10 Burst results for "50 Million Students"

"50 million students" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"50 million students" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Out. All right, so coarse. He went to remote learning back in March for kids all over the place of schools closed down, took a look at this over the course of the summer to see how well kids fared on average school districts. Close campuses back in March. And about 50 million students Kindergarten through 12th grade. I had to get used to using technology from home. That was obviously if they had it. And the problems you know they were expected, and they popped up immediately. There were kids without computers or didn't have Internet access your teachers that had no experience in remote learning. A lot of parents were not available to help. And in a lot of places, kids, you just didn't show up online. And administrators have no good way to find out. Why not? I know you mention this before One school district around here. They estimated about 60% of the students were online any given day, so that's a 40% absentee rate. A lot of district just weren't requiring students to do any work at all. And they're going to be big gaps in the learning. And they kind of figured what those gaps would be. And they figure that Relative to a typical school year. Students learned about 70%. What they needed to learn in reading relative to a typical school year, so reading off about 30% and 50% in math. So whatever Grade your kid or kids were in They learned about half of what they should have learned in math. In the course of Last school year. So you're starting the next school year? Obviously, behind that some schools, I guess we'll work to try to get people up to speed. Others probably won't Then you have a greater learning loss for minority low income neighborhoods where they have less access to technology and and other issues. So see, even though kids are pretty tech savvy when it comes to communicating with each other on the phone playing games on the phone or computer, they're not necessarily Satti when it comes to learning online. And then parents. I mean, those who are home and can't help out get pretty frustrated because it's difficult to do. A lot of parents aren't there to make sure the kids are doing the work in the first place? Another problem is the teachers who don't have any background in remote learning. And in some cases, even if you d'oh, there's not a lot they can accomplish. One example. It's ah. Teacher who's a Spanish teacher, she said in her classes, she has kids who are fluent. Because they're from south of the border. And kids who are non fluency in a classroom. I could look around and see the body language and know when some of my students who are not fluent needs to switch to English. I can't do that online. I can't see them. Because you need the interaction of the kid's face to face. It doesn't actually work online. Yeah, The number of kids you just don't have access to devices is Sad, but it's a large number. So the bottom line is, they say, say the report card was in and it didn't work. But in many cases, we're trying it again, in some cases on a full time basis, in some cases on a part time basis. Kids go to school for two days a week and then learn online the rest of the time. If they possibly can. And I saw this story the other day, And I guess this picture popped up somewhere online. Two little girls. California I think it wass. They didn't have Internet at home. So we showed them sitting on a curb outside of a Taco bell doing their homework because they could pick up the WiFi for free from the Taco Bell. I guess the photo went viral and people started donating. To these kids. And they brought in $130,000. Go fund me. Which means I don't know what they plan to do with 130 thought, but that gets you a lot of y fly there people out there who are willing to help out in situations like this. The bottom line. Is that online learning unless you have a very studious kid, or you are there to ride them and make sure they're doing their work. They don't get most of the work done again. Math on average 50% which means some of them are 10. Some of them are 90. In rare cases, you'll find someone who's there. 100%. But it is and not just for academic reasons for socialization reasons. It's important to get kids back into school. There's a lot more to going to school, then. You know, simply. Reading, writing rithmetic..

Taco Bell California
"50 million students" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

08:14 min | 1 year ago

"50 million students" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Department of Health reported another 5000 for 109 cases on Wednesday, bringing the state's total number of cases above 500,000. The milestone comes as lawyers representing the state's largest teachers union were in court Wednesday as they're asking a judge to block an order from the Florida Department of Education requiring all schools to re open in person classes at least five days a week. And as the FDA is, lawsuit is continuing to be considered. There actually is a hearing they should be underway right now, Starting at 11 o'clock the state had asked for a change of venue from the Miami Dade Circuit Court to Leon County were state cases are typically heard. Will see where that goes. There was no determination made off of yesterday's initial hearing, which took place one o'clock in the afternoon. We'll continue to bring you all the developments with that situation now on topics speaking about the schools were joined by Broward County School Superintendent Robert Run. See You may pull him at Robert W. Runcie on Twitter at Broward schools on Twitter. Superintendent. Run, See? How are you doing? Not too bad, Brian yourself all these considered pretty well as Superintendent. I understand that you have been petitioned to participate in a congressional select subcommittee on the Corona virus and education coming up at two o'clock this afternoon. Tell us a little bit about what this is concerning. Well, it's it's a focus on how the corona viruses impacted our public school systems and to make the case for federal support. To be able to address the many needs and challenges that we're confronted with. So there's there's been a proposal by school district and many organizations around the country for about 200 billion in stimulus funding to be able to help with the recovery process. In our problem schools that serve over 50 million students across the country, those dollars would be used to cover A substantial shortfall in state and local revenue collections. I can tell you in Florida Moody Analytics data an assessment a few months ago on they're estimating that the state could see a 25% reduction in collections and obviously, that's going to trickle down to the school district. We also need to continue to see our students and families. The family side of that is not reimbursed. We served about 2.5 1,000,000 meals we close. We need to continue to support remote learning all the technology that's required for that, including high speed Internet and then finally, all of the protocols that we have around open safety. Right. So that's the pp the materials. Ah, the equipment for enhanced cleaning, a sanitation sold. A lot of resources are needed to be ableto meet the needs so we can safely open up our schools. Get back to some sense of normalcy allowed parents to get back on normal work schedules on get our economy moving aside best as we can, and the schools are central To that. Ah, happening, So I just want to go and try to make a strong case for that today. Understood and superintendent related to the topic that you are mentioning, including funds and like Heard from AA lot of AA lot of homeowners in particular that it concerned about their property taxes, concerned about hanging on to their homes and also, you know pain, ultimately, for in classroom education that's not being provided. Is there any consideration? For potential cost savings going in the form of a tax break for homeowners. Well, let me just tell you this, and I don't have the numbers in in front of me. But I can assure the taxpayers in Broward County if they would have look at their property tax bills going back all the way to 2012 13. They're actually paying less. Today than they were back then. So we have certainly been doing quite a bit to contain the cause of ah of education for homeward, But let me just say this that Yes, The campuses are close, but education and learning still continues. We still have teachers who were delivering services students. We have social workers. I can tell you today. Since the shutdown, they've had over 35 vowels of the pearls and have done about 160,000 intervention. So everybody still working to deliver services to the best of our ability. Notwithstanding the fact that the clothes, food service workers they're still going to be. There are kids and families need meals. So where we need to continue to maintain this district and absolutely be ready and prepared to pivot from online learning, Tio hybrid and full time a CZ quickly as we can once condition's improved We're speaking with our school Superintendent Robert Runcie and Super didn't have a couple questions here came in from listeners 1st 1 as a school teacher and a mom of students have a question for the superintendent. Why not allow the 50% of families that one Face to face school to go, while the other 50% to virtual Well, that that is the plan in the hybrid model, and when we open up vibrate, we believe that we can accommodate every you know most. I can't everyone but in most cases, folks that want to go full time five days a week with those that want to go hybrid and those that want to stay home. You know, we have about 89,000 students in our county school that have chronic health conditions, and they all existed prior to Kobe. That includes everything from asthma, diabetes, hypertension conditions, you name it, I will say the other piece of it, though. This is not just about sending your kids to school. We have about 30,000 employees in the district. 15,000 of them are teachers. Um and you know, we have to make sure that we're doing what we can to make sure that they're not Adversely impacted, get ill bring illnesses home to their families as well. So this is a community wide issue, and we can't just necessarily think about our individual circumstance because there's a lot of folks that can be impacted by any decision. We make toe open schools and if the conditions aren't there to be able to do that. Right now, Our positivity rate in Broward County exceeds 10%. And there were times was as high as 20% of the American Academy of Pediatrics, for example, represent the Florida chapter actually represents about 2600 pediatricians. They wrote a letter to the governor indicating that with infection rates this high It is absolutely imprudent and not safe to fully open schools. So we're goingto continue do the best that we can in this situation we spent this summer. Working very hard to train our teachers on DH provide them the opportunity to develop their skills so that we're ready for online learning, which is going to be here with us for a while, even as we still even if we opened, we know there's still some students are going to be there, but that experience is going to be substantially different. Teacher there train. It's going to be live video. Ah, ah, faith, faith instruction online that that's going to be a big change We're gonna offer AM and PM session. So that families that have to work or have other obligations that they could be there for their kids, especially our youngest, Leonard. So we're gonna have the morning session available from eight to like to an evening. I'll go from 2 to 8 30 same content, saying Qualified teachers were so we're offering that at the secondary level, we're goingto have academic support. After school hours from 3 to 8 or nine o'clock where you'll have be ableto talk with a A teacher on one of our core subject areas get academics afford..

Superintendent school district Broward County Robert W. Runcie Broward County School Florida Department of Educatio Department of Health Twitter Miami Dade Circuit Court Leon County FDA Robert Run Florida Moody Analytics Brian American Academy of Pediatrics school teacher Leonard Florida
"50 million students" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"50 million students" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Just not everybody's practicing common sense. 30 counties in the state are under the new rules announced yesterday. All bars, winery, zoos, museums and family entertainment center such as Bowling alleys and arcades are now closed again in the entire state. Lawyers for some churches in Riverside County say the governor's order against indoor church services will interfere with vital services. Advocates for faith and freedom, says many churches and synagogues. Will be forced to end their support groups, counseling and humanitarian relief. The lawyers say. The community has a mental health crisis that is just as significant as Cove it 19 The head of the school district has called on the feds to doom or to get kids back in the classroom. We all know the best place for students to learn is in a school setting. But Superintendent Awesome, pewter says it's not a simple is clicking his heels together and wishing students back to their desks. He says the feds need to help fund testing and contact tracing its schools across the country, the cost of testing all its schools. Maybe $15 billion will help make it safer for all 50 million students and their teachers in public schools across the country. You nurse says the lack of testing and tracing are among the reasons Ellie USD students won't be on campus for the new academic year next month. There may be a lifelong impact if they're not back in school. Sometimes who Chris and Carl Okay, fine news. The Orange County Board of Education has agreed with a local panel of experts who called online learning an utter failure. Board member, Dr Ken Williams says the board adopted the panel's recommendations to reopen schools without masks or social distancing mass really don't prevent infection in this age group and then social distancing may or may not be of value in this age group and may not be pragmatically reasonable. Williams says kids are unlikely to stay six feet apart while playing, he says school districts in O. C don't have to follow the recommendations, but parents should be allowed to take their kids somewhere else if a district decides to keep campus is closed. News brought to you by cunning dental group, A man from Long Beach who pleaded guilty to helping Still, actress Demi Moore's identity is due for sentencing any minute now, he admitted to helping with a nearly $170,000 shopping spree, using more stolen, no limit American Express black Card. The leader of the scheme is already serving nearly six years in federal prison. He posed as more's assistant so he could pick up a FedEx package containing a replacement credit card he had reported the original missing One of the men who used to bust myths is now a memory..

Dr Ken Williams Riverside County Orange County Board of Educati FedEx Superintendent USD Demi Moore Long Beach Still Carl Okay Chris
"50 million students" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"50 million students" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"No doubt California can turn this recent surge around as always. I want to remind you Limit your mixing with people outside your household. It's just common sense. But the data suggests not everybody's practicing common sense. 30 counties in the state are under new rules announced yesterday. All bars, line rings, zoos, museums and family entertainment centers like bowling alleys and arcades are now closed again in the entire state. Lawyers for some churches in Riverside County say the governor's order against indoor church services will interfere with vital services Advocates for faith and freedom, say many churches and synagogues. We'll be forced to end their support groups, counseling and humanitarian relief. The lawyers say. The community has a mental health crisis that is just a significant as Cove in 19 The head of L. A school district is called on the feds to doom or to get kids back in the classroom. We all know the best place for students to learn is in a school setting. But superintendent Awesome, Pewter says it's not a simple is clicking his heels together and wishing students back to their desks. He says the feds need to help fund testing in contact, tracing its schools across the country, the cost of testing all its schools, maybe $15 billion. I'll help make it safer for all 50 million students and their teachers in public schools across the country. You nurse says the lack of testing and tracing are among the reasons Ella USD students won't be on campus for the new academic year next month. There may be a lifelong impact if they're not back in school. Sometimes who Chris and Carl Okay. Fine news. The Orange County Board of Education has agreed with the local panel of experts who called online learning an utter failure. Board member, Dr Ken Williams says the board adopted the panel's recommendations to reopen schools without masks or so Shal distancing Mass really don't prevent infection in this age group and then social distancing may or may not be of value in this age group and may not be pragmatically reasonable, Williams says. Kids are unlikely to stay six feet apart while playing, he says. School District's anos e don't have to follow the recommendations, but parents should be allowed. To take their kids somewhere else. If a district decides to keep campus is closed, Ella's Pandemic Rent assistance program has received more than 150,000 applications in the first day. The application period runs through Friday. About 50,000 applicants will be chosen at random to.

Dr Ken Williams Pewter L. A school district School District Riverside County California Orange County Board of Educati superintendent USD Carl Okay Chris
"50 million students" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"50 million students" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Both five. We'll talk with ABC scare in Travers. I have a very good relationship with Dr Fauci. That's what the president told reporters yesterday. He called Valachi a very nice person, but says he doesn't always agree with him. This comes after that document. We talked about yesterday that was leaked to several media outlets that pointed out comments made by Dr Fauci at the start of the pandemic. Those comments did change over time. But we'll talk about how the White House is defending that leaked document. We'll get more from Karen in just a moment. But let's start with some of the stories coming out of the 24 hour newsroom, nail and hair salons. Jim's churches and indoor malls in every county in southern California are shut down again because of the statistics on Cove in 19 cases that have been going in the wrong direction. Governor Newsome says he has no doubt California can turn this recent surge around as always. I wanna remind you limit your mixing with people outside your household. It's just common sense. But the data suggests not everybody's practicing common sense. 30 counties in the state are under the new rules announced yesterday. All bars, wineries, zoos, museums and family entertainment centers like bowling alleys and arcades are now closed again in the entire state. Now, lawyers for some churches in Riverside County say the governor's order against indoor church services will interfere with vital services advocates for a faith and freedoms they many churches and synagogues. I'll be forced to end their support groups, counseling and humanitarian relief. The lawyer says. The community has a mental health crisis that is just as significant as Cove in 19 Well, the head of the school district has called on the feds to do more to get kids back into the classroom. We all know the best place for students to learn is in a school setting. But Superintendent Awesome, Pewter says it's not a simple is clicking his heels together and wishing students back to their desks. He says the feds need to help fund testing in contact, tracing its schools across the country, the cost of testing all its schools, maybe $15 billion. I'll help make it safer for all 50 million students and their teachers in public schools across the country. You nurse says the lack of testing and tracing are among the reasons Ella USD students won't be on campus for the new academic year next month. There may be a lifelong impact if they're not back in school, sometimes Christine Carle, Okay, if I knew that the situation is quite different if your kids are in Orange County, the OSI Board of Education has recommended. That schools reopen with no masks, social distancing or reduced class sizes. The contagious nature of this is lower for Children than for adults. Board member Dr Ken Williams says the recommendations come from a local panel of experts who called online learning an utter failure. We need hope in schools to get back to normal for these kids, he says. It isn't logical to believe kids will wear face coverings or stay six feet apart to stop kids from playing too square or playing tag or kickball. Williams says Each district can decide its own reopening guidelines. But if online learning is chosen, parents should be allowed to send their Children to another district or charter school in Orange County. Corbin Carson, CAF I news Ella's Pandemic assistance program that has gotten more than 150,000 applications in just the first day. The application period runs through Friday. About 50,000 applicants will be chosen at random to receive their share of $103 million out pay for rent. Maximum benefit per household is $2000 paid directly to the landlord. Most of the funding came from the federal Cares Act stimulus package. Well. People who live or work in Irvine have taken all the available Cove in 19 testing appointments for the 1st 2 days at a free new testing site. City spokeswoman Melissa Haley says the city is hoping to quickly expand the month long project. The city really.

Dr Fauci Dr Ken Williams Orange County California ABC Pewter Christine Carle Riverside County Governor Newsome president Travers White House Melissa Haley Karen Irvine Jim Superintendent
"50 million students" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:32 min | 1 year ago

"50 million students" Discussed on KCRW

"K. C. R W This is all things considered from NPR News. I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles in the wake of ongoing protests for racial justice, Young People in America are demanding change not just from police departments and legislators, but also from classrooms, petitions air circulating all over the country, urging schools to incorporate anti racist education into their curricula. Here's Sterling Hardaway from New Rochelle, New York, You can't develop in exteriors in the world without really educating them on antiracist resource is and how they can be advocates for this change to better understand what an anti racist education means this week we're taking a look at the American public school system from inside. And outside the classroom back in 1950 for the Supreme Court ruled in Brown V. Board of Education that racial segregation in schools was unconstitutional. But many would say that segregation in American schools is still very much a reality. Today. Rebecca Servilia is one of those people she founded. The nonprofit ed build to better understand how schools in America are funded and she joins us now. Welcome. It's great to be here. Your team found that predominantly white schools get $23 billion a year more than predominantly non white schools. So Can you just help us understand what actually happened after Brown was decided? Why are we still seeing segregation among schools and why our resource is not getting distributed equally? Still, in 1974 there was a really important court case that ultimately had the effect of in essence, reversing a lot of the impact of Brown. That case was Millikan V. Bradley, and what the Supreme Court rule was that if there's a school district line that's drawn anywhere for really any reason. That desegregation doesn't have to cross that border. And so what it did is it entrenched the power of the school district border in desegregation efforts that created a system a very fractured communities. And as a result, a very fractured education funding system. Today. Our school districts are drawn in such a way. Where of about the 50 million students that are enrolled in traditional public school districts on Lee half are enrolled in a school district. That's between 25% white and 25% nonwhite. The other half are enrolled in predominantly white or predominantly nonwhite school districts. And when you get to you 75 85% white or non white Really? Desegregation can't be meaningful E achieved and those kinds of systems in your work With Ed build Over the last five years, you saw a direct link between Racial segregation in schools and the way public education is financed. Can you just explain real quick the basics of how we fund our public schools, so property taxes and locally raise taxes make up about Half of all education funding, and the state then tries to make up the difference between what local communities can raise from very differential tax wealth. And what we find is that even though the states make a valiant efforts to do so, they consistently fall short. So then the question is. How do we reverse this? I mean, what alternative funding models do you think would be more equitable than Simply funneling local taxes into school district's funding education through property taxes is not a bad thing. It's actually a very good thing. Property taxes tend to be the most stable of all of our revenue sources. And that's certainly going to show itself over the next few years where state economies are going to be really hurt by this pandemic. So these borders that have become malleable Because of that Millikan v. Bradley decision don't necessarily need to define where property taxes stay. Just because you're running your own schools and governing your own schools doesn't necessarily mean that you get to keep all of your money. What we've put forward in one of our final at build products. Is the idea that maybe we can actually be bussing dollars across the school district border. Even if we can't bust kids across it. What that would do is it would serve to smooth out these kinds of wealth. Discrepancies that we see coming from a very fractured property tax bases and allow for a much more even start. To our school funding system. And how does evening out the playing field for financing school District's? How does that ultimately? Affect actual education. You think if you can get everybody into a system where the starting point is equal, you start tow level that playing field in terms of representation, which means that the interests of non white students will be heard. More evenly in our advocacy and considered more evenly in the way that we're funding schools. Rebecca Cybil Yah is the founder of Ed Build. Thank you very much for joining us today. Thank you. In New York City businesses Urschel They're reopening and more people are riding the subways. Stephen Nessen of WNYC reports the agency that runs the transit system. Wants to make sure people have easy access to what they need for a safe ride. Latest effort includes vending machines stocked with personal protective equipment at 10 of the busiest stations wearing a mask is required by law. So commuters for gets taken by surgical and cloth masks as well as wipes and a four ounce bottle of hand sanitizer from a company called Yeah, I wonder if I didn't have any wood from 20 year old commuter Latricia Johnson is a nurse assistant. She glances at the big blue vending machine at Atlantic Terminal in Brooklyn and says she knows masks are important and thinks the vending machines were a good move because not everybody that comes to transition has And I, it helps a lot with the Protection Transit Agency estimates that actually, 92% of.

Millikan V. Bradley Supreme Court America New York financing school District Brown NPR News Mary Louise Kelly Brown V. Board of Education Sterling Hardaway New Rochelle Rebecca Servilia Washington Elsa Chang K. C. R Latricia Johnson Los Angeles
"50 million students" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:38 min | 1 year ago

"50 million students" Discussed on KQED Radio

"J f dot org's And from the listeners of San Francisco and we II North Highland Sacramento. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles in the wake of ongoing protests for racial justice, young people in America are demanding change not just from police departments and legislators, but also From classrooms, petitions air circulating all over the country, urging schools to incorporate anti racist education into their curricula. Here's Sterling Hardaway from New Rochelle, New York. You can't develop in exteriors in the world out, really educating them on antiracist researches and how they can be advocates for this change to better understand what an anti racist education means this week we're taking a look at the American public school system from inside. And outside the classroom back in 1950 for the Supreme Court ruled in Brown V. Board of Education that racial segregation in schools was unconstitutional. But many would say that segregation in American schools is still very much a reality. Today. Rebecca Servilia is one of those people she founded. The nonprofit ed build to better understand how schools in America are funded and she joins us now. Welcome. It's great to be here. Your team found that predominantly white schools get $23 billion a year more than predominantly non white schools. So can you just help us understand what actually happened after Brown was decided? Why are we still seeing segregation among schools and why our resource is not getting distributed equally? Still? In 1974. There was a really important court case that ultimately had the effect of in essence, reversing a lot of the impact of Brown. That case was Millikan V. Bradley, and what the Supreme Court rule was that If there's a school district line that's drawn anywhere, for really any reason that desegregation doesn't have Tio cross that border, and so what it did is it entrenched the power of the school district border in desegregation efforts that created a system a very fractured communities. And as a result, a very fractured education funding system. Today our school districts are drawn in such a way. Where Of about the 50 million students that are enrolled in traditional public school district's on Lee. Half are enrolled in a school district. That's between 25% white and 25% nonwhite. The other half are enrolled in predominantly white or predominantly non white school districts. And when you get to you 75 85% white or non white Really? Desegregation can't be meaningful E achieved and those kinds of systems in your work With Ed build Over the last five years, you saw a direct link between Racial segregation in schools and the way public education is financed. Can you just explain real quick the basics of how we fund our public schools, so property taxes and locally various taxes make up about Half of all education funding, and the state then tries to make up the difference between what local communities can raise from very differential tax wealth. And what we find is that even though the states make valiant efforts to do so, they consistently fall short. So then the question is, How do we reverse this? I mean, what alternative funding models do you think would be more equitable than simply funneling local taxes into school district's Funding education through property taxes is not a bad thing. It's actually a very good thing. Property taxes tend to be the most stable of all of our revenue sources. And that's certainly going to show itself over the next few years where state economies are going to be really hurt by this pandemic. So these borders that have become malleable Because of that Millikan v. Bradley decision don't necessarily need to define where property taxes stay. Just because you're running your own schools and governing your own schools doesn't necessarily mean that you get to keep all of your money. What we've put forward in one of our final at build products is the idea that maybe we can actually be bussing dollars across the school district border. Even if we can't bust kids across it. What that would do is it would serve to smooth out these kinds of wealth. Discrepancies that we see coming from. Vari fractured property tax bases and allowed for a much more even start to our school funding system. And how does evening out the playing field for financing school District's? How does that ultimately? Affect actual education. You think if you can get everybody into a system where the starting point is equal, you start tow level that playing field in terms of representation. Which means that the interests of non white students will be heard more evenly in our advocacy and considered more evenly in the way that we're funding schools. Rebecca Cybil Yah is the founder of Build. Thank you very much for joining us today. Thank you. In New York City Businesses air slowly reopening and more people are riding the subways. Stephen Nessen of WNYC reports. The agency that runs the transit system wants to make sure people have easy access to what they need for a safe ride. The latest effort includes vending machines stopped with personal protective equipment at 10 of the busiest stations wearing a mask is required by law of commuters forget taken by surgical and cloth masks as well as wipes and a four ounce bottle of hand sanitizer from a company called Yeah, well, if I didn't have any 20 year old commuter Latricia Johnson is a nurse assistant. She glances at the big blue vending machine at Atlantic Terminal in Brooklyn and says she knows masts are important and thinks the vending machines were a good move, because not everybody that comes to the train station have on Di. It helps a lot with the Protection Transit Agency estimates that actually, 92%.

Millikan V. Bradley Supreme Court Brown America New York financing school District NPR Mary Louise Kelly Brown V. Board of Education Sterling Hardaway New Rochelle San Francisco Rebecca Servilia Washington WNYC Elsa Chang Sacramento
"50 million students" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"50 million students" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles in the wake of ongoing protests for racial justice, young people in America are demanding change not just from police departments and legislators, but also From classrooms, petitions air circulating all over the country, urging schools to incorporate anti racist education into their curricula. Here's Sterling Heart Away from New Rochelle, New York. You can't develop in exteriors in the world without really educating them on antiracist resource is and how they can be advocates for this change to better understand what an anti racist education means. Thiss Week We're taking a look at the American public school system from inside. And outside the classroom back in 1950 for the Supreme Court ruled in Brown V. Board of Education that racial segregation in schools was unconstitutional. But many would say that segregation in American schools is still very much a reality today. Rebecca Servilia is one of those people she founded. The nonprofit ed build to better understand how schools in America are funded, and she joins us now. Welcome. It's great to be here. Your team found that Predominantly white schools get $23 billion a year more than predominantly non white schools. So Can you just help us understand what actually happened after Brown was decided? Why are we still seeing segregation among schools and why our resource is not getting distributed equally still? In 1974 There was a really important court case that ultimately had the effect of in essence, reversing a lot of the impact of brown. That case was Millikan V. Bradley, and what the Supreme Court rule was that if there's a school district line that's drawn anywhere for really any reason. That desegregation doesn't have to cross that border. And so what it did is it entrenched the power of the school district border in desegregation efforts that created a system a very fractured communities. And as a result, a very fractured education funding system. Today. Our school districts are drawn in such a way. Where of about the 50 million students that are enrolled in traditional public school districts on Lee half are enrolled in a school district. That's between 25% white and 25% nonwhite. The other half are enrolled in predominantly white or predominantly non white school districts. And when you get to you 75 85% white or non white Really? Desegregation can't be meaningful E achieved and those kinds of systems in your work With Ed build Over the last five years, you saw a direct link between Racial segregation in schools and the way public education is financed. Can you just explain real quick the basics of how we fund our public schools, so property taxes and locally various taxes make up about Half of all education funding, and the state then tries to make up the difference between what local communities can raise from very differential tax wealth. And what we find is that even though the states make valiant efforts to do so, they consistently fall short. So then the question is, How do we reverse this? I mean, what alternative funding models do you think would be more equitable than simply funneling local taxes into school district's Funding education through property taxes is not a bad thing. It's actually a very good thing. Property taxes tend to be the most stable of all of our revenue sources. And that's certainly going to show itself over the next few years where state economies were going to be really hurt by this pandemic. So these borders that have become malleable Because of that Millikan v. Bradley decision don't necessarily need to define where property taxes stay. Just because you're running your own schools and governing your own schools doesn't necessarily mean that you get to keep all of your money. What we've put forward in one of our final at build products is the idea that maybe we can actually be bussing dollars across the school district border, even if we can't bust kids across it. What that would do is it would serve to smooth out these kinds of wealth. Discrepancies that we see coming from a very fractured property tax bases and allow for a much more even start. To our school funding system. And how does evening out the playing field for financing school District's? How does that ultimately? Affect actual education. You think if you can get everybody into a system where the starting point is equal, you start tow level that playing field in terms of representation. Which means that the interests of non white students will be heard more evenly in our advocacy and considered more evenly in the way that we're funding schools. Rebecca Cybil Yah is the founder of Ed Build. Thank you very much for joining us today. Thank you. In New York City businesses Herschel Reopening and more people are riding the subways. Stephen Nessen of WNYC reports. The agency that runs the transit system wants to make sure people have easy access to what they need.

Millikan V. Bradley Supreme Court America Rebecca Servilia New York financing school District NPR Mary Louise Kelly Brown New Rochelle Elsa Chang Washington Ed Build Brown V. Board of Education WNYC Los Angeles founder
"50 million students" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:31 min | 1 year ago

"50 million students" Discussed on KCRW

"It's 335 This's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles. In the wake of ongoing protests for racial justice, young people in America are demanding change. Not just from police departments and legislators, but also from classrooms. Petitions air circulating all over the country, urging schools to incorporate anti racist education into their curricula. Here's Sterling Hardaway from New Rochelle, New York. You can't develop in exteriors in the world without really educating them on antiracist resource is and how they can be advocates for this change to better understand what an anti racist education means this week we're taking a look at the American public school system from inside. And outside the classroom back in 1950 for the Supreme Court ruled in Brown V. Board of Education that racial segregation in schools was unconstitutional. But many would say that segregation in American schools is still very much a reality. Today. Rebecca Servilia is one of those people she founded. The nonprofit ed build to better understand how schools in America are funded, and she joins us now. Welcome. It's great to be here. Your team found that Predominantly white schools get $23 billion a year more than predominantly non white schools. So Can you just help us understand what actually happened after Brown was decided? Why are we still seeing segregation among schools and why our resource is not getting distributed equally still? In 1974 There was a really important court case that ultimately had the effect of in essence, reversing a lot of the impact of brown. That case was Millikan V. Bradley, and what the Supreme Court rule was that if there's a school district line that's drawn anywhere for really any reason. That desegregation doesn't have to cross that border. And so what it did is it entrenched the power of the school district border in desegregation efforts that created a system a very fractured communities. And as a result, a very fractured education funding system. Today. Our school districts are drawn in such a way. Where of about the 50 million students that are enrolled in traditional public school districts on Lee half are enrolled in a school district. That's between 25% white and 25% nonwhite. The other half are enrolled in predominantly white or predominantly non white school districts. And when you get to you 75 85% white or non white Really? Desegregation can't be meaningful E achieved and those kinds of systems in your work With Ed build Over the last five years, you saw a direct link between Racial segregation in schools and the way public education is financed. Can you just explain real quick the basics of how we fund our public schools, so property taxes and locally various taxes make up about Half of all education funding, and the state then tries to make up the difference between what local communities can raise from very differential tax wealth. And what we find is that even though the states make a valiant efforts to do so, they consistently fall short. So then the question is. How do we reverse this? I mean, what alternative funding models do you think would be more equitable than Simply funneling local taxes into school district's Funding education through property taxes is not a bad thing. It's actually a very good thing. Property taxes tend to be the most stable of all of our revenue sources. And that's certainly going to show itself over the next few years where state economies are going to be really hurt by this pandemic. So these borders that have become malleable Because of that Millikan v. Bradley decision don't necessarily need to define where property taxes stay. Just because you're running your own schools and governing your own schools doesn't necessarily mean that you get to keep all of your money. What we've put forward in one of our final at build products. Is the idea that maybe we can actually be bussing dollars across the school district border. Even if we can't bust kids across it. What that would do is it would serve to smooth out these kinds of wealth. Discrepancies that we see coming from a very fractured property tax bases and allow for a much more even start. To our school funding system. And how does evening out the playing field for financing school District's? How does that ultimately? Affect actual education. You think if you can get everybody into a system where the starting point is equal, you start tow level that playing field in terms of representation, which means that the interests of non white students will be heard. More evenly in our advocacy and considered more evenly in the way that we're funding schools. Rebecca Cybil Yah is the founder of Ed Build. Thank you very much for joining us today. Thank you. In New York City businesses Urschel They're reopening and more people are riding the subways. Stephen Nessen of WNYC reports. The agency that runs the transit system wants to make sure people have easy access to what they need for a safe ride. Latest effort includes vending machines stocked with personal protective equipment at 10 of the busiest stations wearing a mask is required by law. So commuters forget taken by surgical and cloth masks as well as wipes and a four ounce bottle of hand sanitizer from a company called Yeah. What if I didn't have any wood from a 20 year old commuter Latricia Johnson is a nurse assistant. She glances at the big blue vending machine at Atlantic Terminal in Brooklyn and says she knows masks are important and thinks the vending machines were a good move because not everybody that comes to transition has And I, it helps a lot with the Protection Transit Agency estimates that actually, 92%.

Millikan V. Bradley Supreme Court America New York financing school District Brown NPR Mary Louise Kelly Sterling Hardaway Los Angeles New Rochelle Rebecca Servilia Washington Elsa Chang WNYC Brown V. Board of Education
"50 million students" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:23 min | 1 year ago

"50 million students" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The wake of ongoing protests for racial justice, young people in America are demanding change. Not just from police departments and legislators, but also from classrooms. Petitions air circulating all over the country, urging schools to incorporate anti racist education into their curricula. Here's Sterling Hardaway from New Rochelle, New York. You can't develop in exteriors in the world without really educating them on antiracist resource is and how they can be advocates for this change to better understand what an anti racist education means. Thiss Week We're taking a look at the American public school system from inside. And outside the classroom back in 1950 for the Supreme Court ruled in Brown V. Board of Education that racial segregation in schools was unconstitutional. But many would say that segregation in American schools is still very much a reality today. Rebecca Servilia is one of those people she founded. The nonprofit ed build to better understand how schools in America are funded, and she joins us now. Welcome. It's great to be here. Your team found that Predominantly white schools get on average $23 billion a year, more than predominantly non white schools. So Can you just help us understand what actually happened after Brown was decided? Why are we still seeing segregation among schools and why our resource is not getting distributed equally still? In 1974 There was a really important court case that ultimately had the effect of in essence, reversing a lot of the impact of brown. That case was Millikan V. Bradley, and what the Supreme Court rule was that if there's a school district line that's drawn anywhere for really any reason. That desegregation doesn't have to cross that border. And so what it did. Is it entrenched the power of the school district border in desegregation of hurts that created a system a very fractured communities. And as a result, a very fractured education funding system. Today. Our school districts are drawn in such a way. Where of about the 50 million students that are enrolled in traditional public school districts on Lee half are enrolled in a school district. That's between 25% white and 25% nonwhite. The other half are enrolled in predominantly white or predominantly nonwhite school districts. And when you get to you 75 85% light or non white Really? Desegregation can't be meaningful E achieved and those kinds of systems in your work With Ed build Over the last five years, you saw a direct link between Racial segregation in schools and the way public education is financed. Can you just explain real quick the basics of how we fund our public schools, so property taxes and locally raise taxes make up about Half of all education funding, and the state then tries to make up the difference between what local communities can raise from very differential tax wealth. And what we find is that even though the states make a valiant efforts to do so, they consistently fall short. So then the question is. How do we reverse this? I mean, what alternative funding models do you think would be more equitable than simply funneling local taxes into school district's Funding education through property taxes is not a bad thing. It's actually a very good thing. Property taxes tend to be the most stable of all of our revenue sources. And that's certainly going to show itself over the next few years where state economies are going to be really hurt by this pandemic. So these borders that have become malleable Because of that Millikan v. Bradley decision don't necessarily need to define where property taxes stay. Just because you're running your own schools and governing your own schools doesn't necessarily mean that you get to keep all of your money. What we've put forward in one of our final at build products is the idea that maybe we can actually be bussing dollars across the school district border, even if we can't bust kids across it. What that would do is it would serve to smooth out these kinds of wealth discrepancies that we see coming from a very fractured property tax bases and allowed for a much more even start. To our school funding system. And how does evening out the playing field for financing school District's? How does that ultimately? Affect actual education. You think if you can get everybody into a system where the starting point is equal, you start tow level that Plainfield in terms of representation. Which means that the interests of non white students will be heard more evenly in our advocacy and considered more evenly in the way that we're funding schools. Rebecca Cybil Yah is the founder of Ed Build. Thank you very much for joining us today. Thank you in New York City businesses air solely reopening and more people are riding the subways. Stephen Nessen of WNYC reports. The agency that runs the transit system wants to make sure people have easy access to what they need for a safe ride. Latest effort includes vending machines stocked with personal protective equipment at 10 of the busiest stations wearing a mask is required by law. So commuters forget taken by surgical and cloth masks as well as wipes and a four ounce bottle of hand sanitizer from a company called Yeah. What if I didn't have any by 20 year old commuter? Patricia Johnson is a nurse assistant. She glances at the big blue vending machine at Atlantic Terminal in Brooklyn. Says she knows masks are important and thinks the vending machines were a good move, because not everybody that comes to transition has on. It helps a lot with the protection. The transit agency estimates that actually, 92%.

Millikan V. Bradley Supreme Court America Brown New York financing school District Sterling Hardaway New Rochelle Rebecca Servilia Brown V. Board of Education Atlantic Terminal Plainfield WNYC Patricia Johnson Ed Build Rebecca Cybil