35 Burst results for "50 Year"

Why Do Teachers Ask Students What They Think?

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:38 min | 1 d ago

Why Do Teachers Ask Students What They Think?

"You know another thing that teachers do and by the way, I've done a lot of research on this. Next week I'm actually interviewing the sky on my show, John agosto, who wrote this fabulous book, the death of learning. Have you read it? No, but it sounds so right. Gosh, it resonated with me so much. So this isn't just true of my educational experience, but it's also true of others. Teachers have this idea that the student, especially in humanities courses, like English classes, they have this idea that the students in the discussion should figure out what the book is about. And I remember in high school, we were assigned two or three chapters to read of a book. And then the next day we show up to English class. And the teacher wouldn't help explain the themes of the chapter or what it's really about. Instead, she or he would just allow us to talk about it. But we're 14 year old squirts who don't understand. Exactly. We don't understand. So we're just like, I remember I remember sitting there going, I'm so stupid. I don't understand this. Oh God. I thought I was an idiot. Don't touch a sensitive point in my own life two things. One, I remember the same thing, so I'd be in school, and that through so what do you think to teacher would say? And I remember thinking, who cares what I think you're the teacher? It's irrelevant what I think, and then another kid would raise his or her hand, and I don't really want to know. And I like the kids, not I didn't like the kid. At 15, if you, you shouldn't be have the same insight as the 50 year old teacher or the 40 year old teacher. That's why they're the teacher.

John Agosto
Wealth Strategist Rebecca Walser on the Uncertain Economy

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:07 min | Last week

Wealth Strategist Rebecca Walser on the Uncertain Economy

"I'm back with Rebecca Walter, wealth strategist, tax attorney, he probably seen her on Yahoo finance or newsmax or Fox business. We're talking about the economy and Rebecca if I can recapitulate and personalize a little bit for people to get a clear understanding of what you're saying, are you saying that if you make an analogy, let's say between an economy, the economy of America, and let's say a family or an individual, there's been a lot of irresponsible spending that's gone on for a while. In fact, you dated to the 70s for 50 years, kind of outspending your paycheck, accumulating debt, but it seemed that this is something that you could endure because, you know what? You can pay the interest on the debt. So even though the debt keeps rising, you can sort of keep it going. But I think what you're saying is that there have been a series of, let's call them cataclysmic shocks, one after the other, spaced out maybe ten years apart, and at a certain point, it hits you in which you reach a point where the old rules just don't work anymore. You're now in a new situation. You are an a genuine crisis and your normal kind of things, which is, hey, listen, I'll go to my nest egg. Go I'll tap this so I'll put a little money out of my IRA. I just going to be insufficient. Would that be a description of where America is? And if it is, how should we both as a country and as individuals think about it? Yeah, I think it's a great analogy at dinesh and I would also just add that like just imagine that you couldn't go to your 401k or your IRA for a reason. So you decided, let me go to the bank. The bank will let me borrow. I just need a short term loan for the next 6 months. And then I can pay it back and I'll be okay. And you go to the bank and the bank is gone. There is no bank. And that's really the analogy. That's where we're at because the reason that we've been able to sustain this over spending and now certainly in the last two years, this massive extreme overspending is because we have been the sole reserve currency of the world.

Rebecca Walter Newsmax Fox Business Rebecca Yahoo America Dinesh
Sean Davis: The U.S. Will Go De Facto Bankrupt

The Dan Bongino Show

01:58 min | Last week

Sean Davis: The U.S. Will Go De Facto Bankrupt

"We're going to have to raise it There's no doubt about that But in exchange we just elected Republicans to people have spoken then the people voted for people who said well we need a little bit of restraint Again you've worked for spending hawks Sean this is a big deal It is a mathematical not probability But absolute certainty on this path that we will go de facto bankrupt We won't go technically bankrupt because we continue to print money but your money will be increasingly worthless as we go down this de facto bankruptcy path I had Jim Jordan and others on last week and I said please please do not fold This is the I believe most important domestic issue of our time right now this fight over our debt your thoughts You're exactly right There's the old joke How does the company go bankrupt for slowly And then all at once And that's what's going to happen in this country And instead of actually looking at our balance sheet and looking at the huge gap between what we owe in the money we're going to have coming in the debt number actually doesn't even begin to cover how much trouble we're in Because it doesn't take into account all the stuff 50 years ahead like Medicare social security spending what we're not ten or 20 trillion in debt We're probably about a 100 trillion in debt When you look at the gap between what we're going to have to pay out what we're going to collect over the next ten 20 50 years And no one in Washington is serious about it because I'll tell you what's going to happen on this We're going to have everyone in the establishment and leadership say well we can't default the nation's creditworthiness as its most important asset So we're not going to default So we're not going to have the government shutdown over it We're just going to have an agreement And then we'll deal with this in the future with a commission maybe a blue ribbon panel And nothing's going to happen And we're going to be having this exact same conversation in 5 years or ten years if we're lucky if we're not we'll already be broke by this

Jim Jordan Sean Washington
Sean Davis: Documents Scandal Is More About the Biden Family Business

The Dan Bongino Show

01:32 min | Last week

Sean Davis: Documents Scandal Is More About the Biden Family Business

"Biden classified documents debacle I have made the case on my Fox show on this show and on my podcast I believe it's a bigger scandal than just documents It's convenient that the documents are alleged to be about Ukraine and China while Joe Biden's son was involved in multi-million dollar business deals with these two entities while Biden was lobbying the Obama White House at the time for weapons and money to China Interesting that they tried to prosecute Mike Flynn for a foreign agent registration act violation with turkey and yet the scandal staring us in the face that the president of the United States may in fact be a foreign agent as well I completely agree with you I think official Washington has kind of stuck in this model where they have to look at everything through the lens of Trump And so they're constantly trying to find ways Oh this is totally different than Trump And they should go after him but not Biden This to me is so much bigger than who happened to have documents where because to be honest I don't actually care about that I care about the bigger substance issue here which is the Biden family business And how the Biden family has made its money over the last 50 years by selling influence connections to the Biden family and information And in that to me is the actual scandal here It's not where a piece of paper happened to be found or stored It's what the Biden family is actually doing with all of its connections and its interest in and its experience in government namely Hunter Biden

Biden Mike Flynn China Joe Biden Ukraine FOX White House Turkey Barack Obama United States Washington Hunter Biden
Rep. Bob Good: Why Are Lawyers Without Clearance Finding Biden Papers?

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:46 min | Last week

Rep. Bob Good: Why Are Lawyers Without Clearance Finding Biden Papers?

"We've been following these shocking development surrounding the classified documents that have been stored in Joe Biden's office in D.C. at the think tank at his home in multiple locations and the news dropping from ABC is that the FBI actually stopped and did not even consider going in and raiding the homes they just thought, you know what? We're going to let his attorneys handle it for us. I want to get your reaction to that. Well, very concerning, the course, the excuse has been he didn't know he didn't mean it. He didn't realize most of us probably have never taken even if we work from home or work remotely some certainly when you're in Congress and you back in your district and you're traveling your district kind of working out of a base office at home. Most of us probably never take home. Things that we're not permitted to take home from our workplace, certainly not things marked classified or top secret or what have you. But here we have a president who took him 50 years of public service to find the southern border. I guess it's little comfort and unfortunately not surprising to find out that he might not know what he's housing in his own personal office or what he's housing at his home or perhaps he's just willingly has done so with full knowledge or maybe it's just a diminished capacity over the couple of last couple of years, but certainly very concerning and why our lawyers to your point. Why are lawyers the ones without class security clearance I should say are the ones who are finding these documents and you've got this slow drip where I guess they presume with a compliant media and a compliant department of injustice, nothing, there would be no consequences to this while he was saying he just couldn't imagine that president Trump could make a mistake. Let's use that term with having some classified documents that he had the authority to declare declassified as you know as president and Joe Biden no such authority vice president.

Joe Biden D.C. FBI ABC Congress President Trump
The Exponential Trend Line on the Gold Price

Crypto Voices

02:09 min | Last week

The Exponential Trend Line on the Gold Price

"So here we are with our gold price curve. Again, we've looked at this so much. Don't think I need to go over the history of the last 50 years. You have the timeline there. You can check prior videos. If you're interested, but here we have the interest rates going up to 22% during the Volcker years kind of pricking the gold bubble in the United States and gold being priced here in dollars and floating freely for the first time since bretton Woods collapsed ten years prior. Gold actually peaked at about $850 an ounce for about two seconds and then in 1980 and then in December of 1980. Paul Volcker took interest rates to 22%. And then from here we had a falling interest rate period all during this period, the great moderation it was called some people called it the end of history at certain times. We had the Soviet Union ended the Berlin Wall fell. All sorts of great things for freedom, but this also happened during a falling interest rate environment, which is quite different from now. And then of course we have the global financial crisis and then gold popping back up in price. First and 2011. And again, in recent years, during COVID. So the current price as of a few days ago, December 31st, 2022, $1812 per Troy, ounce. And again, remember way back in August 1971, when many economists thought that gold would go to zero, gold was a deep pegging, the brenton Woods agreement was falling apart, the Nixon shock, the Smithsonian agreement ended. Even though they still statutorily have a value for gold on the books in the United States, there is nothing tying the dollar to gold. On the books of the United States, nor anywhere else in the world for that matter. And that all ended in the early 1970s. And then we had gold pretty much for the first time floating freely in the market. In the last 50 years.

Volcker Bretton Woods Paul Volcker United States Brenton Woods Soviet Union Berlin Nixon
The Double Standard With Sex Scandals

The Officer Tatum Show

01:16 min | 2 weeks ago

The Double Standard With Sex Scandals

"Let me get into my next example. I was saying that this double standard. And I'm not here to comment comment on whether or not I think the double standard is justified or not, but there is a double standard. A female police officer go out and smash a whole bunch of dudes, she looked really bad. A guy go out and do it, they think, man, that dude must be a player. In the mind of a Christian man like myself, they both dirty and they need the lord Jesus. Now, it's the same thing goes with schools. You have a female teacher. Her students in the minds of most people generally speaking, they don't view it the same as if a male is having sex with a female student. Let's just use the age of 15. If a 15 year old boy is having relations with his teacher, the other kids would probably give him a high 5. Especially she's a good-looking teacher. They will be giving him a high 5. And to be honest, quite as kelp, they don't even really treat these women that bad, that mess with the boys. If a man sleep with a 50 year old girl in his class, nobody high 5 and nobody he's going to prison, rightfully so.

What's in the Biden Docs?

The Officer Tatum Show

01:43 min | 2 weeks ago

What's in the Biden Docs?

"All right, Mark, I gotta get your initial take on this news that transpired first yesterday. Now even more today, this guy having classified documents that he took as vice president and they're just chilling in his garage mark and in his Corvette, but they're locked away. They're locked away so everything's good. Yeah, well, first of all, the left will call you a conspiracy theorist for telling the truth. This is not hard to figure out. You've got a Republican controlled Congress now sworn in with a speaker who is vowed to investigate the administration. He knows his son's laptop is out there. He knows he's been committing crimes for his last 50 years in Washington. He knows those documents were there. That's why he had lawyers go to get them in advance of the upcoming investigations, they got caught, it leaked. And if you watched the press conference or the White House today with KJ P and watch the media who is now forced to report on this, it's almost as if they're asking questions of her now in the tone. How could you possibly have let us down? We covered you for Trump. We covered Joe Biden, the price cut point. Now we're forced to cover this. How could you possibly be doing this to us? It is not a stretch to understand that this was all, it's not a setup, Biden had this information. He knew he had it, his attorneys are in there taking it out for one reason. To get it out in advance of the upcoming investigations, that's why lawyers were involved. My question is, if you want to get conspiratorial about it, is what did they take versus what did they leave when the story leaked?

Corvette Mark Congress Washington White House Joe Biden Donald Trump Biden
Dr. Wallace Manheimer: Net Zero Could Be the End of Civilization

Mark Levin

01:33 min | 2 weeks ago

Dr. Wallace Manheimer: Net Zero Could Be the End of Civilization

"The daily skeptic I want you to listen to this Chris Morrison Net zero that is net zero carbon emissions Will lead to the end of modern civilization Says a top scientist And of course he's right A damning indictment Of the new net zero political project has been made by one of the world's leading nuclear physicists In a recently published science paper doctor Wallace mannheimer said it would be the end of modern civilization Writing about wind and solar power argued it would be especially tragic when not only will this new infrastructure fail But what cost trillions trash large portions of the environment and be entirely unnecessary The stakes he added are enormous And this is where we're being pushed and dragged Doctor mannheimer holds a physics PhD from MIT and has had a 50 year career nuclear research Including work at the plasma physics division of the U.S. naval research laboratory He's published over a 150 science papers in his view there is certainly no scientific basis he says for expecting a climate crisis from too much carbon dioxide in the atmosphere in the next century or so He argues there's no reason why civilization can not advance using both fossil fuel power and nuclear power gradually shifting to more nuclear power

Chris Morrison Wallace Mannheimer Mannheimer U.S. Naval Research Laboratory MIT
Conservatives Should Take a Victory Lap

The Dan Bongino Show

01:54 min | 3 weeks ago

Conservatives Should Take a Victory Lap

"You stuck it out It was a lot of pressure to bail It was a lot of pressure to just go along to get along like we've done for 50 60 years now as the country collapses into 31 trillion in debt open borders a fentanyl crisis and many more And there was a lot of pressure from a lot of people out there even on our side of the aisle That happened To cave and just go along with McCarthy don't worry he's going to get the numbers eventually You might as well get it over with Take your syrup of it peca Drink it suck it down No No we didn't do that So you should take a victory lap My podcast today's title that was a huge win and ladies and gentlemen it was And proving to you that they were going to be results that were going to materialize and not just be kind of phantasms and otherworldly ideas Dan Crenshaw just dropped an enormous L to gavel in the Homeland Security committee to Mark green It was now going to head that committee who was far more conservative Why Because people on the steering committee which has a role in all of this a lot of them it might have been Byron donalds is now running it Who again is a conservative So I believe me I understand this don't take this as a don't take this as a criticism please at all This is not a criticism I want to be sure because I get a lot of people misinterpret what I say sometimes I get it but there are a lot of folks out there because we've been burned so often for 50 years that even when we get a win there's skepticism I'm like wow it's not really a win They're going to screw us over And then they might they might

Dan Crenshaw Homeland Security Committee Mccarthy Byron Donalds Mark Green
Do People Still Dress to Impress?

Dennis Prager Podcasts

00:46 sec | Last month

Do People Still Dress to Impress?

"If you look, I don't know if you've ever seen this. You should look on the Internet. For a photos just put in base baseball game 1955. Oh, it's like from people, so this is critical. Men and women dressed better far better for baseball games in the 1950s than for church today. My dad told me recently that when he was younger and he would get on a plane, he would wear a jacket in time. I remember when my mother sent me, I was 7 years old. Did you know this? My parents put me on an airplane when I was 7. And they didn't have any rules then. None. I went on the plane like any 50 year old with other plane.

Baseball
Long COVID: Could mono virus or fat cells be playing roles?

AP News Radio

01:00 min | Last month

Long COVID: Could mono virus or fat cells be playing roles?

"Scientists estimate about 30% of patients infected with COVID-19 will have long COVID, with lingering symptoms of fatigue, lung problems, brain fog, and other neurological issues. Many studies show women in obese people are more likely to develop long COVID. Women's bodies tend to have more fat tissue than men. Emerging research is suggesting the coronavirus may hide in fat after infection. There may also be a link to past viruses like mononucleosis and herpes. A virus expert at the University of California, San Francisco. Since they're finding immune markers that signal the Epstein Barr virus has been reactivated in long COVID patients. Particularly, those showing signs of fatigue. While researchers look for answers, one patient, 50 year old Amy Watson and Oregon who suffers anemia migraines digestive and nerve problems, says she just wants her life back. I'm Jackie Quinn

Lung Problems Fatigue Epstein Barr Mononucleosis University Of California Amy Watson San Francisco Migraines Digestive Anemia Oregon Jackie Quinn
Heres What Bitcoin Could Do to Deliver Profits for The Next 50 Years

American Institute for Crypto Investors

00:37 sec | Last month

Heres What Bitcoin Could Do to Deliver Profits for The Next 50 Years

"11 a.m. Wednesday, December 21st, 2022 hay race what Bitcoin could do to deliver profits for the next 50 years Bitcoin was the world's first crypto that means basically by definition it won't be the most advanced it's like comparing the Wright brothers original experimental airplane to a modern jumbo jet. The more the tech gets used, the more people read more the post harees what Bitcoin could do to deliver profits for the next 50 years appeared first on American institute for crypto investors.

Bitcoin Wright
Caroline Ellison, Gary Wang Plead Guilty to 'Fraud' Charges

CoinDesk Podcast Network

02:41 min | Last month

Caroline Ellison, Gary Wang Plead Guilty to 'Fraud' Charges

"Welcome to the hash on coin desk TV. I'm Zach seward. That's Jensen assy. Will foxley over there. We're going to get you up to speed on all that's going on in the world of crypto, including some major developments in the case against Sam bankman fried Jen, take us there, what's going on? All right, so former Alameda research CEO Caroline Ellison and FTX cofounder Gary Wang have both pled guilty to charges associated with FTX collapse. The SEC and CFTC have also announced charges against the two saying that Allison manipulated the price of the FTT token, U.S. attorney Damian Williams says both are cooperating with investigators, former FTX CEO Sam bankman fried was charged with 8 crimes earlier this month. We've discussed those at length. They include money laundering, wire fraud and securities fraud. He is being extradited from The Bahamas to the U.S. and is in FBI custody. Zach, a lot to unpack here. What do you got? So much to unpack. Kids, if you're ever in a criminal conspiracy involving $10 billion that are vaporized, especially from customers, snitches fast as possible. That's the story here. Everyone associated with FTX and Alameda turned snitch on sandbank and freed. And they're probably going to have a much more comfortable life because of it all their former colleague rots in a prison cell somewhere for a long time. That for me is the takeaway looking at some of this stuff. It's pretty wild. Bank and freed was flown in from Bahamas into the New York area last night. A lot of people were closely watching flight trackers on the Internet to see where he was headed. Apparently he's touched down over in Westchester and is making his first appearance in New York in court today for a presentment that initiates the legal proceedings here in the U.S. after some complicated back and forth over whether or not he was going to make his way over here from The Bahamas. So that's what people are watching. I know coin disc has a reporter on the ground at the courthouse in the southern district of New York. So we're going to watch it, watch that for updates later today. And yeah, I don't know. Caroline and the cofounder, they may have found themselves a pretty sweet deal. I don't know, what do you think? Yeah, I think they found themselves a really good deal, right? But if you look at the charges, they possibly were going to have just think it was like 250 years for Caroline. And it was about 50 years for Gary if they were just charged for what they're doing in the first place. I went to the different administrations, the DoJ, and they're getting off the hook more or less. So Caroline Ellison is looking at getting some fine slapped on her disgorgement for any ill gotten gains and then also she's not going to be able to trade anything on behalf of other people

Sam Bankman FTX Zach Seward Caroline Ellison Alameda Research Gary Wang Damian Williams The Bahamas U.S. Cftc Jensen JEN Allison SEC New York Zach Alameda FBI Westchester
Monica Crowley: God Revealed to Me 50 Years of Deep State Tyranny

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:51 min | Last month

Monica Crowley: God Revealed to Me 50 Years of Deep State Tyranny

"It means we're no longer in a representative republic. We're in a tyranny. You know, one day toward the end of the summer, Todd, I had this like lightning bolt that just came into my brain and it was definitely a hand of God kind of thing. And it just dawned on me that I've been blessed to work for two American presidents. President Nixon, during the last years of his life, and president Trump at the Treasury Department during his administration. And what God revealed to me, which I hadn't thought of or put together before, is that this has been a 50 year arc of deep state tyranny and undermining of the constitution and the will of the people. So the deep state had a direct hand in removing Richard Nixon. Why? Because Nixon was an existential threat to their absolute grip on power. In Nixon's second term, he was going to do what Donald Trump began to do, which is drain the swamp and reform the executive branch, which includes the DoJ and the FBI and IRS, et cetera. So we had to be removed fast forward 50 years, Donald Trump, same thing because he poses the same threat. And in fact, over the last week or so, you can bring the timeline even further back to 1963 because we're getting these documents now that showed that the CIA had a hand in the assassination of JFK. So we are now in this position in this country where we are beginning to realize that, you know, we're out here voting and doing our civic duty and none of it matters because the real powers with the deep state and that is a terrifying proposition to a lot of Americans, but as long past time that we understand the reality of what we're dealing with so we can counter it and fight back.

President Trump President Nixon Nixon Donald Trump Treasury Department Todd DOJ FBI IRS CIA
Tucker Carlson: What Was the CIA's Role Regarding the JFK Files?

The Dan Bongino Show

01:34 min | Last month

Tucker Carlson: What Was the CIA's Role Regarding the JFK Files?

"Here is Tucker's opening segment on the JFK files and asking a question What was the CIA's role in this Check this out So not long after Jack Ruby shot Lee Harvey Oswald on camera in the basement of Dallas police headquarters A lot of Americans started to have some questions about the Kennedy assassination It was you have to admit a pretty extraordinary sequence of events A lone gunman murders the president of the United States and then less than 48 hours later that lone gunman is himself murdered by another lone gunman What are the odds of that It's one thing if you get struck by lightning rare but possible But if every member of your family also gets struck by lightning all on different days you might begin to suspect these are not entirely natural events But oh replied the U.S. government they are this bizarre chain of killings was all entirely natural Less than a year after the JFK assassination that Johnson White House released something called the Warren commission report and the report concluded that while their motives remained unclear both Lee Oswald and Jack Ruby had acted alone No one helped them There was no conspiracy of any kind Case closed time to move on And many many Americans did move on At the time they had no idea how shoddy and corrupt the Warren commission was It would be nearly 50 years before the CIA admitted under duress that in fact it had withheld information from investigators about its relationship with Wii Harvey Oswald Okay okay that part's the most interesting part of that What was the CIA's relationship with Lee Harvey Oswald

Jack Ruby Lee Harvey Oswald CIA Tucker Warren Commission Kennedy Dallas U.S. Government JFK United States White House Johnson Harvey Oswald
Eric Metaxas: The American Church Is Hiding in a Theological Corner

Liberty Station

02:20 min | Last month

Eric Metaxas: The American Church Is Hiding in a Theological Corner

"To sum up my book, it's called letter to the American church, but the sort of sum it up, it, or at least one of the things that's at the center of this book letter to the American church is the idea that if you're a person of particularly Christian faith, because I write letter to the American church. This is the people who claim to be Christians. If you think you can avoid politics, if you think you should avoid politics, that is an unbiblical idea, and not only is it on biblical, but if you do not fight for liberty, if you do not fight for these biblical values, you will not even get to do the one thing you think you need to do, which is preach the quote unquote gospel, you won't even get to do that. You are going to be silenced because we have an essentially binary choice. The values of the Bible lead to freedom. And if you are under an authoritarian regime and you don't fight back against that and fight for religious liberty, you are more and more and more going to be unable even to say anything, even the one theological thing that you want to talk about. The gospel, you won't even get to talk about that. So these things are unavoidably related and the lie that I'm trying to push back at in a lot of what I write, but especially in the new book letter to the American church. Is this idea that we can just carve out our little theological corner, there is no such thing. The Bible doesn't allow us to do that. It says, you're supposed to take the truth of God into all the world into every sphere into politics into culture into schools into media. And by the way, if you don't do that, you're doing nothing. You can't really hide in a theological corner. If you hide in the theological corner and just stick to what you think is somehow non controversial, you're kidding yourself and you're doing nothing. And I think that that's why we are where we are Bryce in the culture is because for about 50 years, we haven't fought that battle. We haven't understood that at the heart of our faith is taking that faith into every region of the world and of the culture and fighting for liberty and understanding that there's a link between faith and the God of the Bible and liberty and self government. If you don't get that, you kind of lose everything.

American Church Bryce
James Lindsay Tells Us About His New Book

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:48 min | 2 months ago

James Lindsay Tells Us About His New Book

"Tell us about your new book coming out December 9th. Well, it's perfect because, you know, I just said the brainwashing. I went and got a prop a minute ago. It is, I don't know if you can see it or centered up. The marks vacation of education. I love that. And so it actually details one character in one character only for the most part by the name of Paolo Ferrari, who's a Brazilian Marxist who claims to have been an educator, but what he did was he laid out a system of brainwashing that looks like education. So the subtitle is Paulo ferry's critical Marxism and the theft of education and those last four words are the key part of the whole title. The theft of education. What Ferrari's philosophy or educational approach or whatever you want to call it? It's more sorcery is what it is. Enables is the theft of education from America from the west from our society and from a specifically, of course, our children. And the way that that theft works is by retooling education not to teach, say, literacy or numeracy or any of this, but to teach what he calls political literacy while using the reading lesson, the math less and the history lesson is what he calls a mediator to political knowledge. And so he set it up to where these marxists and education and they've controlled education for roughly 50 years now have the ability to give you a math problem or give you a history lesson or give you a reading lesson and actually tool it so that it achieves a doesn't achieve. It becomes a political lesson instead. And so that's what I'm trying to expose in this book so that parents across the country so that teachers who are still not woke across the country can understand what's happening around them in the education because I think even if we stop all of this disaster that's happening now, if we don't fix education, we're going through it again in 5 or ten years. It's

Paolo Ferrari Paulo Ferry Ferrari America
"50 year" Discussed on Popcast

Popcast

04:58 min | 2 months ago

"50 year" Discussed on Popcast

"My as I'm sure y'all know a few days ago, take off from Migos and was shot and killed in Houston following an altercation that does not appear that he was a part of. I wrote a little something about the technical contributions of takeoff and amigos and why his flow patterns were so striking and so interesting and the kind of role that they played in the continuum of a certain stripe of hip hop, especially not New York and LA hip hop very much Midwest and the south. I don't know, that feels kind of insufficient. I woke up this morning. I saw there was like a young drill rapper, edap baby, who seems like potentially taking his own life, I was thinking about Nadia Osama, who was a 14 year old drill rapper from New York, who stabbed a death, not that long ago. And PnB rock, the murder PnB rock recently, it's too much to name. It's too much overwhelming to go through and it feels like as a condition of fandom these days as some kind of strange, tolerance of the instability of life. And there's an awful, awful place to be. And it certainly something that I have been thinking about and living with for many, many years, dating back to obviously up to two Bach and biggie and just feel so omnipresent now. I flinch a little bit when I see people talking about violence and hip hop and how it's not. This kind of violence and other communities and other musical communities. And it's like, yeah, but also this is a broader American condition. That we are seeing play out here. This is not a rap music thing. I literally feel like we're having some conversation, like a PMRC type conversation in the mid 90s and that's just not what it is. There are horrific things happening constantly every day and sometimes they intersect with people who have notoriety on the Internet for the creative output that they make, not insignificant part of my job is celebrating such creative output. And I do. And I think that can be a bulwark against some of the negativity. And some of the other challenges. But it doesn't make it any easier to accept when you lose someone, like take off at this young age to say how great the art was. Because it might have been great, but maybe it wasn't enough. I wish I had clearer answers about it. I've had a lot of conversations this week with friends and other writers and everybody is particularly I find broken up in this moment. There's a little bit of perseverance that people strong faces that people have put on in recent weeks and months and years. But every now and again, I feel like you're kind of like breaks the dam. Certainly like when juice world passed. And again, I think this week, I feel the damn breaking. And I see a lot of people who I care about and respect and find counsel and give counsel to depending on the conversation and depending on the moment throwing up their hands and really at a loss. And I'm sure, frankly, a lot of y'all are at a loss too. And I wish I had a better Beacon at the moment, but at minimum, I guess just know that we're lost together. So let's listen to a little take off on the way out. I was listening back to a bunch of old stuff, but I was impressed with the LA leakers freestyle from last year, which I liked because if you listen to it, carefully, I feel like you hear 2013 Migos in it. But also you hear the modern, more fully developed exposition of that idea, and they stuck with it, even as Atlanta rap kind of moved in different directions. They stuck firm to it. So this is take off first on the Migos LA leakers freestyle from last year. We'll be back next week. Thanks, JP for coming through. Listen to every podcast ever. And why times dot com slash podcast, email us a podcast, and I want times dot com with any questions. Also, we're going to probably do a year in mailbags and start putting some questions in there. There are a few leftover Taylor questions that'll probably go in there too. Shout out my guy, Daniel in Paris. Subscribe to podcasts anywhere you get your audio content, Spotify, Apple, stitcher, et cetera, et cetera the church, again, it's the pop gas my Shopify dot com, our producer, as always, as Pedro rosado from head stepper media. We'll be back. Here's

Migos Nadia Osama PnB rock New York biggie Midwest LA Houston Bach Atlanta Taylor Daniel Paris Apple Pedro rosado
"50 year" Discussed on Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

03:27 min | 10 months ago

"50 year" Discussed on Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

"We need <Speech_Male> to automate as much <Speech_Male> of engineering <Speech_Male> as we can. And <Speech_Male> unleashed <Speech_Male> creativity <Speech_Male> to use. <Speech_Male> And I <Speech_Male> think that will help with <Speech_Male> the diversity because <Speech_Male> a lot of people <Speech_Male> don't want to <Speech_Male> be in <Speech_Male> effect digital drafts <Speech_Male> persons. <Speech_Male> Or whatever. <Speech_Male> They want to <Speech_Male> be solution <Speech_Male> creators. <Speech_Male> And I think if <Speech_Male> we can get <Speech_Male> the tools to <Speech_Male> a point where you <Speech_Male> can either <Speech_Male> open <Speech_Male> a cell phone box <Speech_Male> and not even look <Speech_Male> at the instruction manual <Speech_Male> and still be able to use <Speech_Male> your phone. If you <Speech_Male> can walk into a design <Speech_Male> office and use all <Speech_Male> the design tools in <Speech_Male> a design office without having <Speech_Male> to read the manual, <Speech_Male> then you can <Speech_Male> unleash the creativity <Speech_Male> on top of that. And I think <Speech_Male> that will bring <Speech_Male> the diversity because I <Speech_Male> think that going <Speech_Male> forward, <Speech_Male> it's all about <Silence> multidisciplinary <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> engineering. It's all <Speech_Male> about teaching <Speech_Male> people <Speech_Male> to work at the <Speech_Male> interfaces <Speech_Male> between traditional <Speech_Male> systems. <Speech_Male> Because that's <Speech_Male> where all of <Speech_Male> the challenges are, <Speech_Male> it's where all of the <Speech_Male> advances are, is <Speech_Male> that the interface is <Speech_Male> between these systems. <Speech_Male> And if we can <Speech_Male> automate the basic <Speech_Male> stuff as much as <Speech_Male> possible and unleash <Speech_Male> the creativity, <Speech_Male> then we can tackle <Speech_Male> those interfaces <Speech_Male> and come up <Speech_Male> with <SpeakerChange> more <Speech_Male> optimized solutions. <Speech_Male> Yeah, <Speech_Male> I'd like that. <Speech_Male> I agree, Graham, <Speech_Male> but I'd like to add one <Speech_Male> other thing that I think we <Speech_Male> need to do is <Speech_Male> we go off and develop <Speech_Male> an aircraft. <Speech_Male> And then there's a gap. <Speech_Male> And so all <Speech_Male> the lessons learned <Speech_Male> are forgotten <Speech_Male> by the engineers. <Speech_Male> They're not <Speech_Male> the new engineers <Speech_Male> aren't Mandarin. And then <Speech_Male> we have <Speech_Male> the same <Speech_Male> learning process <Speech_Male> on the next one. And I <Speech_Male> think Airbus <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> at least they have been <Speech_Male> focused on <Speech_Male> the keep our <Speech_Male> design engineers <Speech_Male> continuously <Speech_Male> involved <Speech_Male> in various items. <Speech_Male> And they <Speech_Male> do that so they don't <Speech_Male> lose that they <Speech_Male> don't have that gap. <Speech_Male> The other thing I think is <Speech_Male> necessary for <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> engineering <Speech_Male> students is <Speech_Male> over the next 50 <Speech_Male> years is <Speech_Male> to keep learning. <Speech_Male> I mean, in the <Speech_Male> technology organization, <Speech_Male> I was running <Silence> until February, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I did this <Speech_Male> estimate, 60% <Speech_Male> of the technology <Speech_Male> where we're working <Speech_Male> on <Speech_Male> patent been <Speech_Male> invented <SpeakerChange> when I <Speech_Female> graduated. <Speech_Female> What comes next <Speech_Female> for John borghese, <Speech_Female> because I just don't see <Speech_Male> you sitting back and <Speech_Male> retiring. <Speech_Male> Well, thank you, Carl. And <Speech_Male> I think you're right. <Speech_Male> So my <Speech_Male> basic goals <Speech_Male> are to be <Speech_Male> mentally <Speech_Male> and physically <Speech_Male> active <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> to have <Speech_Male> fun. <Speech_Male> So I'm doing basically <Speech_Male> two things. One is I've <Speech_Male> got starting with a couple <Speech_Male> of friends <Speech_Male> that are university professors <Speech_Male> and an <Speech_Male> idea on <Speech_Male> the academic <Speech_Male> publishing <Speech_Male> process <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> using machine <Speech_Male> learning to <Speech_Male> be able <Speech_Male> to facilitate <Speech_Male> and make it <Speech_Male> make it <Speech_Male> faster <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> less <Speech_Male> expensive <Speech_Male> in the process. <Speech_Male> The other <Speech_Male> one is there's <Speech_Male> so many <Speech_Male> technologies that I've <Speech_Male> wanted to learn that I haven't <Speech_Male> had time to <Speech_Male> learn because you're <Speech_Male> working the whole day and then <Speech_Male> you do email at <Speech_Male> night. And so when do <Speech_Male> you have a chance <Speech_Male> to take a course? <Speech_Male> And now there's some <Speech_Male> great courses <Speech_Male> online <Speech_Male> by leading <Speech_Male> universities. <Speech_Male> I'm taking one <Speech_Male> photo bouquets <Speech_Male> from MIT <Speech_Male> OpenCourseWare, <Speech_Male> one from Yale, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I'm taking multiple <Speech_Male> courses in <Speech_Male> machine learning. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> that's what <Speech_Male> I am doing, <Speech_Male> staying quite <SpeakerChange> active <Speech_Female> in those areas. <Speech_Female> Out of the student. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Well, unfortunately, <Speech_Female> we need to leave it <Speech_Female> there. And <Speech_Female> join us again <Speech_Female> next week <Speech_Female> for another <Speech_Female> episode of check 6. <Speech_Female> John and Graham, <Speech_Female> thanks a lot for joining <Speech_Female> me today. This has been a <Speech_Female> fantastic conversation. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> Bye for <Speech_Female> now. And thanks for <Music> listening.

John borghese Airbus Graham Carl John
"50 year" Discussed on Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

03:48 min | 10 months ago

"50 year" Discussed on Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

"That's where we kind of went wrong. I just want to piggyback on something that Graham said. And that's I did a interview with supernal supper. Which is the Hyundai advanced air mobility division. And one of the things that they found was that in hiring people, they started out looking for the same thing that aerospace had always looked for and ended up having to rewrite job descriptions because they didn't want that pedigree what they wanted was that aspirational mind that that curiosity and seeking versus merely the same old that looked the same. So I wanted to move us along and it's really about right now because we have two questions left. Right now and the future. So if you were going to say right now, what do you see as the most significant innovation challenges facing the industry? What would those be, John? Well, I would say it's getting the best students entering into aerospace and defense. And that's twofold. One is to make it as Graham said to make it exciting for them to want to enter. But I say the other part is if you look at PhDs that are being graduated from leading universities in the U.S., many of them are foreign students. And that means they're restricted from defense and a lot of air space to begin with. So John sulfur, who was the director of MTO at darpa, about ten years ago, told me, you know, we ought to do is hand a U.S. citizenship application to every foreign PhD in the U.S.. I think the other one is doing being able to do a classified work from home. You can't do that today. If you're going to get the best people, they're not going to want to work in a room that doesn't have windows, and so you need to do that..

Graham Hyundai John sulfur U.S. John MTO darpa
"50 year" Discussed on Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

04:35 min | 10 months ago

"50 year" Discussed on Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

"Are there other ways of getting the funding instead of just consolidation into very, very few companies? Yeah, and I have some thoughts on that. I mean, one of the results of consolidation is the either of the consolidation or the actual outright disappearance of corporate labs that would be, I mean, and I'm not talking about the top of the corporate. I'm talking about sometimes labs within divisions. As they consolidate these laps get sort of rolled together. And then the consolidated corporations aren't de priorities kind of get led on top of all these units and I think the end result is a loss of diversity in R&D within aerospace. And a lot of the outsourcing of innovation to now we have got a healthy startup ecosystem that comes along and it's very tempting to reach into that healthy diverse ecosystem. But I think that that's also a challenge to justifying the corporate R&D. It comes down to it's not just money decisions. You have to really decide what thing you can do as a corporation that will differentiate you. You can't go and buy from a startup or whatever or something like that. And I think that has the industry suffered from that over the years because I think it's just hollowed out some of the degrees of diversity of approaches being researched within companies that John's experienced this. I mean, he's gone through many, many corporate transitions. And I'm sure he's had to every time that's happened. He'd have to go back to the table and justify his technology decisions saying as company X, these are things we must focus on. These are the differentiators. And then he's got somebody now from corporate Y that's in charge, saying yes, but we can go get that somewhere else. What about this? This corporate this company Z we bought over here wants to spend money on this. And I think that consolidation, I think, has made it really, really hard for aerospace to know where to invest. The customer sometimes hasn't helped. The DoD is not provided strong enough technology pulls.

John DoD
"50 year" Discussed on Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

04:36 min | 10 months ago

"50 year" Discussed on Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

"How much fuel aviation would use if we were using 7 engines? We probably use half the hydrocarbons in the world today. Sure enough. And Graham, what about you? Yeah, I'd actually settle down on the same sort of thing. And to be honest, my many visits to John's lab at Collins kind of underlines this. This whole analog to digital thing that happened in my lifetime and Johns as well. Really where we took things that we used to do in physical and mechanical means levers and pivots and all these sort of things and hydraulics and all that sort of stuff. And we turned it into software. And that allowed us to take a lot of physical complexity out of things. I think we put a lot of digital complexity into things when doing that. But it allowed us to then sort of do things that we just couldn't imagine when we were constrained by purely mechanical. And I think to me, the biggest thing is the evolution of what I think darpa coined as being cyber physical, which you really, really intelligently combine the physical with the mechanical with the software, the physical with the software, and you come up with systems that have got brains, whereas you get a dumb actuator back there. Now you're inaccurate with a processor attached that can do some very clever things. And I think we'll get to this later in this podcast, but I also think that the digitalization of everything that we touch in aerospace is going to dramatically change the art of aerospace. What you physically do as an engineer and the tools that you work with and the approach that you produce. So I would have to focus and again, I've seen John has demonstrated some of these things to be many times over the years as the things you could do once you bring software to a system in aerospace..

Graham Johns Collins John
"50 year" Discussed on Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

01:43 min | 10 months ago

"50 year" Discussed on Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

"With us to discuss this, our John borghese and Graham Warwick. John recently retired from Collins, aerospace, capping off a 50 year career that began with the drawdown from the war in Vietnam and through today's world where we are seeing all of these innovations and challenges. John is also been a member of the NASA aeronautics committee since 2011 and was its chair from 2017 to 2021. With us too is Graham Warwick, aviation weeks executive editor for technology. In this role, Graham has worked with John several times, including an aviation week study of innovation across the industry, as well as on technology developments. Graham graduated in aeronautical engineering just a bit after John and worked in advanced design at hawker city aviation in the UK before becoming an aerospace journalist. He's won a lot of awards and as you all know, he leads to us as a mentor as well as journalist. Between the two of you, you've seen a lot of change and a lot of innovation. John over the course of this half century and that sounds weird even saying it to you because you're young at heart. What has been the most significant technological change you have seen? Thank you, Carol. Good to talk to you again. And thanks for asking. I really have two items for you. With the first being the move from analog to digital, which has been driven by advances in semiconductor technology. When I first started in 1972, I actually worked on two systems, anti skid and rad altimeters, but both of them were analog systems..

Graham Warwick John borghese John NASA aeronautics committee hawker city aviation Graham Collins Vietnam UK Carol
"50 year" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"50 year" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Service committed to whether any nation work with them. They'll take you as far as you wanna go. And that's that's unfortunately where we have to end. I could talk louis for for hours on him. He's a great colleague. Someone that has served as a mentor for me as a friend is todd. League confident in our roles is am presidents and colleagues in the field. And i'm certain. I said this before he came on. I'm louis holds the record for the most appearances on whether he says the podcast and the tv show. So i'm gonna take host. Live up the privileges here. This week's gig of the week is dr louis utility. Dr each lady received his bachelor's degree a degree at university of wisconsin master's and bachelor's so he is a triple badger. As i see it. I believe became the sixteenth director of the national weather service in two thousand thirteen. Who's am as president in twenty twelve twenty. Thirteen director inset for fourteen years and has published more than seventy peer reviewed articles and chapters in books on numerous including severe weather outbreaks snowstorms gravity waves jet streak cycles of the satellite data in applications and more recently the basis for the joint center for satellite data simulation. Wmo base grand challenge for seamless prediction and the restructuring of the national weather service to build a weather ready nation. Dr jalili has been a driving force behind transition. Transitioning this nation. And we thank you for your service. Louis thank you for joining us and thank you for also giving us this opportunity on web geeks to to speak with you in this really pinnacle moment in your career always a pleasure. Marshall thank you. And i am dr marcia shepherd. We'll see you next time on weather geeks a..

dr louis louis national weather service todd joint center for satellite dat university of wisconsin Dr jalili Wmo Louis dr marcia shepherd Marshall
"50 year" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

06:33 min | 1 year ago

"50 year" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Again bicameral bipartisan support. You saw this in the weather act. It was passed unanimously doth. I mean this was really incredible. The people who help that happen actually are the partners hours talking about that linked in with two whether any nation emergency manages water resource manages the other ones canvassing at the state and local levels not just the federal level. It is every every emergency manager. Every organization is arguing for us right. Well kids every house district in the united states. So the point is we that connection. Connectivity allowed that happened. 'cause i can't go on a hill argue for anything but the president's budget i can't lobby the hill. So you gotta recognize that to make it work and same thing with sequestration. It turned out the the may two thousand thirteen Tornado outbreak out there. Near more oklahoma and elry i l l now i think we already know case know The hill senate at that point whether service no we're not going to be sequestered but we didn't get out of the budget constraints until two thousand fourteen But the fact that we never had to do sequestration based on our performances during the tornado outbreaks and the seriousness of the impact. It would have had on our weather offices. We made that clear and it wasn't just for the during the hurricanes there was the fire season. Had actor you plan for preparing for that so we never did get sequestered but we had some rough budget periods there just from the how long we had a wait before it finally opened up yet and the weather service is one of the greatest values in the federal government system if you look at their budget to value ratio a couple of final questions. When i saw the article that you said you prepared to be fired after sharp Itchy stood by your your point. Is that i had to do what i did. From a leadership perspective Of and careful about exactly what he said but not with respect to having the backs of the birmingham forecast office. And i knew that the service your i got a courtesy call when before ten minutes before they the that message was released And i knew at that point what. I had to do that following monday. Because i was giving a keynote address at the. Nfc way Was you know back to a very office no matter what the consequence and you know Do an executive branch so that were at. I'm not it's not a political position. But i still work in the executive branch. I had the back at forecast office. They did the right thing. Everybody during during did the right thing In terms decisions that were made but especially The the birmingham office. I thought i think that Your leadership i've always been a big huge backer. The weather service. And i think your leadership i think people Within the weather service definitely resonated with your leadership and again you're a louis people personalities also former trout president of the american meteorological society. What do you. What do you see the weather service looking like in ten twenty years. I mean how will look different than it looks. Well one of the interesting things is you know if you look at what we do in our mission statement from producing Opposite the weather water climate observations forecasts and warnings and for the protection. And this is something that. I wrote up in the paper in the paper with john ten. Hove is that there's like. it's like an hourglass. The bottom part is the production. Part that lends itself to more centralisation More of you know. It based approach now but when you get for the protection of life and property and you gotta do the ids at every government level especially the local level in this country where mostly all the decisions are made for. Public safety is at the local. You gotta spread out so that lends itself to a decentralized we got do both okay we gotta have not only accurate messaging. We have to have consistent messaging. So what i see is an improvement and advancement by t- that allows us to extract. The relevant information. Were already producing. Observations and models are really extracted information in a much more effective way. Because we're probably just using about twenty to thirty percent of the information content and we need to extract but we gotta need that local presence. It's essential for decision making in the villages of of alaska southwest pacific states throughout conus the continental united states and puerto rico virgin islands. I mean you've got to have that local presence that understands what's happening on the ground as it's happening and understands the human factors of getting people make decisions in those locations. So i see the i see the footprint remaining the same the services being a lot more extensive in terms of the earth system. It's not just going to be the weather. It's going to be helpful. Boom which is already doing and really seeing through who forecast offices as the outlet. I mean things like the dad being environment. Prediction is going to be much more obvious from space weather to the oceans You're going to see this and it's gonna be it's gonna be through the national weather service it's going to be a center to see as we all ambition it already seconds or less louis. Someone's getting a call soon or maybe already About the succeeding us. National weather service director. What are some quick pieces of advice. You'd give well. I made up my mind. That if i only give advice to the next director if i math and it'll be in private right but i would say you've got the best workforce in the world. We know that mckinsey has done three analysis on us over six years. We got the best workforce committed to mission committed. The public.

birmingham john ten united states oklahoma american meteorological societ senate Nfc federal government puerto rico virgin islands Hove southwest pacific alaska National weather service mckinsey
"50 year" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

07:31 min | 1 year ago

"50 year" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Service might chesterfield. who has the outstanding executive producer of weather geeks and someone. I know that you've met. And when you've come down and do the tv show He text me literally in real time. While we're doing this. He had a couple of questions that i want to honor my gun. Loud him nastier. A couple of questions be attacks. He was curious about. What did you wish you would accomplished. But didn't while you're the director of the national weather service and then he also wants to know what's the future of the national weather. So what what is there as we get -ccomplish that you wanted or had a real goal of getting accomplish about laci. They're you're still near. Yeah the The the rate at which we can improve the infrastructure The rate in which we can improve the models is certainly of something that Yeah everybody wishes and everybody in certain respects complains about right But we had such a usage infrastructure issue to deal with With respect to the budget as i noted but also with respect to how we receive data how we process it in a in general how we process for the models getting the computing capacity. Which we have. I mean i started with but to girly. And we're now up to you know we're going to be up to like you know Increased by four flops. The new i mean you know we're really exponentially increasing our computing power which is important part of this but the rate which he can do this Through the budget process even with the full support of the hill is not as fast as what i think people would like. We want to know is what i would like but it is what it is you gotta you gotta do what you have But i wish we could. Have you know got not done. But i wouldn't have done that at the expense of the focus. We had on the last mile because it's the delivery of the services that are really really important factor in saving lives and mitigating property loss. And that's what that focus. I wouldn't take away. It's just that getting that infrastructure built Took a bit longer than i even. I would have hoped for. Louis wear we. I mean i need to talk with me. And we we you know we hear about things coming forth you were just talking about the computing and i know they were sort of increase on funding after sandy and so forth where we in the great model race the for you. You hear about this all the time. I thought i always think it's a bit overblown out there. And sort of the weather social media world because the s. models world-class model at european models a world-class model. We use them both effectively. Where are we on that. Yeah the the european center Certainly has You know a great modeling system and they have a more restricted mission so they can really focus their compute power on that one Global model we have the forecast space weather to the ocean surface and down. We're now getting into our system. Science approach you fully couple miles chrysler so we got really short range. Very high resolution you. The researchers are clamoring for Gregory saw resolvable convective in sambas yell so boy anti talk about a huge challenge for national weather service. Yes while the thing is it's very exciting aspect to be working right but what we are doing is we're we're really redoing. The whole structure of models to make it more efficient building. The new dynamical core build in the bed of physics representation. I think our biggest weakness is is the Data assimilation yeah. We talked the choice. We made for multi model and samples. Wanted if we did that. It was very clear that our trip down the road for four dimensional variation analysis for data assimilation. Was going to be impeded you. We couldn't do both. We chose the multi model and sombor route right and we have a data assimilation system. Today that's built off of those in samba. approach that hybrid variations escape. But there's but there's a lot of work on optimizing code forty bar and we're involved in at work. And i believe that's another part brick in the wall of us moving forward in his whole modeling continual. But you know something you said. Was we all use. The the whole group model we have partnerships with the european centre with the uk met with canada. We've we exchange what we're doing right because our forecasters use them all us. All those mobs. It isn't one model against the other. Right pull them together and the forecast is have access to them. All and that's critical. And if you look at the verification i keep on telling get diversification of the at the age lately. Hurricane center forecast the best of all amazing. So so that's what we want to see right access to all these models a global effort in a partnership again a team International team trying to advance prediction now today. Even as we speak from an earth system science perspective fully couple applied from the measure scale all the way up to the sub seasonal seasonal scale with one functional system that leaves us room on a computer to do all kinds of research with it. So i think that this is what the futures pointing to and i think it'd be a very exciting time for who are does get the job After me i got cut. We'll have a lot of time left. But i got a couple more questions. Gotta get to one. I think is an important question warrior successor. Because i'm curious. In what advice you give to whoever steps into that role. But i'm particularly interested in how you louis have successfully navigated a political waters a sharpie gate. Sequestration government shutdowns. Sandy you you navigate all of this and your longevity in this role Suggests that you did it effectively. So how did you do it. And then what generally by the for your successor going. Well the simple fact with respect to managing within government that one has to accept is that appropriation law is what you live by. The budget process the executive ban can offer a proposal comes back is what you operate off of. That's appropriation. that's what comes from the hill. So you worked at. And i one of the things that i was blessed with as a period of time..

european center laci sambas national weather service european centre Louis chrysler Gregory samba Hurricane center canada uk louis Sandy
"50 year" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"50 year" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"And it's working still work do right but it's really working and And this is. This is the pathway now for the future is going beyond the forecast warning. Can i think with With the decision makers in the atmospheric type things like tornadoes etc and in water flooding. Still a big challenge as we say so. That's that's it that was it. Those are the things and and everything that came along with because we didn't lose sight of the science and technology that we would need to move the forecasts and warnings for but the job doesn't end there and i think that we saw that recently with ida off the national weather service forecast were amazing the remnants and an initial stages but getting that last mile there was clearly information that you won't put out a deal with significant flooding in the northeast but there were still challenges because of not so much the four k. That last mile it the thing is it's that's an added factor there. You know the magnitude of the rainfall of something that we've never seen before you know. We had that record with andrei with one point nine four inches in one hour in central park. You got smashed smashed by ida two weeks later. An hourly rainfall rate of three point. One five inches doesn't happen in the extra is the new york. She never happened before. So there's obviously an infrastructure build issue here. The infrastructure can't deal with magnitude rainfall. We're seeing the same thing. Southwest of nashville. We're where we're predicting the heavy rain. We're looking for the totals about right but the magnitude of the rainfall in a short period of time when we're dealing with something we haven't seen before. So how do you communicate that. It's got to be a learned experience. And emily happens for the first time. That's what you start learning from. Well that doesn't save the forty something lives lost Tragically in new york city right so we got to learn from this. We've got to learn from this but this is also an infrastructure issue and whether the built infrastructure in the urban environment in valleys where people live right whether that can handle this kind of rainfall. And i think the answer is no town so we got. We got a big societal issue. Here that has to be within. Of course this. I believe this is related to global warming. You we all know as scientists right. If the air's warm it's going to hold more water vapor and. We had a brief moment of heavy rain here. I live south of baltimore. And i was thinking to myself. You know what this thing really gets. This happened the night before. I see well. Listening really gets its act together in pennsylvania new york city if it rains like this long period of time. We're in trouble so we kept on. We kept on messaging net but not three point one five inches in in one hour and have a flash flood emergency in all five boroughs of new york city at the same time. Never had me first time. I add in the counties tend to northern nassau county to the east. I mean this was.

national weather service andrei central park ida nashville new york city emily new york baltimore pennsylvania nassau county
"50 year" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

07:37 min | 1 year ago

"50 year" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"And new and interesting tool right and we are back on a special edition of weather geeks. Podcast i'm dr marshall shepherd from the university of georgia and i'm talking to my friend and colleague dr luigi cellini who is now this week. His retirement from the national weather service's research most recently serving as the director. But as you just. He has a long career and legacy with noah And i i hope you miss some of the things he said there. Because again some of the foundations of our weather prediction enterprises. We know it. Today ensemble model a multi a model and symbols Climate forecast these things. You heard the origins of those during his time. As the director of in seven national senator environmental prediction again. Those that are familiar with. No you know about centers if you're not there. Sleep centers within noah people know about hurricanes international incident and so forth storm predictions. There got the national centers. And so that's kinda sort of the way the arranged. Okay now. i wanna fast forward to the national weather service directorship when you walked in the door there. What was your biggest challenge The the budget Structure the budget process a lack of governance document We were coming out of financial Misstep a Refer to it That was pretty serious. And so we were not fa favorite child of those on the hill since the people on the really do care about the national weather. Somebody tell you that. You know by bicameral bipartisan. Incredible support for the instrument service So that's what i walked into and i That's the first step. Two things one We had to get a a budget process. We had to get a structure a process and governance document that people the senior executives the management team could make work to support those forecasters in the field of the folks in the weather service. Who also responsible for it development model development etc to get that focus again supported that we would improve not only our forecast but our outrage to the emergency management community And that's where the weather ready nation aspect comes in but that was my first task and we got it done basically in two years. And it's amazing when you think about it. Because i had to get approval through to the hill to restructure the budget. Because that's the way we get our money. That's we're going to execute the budget the that were appropriate it through congress. They have to approve everything rightfully saw so we made the case we showed it. We had a run it in parallel with our old budget structure and show them the advantages of the new system. We had to develop a governance document and say this is the way it works is the way we plan. This is the way we develop the execution aspect of it. Schedules cetera et. This is the way we track it on a quarterly basis. And and and that's a three year cycle that we work We got that done. And i was back through the natural kademi public administration. That actually recommend that we do this After we laid out our concerns what we needed to do they never seen it get done and get it done in two years so that was really important and i can tell you that from a budget a planning budget appropriation. Budget execution perspective We've run on eight cylinders and we haven't had a problem Since okay And one of the one of the things that i did with the governance documents which i would stay would credit jack. Kelly who i worked under for a three to five years depending on how you can. His positions You know power the pen right. All the astor's had assigned the The govern- starring so if you're gonna work as a senior executive in the national weather service you're gonna sign which man that everybody knew how you know. We were acting together. How we were planning and we to do runs. It's really more people really bought into it and one of the things. We update that governance document based on weaknesses. So it isn't like you signing it and say well. I'm not sure this is gonna work okay. Well we'll keep track of things that aren't working well update so all version four point. Oh it's sort of like a computer code for one of the big computers. Find out that it's not working. As all the researchers in model developers thought it has to be adjusted to version two and then university threat. Well we're on version four point. Oh this was. This was critical. Okay so that was. Step one in sort of in parallel. Was the weather station where we came to the realization in two thousand eleven to a weather season was sort of the epiphany for us that the modernization is great as it was. That's accessible wasn't bringing in the new technology degreed meteorologist etc etc a new structure. You know especially with next ride you know being centerpiece for our warning systems. A new structure of the forecast. We did a great job in forecasting out looking forecasting watching and learning all these severe weather outbreaks and incredible number of people were dying equivalent to what we saw. Nineteen seventy four. Two thousand eleven April outbreak was almost equivalent to the one thousand nine hundred ninety. Four outbreak That's a famous Severe weather outbreak in the central part of the country. Almost the exact same number of people died into a three hundred sixteen and one hundred fourteen. What's missing the last mile addressing. The connection to the people who actually in the communities evacuating communities on hurricanes preparing communities from severe weather outbreak. Actually we had to connect with water resource managers for droughts floods etc so that any nation strategic plan which was developed when jane lubchenco came in jank as was the weather so i was tactically the head of strategic team. Okay so get. Another team gets together with field. People the union vice president People from mensa really solid And the idea was With weather ready nation from the one person who was not a meteorologist by the way came up with weather nation as an outcome for society right. Not hey help good as the front going to be forecasted now how is it going to affect society so you have to go the last one it becomes the service aspect models a great observations. Great you need you need. The allergy need the models..

dr marshall dr luigi cellini national weather service kademi public administration university of georgia astor congress Kelly jank jane lubchenco
"50 year" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"50 year" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Be the career highlights and i got the weather service jobs. One of the most exciting projects going on at the weather channel right now. Is something called immersive mixed reality. Yes i am are and if you don't know what it is. That's one of the reasons. We're doing this podcast today because you probably have seen if you watch the weather channel. So let's start at the beginning. Where do decision come from to go in the direction and why. Yeah so it really started you know what first of all as a weather producer Been weather producer for almost twenty years. dating myself. A little bit there but You know growing up in telling whether stories we we had these weather graphics. Applications that allowed us to graphics together present them to the to the audience In the background. I've always watched these video games and Seeing the incredible power these video games. And i always in the back of my head imagined. What could we do with that. And a lot of other folks here at the weather channel thought the same thing and then about a five or six years ago. New technology camera tracking capability came out and that allowed us to Augment the graphics into our studio space what we basic a are and what camera tracking capability allows us to do is place the graphic into the studio then track track. That graphic as if the graphic was really there so now we're able to put graphics into the studio space when it or not really there so this is.

the weather channel
"50 year" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

07:48 min | 1 year ago

"50 year" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"That was your first real taste of operational side right. Oh yeah oh yeah and i. Bill bonner unfortunately passed away. Several years ago. I've been in communications with mcpherson and would stole even like last night and i still ask them what were the he's making. They hired me. I really wanted to do it. And i'd spend time on the floors and visiting scientists but They took a chance with me And certainly Made a point of Emphasize into the folks on floor. When i became the division chief that i was there for them. and Boy you know that floor needed it because there was no there was it was all analog techniques it was all you know copying paper. There was no unix. There were just. They were just starting to play around with some workstations. It was It was the old days. Okay and Look where they are this. What's the weather prediction center now. Okay so yeah just just an amazing story and i think lessons learned for some of you that i know listen. The weather geeks in net one thing that we said is how his research career you know progressed into different areas in also how he stepped out of a comfort zone perhaps research at nasa inches or more of an operational environment. So what a transition out of your national weather service career in thinking really more about your time as the director of the national weather service give so much. The weather ready nation obviously is a big part of your legacy. Would you consider your biggest national weather. Service director legacy. Are there others well. You always skipped over fourteen years. The answer sounds good tour to fill in that gap. Because i think it is relevant to your experience becoming a national weather service director. So you think. That's where. I probably i became aware of you. Actually as the as determine set so tell us about those years. Yeah i olympic about it. Because i was actually what i was in. Mo leading mld mcpherson. Who had that job before me and then hired me into their became. The mc director. He he had to strategic vision for up but we had to put together so we put together a team. And i was the head of that team so the whole team that put together as as we know that now with but without space weather space weather came on board in two thousand five when i was in but you know putting that all together He he put that team that i was put in charge of a really did a phenomenal job again. You know this whole idea of team right a in something. I learned at nasa. You gotta have the team to make things to make things were while. Didn't know that. I would someday be the head of an sep what i came back. Nineteen ninety nine Kelly was actually selected to be the the head of Ends up replacing ron. You know there's a of work to do. And one of the things was we had a we. We were frozen computerized for ten years. in the ninety s where we even as the what was now. The environmental modeling center was really moving. Things forward from resolution The global models the regional models that we were that were being developed. Couldn't get him on the computer. So finally you know ninety nine. As i was coming on board we were just getting the first ibm system. Parallel processing with the first operational center in the world to go to parallel process. If there was a risk but there was a reward you know and we will leasing. Computers not owning. So we'd have more flexibility in building up the space so all that started happening Ninety eight ninety nine timeframe and with that new computer. Something very important happened. Was we decided. Based on scientific experiments right. Same ex- experiment in the midwest. The thought experiment globally. Which i was involved with through the wmo insolvable model and multi model and sambas is the best way to go so we introduced a sheriff and we introduced the digests global forecast system and then the on the north american idol. Because we were in partnership with canada through packs working real time so the realization of multi model and samples really hit and. That's we make that strategic decision to go that way and build our modeling capabilities that way than we did this. Climate forecast system and operational climate forecast system for seasonal prediction. Working with the research community. Have a six member multi model insolvable. Lynette so i can ted. We were the first operational center. Have a seamless suite of multi model samples from the short range to the to the seasonal range. And that's what we run today. Now we've got optimize it. We've got to streamline it through the unified forecast system in light but that was a major effort and the building. i don't know you have. Did you ever get to go to the world weather building. Did louis i. Actually i feel like actually maybe talk to run there before you came in as a grad student. Okay well that was not a building that you wanted to build the national centers violent prediction and say impressive from officials dead. And you know it's just a mess actually and people trying to get out out of it. They tried to get a project where we could move nearer. So when i came on board made top priority was to get out of. That building took thirteen years but we got out. We got into a beautiful building that matches the mission of what we do with the collaborative now collaborative service centers. The emc nasdaq days. Away are all in the same building working together. Great conference center. International meetings have been held there before kovin so it became an environment that people wanted to come to work in and it forced at the collaboration within the building. Okay not you walk in an elevator. Ten feet into a building. Tempe elvin you disappeared in your office. The whole day. It's a wide open atrium and on people interact better. And it's it's really terrific. And i'm really looking forward to the post. Covert era when everybody can get back in there. I was there yesterday. It stalled strikes me really beautiful environment to get the work so from that perspective. That you know. The seamless sweet the collaborative nature of the fork other senators and and the building itself was what i thought would be the career highlights and i got the weather service jobs. One of the most exciting projects going on at the weather channel right now. Is something called immersive mixed reality. Yes i am are and if you don't know what it is. That's one of.

mld mcpherson Bill bonner nasa environmental modeling center mcpherson national weather service olympic Kelly ron ibm midwest Lynette Great conference center ted canada louis emc Tempe the weather channel
"50 year" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

06:34 min | 1 year ago

"50 year" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Him. Louis thank you for joining us on this well. I don't want to say perhaps last episode of well weather geeks with us national as a guest but perhaps as the national weather service director while what what an amazing career what. What got you to this point that you decided it was time to hanging up. Well our been Been doing this for fifty plus years As a research meteorologist versus a student that got involved in activities even as an undergraduate and and worked on My first paper was on the gravity lever. I i did that as a bachelors and master's thesis and i've been on the go ever since doing a phd getting involved with national programs a student And then going to nasa and building a research career. There of course being at the university of wisconsin and getting all my degrees there before i went to nasa able to work a with verne sumi in his his team on what was then the new satellite you know era that was emerging out of that institute And it's just been non stop and at the same time you know and my wife and at the university of wisconsin She's been there a step of the way. We just celebrated our fiftieth anniversary. And we realized you know it. It's time right so anyway It's it's a tough decision i can. I can tell you. I can forewarn you. It's it's the toughest decision to make. Actually make your body. Where i'm i'm sitting here juicer. You you've done so much for the enterprise and infirm nolan. Whether i don't even know where to sort of dive on this. But i want to start the question with you. I mean what what are you. Let's let's let's go back to your research contributions first before i go with the national weather service. What do you feel is your most significant contribution from your research reviving people know your weather. Career majority esteemed researcher your book with paul coast on winter. Storms is just one of the the go-to resources so from a research perspective. And i and. I know this is not a swansong for you. But what are you reflect. That is your most important contribution research wise. Well i was. I was obviously always curious about the weather. Ackerman child in the wise. You know. I wanted to know why things happening. And of course. I was always interested in wife forecasts for wrong as a kid especially when forecasting snow. We got rain But in all seriousness. I was just to the university of wisconsin. I was Elated with what. I was learning about something. I always wanted to know more about and so there was gravity. Waves i just. What are these this periodic nature in the convective storms and then that led to gravity papers. That at the time was was very controversial. Now now it's except the two to four hour. Gravity waves foreign supposed to be able to exist right much less you know affect the development of Severe weather and then the jets. The jet streaks I read a little book. I got out of out of a supermarket by elmore writer. They had the series. The science on jet streams. Right that i should spend. This is what i wanted to do. And then i started doing the research on jetstream. Cyclones got to nasa. I mean in start working for joins simpson after working for getting my masters unto charlie anderson who let loose on average lady. Shimano is grandpa. Had nothing to do with it and then went work for joe and At at nasa. I i just fell like From going from don johnson as my phd adviser to john and it was like a dream from a research perspective. Just being allowed to work things we saw as important and and do it as a team. That was the other thing about. You know going to nasa. Was their team approach. You saw it. Every day missions engineering and in the science in having a team and having a kadri of people that you know you're recruiting to come in. Just you know the best and the brightest coming out of the university at the time and just everybody and it was just. This is terrific experience and just everything we touched seem the work. The president's day storm Became the vase. Demonstration scientists the vizor atmospheric silence the first geostationary. Sound actually up to this point. It's the only geostationary sounder from the united states. At least and doing work with that you know working with sounding scientists that a brilliant and split windows. So you know i. It was just one thing after another that we touched worked for us in more for me and Certainly i used everything. I was learning during that period to bring over to the weather service. When i made that switch because i also wanted to improve the forecast which over time eighty nine. Yeah so i got my phd. In seventy seven one year post are under don johnson. A post doc with burn sumi and Sec signed a space signs. An engineering center and over the nasa for almost eleven years Most of it working with joanne simpson. And and the group she allowed us allowed me to develop Under her and then took that went over to the meteorological operations division. The largest forecast office in the national weather service. Bill bonner and ron mcpherson hired me. And i didn't have one day. Experience forecast for now is gonna point on that because that's interesting right into the operationally in from based on what i know about you..

nasa university of wisconsin national weather service verne sumi paul coast charlie anderson Louis nolan Ackerman don johnson elmore jets simpson joe burn sumi john joanne simpson united states meteorological operations divi Sec
"50 year" Discussed on The Bible Recap

The Bible Recap

07:08 min | 1 year ago

"50 year" Discussed on The Bible Recap

"Today we read about god's judgment on several more enemy nations and cities. We probably won't remember all of them and some you may not even recognize. That's okay chapter. Forty nine is like a destruction charcuterie board. It's got a lot going on. We start out with amman. as in the ammonites if you're familiar with the modern day city of amman jordan then you have an idea of where these people are located there. Israel's neighbors to the east. God says he will drive them out of their land but like we saw with moab yesterday he also promises that they will experience restoration afterward. And i'll be honest. I have no idea why. I read eleven commentaries about this and none of them gave a reason for it. Mostly they either said oh. Hey he did that for moab to or they basically said wow god is merciful to his enemies so maybe this is just to display his mercy. Who knows then we move onto judgment against him. These people are the descendants of e saw. You may recall that. E saw is the older twin brother of jacob israel who was the father of the twelve tribes esau and jacob israel have been enemies since they were in the womb together god promises judgment and destruction for the estimates too but he adds an interesting caveat in verse eleven. He says he will be the one to take care of their orphans and widows in verse twelve. There's a prophecy that could have two layers. It says if those who did not deserve to drink the cup must drink it. Will you go unpunished at the time. This meant that there were people who suffered through the effects of god's judgment who had been faithful to him. The remnant of israel still had to be driven out of their land as a result of the sins of those who were destroyed sin has consequences that reach far beyond. Just the person who is disobedient. No one sends in a vacuum so god is basically saying to them. Look if the remnant of my people have had to endure exile and destruction because of sin and rebellion. Then you're definitely not getting off the hook because you're not even my people. The second potential layer of prophecy is that this could be pointing to christ. He had to drink the cup. He didn't deserve to drink three times. He asked the father if there was any other way and three times. The father said no. Jesus drank the cup of the father's wrath toward the sins of his people. He paid for those sins. But these people who don't know god are having to pay for their own sins. He says his cup is filled to the brim for them. Next up. is damascus a city in modern day syria. Which is north of israel. He promises to burn it with fire. I also think it's interesting that the phrases got associates with his enemies and their circumstances are the opposite of what he associates with his kids. God's people will not be afraid because he's with him but for his enemies. He says things like they melt in fear they are troubled like the see. That cannot be quiet. Panic seized her anguish and sorrows have taken hold of her. While god's people experience his presence to bless his enemies don't experience his absence. They experience his presence to judge then. We have qatar and heyzer both of which are cities in northern arabia. I had to let these up. They've managed to avoid a lot of drama other nations experienced. In fact things are so low key for them that they don't even have city gates so they're probably super vulnerable but probably don't even realize it and king nebi will come in and take advantage of that for his gain and for their destruction qatar in hazoor or like our friends from a small town who bragged that they never have to lock their doors. And like you big city folks but then they get robbed our last judgment in chapter forty nine is on ilam and once again they're an enemy nation he promises to restore and once again. I have no idea why from my vantage point. It seems to be arbitrary. But from god's vantage point perhaps he's just choosing who he wants to be merciful to. Jesus said something kind of like this in matthew five forty five. He said the rain falls on the just and on the unjust in modern language. That sounds like you saying bad. Things happen to everyone. But an ancient language rain was a blessing so jesus was actually saying that god sends out some of his blessings on all mankind like common grace and nations like amman and ilam get caught up in the current of his kindness. Then we moved to the judgment of babylon in chapter fifty after god uses babylon to punish israel and judah then he judges babylon and lays it to waste. He says it will be the last of the nation's which kind of sounds like it will be the final survivor. But what that actually means is that it will be the least prominent in position. It will be the bottom tier. When god destroys babylon it will also end the captivity of his people who were there. How very efficient. Then the remnant from among israel and judah will return to zion with hearts that love god and that remember and rejoice in the everlasting covenant. He made with them. What was your god shot from. Today's reading mine was in fifty twenty. It says in those days and in that time declares the lord iniquity shall be sought in israel and there shall be none and sin judah and none shall be found for. I will part in those whom i leave as a remnant. This says a lot more about god than it does about people got isn't saying his people will be senlis. He saying that their sins will be pardoned. The very act of pardoning suggests that there has been sin. God people do sin but wing. God looks at his kids. It doesn't point to our sin. He points to a righteousness which is as we know the righteousness of christ christ's death on the cross made atonement for our sins and because he paid the penalty we received the pardon. he's where the righteousness is and he's where the joy is those of you who aren't familiar with patriot on i'll fill on what it is we live in a world where most quote unquote free. Content is paid for by ads. Patriarchs works to find a way around that it's a website and an app where content creators like us who want to offer ad- free content can still keep the lights on. But it doesn't just support us. It's mutually beneficial. It offers commitment levels where listeners can get content based on their level of medley support so in the end it's a blessing to the content creators helping them cover their cost. And hopefully it's a blessing to the supporters who especially value that content. We want to provide you with such great content for free that intern. You might consider supporting us financially so you can get more of the content you love. It's easy to set up an account. And you can unsubscribe or change your commitment level at any time to find out more about the tears we offer visit the bible. Recap dot com. And by the way you aren't restricted to what we've invented you can even invite your own tier so check out our patriots today at the bible. Recap dot com the bible recap is brought to you by du discipleship bible study groups that meet in homes and churches around the world each week..

amman israel ilam jacob israel heyzer king nebi hazoor qatar esau jordan damascus judah syria jesus arabia gates matthew patriots du
"50 year" Discussed on JOHN16AND12.COM

JOHN16AND12.COM

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"50 year" Discussed on JOHN16AND12.COM

"And that's why as i told you that that had no one i was by myself. I don't look on. Don't like that you the whole time. Have you make me be on my own. You'll have closed store for me for me to be a so lonely as you were. Were i live to in the hospital. And that's not nice that you have kept me to be on my own. it's eighty sue. That have stopped me from have friends and have a family that have done that. So what are you going to do now. Are you going to be the same that you've stopped me from everything that you want to stay lonely alone not to have any friends heaven family. Nothing not to have my grandkids. So that what. I was thinking that you should come through that. I knew that this was in the hospital. But i was thinking that that postseason that come down here and see in my share that this person with that kind of anger you'll show me that it should be not something positive. I was hoping it should be a positive thing that you that you could. Take away your anger against me when you come here down. Nyayo is god's mercy on you. Because i have some time left here on earth and so there is still time to to repair what you have done the time you can repair..

"50 year" Discussed on Ron Paul Liberty Report

Ron Paul Liberty Report

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"50 year" Discussed on Ron Paul Liberty Report

"And it doesn't work. There's hysterics in the market. They tried that. In in the fall of two thousand nineteen and overnights rate shot up to ten percent so they had to back off when i made a feeble attempt to shrink the balance sheet so they have really no tools other than their gabbing and convincing people and the markets respond pretty well because when when the fed announces policy. You know the the banks are happy and the stock market. Seems to be happy no matter what you do But that just means to me that the The system now tolerates a bigger bubble than ever before probably bigger than ever seen in all history. So chris we do have a bunch of people who thinks that it's transitory but more and more now real they they you know they know that is just a lot of market that this is transitory. This is impossible to solve without some real real solutions which means that there will be a penalty for it. And why one thing that i try to. Emphasize is that any individual company corporation country. Or whatever if you live way on your means you will be forced eventually to live beneath your means and that is known in individuals that if they get too much debt and the bank loan them anymore money again eventually their standard of living goes down and you say well no with a fair. They keep earning money. Yes they will do that and they'll get away with it and sell them. We'll be able to get more in their favor but he eventually the telltale sign of this thing Not working so well. Anymore is the cost of living goes up and the value of the money goes down Chris i think we're entering an era now is going to get much much worse before the people and our our so called leadership in washington wake up and decide maybe maybe there is an answer. It's not found in keynesian. Inflation them very good doctor pool. And you are correct. Inflation is transitory in the same way. That fifteen days will flatten curve So you can think of it that way and you know even though they are bankers members of the fed You could treat them like politicians what they say makes headlines every week but it means very little i mean think of all the bubbles that you may have lived through and the longer one has been here. The more bubbles. I know i've been through my share of them. All the bubbles and busts at the fed creates think back of how many times the fed chairman went on tv. And said you know what you should really salman valve. Now's the time for yourself. Never and how many times have you heard say yeah. I was watching the fed chairman the other day and i took his word to now and financially independent again. You will never hear that because the fed is not our financial adviser. It is a marriage of the banking industry and the government. So it's the same old story of corporations married to the government. We have the pharma. We have the military. We have the media but the fed is the worst of them all because they make all the others possible. You know the fed is not there for us. They are they what they do..

fed chris Chris washington