northeast but there were still challenges because of not so much the four k. That last mile it the thing is it's that's an added factor there. You know the magnitude of the rainfall of something that we've never seen before you know. We had that record with andrei with one point nine four inches in one hour in central park. You got smashed smashed by ida two weeks later. An hourly rainfall rate of three point. One five inches doesn't happen in the extra is the new york. She never happened before. So there's obviously an infrastructure build issue here. The infrastructure can't deal with magnitude rainfall. We're seeing the same thing. Southwest of nashville. We're where we're predicting the heavy rain. We're looking for the totals about right but the magnitude of the rainfall in a short period of time when we're dealing with something we haven't seen before. So how do you communicate that. It's got to be a learned experience. And emily happens for the first time. That's what you start learning from. Well that doesn't save the forty something lives lost Tragically in new york city right so we got to learn from this. We've got to learn from this but this is also an infrastructure issue and whether the built infrastructure in the urban environment in valleys where people live right whether that can handle this kind of rainfall. And i think the answer is no town so we got. We got a big societal issue. Here that has to be within. Of course this. I believe this is related to global warming. You we all know as scientists right. If the air's warm it's going to hold more water vapor and. We had a brief moment of heavy rain here. I live south of baltimore. And i was thinking to myself. You know what this thing really gets. This happened the night before. I see well. Listening really gets its act together in pennsylvania new york city if it rains like this long period of time. We're in trouble so we kept on. We kept on messaging net but not three point one five inches in in one hour and have a flash flood emergency in all five boroughs of new york city at the same time. Never had me first time. I add in the counties tend to northern nassau county to the east. I mean this was.

national weather service andrei central park ida nashville new york city emily new york baltimore pennsylvania nassau county
"50 years" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

07:37 min | 1 year ago

"50 years" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"And new and interesting tool right and we are back on a special edition of weather geeks. Podcast i'm dr marshall shepherd from the university of georgia and i'm talking to my friend and colleague dr luigi cellini who is now this week. His retirement from the national weather service's research most recently serving as the director. But as you just. He has a long career and legacy with noah And i i hope you miss some of the things he said there. Because again some of the foundations of our weather prediction enterprises. We know it. Today ensemble model a multi a model and symbols Climate forecast these things. You heard the origins of those during his time. As the director of in seven national senator environmental prediction again. Those that are familiar with. No you know about centers if you're not there. Sleep centers within noah people know about hurricanes international incident and so forth storm predictions. There got the national centers. And so that's kinda sort of the way the arranged. Okay now. i wanna fast forward to the national weather service directorship when you walked in the door there. What was your biggest challenge The the budget Structure the budget process a lack of governance document We were coming out of financial Misstep a Refer to it That was pretty serious. And so we were not fa favorite child of those on the hill since the people on the really do care about the national weather. Somebody tell you that. You know by bicameral bipartisan. Incredible support for the instrument service So that's what i walked into and i That's the first step. Two things one We had to get a a budget process. We had to get a structure a process and governance document that people the senior executives the management team could make work to support those forecasters in the field of the folks in the weather service. Who also responsible for it development model development etc to get that focus again supported that we would improve not only our forecast but our outrage to the emergency management community And that's where the weather ready nation aspect comes in but that was my first task and we got it done basically in two years. And it's amazing when you think about it. Because i had to get approval through to the hill to restructure the budget. Because that's the way we get our money. That's we're going to execute the budget the that were appropriate it through congress. They have to approve everything rightfully saw so we made the case we showed it. We had a run it in parallel with our old budget structure and show them the advantages of the new system. We had to develop a governance document and say this is the way it works is the way we plan. This is the way we develop the execution aspect of it. Schedules cetera et. This is the way we track it on a quarterly basis. And and and that's a three year cycle that we work We got that done. And i was back through the natural kademi public administration. That actually recommend that we do this After we laid out our concerns what we needed to do they never seen it get done and get it done in two years so that was really important and i can tell you that from a budget a planning budget appropriation. Budget execution perspective We've run on eight cylinders and we haven't had a problem Since okay And one of the one of the things that i did with the governance documents which i would stay would credit jack. Kelly who i worked under for a three to five years depending on how you can. His positions You know power the pen right. All the astor's had assigned the The govern- starring so if you're gonna work as a senior executive in the national weather service you're gonna sign which man that everybody knew how you know. We were acting together. How we were planning and we to do runs. It's really more people really bought into it and one of the things. We update that governance document based on weaknesses. So it isn't like you signing it and say well. I'm not sure this is gonna work okay. Well we'll keep track of things that aren't working well update so all version four point. Oh it's sort of like a computer code for one of the big computers. Find out that it's not working. As all the researchers in model developers thought it has to be adjusted to version two and then university threat. Well we're on version four point. Oh this was. This was critical. Okay so that was. Step one in sort of in parallel. Was the weather station where we came to the realization in two thousand eleven to a weather season was sort of the epiphany for us that the modernization is great as it was. That's accessible wasn't bringing in the new technology degreed meteorologist etc etc a new structure. You know especially with next ride you know being centerpiece for our warning systems. A new structure of the forecast. We did a great job in forecasting out looking forecasting watching and learning all these severe weather outbreaks and incredible number of people were dying equivalent to what we saw. Nineteen seventy four. Two thousand eleven April outbreak was almost equivalent to the one thousand nine hundred ninety. Four outbreak That's a famous Severe weather outbreak in the central part of the country. Almost the exact same number of people died into a three hundred sixteen and one hundred fourteen. What's missing the last mile addressing. The connection to the people who actually in the communities evacuating communities on hurricanes preparing communities from severe weather outbreak. Actually we had to connect with water resource managers for droughts floods etc so that any nation strategic plan which was developed when jane lubchenco came in jank as was the weather so i was tactically the head of strategic team. Okay so get. Another team gets together with field. People the union vice president People from mensa really solid And the idea was With weather ready nation from the one person who was not a meteorologist by the way came up with weather nation as an outcome for society right. Not hey help good as the front going to be forecasted now how is it going to affect society so you have to go the last one it becomes the service aspect models a great observations. Great you need you need. The allergy need the models..

dr marshall dr luigi cellini national weather service kademi public administration university of georgia astor congress Kelly jank jane lubchenco
"50 years" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"50 years" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Be the career highlights and i got the weather service jobs. One of the most exciting projects going on at the weather channel right now. Is something called immersive mixed reality. Yes i am are and if you don't know what it is. That's one of the reasons. We're doing this podcast today because you probably have seen if you watch the weather channel. So let's start at the beginning. Where do decision come from to go in the direction and why. Yeah so it really started you know what first of all as a weather producer Been weather producer for almost twenty years. dating myself. A little bit there but You know growing up in telling whether stories we we had these weather graphics. Applications that allowed us to graphics together present them to the to the audience In the background. I've always watched these video games and Seeing the incredible power these video games. And i always in the back of my head imagined. What could we do with that. And a lot of other folks here at the weather channel thought the same thing and then about a five or six years ago. New technology camera tracking capability came out and that allowed us to Augment the graphics into our studio space what we basic a are and what camera tracking capability allows us to do is place the graphic into the studio then track track. That graphic as if the graphic was really there so now we're able to put graphics into the studio space when it or not really there so this is.

the weather channel
"50 years" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

07:48 min | 1 year ago

"50 years" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"That was your first real taste of operational side right. Oh yeah oh yeah and i. Bill bonner unfortunately passed away. Several years ago. I've been in communications with mcpherson and would stole even like last night and i still ask them what were the he's making. They hired me. I really wanted to do it. And i'd spend time on the floors and visiting scientists but They took a chance with me And certainly Made a point of Emphasize into the folks on floor. When i became the division chief that i was there for them. and Boy you know that floor needed it because there was no there was it was all analog techniques it was all you know copying paper. There was no unix. There were just. They were just starting to play around with some workstations. It was It was the old days. Okay and Look where they are this. What's the weather prediction center now. Okay so yeah just just an amazing story and i think lessons learned for some of you that i know listen. The weather geeks in net one thing that we said is how his research career you know progressed into different areas in also how he stepped out of a comfort zone perhaps research at nasa inches or more of an operational environment. So what a transition out of your national weather service career in thinking really more about your time as the director of the national weather service give so much. The weather ready nation obviously is a big part of your legacy. Would you consider your biggest national weather. Service director legacy. Are there others well. You always skipped over fourteen years. The answer sounds good tour to fill in that gap. Because i think it is relevant to your experience becoming a national weather service director. So you think. That's where. I probably i became aware of you. Actually as the as determine set so tell us about those years. Yeah i olympic about it. Because i was actually what i was in. Mo leading mld mcpherson. Who had that job before me and then hired me into their became. The mc director. He he had to strategic vision for up but we had to put together so we put together a team. And i was the head of that team so the whole team that put together as as we know that now with but without space weather space weather came on board in two thousand five when i was in but you know putting that all together He he put that team that i was put in charge of a really did a phenomenal job again. You know this whole idea of team right a in something. I learned at nasa. You gotta have the team to make things to make things were while. Didn't know that. I would someday be the head of an sep what i came back. Nineteen ninety nine Kelly was actually selected to be the the head of Ends up replacing ron. You know there's a of work to do. And one of the things was we had a we. We were frozen computerized for ten years. in the ninety s where we even as the what was now. The environmental modeling center was really moving. Things forward from resolution The global models the regional models that we were that were being developed. Couldn't get him on the computer. So finally you know ninety nine. As i was coming on board we were just getting the first ibm system. Parallel processing with the first operational center in the world to go to parallel process. If there was a risk but there was a reward you know and we will leasing. Computers not owning. So we'd have more flexibility in building up the space so all that started happening Ninety eight ninety nine timeframe and with that new computer. Something very important happened. Was we decided. Based on scientific experiments right. Same ex- experiment in the midwest. The thought experiment globally. Which i was involved with through the wmo insolvable model and multi model and sambas is the best way to go so we introduced a sheriff and we introduced the digests global forecast system and then the on the north american idol. Because we were in partnership with canada through packs working real time so the realization of multi model and samples really hit and. That's we make that strategic decision to go that way and build our modeling capabilities that way than we did this. Climate forecast system and operational climate forecast system for seasonal prediction. Working with the research community. Have a six member multi model insolvable. Lynette so i can ted. We were the first operational center. Have a seamless suite of multi model samples from the short range to the to the seasonal range. And that's what we run today. Now we've got optimize it. We've got to streamline it through the unified forecast system in light but that was a major effort and the building. i don't know you have. Did you ever get to go to the world weather building. Did louis i. Actually i feel like actually maybe talk to run there before you came in as a grad student. Okay well that was not a building that you wanted to build the national centers violent prediction and say impressive from officials dead. And you know it's just a mess actually and people trying to get out out of it. They tried to get a project where we could move nearer. So when i came on board made top priority was to get out of. That building took thirteen years but we got out. We got into a beautiful building that matches the mission of what we do with the collaborative now collaborative service centers. The emc nasdaq days. Away are all in the same building working together. Great conference center. International meetings have been held there before kovin so it became an environment that people wanted to come to work in and it forced at the collaboration within the building. Okay not you walk in an elevator. Ten feet into a building. Tempe elvin you disappeared in your office. The whole day. It's a wide open atrium and on people interact better. And it's it's really terrific. And i'm really looking forward to the post. Covert era when everybody can get back in there. I was there yesterday. It stalled strikes me really beautiful environment to get the work so from that perspective. That you know. The seamless sweet the collaborative nature of the fork other senators and and the building itself was what i thought would be the career highlights and i got the weather service jobs. One of the most exciting projects going on at the weather channel right now. Is something called immersive mixed reality. Yes i am are and if you don't know what it is. That's one of.

mld mcpherson Bill bonner nasa environmental modeling center mcpherson national weather service olympic Kelly ron ibm midwest Lynette Great conference center ted canada louis emc Tempe the weather channel
"50 years" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

06:34 min | 1 year ago

"50 years" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Him. Louis thank you for joining us on this well. I don't want to say perhaps last episode of well weather geeks with us national as a guest but perhaps as the national weather service director while what what an amazing career what. What got you to this point that you decided it was time to hanging up. Well our been Been doing this for fifty plus years As a research meteorologist versus a student that got involved in activities even as an undergraduate and and worked on My first paper was on the gravity lever. I i did that as a bachelors and master's thesis and i've been on the go ever since doing a phd getting involved with national programs a student And then going to nasa and building a research career. There of course being at the university of wisconsin and getting all my degrees there before i went to nasa able to work a with verne sumi in his his team on what was then the new satellite you know era that was emerging out of that institute And it's just been non stop and at the same time you know and my wife and at the university of wisconsin She's been there a step of the way. We just celebrated our fiftieth anniversary. And we realized you know it. It's time right so anyway It's it's a tough decision i can. I can tell you. I can forewarn you. It's it's the toughest decision to make. Actually make your body. Where i'm i'm sitting here juicer. You you've done so much for the enterprise and infirm nolan. Whether i don't even know where to sort of dive on this. But i want to start the question with you. I mean what what are you. Let's let's let's go back to your research contributions first before i go with the national weather service. What do you feel is your most significant contribution from your research reviving people know your weather. Career majority esteemed researcher your book with paul coast on winter. Storms is just one of the the go-to resources so from a research perspective. And i and. I know this is not a swansong for you. But what are you reflect. That is your most important contribution research wise. Well i was. I was obviously always curious about the weather. Ackerman child in the wise. You know. I wanted to know why things happening. And of course. I was always interested in wife forecasts for wrong as a kid especially when forecasting snow. We got rain But in all seriousness. I was just to the university of wisconsin. I was Elated with what. I was learning about something. I always wanted to know more about and so there was gravity. Waves i just. What are these this periodic nature in the convective storms and then that led to gravity papers. That at the time was was very controversial. Now now it's except the two to four hour. Gravity waves foreign supposed to be able to exist right much less you know affect the development of Severe weather and then the jets. The jet streaks I read a little book. I got out of out of a supermarket by elmore writer. They had the series. The science on jet streams. Right that i should spend. This is what i wanted to do. And then i started doing the research on jetstream. Cyclones got to nasa. I mean in start working for joins simpson after working for getting my masters unto charlie anderson who let loose on average lady. Shimano is grandpa. Had nothing to do with it and then went work for joe and At at nasa. I i just fell like From going from don johnson as my phd adviser to john and it was like a dream from a research perspective. Just being allowed to work things we saw as important and and do it as a team. That was the other thing about. You know going to nasa. Was their team approach. You saw it. Every day missions engineering and in the science in having a team and having a kadri of people that you know you're recruiting to come in. Just you know the best and the brightest coming out of the university at the time and just everybody and it was just. This is terrific experience and just everything we touched seem the work. The president's day storm Became the vase. Demonstration scientists the vizor atmospheric silence the first geostationary. Sound actually up to this point. It's the only geostationary sounder from the united states. At least and doing work with that you know working with sounding scientists that a brilliant and split windows. So you know i. It was just one thing after another that we touched worked for us in more for me and Certainly i used everything. I was learning during that period to bring over to the weather service. When i made that switch because i also wanted to improve the forecast which over time eighty nine. Yeah so i got my phd. In seventy seven one year post are under don johnson. A post doc with burn sumi and Sec signed a space signs. An engineering center and over the nasa for almost eleven years Most of it working with joanne simpson. And and the group she allowed us allowed me to develop Under her and then took that went over to the meteorological operations division. The largest forecast office in the national weather service. Bill bonner and ron mcpherson hired me. And i didn't have one day. Experience forecast for now is gonna point on that because that's interesting right into the operationally in from based on what i know about you..

nasa university of wisconsin national weather service verne sumi paul coast charlie anderson Louis nolan Ackerman don johnson elmore jets simpson joe burn sumi john joanne simpson united states meteorological operations divi Sec
"50 years" Discussed on The Bible Recap

The Bible Recap

07:08 min | 1 year ago

"50 years" Discussed on The Bible Recap

"Today we read about god's judgment on several more enemy nations and cities. We probably won't remember all of them and some you may not even recognize. That's okay chapter. Forty nine is like a destruction charcuterie board. It's got a lot going on. We start out with amman. as in the ammonites if you're familiar with the modern day city of amman jordan then you have an idea of where these people are located there. Israel's neighbors to the east. God says he will drive them out of their land but like we saw with moab yesterday he also promises that they will experience restoration afterward. And i'll be honest. I have no idea why. I read eleven commentaries about this and none of them gave a reason for it. Mostly they either said oh. Hey he did that for moab to or they basically said wow god is merciful to his enemies so maybe this is just to display his mercy. Who knows then we move onto judgment against him. These people are the descendants of e saw. You may recall that. E saw is the older twin brother of jacob israel who was the father of the twelve tribes esau and jacob israel have been enemies since they were in the womb together god promises judgment and destruction for the estimates too but he adds an interesting caveat in verse eleven. He says he will be the one to take care of their orphans and widows in verse twelve. There's a prophecy that could have two layers. It says if those who did not deserve to drink the cup must drink it. Will you go unpunished at the time. This meant that there were people who suffered through the effects of god's judgment who had been faithful to him. The remnant of israel still had to be driven out of their land as a result of the sins of those who were destroyed sin has consequences that reach far beyond. Just the person who is disobedient. No one sends in a vacuum so god is basically saying to them. Look if the remnant of my people have had to endure exile and destruction because of sin and rebellion. Then you're definitely not getting off the hook because you're not even my people. The second potential layer of prophecy is that this could be pointing to christ. He had to drink the cup. He didn't deserve to drink three times. He asked the father if there was any other way and three times. The father said no. Jesus drank the cup of the father's wrath toward the sins of his people. He paid for those sins. But these people who don't know god are having to pay for their own sins. He says his cup is filled to the brim for them. Next up. is damascus a city in modern day syria. Which is north of israel. He promises to burn it with fire. I also think it's interesting that the phrases got associates with his enemies and their circumstances are the opposite of what he associates with his kids. God's people will not be afraid because he's with him but for his enemies. He says things like they melt in fear they are troubled like the see. That cannot be quiet. Panic seized her anguish and sorrows have taken hold of her. While god's people experience his presence to bless his enemies don't experience his absence. They experience his presence to judge then. We have qatar and heyzer both of which are cities in northern arabia. I had to let these up. They've managed to avoid a lot of drama other nations experienced. In fact things are so low key for them that they don't even have city gates so they're probably super vulnerable but probably don't even realize it and king nebi will come in and take advantage of that for his gain and for their destruction qatar in hazoor or like our friends from a small town who bragged that they never have to lock their doors. And like you big city folks but then they get robbed our last judgment in chapter forty nine is on ilam and once again they're an enemy nation he promises to restore and once again. I have no idea why from my vantage point. It seems to be arbitrary. But from god's vantage point perhaps he's just choosing who he wants to be merciful to. Jesus said something kind of like this in matthew five forty five. He said the rain falls on the just and on the unjust in modern language. That sounds like you saying bad. Things happen to everyone. But an ancient language rain was a blessing so jesus was actually saying that god sends out some of his blessings on all mankind like common grace and nations like amman and ilam get caught up in the current of his kindness. Then we moved to the judgment of babylon in chapter fifty after god uses babylon to punish israel and judah then he judges babylon and lays it to waste. He says it will be the last of the nation's which kind of sounds like it will be the final survivor. But what that actually means is that it will be the least prominent in position. It will be the bottom tier. When god destroys babylon it will also end the captivity of his people who were there. How very efficient. Then the remnant from among israel and judah will return to zion with hearts that love god and that remember and rejoice in the everlasting covenant. He made with them. What was your god shot from. Today's reading mine was in fifty twenty. It says in those days and in that time declares the lord iniquity shall be sought in israel and there shall be none and sin judah and none shall be found for. I will part in those whom i leave as a remnant. This says a lot more about god than it does about people got isn't saying his people will be senlis. He saying that their sins will be pardoned. The very act of pardoning suggests that there has been sin. God people do sin but wing. God looks at his kids. It doesn't point to our sin. He points to a righteousness which is as we know the righteousness of christ christ's death on the cross made atonement for our sins and because he paid the penalty we received the pardon. he's where the righteousness is and he's where the joy is those of you who aren't familiar with patriot on i'll fill on what it is we live in a world where most quote unquote free. Content is paid for by ads. Patriarchs works to find a way around that it's a website and an app where content creators like us who want to offer ad- free content can still keep the lights on. But it doesn't just support us. It's mutually beneficial. It offers commitment levels where listeners can get content based on their level of medley support so in the end it's a blessing to the content creators helping them cover their cost. And hopefully it's a blessing to the supporters who especially value that content. We want to provide you with such great content for free that intern. You might consider supporting us financially so you can get more of the content you love. It's easy to set up an account. And you can unsubscribe or change your commitment level at any time to find out more about the tears we offer visit the bible. Recap dot com. And by the way you aren't restricted to what we've invented you can even invite your own tier so check out our patriots today at the bible. Recap dot com the bible recap is brought to you by du discipleship bible study groups that meet in homes and churches around the world each week..

amman israel ilam jacob israel heyzer king nebi hazoor qatar esau jordan damascus judah syria jesus arabia gates matthew patriots du
"50 years" Discussed on Ron Paul Liberty Report

Ron Paul Liberty Report

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"50 years" Discussed on Ron Paul Liberty Report

"And it doesn't work. There's hysterics in the market. They tried that. In in the fall of two thousand nineteen and overnights rate shot up to ten percent so they had to back off when i made a feeble attempt to shrink the balance sheet so they have really no tools other than their gabbing and convincing people and the markets respond pretty well because when when the fed announces policy. You know the the banks are happy and the stock market. Seems to be happy no matter what you do But that just means to me that the The system now tolerates a bigger bubble than ever before probably bigger than ever seen in all history. So chris we do have a bunch of people who thinks that it's transitory but more and more now real they they you know they know that is just a lot of market that this is transitory. This is impossible to solve without some real real solutions which means that there will be a penalty for it. And why one thing that i try to. Emphasize is that any individual company corporation country. Or whatever if you live way on your means you will be forced eventually to live beneath your means and that is known in individuals that if they get too much debt and the bank loan them anymore money again eventually their standard of living goes down and you say well no with a fair. They keep earning money. Yes they will do that and they'll get away with it and sell them. We'll be able to get more in their favor but he eventually the telltale sign of this thing Not working so well. Anymore is the cost of living goes up and the value of the money goes down Chris i think we're entering an era now is going to get much much worse before the people and our our so called leadership in washington wake up and decide maybe maybe there is an answer. It's not found in keynesian. Inflation them very good doctor pool. And you are correct. Inflation is transitory in the same way. That fifteen days will flatten curve So you can think of it that way and you know even though they are bankers members of the fed You could treat them like politicians what they say makes headlines every week but it means very little i mean think of all the bubbles that you may have lived through and the longer one has been here. The more bubbles. I know i've been through my share of them. All the bubbles and busts at the fed creates think back of how many times the fed chairman went on tv. And said you know what you should really salman valve. Now's the time for yourself. Never and how many times have you heard say yeah. I was watching the fed chairman the other day and i took his word to now and financially independent again. You will never hear that because the fed is not our financial adviser. It is a marriage of the banking industry and the government. So it's the same old story of corporations married to the government. We have the pharma. We have the military. We have the media but the fed is the worst of them all because they make all the others possible. You know the fed is not there for us. They are they what they do..

fed chris Chris washington
"50 years" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"50 years" Discussed on Here & Now

"It's a fascinating story which we will get to but part of your story is your work on a number of well known film scores with some big stars. What was the process for capturing the essence of this documentary while also maintaining that things sonically that we love so much about mary. J blige's music will. It was the goal of the director. Vanessa roth and myself to you know underscore to support the stories that were being told about mary and by mary herself recounting her life. But we wanted to support that musically in a way that complimented her own music but also contrast from her own music so that the many songs that are that are featured in the film would stand out. We didn't want the scored a sound like mary's songs. Well quincy jones recommended. You write the score for this film. You and mary didn't know each other before this. And this documentary. She gets into some pretty dark places her childhood growing up in the projects abusive relationships depression and she does this with the beat of your music. Here's a sample of your score. Ooh You know mervyn. I understand what you're saying when you talk about supporting.

Vanessa roth J blige mary quincy jones mervyn
"50 years" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"50 years" Discussed on Here & Now

"From politico and chad. Pergram congressional correspondent for fox news. Thank you both thank you. Thank you been all this week. We've been exploring and reflecting on the ways in which the war on drugs has affected our country and has been fifty years since president. Nixon launched his aggressive strategy. Crackdown on drug use and addiction. Sending a disproportionate number of people of color to prison to communities in particular huntington west virginia and brownsville. New york have found themselves on the frontlines of this war and npr's addiction correspondent. Brian man went to both places to hear how people there are dealing with the impact brian. Welcome thank you peter. So you met two very different people in these very different places in both have felt the impact of the war on drugs. Tell us about who they are in in what you learned about. The way addiction has changed their lives. Yeah these were people who were generous enough to kind of take me inside their communities. Which as you as you mentioned were hit really hard. Aaron hinton is a community organizer in brownsville is predominantly black community in new york city and aaron lost his own mother to a drug overdose In two thousand seventeen. You never really get over it you know so it is kind of difficult to deal with but you just find a way to deal with it and you just keep going and this has happened so often in his community and and the other person who i got to know as part of this reporting is courtney hessler. She's a journalist with the local newspaper In west virginia her mother has struggled with opioid addiction. It ravaged her family. Courtney herself Wound up in foster care as a child. I.

Aaron hinton Brian aaron Courtney courtney hessler brownsville peter Nixon fifty years fox news both huntington this week new york city New york both places brian two thousand seventeen Pergram west virginia
"50 years" Discussed on The TED Interview

The TED Interview

05:17 min | 1 year ago

"50 years" Discussed on The TED Interview

"But my first fifty years you could even take my first fifty nine. A few things changed like ivan iphone. My parents didn't but so much stayed the same. Like i grew up being carted around in a car. Now i drive a car. My car's better safer. It has side airbags better sound system. I sit on a sofa now. I sat on a sofa. Then rates completing college and high school depends how you measure them. Maybe they're up a bit but so much of the country works on the same principles again. I would say computers. The internet is an exception but other than that sector. life hasn't changed nearly as much. So what you just said. That runs counter to a huge panoply of sort of people have spoken at ted who are obsessed with technology and believe that it's almost in the nature of certain technology but but many would extend it to human culture human history to have accelerating change. I mean the big idea at the heart of it is the each piece of innovation creates the conditions by which the next piece of innovation can happen foster. And so you know the obvious examples like you know. The printing press spread all this knowledge so that things sped up you know the. The arrival of computers created tools. That would allow much rapid innovation. The internet connection us all spread innovation and so forth. And it's backed by things like moore's law way fundamental engines of distribution of information doubling empowered at a shockingly rapid pace And yet your argument goes fundamentally against says. That is missing the wood for the trees correct. I think it's relatively small changes compared to what my grandmother saw. Now note the. Us government collect statistics on the value of innovation and as best we can measure it in the nineteen twenties and nineteen thirties. Innovation was adding value at a rate of about two to three percent a year and more recent times. We're actually lucky if the value added from innovation is one percent a year and sometimes it's half a percent a year so that's a big difference especially when you compound it so i think the number is support. My view and the anecdotes support my view. But i absolutely would admit computing..

iphone first fifty years ivan first fifty nine one percent a year half a percent a year about two each piece three percent a year nineteen thirties nineteen twenties
"50 years" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

07:53 min | 2 years ago

"50 years" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Hobby Saturday. Everyone today is the first day in. May which typically would be Kentucky Derby Day but the Derby has been postponed until September fifth of this year because of the covert nineteen pandemic. But we thought today might be a good day to re release our previous episode on the Kentucky Derby I fifty years. This episode originally came out may third two thousand seventeen so enjoyed welcome to stuff. You missed in History Class. A production of iheartradio loan. Welcome to the PODCAST. I'm Tracy Wilson and I'm calling frying way. We one of the projects I'm working on for our podcast.

Kentucky Derby Tracy Wilson Kentucky History Class