20 Episode results for "40 Percent"

Ethiopia To Sell 40 Percent Of Ethio Telecom

Newscast - Africa

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Ethiopia To Sell 40 Percent Of Ethio Telecom

"You're listening to the news This time on Africa Business Radio State Minister of Finance. A UP SAKE ALLYING. Lena sort lightest the DC hyphen government. Will forty percent stake in Ethiopia Telecom a monopoly operates service part of the country's plans for opening one of the world's last major close telecoms markets so dominant officials briefed on? The matter said foreign firms will be invited to be on. The percentage of the minority stake Basaltic Philippians citizens. The governments will retain ownership of the remaining sixty percent news this time and Africa Business Radio. You can continue soon life online at. Www Dot Africa business radio DOT COM or mobile APP. Thank you for listening.

Africa Radio State Minister of Financ Dot Africa Ethiopia Telecom Lena telecoms forty percent sixty percent
New Algorithm Can Turn Thoughts Into Speech, Airplane Seat Belts, and the 40 Percent Rule

Curiosity Daily

07:25 min | 2 years ago

New Algorithm Can Turn Thoughts Into Speech, Airplane Seat Belts, and the 40 Percent Rule

"Hi, curiosity dot com to help you get smarter and just a few minutes. I'm Cody gov, and I'm actually Hamer today. You learn about a breakthrough technology that can translate thought into speech a navy seals method for mental toughness and why airplane seat belts are the way. They are buckle up. We're gonna satisfy some curiosity for the first time ever. Scientists have taught an algorithm to translate thoughts into recognizable speech. Yeah. Researchers at Columbia University and Hofstra north wells school of medicine have made human thoughts. Audible and this groundbreaking research has big implications for medicine. The breakthrough relies on what's called a VO Kotor, that's the same technology. That powers our robot. Butlers like, Alexa, and Siri. A VO coder is just a computer algorithm that can synthesize human speech. And in this case the research team taught such an algorithm to recognize and translate brainwave patterns in a person's auditory cortex into speech. The auditory cortex is the part of the brain. That's activated when we speak and listen. And importantly, when we imagine speaking and listening in other words, when we think I'm over simplifying this a little since the definition of thought is actually an open philosophical question. But in the context of this study, I'm talking about what's called inner speech or language, we've actively called to mind, so like your brain can picture a sun flower. But that's not the type of verbal thought. This study was focused on for the researchers to teach the voter how to translate verbal thoughts. They used brain scans that were taken during routine brain surgeries on epileptic patients. They tracked the activity in the auditory cortex of those patients while they listen to various people read sentences out loud overtime. The scans taught the voter to match neural activity to simplify speech so far it can quote unquote, read the numbers zero through nine from brain activity alone next. Researchers plan. To experiment with other words in sentences. That's a big breakthrough of course. But the other groundbreaking part is that the voters robo voice can translate brainwaves reliably in intelligibly the team found that people could understand and repeat the sounds the voter made about seventy five percent of the time. I can barely get Syria to understand what I'm saying that often the technology is great because one day it could help people who can't speak connect with the world. Whether they've lost that ability because of a stroke LS or some other illness or injury, the research is still in the early stages, but someday this code technology could be built into an implant that could help patients communicate just by thinking. And ideally, it would only translate thoughts on command. Because if you think online privacy is hard to keep right now, imagine if you had a device that could literally translate your thoughts could be trouble really, hoping they focus hard on that whole on-command part. You've ever run a marathon or survived a natural disaster or given birth. You know that your body is capable of much more than you think. One US navy seal has turned this idea into a life hack that you can use to achieve mental toughness. It's called the forty percent rule. And it's pretty simple when your mind says you're done you're only forty percent done. The idea came from a navy seal named David Goggin 's and some people call him the toughest man alive. I mean, he's an iron man triathlete who finished fifth in the one hundred and thirty five mile bad water ultra marathon in death valley, and he used to hold the record for most pull ups completed in twenty four hours, a billionaire named Jesse it slur paid Goggin to live with him for a month and teach him how he did it all the first day. He was there Goggin asked. It's slur. How many pull ups he could do? Here's what it's ler said happened next quote. I'm not great at pull ups. I did about eight. He said, okay, take thirty seconds and do it again. So thirty seconds later. I got up on the bar. I did six struggling he said. All right, one more time, we waited thirty seconds, and they barely got three or four, and I was done unquote and Goggin told him they weren't leaving until he did one hundred. It's ler thought he'd never do it. But he did thus. The forty percent rule Goggin would say that when your mind is telling you, you're done, you're really only forty percent done and believe it or not there's some scientific research to support this idea. A number of studies have found that the placebo effect has a big impact on sports performance. That is if you think something will improve your performance, they probably will the moral of the story is the next time. You think you can't do anymore? Remember that you probably can have you ever wondered why seat belts on airplanes? Don't have shoulder belts. You know, the thing you pull across your chest. When you get near car and what's up with wearing a seat belt on an airplane. Anyway, believe it or not you really do have to wear your seatbelt. Here's the deal as reported by how stuff works, even if your flight is going smoothly and also. Systems are go you might hit turbulence if you've ever flown than you probably know what I'm talking about. And turbulence can be pretty hard core. Consider this. If you're not strapped in right? You could hit a patch of turbulence in your head could smack right into the top of that plane. Look, I'm six foot four inches tall. That's just over one hundred ninety three centimeters and I have flown in some tiny planes. So this is an actual concern for me. If you think that sounds silly VO it might be because you're getting the physics wrong. Here's the thing when you hit turbulence it's not you being lifted up into the air. It's the plane that drops those seat belts are designed to protect you from the airplane. This goes back to Newton's first law of motion a body at rest will stay at rest unless it's acted on by an outside force paraphrasing, by the way, if the plane suddenly dropped because of turbulence then you're the one at rest the plane very literally will drop out from under you now. Typically, your standard lap seat belt will be good enough to keep you safe shoulder harnesses do make a pretty big difference in smaller. Lands though, according to the Federal Aviation Administration. They can reduce serious injuries. From accidents by eighty eight percent and fatalities by twenty percents but for bigger planes. They're expensive doing Saul and hard to get working. Right. That's a mentioned they might annoy the general public on top of all the other flying pet peeves you have to deal with like paying the check your luggage and being stuck in the middle seat. Gross. And the thing is there were zero people that died in the commercial jet or airliner incident anywhere on the planet in 2017 kinda tough to get the fatality rate much lower than you know, zero. So just be happy shoulder. Straps are one less thing you'll have to deal with after you're done going through that endless security line and paying the check your bags. Just remember to stay buckled up and the friendly skies will seem a lot more friendly. That's all for today. But you can keep learning all weekend on curiosity dot com. This weekend. You'll learn about fifteen ways you might be doing your laundry wrong. How having junk food nearby can make you pick something healthier. What would happen? If you traveled. Faster than the speed of light. How envy can be good for you. Why the earth's core doesn't melt and more? If there's something else you curious about than even Lena question to podcast curiosity dot com. We might answer it on the future episode. That's podcast at curiosity dot com. Come hang out with us again Sunday on the award winning curiosity daily. And learn something new in just a few minutes. I'm Ashley Hamer, Cody gov. Have a great weekend and stay curious. On the Westwood One podcast network.

David Goggin Ashley Hamer Cody gov Columbia University Alexa US Westwood One Jesse Saul Syria north wells school of medicine Lena Federal Aviation Administratio Newton Siri forty percent thirty seconds
The Murder of Dawna Natzke

True Crime Fan Club Podcast

34:30 min | 9 months ago

The Murder of Dawna Natzke

"Hey everyone. I'm happy to announce that i'll be participating in an all day. Podcast on february twentieth from noon to midnight eastern to raise money for the charlie project. The charlie project is an independently operated website and database that seeks to promote and provide information for missing person cases in america the website features over fourteen thousand cold cases and his managed and updated by a single person. Her name's megan good on a very meager annual donation based budget of less than ten thousand dollars. The charlie project has been integral to the research of this podcast and many of your other favorite true crime. Podcast so a bunch of us are getting together to host this podcast thon to help megan improve the site and make this fulltime and critical endeavour more viable. Join me and some of your other favorite true crime. Podcast like the trail went cold. True crime bullshit mining crime on crime. No cattle and many many more join on get vocal on february twentieth to help raise support for charlie project. I'll include the link in the show notes. So if you want to donate ahead of time you can. It's been a while since i've introduced uses some of my favorite shows. So i'm going to play a couple of trailers for you on some of the true crime podcast set. I actually listened to you so here the are and enjoy. Oh hey listeners. If you're tuning into this show you have good taste and to you might enjoy another show that we host death by champagne. The podcast here. Keep you up at night. i'm mckenzie and i'm olivia. We have topics in all rounds from the reality of true crime to the depths of the occult. We have dozens of episodes binge. That range from hair-raising scares to infuriating miscarriages of justice. We've covered everything from the origins of satan till the crimes of an unidentified serial killer in our hometown of saint. Louis other episodes include tales of unsolved mysteries murder investigations disappearances cold cases ponting's folklore and people in history that are stranger than fiction in season. Three you can join us for a true crime. Book club giving in-depth coverage on cases living in the darkest corners of our bookshelves are first. Multi part series is on the crimes of gary ridgway focusing on his family victims and survivors. So grab your cat. Keychain surround yourself in assault circle. Lock your doors and unlocked up bone. Hail satan and pop some bottles google. Men's raya the guilty mind. It's the intense needed to prove certain crimes such as murder. Join me your host sinead. As i explore the stories of missing women abusive jealous brothers and the silence of the irish countryside. Then follow these stories to the historic buildings of the uk and ireland for the legal argument to prove guilt. Men's raya releases new episodes every second sunday so for true crime from the emerald isle. Join me and until then. Don't do anything i wouldn't do. Hey everybody this is. Eric carter line dean. The host and producer of true consequences podcast. True consequences is a true crime and mystery podcasts with stories based in new mexico and the american desert southwest. I started the show to bring light to cases that need to be solved in my state. You see my brother was murdered three three years ago and his murderer still walks free so i cover cases with an empathetic lens. Because i understand what it's like to seek justice for a family member. I hope you'll get to consequences of chance. You can find me wherever you listen to podcasts. Explicit content is found in this episode so listener discretion is advised. Welcome back to the true crime. Fan club. podcast. I'm your host laney nine one. One dispatchers are often the unsung heroes of emergency services. The work behind the scenes acting as the first responder for numerous traumatic events nearly forty percent of dispatchers experience burnout which is almost double the burn out rate for normal jobs however most dispatchers believed. They are safe both on and off the job. Unfortunately this isn't always true particularly for today's case. Okay onto the show on december twenty first two thousand eleven dona. Naski nine one. One dispatcher attended a christmas party with her boyfriend. Kevin duck and her mother doris smith. The party was held at the home of scott and sandra randall. In the village. Randall was the general manager of the property. Owners association at the time dawn was drinking her usual miller. Lite and kevin had a glass goblet of red wine. Hot springs. Village is a gated community in arkansas which sits between two counties garland and saline and two thousand ten. The population of hot springs village was twelve thousand. Eight hundred and seven making it the largest gated community in the united states. The village is predominantly a retirement community. As a median ages. Sixty nine years old compared the statewide median age of thirty eight odd springs village spans six thousand acres in his governed by the property owners association. Which is a private tax exempt. Property owners association. The property owners association is managed daily by approximately four hundred and seventy five employees working in one of six departments administration. Golf planning and inspection public safety public works and recreation. There is also an architectural control committee to ensure all buildings conform to the policy and building codes of hot springs village. The village has very detailed instructions on all public areas and also on hall yard should be maintained. The village has a lower crime rate than the rest of the state. One in eighty one versus one in twenty eight or one crime for every four acres. The city of hot spring sleepworld as america's first resort sits thirty minutes southwest of hot springs village and sits within the hot springs. National park on springs was once the vacation locale of notorious gangster such as bugs moran lucky luciano and al capone illegal gambling was prevalent in hot springs and eventually oh and matt showed up in nineteen thirty. Five owen was british but had grown up in new york. In the neighborhood of hell's kitchen elwyn is credited with organizing or crime after he arrived in hot springs word spread and it became a safe haven for gangsters who were hiding from law enforcement. This continued until the nineteen sixties when the federal government. Crackdown on illegal gambling. Donna had worked for the hot springs. Police department for six years and was well regarded by her. co workers. Two thousand eleven was difficult for donna because her husband of twenty years filed for divorce out of the blue however before the divorce was final. Donna began dating. Kevin duck who was eighteen years younger than she was. However according to donna's mother doris. Donna was growing tired of kevin by the christmas party. One thing that had soured. Donna was when kevin moved into her home one day without her permission and while she was at work. Doris said kevin tried to wind on over with lavish presents and constant attention which donald wasn't used to but the attention turned into possessiveness. That doris was not comfortable with. Kevin always had his hands on her whether it was her leg or rubbing her back or even the teenage boy prank of snapping her bra. Donna's son ronnie said to be that protective and hansie with her was concerning. There had been rumors that donna was secretly dating one of the officers she worked with. And that was what precipitated. Kevin's move into her home. She seemed to want to try to make the relationship work and was excited about the invitation to the christmas party. However at the last minute. Donna asked her mother to accompany them to the party. Something she had started doing more and more often. Doris said dona told her the night before the party that she was going to see about having kevin kicked out of her home. Donna and kevin picked up doors for the christmas party. And doris notice. That donna looked on the verge of tears. Her nose was fred which was usually a clear sign. She was trying not to cry. As mentioned previously. The couple both drank that night but neither appeared very happy around. ten o'clock. Donna went outside to smoke a cigarette. And when she came back inside she was crying she went to her mother and hugged her and said she was crying over the legal situation with her estranged husband. Todd still crying. Donna walked into the bathroom and her friend patty. Hathaway followed her. Patty was yelling. At donna to throw kevin out not realizing kevin was outside the bathroom door listening. He actually barged in and then let her out of the party pushing her out the front door. The couple did not get donna's mother nor did they say goodbye to anyone. At the party. Patties kevin pushing donna outside and was not happy about it. Kevin still had his wine glass in his hand when he walked outside. And afterwards sharon. Randall found a broken wine. Glass stem outside. One of randall's neighbors later told investigators. She had heard what she could describe only as the blood curdling scream of a man in a fit of rage then a car door slamming and tires peeling on the pavement. Doris waited for an hour before getting a ride home from a friend. She got ready for bed and then lay awake worried about her daughter to twenty one a. m. her phone rang and it was kevin. He said miss storace which he never did. Like all of donna's friends he usually called her mom. He asked her. If donna was there and doris replied no. She's with you. She left me at the party with no way home. Kevin quickly hung up. He called her back at six. Forty five am and said. He slept on the couch. And donna had left so he figured she was with doris again. He hung up quickly. Dora said donna did not drive after dark because her eyesight was so poor later. Kevin contradicted historic to police saying he did not wake up until seven. Thirty and found. Donna gone then a short while later. Patty symantec donna. Angry that she had witnessed kevin pushing her. She received an odd reply. He didn't push me. I fell and he caught me. I had taken a pain pill and was tore up. Patty thought the message was odd because there was little punctuation and tour was misspelled donnas. Youngest son brandon woke around five forty five. Am and saw his mother's car still in the driveway. She had ordinarily left for work by that time. But unbeknownst to him she had taken a vacation day that day however just a few minutes later. Some of her friends saw the car speeding through an intersection heading towards her office. Moments later. The car vanished. Brandon asked kevin leader if he knew where his mother was and when they had returned home. Kevin said they had returned home around ten thirty and watch. Tv together brandon knew this was untrue because he had been up until midnight. Donna sons were concerned because kevin duck had a violent past assaulted two and had even beaten his own two year old daughter savagely with a pvc pipe. Her sons began contacting all of her friends to see if they had seen her. And by the morning of december twenty third they went to the hot springs police department to notify her co workers. She had not been seen since the night before her friends and coworkers immediately suspected foul play at eleven fifteen. Am on the twenty second a us. Forestry service worker found a car smoldering in the woods eight miles from the intersection of arkansas. Hi ways to ninety eight and seven. The car had burned so hot parts of the aluminum engine block had melted into slag. The car was a ford escort station wagon which was the same car donna drove. Unfortunately the car was not reported to the hot springs village. Police department until christmas eve in large part this was because donna was not reported missing until december twenty third and a bolo or be on. The lookout bulletin was not issued until that morning on springs village detectives into flatbed truck to pick up the car and it was hauled uncovered to the hot springs village. Pd where it sat for four days before being processed by the arkansas state crime lab. The area were donna's car was located was not searched until the day after christmas. Search dogs were used that day and again on december twenty eighth on the morning of december. Thirty first five hundred. Volunteers showed up at the jesse. Ville jim to lead their own search efforts. No law enforcement from garland county sheriff's department or the hot springs village. Police department were there however a very surprising volunteer turned up. Kevin ducks father. Geoff meek of reporter for the hot springs. Village voice was listening to train. Searchers divide people into groups and overheard. Someone say shell store which is where. Kevin duck worked. Jeff turned around and asked the man if he could interview him and that's when he found out it was luther duck. Luther told jeff about his sons violence and some mother family issues as the two men were talking. Jeff heard a slight commotion and saw that the women who had previously passed out maps. Were now crying. Forty five minutes into the search effort donnas remains had been found. Donna was found floating at the edge of george spears curve pond which was a cat tail covered muddy pond on west main hall road about six miles from where her car was found. There were tire tracks. That indicated car had backed up to the edge of the pond as a chatter grew. Luther told jeff he had told hot springs village police to search that area days before horrifyingly doors found out about the discovery of the car and her daughter's body through facebook post. Kevin duck was nowhere to be found. His probation officer soon learned his contact. Numbers were no longer working. An investigator from the arkansas state. Police soon located kevin and south louisiana and interviewed him there on january thirteenth on january. twenty fifth. a warrant was issued for kevin's arrest on parole and probation violation since he left the area without reporting it to his officer. Kevin was extradited back to arkansas. Where he posted a fifteen thousand dollar bond. The night donna's body was found. Nancy grace covered the case on her popular. Cnn show of the same name in her usual style. Nancy and her producers highlighted the feelings of the police such as not getting search dogs in the area earlier. She talked about the forestry service. Not reporting the car until a few days after finding it but an fbi. Spokesperson from little rock said burned. Cars were common in the ouachita. National forest donna. Sister vicky was a callin guest on nancy. Show that night. As nancy erupted into her diatribe about the police investigation vicky defended them saying the bulla was issued. As soon as donna was added as missing person. she said. The police did not botch this. They were looking for her. They love her. That's what is so aggravating. This we the police department come to our house and give us reports all the time. As nancy said she hated that there were hours missed from the discovery of the vehicle. Vicky firmly interrupted her. Two different times with no vicky did admit she found out about the discovery of the car. While looking on facebook for any information on donna a former investigator turned author called in and pointed out that kevin needed to be investigated thoroughly because he was the last person who saw her and he had previous convictions for domestic battery. One of nancy's forensic experts former chief medical examiner of bear county said. The car was likely burned to destroy trace forensic evidence because it was probably used as a transport vehicle. The autopsy results revealed donna had been prudently beaten but was still alive when she was put in the pond based on the water found in her lungs. A memorial service was planned for don effort january fourth. Two thousand twelve. The memorial was held at the village. Church of christ in hot springs. Village the memorial service was completely planned by donald three sons and their minister. The patriot guard against of motorcyclist who usually attend military funerals but also attended those of family members who died tragically and unexpectedly wrote in support of donna and bore flags the church holds five hundred people and also were filled with people standing in the aisles. To people refuse to speak on the record with the press out of respect for donna's family by january fifth two thousand twelve police announced that they had a person of interest in the slaying of donna but did not name the person. Investigators did state that. They had interviewed. Donnas estranged husband but he had a solid alibi. This episode is brought to you by better help. Is there something that interferes with your happiness. Worst preventing you from achieving your goals. Trust me i have been there. And i still struggle with these issues but better help online. Counseling is there for you like it's been there for me. You can connect with your professional counselor and a safe and private online environment which is so convenient for me and it really makes me feel comfortable. You can now get help on your own time and at your own pace you can schedule secure video or phone sessions plus chat and text with your therapist whenever you need to. They have licensed professional counselors who are specialized in lgbtq plus matters grief self-esteem trauma relationships anxiety. You name it. Anything you share with them is confidential. And if you're not happy with your counselor for any reason you can request new one at any time at no additional charge. They have over three thousand. Us licensed therapist across all fifty states and they're available worldwide start communicating and under twenty four hours. The best thing is it. Secure convenient professional affordable and. It's not a crisis line. Best of all like you said. It's a truly affordable option. True crime fan club podcast listeners. Get ten percent off your first month with discount. Code t cfc. So why not get started today. Go to better help. Dot com slash. Cfc simply fill out a questionnaire to help them. Assess your needs and get matched with the counselor you'll love that's better help dot com slash t. Cfc to get ten percent off your first month. Today's episode is brought to you by beekeepers. Naturals beekeepers is on a mission to reinvent your medicine cabinet with clean remedies. That actually work. You and your family deserve to feel your best all day every day which is why beekeepers naturals creeds clean science backed remedies that naturally support your daily health like be soothed cough syrup the truly clean cough syrup that helps you get back on your feet. 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That's b. e. k. e. e. p. e. r. s. n. a. t. u. r. a. l. s. dot com slash tru e. C r i m e to get fifteen percent off. Meet your new medicine. Cabinet with beekeepers naturals the kice essentially stalled for almost two years until an arrest warrant was issued for kevin duck and on november twenty. Six two thousand thirteen. Kevin was arrested without incident in burlington. Colorado he was held on two hundred fifty thousand dollar bond. According to the arrest affidavit for him cellphone records analyzed by the fbi. Were the biggest piece of evidence. Especially a call made from kevin's phone at eight thirty four. The morning donna disappeared that originated a mile from where her body was found. Another call was made approximately thirty minutes later which originated in roughly. The same area where donuts car was burned. The arrest warrant also noted. Kevin had been late to work the morning after the christmas party. Once rested on the murder charge. Kevin was also charged with violation of probation from an unrelated case. He was sentenced to six years in prison for this violation. The probation stemmed from charges in two thousand nine for aggravated assault. Kevin's sister whose name is not provided. Once trying to intervene in a bad relationship was having and kevin became violent he woke their brother john by pointing a gun in his face and threatened to kill his sister. This became a physical altercation with kevin fighting. Both his sister and brother with a three-foot jank handle the sisters injuries were so severe that she had to be hospitalized for this. Kevin was charged with assault and given five years probation. John duck testified that as children kevin would mentally and physically abused them. When john was seven years old kevin made some unreasonable demands of john and their sister one time when they did not comply kevin at the time. Seventeen took a shotgun threatened to commit suicide and locked himself in another room. He pulled the trigger. The two younger children were terrified and started beating on the door when he finally opened the door he was fine. He had fired the shotgun out the window amber dunk. Kevin second wife said that kevin had subjected her and their children to violence throughout their marriage. Once kevin dragged a pregnant amber down the stairs threw her into the car drove across town and left her. Not far from where. Donna's body was later found another time. Kevin had used a piece of plastic tubing to beat his two year old daughter so hard that her bottom was purple and she could not sit down. Ambrose also said that he had slapped their daughter so hard in the face one time that she flew across the room and landed on her back. Amber left the marriage when her parents threatened to take the children away. If she stayed kevin was also accused of violating his probation by not reporting an address change to his probation officer. And for not seeking permission to travel out of state. however kevin's attorney said that kevin had addresses in hot springs and louisiana because he worked on the pipeline he had received fourteen work permits from probation officials in the eighteen months leading up to his arrest. Kevin tolson investigators. That donna was pregnant at the time of her death. Unfortunately due to missing body parts it was impossible for the medical examiner to determine if this was true or not. Kevin had repeatedly told on to have an abortion but not mad each time former hot springs village. Police department officer. Tim cox was the only officer who testified about the alleged pregnancy as the defense steered clear of it. Before the trial occurred kevin duck was released on one hundred and fifty thousand dollar bond and december. Two thousand thirteen. Kevin's trial was initially scheduled for july. Two thousand fourteen but his defense attorneys requested a delay to review documents received in the discovery process. The judge granted the delay and the trial was rescheduled for november. twenty fourteen. the trial was then owned again. At the request of the prosecutor. The state was still awaiting evidence. From the federal bureau of investigation's. The trial was delayed several more times. The last time for additional dna testing the defense wanted to test unidentified dna found on donna's clothing against that up the former chief of police. This goes back to allegations. That the chief and donna were having an affair. The test results were negative and have still not been matched to anyone during the trial. Fbi special agent. William shoot testified that he could place kevin cell phone near the pond. Where donna was found and twice near where her car was set ablaze on the morning of december twenty four. Th two thousand eleven shoot was a specialist and had developed cellular radiotelephone analysis in two thousand five and helped found the fbi cellular analysis survey team in two thousand ten after the christmas party. In two thousand eleven kevin me numerous calls. That shoot was able to track from the victim's home the villages west gate highway seven and highway two ninety eight. After more than four hours a garland county circuit court. Jury found kevin duck guilty of first degree murder. He was sentenced to life in prison chief. Deputy prosecuting attorney joe. Graham told the jury before it began deliberations life means life. Donna naski was by all accounts. A wonderful mother sister daughter and friend her two youngest sons played football at jesse ville high school and she attended all the game she could. When donna was thirty five she gave her father one of her kidneys which gave him another ten years. He passed away not long. Before donna was murdered. She was also beloved by her friends and colleagues her three sons brandon and aaron net. Ski and ronnie muller wrote an impact statement which brandon redden court. Dan who was only seventeen at the time of his mother's death was frequently overcome with emotion as he read the impact statement. It read quote the worst experience. Our life was trying to act like everything was okay on christmas back in two thousand eleven trying to open gifts and enjoy our time together when we were all hurting on the inside the thought of our mother not being there next to us was tearing us apart the thought of never seeing her finding her took its toll on us to the point. That every christmas isn't the same anymore that because of one man she has gone. Christmas will be forever tarnished in our lives. The lies in the news and the courtroom is not who she was is. There were so many details that were left out about our mother. She was a kind of mother who never bought herself another piece of clothing just so she could ensure her sons had what they needed. She really is the person we strive to be. Like the one who is unselfish and puts. Everyone i the one who will talk to anyone to make them feel important. The lady who worked hard to make sure her sons were happy even if it brought her to exhaustion the person who smiled and laughed and could start a by herself. She was the kind of person who was who she was. And nobody was going to change that then brandon toward kevin and said he had been touched by luther duck embracing his son after the verdict. Particularly because luther duck had been on the nazi side through it all brandon continued just like luther did with his son. God is looking down at kevin in the same manner that he has made the same mistake a mistake. He can never take back but he still loves his son. So i pray for kevin and i pray that through this decision and as he goes forward with his life then he knows. There's a father out there that there's a god who still truly loves him. Kevin's attorney clay. Jansky said after the trial that brandon had delivered the best impact statement he had ever heard anything negative about the victim had been unintentional. Jansky said it's one of the few trials where the credibility of the victim was really not put into play. I think the only bad thing about her at all was that she liked drinking. Miller lite in my book. That's not a bad thing other than i prefer coors light. My client never told me a bad word. About don and nazi okay. Fan club members as i conclude this episode. My one question to you is. How will you sleep tonight. Thank you for listening if you enjoyed this episode. Please leave a positive review in reading on apple. Podcast or your podcast player of choice. It really does help. You can find us on social media platforms twitter at tfc pod facebook dot com slash tfc. Podcast instagram at true crime. Fan club pod and of course our website is true crime fan club dot com if you have an episode request citizen email. Tfc pod at gmail.com. This episode was researched and written by susie. Saint john content editing by britney martinez produced by the best in the business nico or niks at we talk of dreams. Check him out on twitter at we talk of dreams or we talk of dreams dot com. And if you wanna see some editing behind the scenes of what makes his podcast what it is and other great podcasts out there head to twitch dot com and search for we talk of dreams for you can see me. Go do the amazing things. He does behind the scenes.

donna kevin Donna Kevin duck Property owners association Kevin doris kevin duck Doris arkansas gary ridgway Police department Eric carter american desert southwest Naski doris smith sandra randall Owners association
Biden looks to the sun to fuel green energy initiatives

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

07:19 min | Last month

Biden looks to the sun to fuel green energy initiatives

"This marketplace podcast is supported by equifax the world's digital infrastructure company looking for the choice and control of hardware with the low overhead and developer experience of the cloud deploy equinox metal in minutes across eighteen global locations from silicon valley to sydney. Just add metal at metal dot equinox dot com this marketplace podcast is supported by out systems the modern application platform for building the software. That makes the difference fast right and for the future out. Systems empowers teams to develop and deploy innovative cloud applications for capturing new markets delivering new services and winning new customers. build the difference without systems. Learn more at out systems dot com slash action when hey kid would away that video game tanks the stock market. I'm david brancaccio. Let's start with more details on the ambitious plan for solar power. The biden administration laid out. Yesterday it's from a new study from the department of energy it shows the. Us has the potential to power about forty percent of electricity needs with solar energy. And we could do that. In less than fifteen years. Marketplace's amanda teacher has more solar energy. Right now makes up about three percent of the. Us electricity supply so getting to forty percent by twenty thirty five. It's a very ambitious. Goal can gillingham an economics professor at yale school of the environment within a policy support. I do think the numbers are possible. Possible but practical not yet it will take more tax incentives major upgrades the electrical grid and quicker permiting processes to reach that level of solar power. Right now this is just a blueprint. Getting to policy is congress's job and abigail ross. Hopper with the solar energy industries association says that certainty is key for financing. Look you don't have the certainty then. Investors are gonna wait. They're gonna put their coppell on the sideline or they're going to invest in something. That's a little bit more. Sure bash but ross opera says as climate change is already underway. There's not much time to wait. I'm amanda feature for marketplace. Yesterday it was news of a further. Chinese regulatory crackdown on private sector education and the tutoring industry there. Today it's the video game industry again in the crosshairs. It's a new warning from beijing about what it sees as the danger to kids of online gaming that sent stock prices of technology firms tumbling in asia stocks in hong kong saw their biggest drop since july is shares of tech conglomerate. Ten cent fell eight percent gaming. Giant net ease fell eleven percent. The bbc's andrew would is following this in hong kong beijing's responding to the worries of parents who think the children's spend too long playing computer games and you may remember. Beijing announce that children would only be allowed to play computer games for three hours a week and it also expressed concerns about the content so some of the big tech companies like tencent. They met with government representatives regulators. And so on to show that they were applying the rules and keeping the authorities. Happy about this all right. That's andrew would with our editorial partner. The bbc let's do the numbers again. The hang sang stock index in hong kong fell. Two point three percent here. I just checked out. Snp anez dak. Futures reached down in the two to three tenths of a percent range as we reflect on the twentieth anniversary of the september eleventh terrorist attacks this weekend. A key focus is on. New york's downtown or the pentagon in northern virginia and thousands are expected in the farmland of pennsylvania. This weekend were on nine. Eleven united flight ninety three crashed in shanksville. It's about an hour and a half from pittsburgh. The site of the crash is now a national memorial. Marketplace's nova ofo is in western pennsylvania this weekend reports today from shanksville on the wider effects of that memorial on the town and the region flight ninety three crashed in a field in shanksville population. A little over two hundred. Jason snyder was a member of shanksville volunteer fire department. At the time just knew there was a big hole in the ground. Smoke coming out. I met snyder outside the convenience store he owns in shanksville one of only a couple of businesses on the handful of streets that make up. The town's core snyder says every year around this time he just get an influx of people the whole week or two weeks before you know people coming down that influx has not necessarily meant new business. Though snyder says historic serves mostly locals and sometimes a few curious terrorists. That's not the case ten miles away in somerset. The closest big town population six thousand. I did you wanna quarter founder. Burger at the pine grill restaurant. There dylan zerfoss is taking phone orders. He says the flight ninety three memorial brings in a lot of newcomers quite often left. Patrons ask for directions alone to the monument. Or they'll say that they have been there. Pine grill's owner mark miller really noticed the uptick in business when the national memorial officially opened in twenty eleven. At any given time here in the restaurant you might have twenty five thirty percent of the people that are going to flight. Ninety three miller's restaurant has benefited because of its location in somerset the biggest city in the area right off the pennsylvania turnpike with a cluster of hotels and restaurants for visitors. But ron album had of the somerset. County chamber of commerce says those benefits have not translated to significant regional economic boost. It hasn't had that big of an impact on permanent things. Like you know more restaurants more hotels more but it has solidified those that are here. One reason for that he says is that somerset was already a tourist destination with state parks ski resorts and other attractions. The other reason album says is that the flight ninety three memorial is personal for so many here who witnessed the tragedy twenty years ago. There's a sense of nobody wants to exploit it. With new businesses that take advantage of the memorial's presence in somerset i'm software for marketplace and the anchor city in that region's economy pittsburgh will host a high level meeting later this month that could define the us economic relationship with europe for years to come. It's big picture stuff. Technology standards making supply chains more secure sustainable technology and the rules for data and privacy this us eu trade and technology council begin meetings september. The twenty ninth. I'm david brancaccio. This is marketplace morning report from apm american public media.

shanksville david brancaccio biden administration yale school of the environment abigail ross ross opera hong kong amanda equifax solar energy industries associ beijing snyder gillingham united flight ninety
Hector Santiago wants to represent District 6 on Detroit City Council

Daily Detroit

22:57 min | Last week

Hector Santiago wants to represent District 6 on Detroit City Council

"Hello and welcome to your daily detroit for monday october. Eighteenth twenty twenty one on episode eight fifty five of the podcast district six spans from most of greater downtown detroit to the west along the detroit riverfront too outer drive in fort and all the way up to grand river and oak men inside. It is probably one of the most diverse districts in the city. It's about forty percent. Latino forty percent african american and twenty percent white it has skyscrapers refineries neighborhoods that are emptying and those growing in leaps and bounds. Not dimension detroit's hispanic population is the only one to consistently grow over. The last couple of senses counts. The current council member is not running for office so who will take their place. Hector santiago is my guest today. Now as i've said before with these candidate conversations we are not doing endorsements. Were opening the door to any candidate on the ballot. That wants to participate. And letting you get a feel for what you're looking for. My only encouragement is that you vote and be part of the process. Thanks to our members on patriot patriot dot com slash daily detroit for your support which allows us to do these without fear or favor so without further. Do let's jump into it. Welcome to daily detroit sir. Thank you very much. I appreciate you for having me on today. And it's a pleasure. Of course. Of course so i guess this is kind of the first question. I always ask anyone in these kinds of conversations. Why are you running. You've got a family. You've had a very involved job in the community. You're doing things why step up and try to go for city council. Well that's a great question and I'm definitely gonna break it down to you know lately story but you know i believe the voters in Everybody needs to understand what i've been through in order to run you know. And that's what really impacted me to fight for our district and city. So i'm born and raised here in Southwest detroit went to our dps schools graduate. It from western national high school excelled in the baseball field and classroom. What's the first ten college. My parents are pastors. But you know At that time everybody's not perfect correct. I received a nonviolent offense where Ten years ago. You know when you don't understand you know when you're young you know what. A felony is or Probation or if you sign this paper into we find your innocent. You know you still go jail or if you signed this you can get probation right. Sign the paper now. You got probation plus felony so you really don't understand until it hits you so ten years ago lost all hope thought i was done and i found The detroit you know my mother found a flyer and they gave me an opportunity and now ten years later i run the program that i went through and it's a true blessing. Now i'm helping those returning citizens. This engage us. I teach remedial math. Help parents through soon to Help their kids learn math. And then also. I hope what barriers to employment. I hope What the wraparound services. Also in the environmental side. I hope planting trees carbon buffers and or remediation. Doubts about disconnect. So that way. That water doesn't go into. The store goes into their plants and so much more and then so years ago project clean slate. Gmo in my wife. Sina sign says. Hey call this number. So i called the number and i said hey You know i got this something is gonna take a long time and The process happened so quick. That when i have the car fell to my knees in the back of the work and said oh my god. This is happening north. Thank you right and I ended up getting my experiment you know cleared by the sand dunes and he says I told him. I don't know if you remember me. You said that you see megan. And he's absolutely do now. It's my highest honor to grant you a experiment you know. Be that leader that you've been chosen to be right. This is what i want to do. This is my job to give expunges to Help people like yourself. It was just a true blessing and then a year later. I was invited to that Bill signing with the lieutenant governor and governor and mayor for to help eighty thousand other individuals like myself in order to help them. You know expunge that Either felony or misdemeanor. So why was sending their you know all the teams that i've coached for twelve years all the church kids and members. I helped All the trainings members that i helped draining also the community people that have helped they tuned in. I say you know what it's time to take it to the next level. And it's time to fight for the district and city. That's never turned his back on me. And that's when. I decided to run for city council districts. How important are those kind of programs. Do you think to the district at large because you know the city of detroit. It deals with a lot of issues around poverty around challenges. A lot of people who might be listening to some some might have dealt with it and somebody be going. Well how can all this happened in one place but how important are those. And how important is it to for instance at programs to get people back into work. Even if say they haven't had an expunge meant you know like the programs at some company is starting to pilot wear depending on what crimes committed. You're able to actually get back to work again. Because what i find is is that there's a pipeline and it kind of becomes a revolving door unless somehow something gets in the way to change it and it's very important because i'm a living testimony. Degree in detroit actually gave me that opportunity and believed in me and i was able to move up and helped me with the barriers to employment that i have right now. They gave me the opportunity to reach that level when products came out to be able to Expunged my record and now run for city council. right. And i've seen now as the person that's running the program all the barriers to employment all the wrap around services. We need to do in order to help these individuals in order to maintain the job how we can get them to job. What do jobs really encounter or have issues with for them to get workers because a main issue is it could be passing drug tests or it could be or example not being able to pass their test right because here the reading and and writing level is at third or fourth grade reading level right or fourth grade math. I mean this is intro that we do you know in our training program just to see and a lot of the Companies they say man like they can't pass our tests or they can't pass the drug test or they can't they don't have the transportation or the licenses another thing is with the bus routes being cut you know. How are they able to be transported to those jobs and there's a lot of barriers you know you've got people that are starving at home are homeless. That came through our programs. And we don't know this and employers. Don't know this right. And sometimes they don't have babysitters and it's just knowing what a person's point through and how as employers which i know employers are more like man they got to be job ready and ready to go yes but you know these still trade places that really help with the wraparound services and barriers. You know we're trying to make sure that they get that training or worker. That's policy enough to be able to Excel to the level. You know so like for example. I'll bring out like say davey tree or pains right. And i said okay. Hey this is the final week. You guys can see everybody in the field they. Oh wow i like that. I that guy that way. They're seeing a good worker right and they're able to say okay. I don't have to waste time training. You know and that's something that we need to invest into our district because a lot of these restaurants lot of these businesses you know we see it all around you know i mean i think i've seen the sign and mcdonald's five hundred dollars signing bonus or something like that just to start you know. A lot of businesses are missing workers. You know in lines are. I mean off the chain right now and creating like for example you know just example like a building like ymca having skilled trade centers or skill trade different level in a building like that. You know where. You're gonna chefs doing hooks. You know stuff like that. Where in the restaurant business or any other business. You have them all in one building. Learning trade skill and for example like western. You know they're doing some west The four building where warren straight into the four. You know entrepreneur like that so these are things that we need to keep going. You know in our district if the answer questions. Oh yeah and it gives me ideas for a few different questions. i think first off. I'll start with the one. That listeners will know is important to me. And i know it's important to our listeners. Arts is transportation. You know it's very difficult right now to get around the city. The the bus system is in occurrence state of crisis frankly with lack of drivers and having to to cut routes things like that. What are some of your ideas to improve. The city's transportation system is sitting with my team and and the transportation system and actually Try and see. What's the issue i know it's about. They're saying the lack of drivers right and we have to see what's causing lack of drivers it. The risk of the cove infection right is if the risk of money in our we paint him. Is this business apple because like our police officers where where training. But it's basically training them to go to the suburbs right because they feel they're not getting paid enough. So is this something that we gotta look into for our bus drivers you know bs. They're risking their lives because anything can happen on the bus right. they're driving. they're going around. So i really looked into this issue once elected lord willing to understand it you know. I don't want to really say something that. I really don't want to lie to the folks right right now because i really want to dive in and see what's going on because i feel is really hurting. You know our communities and a lot of us you know that we know our families and friends that catched a bus especially a lot of my trainees. It's hurting them. It's really making them lose. News hope like man. I'm just going to get fired wherever i go. So now you're cutting more transportation and and and them is making it turned into a barrier. You know a bigger barrier. So i really want to dive into that. You know and and see what the real causes. Because i'm hearing you know a few things. You know a few different things. And i just don't want to say the wrong thing and Incorrect you know. I'm the type of person that wants to actually have the facts and and be correct for the people you know. I don't want to sell lies. And that's how i am so in your day job. You do a lot of work with grinning of detroit. I know that you work on the job side but obviously you mentioned the environment aside. You know that they've been involved in the listeners. Don't know they should know they've been involved in the community for years around environmental issues planning trees all of that stuff so it leads me to think an ask about environmental issues. You know southwest detroit. Parts of it have among the worst air quality in the state. There's that ground shift near would mirror that you know as of this recording they still haven't really publicly like gone out and said what's behind that. So how important are environmental issues to you. And what are some of the things on your priority list to knock out if elected absolutely i mean just seeing explosion you know or that. The shift that happened i was there. I talked on on my facebook life. I mean that's scary right for our district for our people to see something like that especially to residents. I talked to. I'm i'm real close with and burns and up that have been reporting to smell to him. People have told me. Hey pass by the streets i pass. It looks like a cloud of rust. That hits the homes. It's just terrible right. And this is something that i really want to look into. And then also with the environmental side you know is dear to my heart because we're in through the grand detri- like i said you know planning these buffers. Now's about disconnect you know we see the basements flooding. I was a a person that lost a lot of things as well like our residents and you know we are resins field. I or said you could say who like. We really didn't get that help right. We seen what happened in new york. The water just shot up from the source so is it infrastructure or is it climate change so these are things we gotta look into right and another thing is having theresa landed him indoors and more willing bring bringer. You know making her part of the team as a environmental person that she is a grill. You know if elected lord willing because she has been fighting for this for years and she knows what has happened in two one seven they have been forgotten about. they have been disenfranchised. And that's how a lot of our neighborhoods have been and that's why it's so dear to my heart and then definitely you know another things that i'm focusing on this definitely crime and safety. You know true affordable housing you know just bringing the economic development in our communities. Bring it back. How can i say at the photo water and low income For folks that are having trouble paying their water bills you know. These are things that as city council we can do right. And because i see the struggle you know when you live here you see what. A lot of people struggle with and You're able to connect with them and when you're not living here and you just dictate you're hurting the people when you're not able to come up with a solution and just turn your back on the residents voted you in. There's no point of you sitting up there because you're not coming up with solution that's going to be able to help you. Residents it's going to hurt them at the long run. So you're just thinking about yourself. You're not thinking about your district so i'm a person that builds bridges right and I wanna continue to In these ten years that. I've been building bridges and myself and my track record has shown it. That's what i wanna do for our district. I finally want to ensure the people that they'll have the right person that's gonna fight for all these things and you know i'm not saying it's gonna change in one day but us working together we can definitely make changes you know and then feel like they're being hurt. Finally we talk about fighting for residents and making sure that they're heard that makes me think of some of the recent issues that we've been having with city council around ethics issues. Are there any reforms that you'd want to do or things you'd want to look at. Because the last council term has been pretty heartbreaking for a lot of detroit residents as far as basically. What's everything that's been going on. I know everybody. I've been talking to you. Know i've i've gone with you know from every zip code. Know i've been gathering information. I know definitely every form i want. I minded into is criminal justice reform. You know i've been through it. I see a lot of things happen. I really wanna help people understand that. If you got a felony you can still vote. If you have found any this part you know this long you can get expunged to me. Eighty hours you know if you need a church or you can work in a campaign. I mean if these resources right. There's a lot of reforms that i i'm trying to think of doing you know. But i'm thinking specifically around the city council like are things that could be done with the city council members like there's been a couple of members that are in legal trouble and pleaded guilty. Are there some changes to the ethics. That could be done with city council. I feel that to me. I understand that what's going on. You know it's just. But i mean for you to get talked to not take bribes or not still or i mean. That's not a job for you. Then you know. I mean you're here for the people yes. We should be held accountable. And if it turns into that. I mean you should be able to suffer the consequences like any other person you know and and not be treated differently you know and have to step down into you. Know pleaded guilty it or not. I mean that's what happens to a lot of us right to get when when we're in. Hr investigation where they do. They send you home until is investigator right. So that's something that we can look into but at the same time you know for somebody to sit there and say actor you know. Make sure you don't take rise or make sure you don't do this. I mean first. Of all i already experienced something that cost me ten years of you know what i'm saying. I don't wanna say the other way because you know. I don't to say the devil eat. It really changed my life right. And yes you know i know is always there and stuff but you always think about the people you're letting down the district that you're fighting for you know they've put you there for a reason so by you. Haven't people training you on no bribery. Or i mean you've got a strong staff strong leader so you gotta pick the right people to be around you and if you see somebody as a cancer you gotta let them go. You know if you feel like this person is gonna let you down. You gotta let them. I mean that's a type of person i am. You know because that's the way. My father raised me and being a pastor. I know you used to one. That's going to puerto rico. We say you know knuckle to the to the forehead you know. And it's got to cook with basil you know and you know. But that's something that i would be looking into. You know you know almost like that. Hr kind of process areas. You're looking into man. I mean you gotta go home into it's over. You know you shouldn't be making decisions if you're gonna look into it strikes me that your faith is very important to you. And how born is it to you in context of running for office. I mean it's very important. I mean i. This whole run has been in. God's hands and i put it in god's hands and You know i know. I don't like mixing religion and politics but at the end of the day you know. I'll never crossed the two right but all i can say. Is lord you know protecting right. Watch over me watch over the people but I would never say hey guy said both for this policy. You know i won't mix too. You know what i'm saying. But i am a pastor son. You know i am in church. I am. You know christian pentecostal but at the end of the day. It's all about really understanding what that has for you and for people you know i tell the people every talking. I want to be that moses. I wanna leave the people. I wanna make sure that the changes here i want. Bring the unity back you know. My saying is unity. Strength diversity is power you know because our district is the most diverse right and me graduating from western national high school. it's the most diverse high school. So that's a win win right there. Because now i know how to unite. And i think i'll rating shown that with some events i've had where i've had people from each zip code calm and also by having davis answers theresa landreau tyrone carter lisa carter and more John garcia even to wash meyer carmen. Belda ours former state rep and cynthia johnson. I mean all of these people just jump behind me and and supporting that shows the diversity in unity that can bring you know and the first time ever to people are hanging banners. You know on their building. You know trusting in me. You know. Because i'm real you know and i don't believe in lying to the people here in our district. They could see right through you. You know and i connect with them. I know what i've been through. And i can relate well actor santiago running for district six in the city of detroit. Thank you so much for your time today. I do appreciate you. Thank you so much i appreciate. You doubt bless and really you know. It's our time to make a change. And if anybody needs anything from me you know you can always go to hector heck or something. I'd for detroit dot com or both to head to santiago for detroit dot com or you can call it three one three five seven three zero to six four and you know Reach out to me man and you know volunteer come seeming in action. I got a phone. You know i have fun and It's not for a change. You know it's time for unity and Appreciate you having me on. And god bless you and look forward to seeing you again. I will put all of that information in the show notes so it's easy for people to grab and read and have all that and take youtube. Thank you and that's it for your daily detroit tomorrow. Fletcher sharpens in. We'll talk about what's going on around town including detroit. Cfc's win over the weekend. Plus he's bringing guests to preview the red wings season with that. I'm jair stays. Thanks for listening to care of each other. And i'll see you around detroit.

detroit city council western national high school Hector santiago grand river Sina megan fort baseball ymca mcdonald warren Bill theresa apple facebook
GE's Danielle Merfeld and Arvind Rangarajan on AI and Renewable Energy - Ep. 150

The AI Podcast

31:12 min | 2 months ago

GE's Danielle Merfeld and Arvind Rangarajan on AI and Renewable Energy - Ep. 150

"Hello and welcome to the video. Ai podcast i'm your host noah kravitz energy has been in the news a lot lately and with good reason between climate change political efforts by the biden administration to incentivize and increase uses of renewable and alternative energy in the us and throughout the world. And well let's face it. The early and intense weather and heat waves going on the united states. Already as we tape this in late june energy our access to energy and perhaps the lack thereof is a hot topic no pun intended for everybody on the planet. We have two guests today who are experts in the field of energy and renewable energy in particular and the hair to talk about. How a i is playing a big role in the work that they do joining us today from. Ge renewable energy are danielle murphy. Eld an arvind wrong garage. Danielle is the cto of ge renewable energy and arvind as technical leader the advanced manufacturing organization. Then you'll also recently lead a session that gtc digital entitled advances in renewable energy enabling our decarbonised energy future with technology innovations and smart operations danielle and arvind. Thank you both so much for taking the time to join the invidia. Ai podcast and welcome. Thank you thank you. It's great to be here. So i gave a very brief. I didn't want to take up too much time. A very brief sort of glossed over kind of layman's approach to why renewable energy is important. But now that we're into it. Let me ask you danielle and arvind What is renewable energy. What is ge. Renewable energy do And what are your roles in in the process in the organization and then we can kind of dive in from there. Yeah so at a high level. Renewable energy is just as it sounds energy that you create through renewable resources such as wind and solar energy resources that are refreshed continually so that you'll never have to pay for it. We have to harness it. And it's generally almost exclusively carbon-free so that's why renewable energy is so important because it aligns with the decarbonised energy sector future and of course lots of lots of visibility around the need for that lately. Our renewable energy business sells a lot of different types of renewable energy generators such as onshore wind offshore wind we sell Systems around solar and storage even hydro power and we also have a portion of our business that serves the grid and you might not realize this as we put more and more of this variable energy variable renewable energy like wind and solar on the grid. It just behaves differently so now we have to operate the grid differently. So we sell a lot of equipment. both hardware and software onto the grid and have some key experts. And how the grits operate and we're kind of managing that transition from generator all the way through transmission and distribution in cheese renewable energy business. And so does she sell Exclusively business to business or do you sell home in residential and consumer solutions as well. We are exclusively commercial scale to utility scale. Gees doesn't have that consumer level appliances or or even any of the businesses lightbulbs. All the things that people remember about jeeves fifty years ago not in those businesses anymore got it. Got it okay. I can relate a little bit though to what you said and perhaps others listening can as well Last year we had solar panels and a home battery storage solution installed where i live and you know there are kind of two phases to the work. One was actually having the equipment you know the system designed and installed in our house and the other was connecting up to the grid and so just to get back to your point about adding renewable solutions of whatever sort to the grid kind of changes. The way the grid operates. Can you maybe just quickly kind of get into that and kind of loop back to decarbonisation and what that means. Probably the easiest way to describe the difference in terms of how the grid operates. Is that today a lot of the grid. Functionality and ways that it manages faults and thinks about managing stability and reliability is based on the operation of synchronous generators so big steam turbines gas turbines hop things that spin creates inertia. And that's it's a very elegant almost foolproof designed for how to keep a dampening in the system and keep this very complex engineering feat balanced and safe and reliable. The problem is is when you move to power. That's coming onto the grid through power electron ix and not through Rotating machines that create a sine wave of energy. Now things happen faster They have the changes can happen faster. It's actually a good thing if you use it to your advantage because it's highly programmable and shape -able but it's also volatile because you're you're waiting for the wind or the sun to do some of their work and then you've got to transform it into something that can be safely put on the grid so again it's just different. And that's why require a new set of rules and a new set of how utilities operate those systems worse. It's just different in any kind of changes this talk sometimes for a system. But it's the it's the right change to make to enable this carbon-free future and how far before we get into the specifics of how you're using in other technologies to make this whole process. Better how i don't know if you can quantify this but how far are we into and when i say we you tell me if that means the united states or the world or port. We talk about the grid. But i don't know if the grid is really multiple grids linked together but what what kind of a metric so people can understand how far we are into the process of harnessing renewable energy or. Maybe changing the way know that we've done things to something better. That's a great question because it helps provide the context that so many people don't have and maybe don't even realize that they need to have because Highlight some big issues so if you look out and typically like the international energy agency uses twenty fifty as the guiding point in time when we by then we need to have already been in a zero carbon energy system and that means electricity is part of that today. Electricity is only about twenty percent of the energy in the world. but it's the easiest to decarbonised because you can use renewable energy in electricity. So there's two things that need to happen in the next thirty years. We need to decarbonised as much of that electricity as we can and we need to make things that today use fuel or fossil based resources electrified so that they can also then use some of that decarbonised energy so the goal that the international energy agency has set is to reach this net zero energy sector by two thousand fifty. It means that we're going to have to have about eighty eight percent of our electricity from renewables and that means wind for example would have to be about forty percent of that today. Wind is about eight percent of that not only. Is it going to have to go from eight to forty percent. The total amount of electricity is going to be increasing. Some would say between fifty and one hundred percent just manage all those other sectors that are coming in to become electrified so we'll need more electricity to manage more sectors going electric. Yes yeah although overall the total energy will come down slightly because things are so much more efficient when you move them to electric rates. And that's to put you on the spot. But i would be remiss not to ask because there's so much that i think people don't understand it's easy for somebody like me who i mentioned you know bragging about my solar panels and what night and to say you know you need to get solar to your house and you should give up your car and get an electric car. Do all these things. How much of it is individuals. How much of it is you know. Large organizations or corporations how much of it is the world governments. You know what do we need to do. Or which which bodies need to act to get us to where we need to go. Yeah so it's pretty clear now. That technology is not the hurdle we have the technology we need to move forward decades into this transition It's a lot of policy not to make it financially accessible. it already is the cheapest energy on the planet. That's good news but to increase the rate of permitting and to reduce the policy hurdles to get more of this at the country scale so in terms of individual versus big corporate or country or government level influence. It's definitely the latter. We can't make the progress that we need to make on an individual level. We've gotta make decisions as a society about where we want to have our energy come from got it. Well i will continue to pat myself on the back for having solar panel job. Yes all right. So let's get into the podcast after all let's get into what. Ge renewable is is doing or how you're using ai to make your products and your services better throughout the whole life cycle of making renewable energy more of a reality. So i thought maybe i could set up some of the scenario about what makes renewables need this and i'll pass it over to arvin. He can give you some of the details. maybe an example of. We're doing that so it's important to know as we're seeing this huge demand spike and we're trying to increase the scale of all of the wind for example of renewable energy that we're putting out there. Is that costs are going to continue to drop. There's this pace of innovation we have to keep up with and we have to design these systems to last for a long time like a typical wind. Turbine is as a forty year life. And it's got survive these wind conditions that we don't get to control and it's gotta make our efficiently throughout that whole life and the volume of these assets is growing and we're changing them so there's a bunch of different types of systems in the field so we have to think about how to manage this really complex environment through this life cycle. And we're doing that. By using a i really across the whole range. We can use it in the engineering in design in manufacturing and servicing this whole kind of complete life cycle of our products. But there's a couple of things that are that make renewables quite different from where we typically see i applied and one of them is just most clear is that we have really small data sets that we're using this is not about flooded with data and sifting through to learn to get those nuggets. It's about finding the needle in the haystack. We're training on flaws in the manufacturing facility or in the service you know looking for wear on a turbine blade. And that's our most common problem in this domain is dealing with these very few data points and so typically were used to training the data so that they can better help a human in the loop so carp roach and then how we're using them are quite different. So maybe i can pass it over to arvind to you. Some more context and examples there. Sean thanks so. I think daniel of the key points right this. Typically we are designing these products to be extremely stable and run for a long period of time but the also don't want to have any defective products into field so for example trying to design a bit system to find defects on a blade. I mean i've processes are good enough that we don't generate a lot of defects that we can actually use to train a model effectively so we don't make millions of data ship out today which is a good thing exactly so so the focus started but we also want a wide escapes. So that's mad. Thinking of a i can play this because again we have so few of these defects hospital find the same people over time but they can actually get really good at spotting these defects so be airplane kind of the initial in terms of being able to train this small data sets but have enough understanding that it can find anomalies that then people can actually make a better decision so This has got a very field that you know it's it's gonna be augmentation of what people do today by using a so. We don't at least in our domain. We don't see immediately replacing people. But it's going to help people find that data in the start Danila talked about so when you say. A manufacturing defect on a wind turbine blade. Couple questions come to mind for me. How big are the blades. what is a defect. look like. And then if there is a defect that that isn't caught and it's out in the field. What's the impact. And what do you have to do. A imagining that You know if you're putting a company like ge putting these resources behind Training on these very small data sets to find what sounds like not that many defects but to improve them they must be pretty high stakes situations. That's right yeah so it's a good question components that are really really big. I mean anything. We'd be look. Bento binds the range from anno fourteen meters in length to up to one hundred meters which are largest blade offshore turbines. That's that's a football field. An american buffet a european football patriots. Yeah that's a big blade. Yeah plus the end zone right and so what you're trying to make you look at. That's like you know it's like a good four. Finally does across is not so they're trying to find a small t. Five millimeters deep defects on things that are hundreds of square meters right. And so that's the example. I use just to give the killers knows each like trying to find a penny on like a wooden slowed in two thousand square foot house. So that's basically what you're looking for in this and it doesn't happen often right and if there is a defect does it reduce generation capacity. Does it bring the whole system down. What does a tiny little defect on a huge played like this do. Yeah so it's about. How much design margins get to have on our blades. Depending on how accurately we can capture the defects as long as captured or defensible. Certain size we can take some practice safety now decide. We know that those differences are going to be responded so it's not going to really do anything catastrophic if they have escaped but it's around having that candadian life that danial talked about these donate twenty years so if they can find any defect that is over that size than Basically have little trouble in terms of finding the in dublin. Footages life right so talking about how your training data sets and deploying them and You know you mentioned kind of having a unique approach. Can you get a little bit more into what that process has kind of been like. And maybe some of the challenges or learnings. you've had As you've deployed and tweak your use of ai showed so kind of started with Some models that have been used on image data sets starting point and It'll be evaluated conduct yours and what we was having a lot of over finishers simply because i mean it's just oh. Such data sets the tried to incompetent synthetic data. Then what we realized was one thing we could do to increase. The data sets was to start doing some of these training data images the lab setting and then incorporated into the data. Set are actually getting from the factory itself to kind of maybe axelrod And became up with some techniques to leverage the lab data in conjunction with synthetic data and evacuated to build up a model that more accurate than just relying entirely on the factory. The rent and this has kind of helped us kind of move. The needle in terms of the accuracy required to be relevant in the factories today. And is this all happening in one. Centralized place as far as Gathering the data and using it and the humans in the loop and everything or is this kind of distributed across different maybe labs manufacturing facilities or even out in the field so in the actual system kind of makes local decisions but the deployment of the system is going to be global way. Essentially expect to in o- once we do all the but acquired validation with a quality team then goal is to actually roll it across all factories and Which means that you know. We are going to have an edge based system that's doing all the influencing but you know they're going to be continually updating the model that we are going to distribute on a central location to these individual notes that are independent factories beyond the manufacturing process. Are there other places in. Oh that g. renewable is a lot of services. Are there other places where i and the human in the loop approach that you mentioned are also coming into play providing benefit to your work. Sure yeah so you know. We talked about in a defects. Knock leaving the manufacturing floor but you know we really can't control once the i know tobe inside in the field. Our products on the field. How the interacted right. So i'm specifically thinking about something like a lightning strike random. We basically have somebody lightning strikes down and these standing in the on. It'll allies and places a lot of lightning and thunderstorms so one of the things we do have to do is to kind of periodically inspect turbans on and ensure that you know are safe to continue operating sort of how these inspections that do not really sophisticated In florida cameras. That can take up to three thousand of ameijeiras and try and find these defects and the latest spinning right. So go to try to go over that over the entire length of the blade is gonna take all the hush inspector right and and so one of the things that he is enabling us to do and this is looked done by a team a ged so as to be able to kind of take those three thousand images and apply the filter down into baby. Twenty critical frames. Glad we think that might be different right right so so we get this fifty excellent action in polity for the field inspector needs to do to kind of try to spot these red instead of instead of trying to follow a giant blade spinning at super high speeds they can look at twenty images that were pre selected by the ira makes a lot of sense exactly and and i think that's another place where the human in the loop so again be- we don't have enough defects to be able to fully train autonomous. That's counting it. Which is our future vision. But but today this again with the supplemented by human in the loop as billy doing a great job of providing value for us in benito kind of boba knowledge be and the capability to do economists decisions. Absolutely will we hear a lot of a lot of success. Stories are their their stories. Being written for sure allows success stories about that using ai to augment the human human in the loop. You know kind of giving the person almost superpowers if you will Versus you know. It's not a all right. We've built the system. We can fire everybody and let the computers run things. That's exactly our guest. Today are danielle murphy. Failed and arvind rangarajan of ge renewable energy and we're talking about their use of ai and their approach to Using a in humans in the loop were speaking specifically about manufacturing defects in wind turbine blades. But really to improve across their diverse portfolio of renewable energy products and solutions that they deployed globally. So we've been talking both kind of at a high level about what. Renewable energy is and the different ways that it's being deployed or replacing or working to replace fossil fuels if you will and and energy sources that aren't renewable and art sustainable and put carbon back into the world which is not what we want. Got into a little bit to the specifics. About how you're using a i to train on these small data sets but kind of going back to the big picture. What's next. And i wanna kind of fold into that. If maybe there have been any surprises anywhere. Along the way whether it's in terms of how energy behavior how humans behave around energy or what have you And then kind of leading into what. Ge renewable is working on her maybe where the next big opportunities might lie. I'll just add one surprising thing for me. Just as a leader in the energy space especially as a technology leader in the energy space is how much this is not just a technology issue. you know. there's a ton of opportunity in the technology realm especially for a i to help us with understanding and better managing our factories service plays even our designs. But what. I'm what. I'm now realizing a lot more especially as i think of how. This interacts with the grid is that there's you know there's real market challenges to how do you design systems where the cost of fuel is free and most of our energy systems are based on deployed. Costs that are variable really based on fuel costs and then what about operating systems differently. You know it's not just about the new invention of the wind turbine versus the steam turbine. It's about they. They have completely different behaviors on a system. So there's a whole new realm here of behaviors and operations in markets. Physics that I think it's almost boundless opportunities to be bringing intelligence to these challenges. Well it's interesting. This may just likely it speaks to our relative levels of expertise although it may speak to my personality but as you were talking i was thinking. Oh gosh these sounds like problems and you cast them as opportunities you spoke you know previously danielle about the technologies here the policy as issues present. Or maybe a better way to say it is that you know there are policy changes and new policies that need to be implemented leaving that aside for a second and talking a little bit about the technology. Are there things that you're working on now and and bonus points. Obviously if you're using a i to try to grapple with them that can address some of the challenges you're talking about and bringing these newer you know sort of variable. I think you called them. Energy sources onto the grid and doing whatever needs to be done to help the grid adapt so i mentioned to one that we're working on and one that we really think needs more work and we want to grow that space. But it's it's not something that were uniquely focused on the first is what i'll call grid forming controls so this is really just like a control system for any asset. It's like the brains of the system. This is one for you. Integrate the energy going onto the grid. As i mentioned the way it has behaved in the past is all based on this very elegant synchronous generator design and using your converters converters. Now you can shape that to be whatever you want it to be. It can be very quick but also faults happen. Quicker and flaws in the system harmonic they. They can arise more quickly. That's harder to deal with. One of the things that we're doing is helping that converter or that inverted. That's now hooking up to the grid because it's how the wind and solar power are getting onto the grid we're giving out the ability to maintain the grid voltage or the frequency. Which are the two really important factors of that. Ac signal on the grid giving it the ability to form instead of follow the grid so it is today that most of the wind and solar electricity that goes onto the grid is sort of in following mode. It's role on the greatest just not to screw up things around. It doesn't add a lot of value and in this new paradigm. We're figuring out how to make it improve the grit around and better. Because it's they're not in spite of it. And i think that's a really exciting new space for enhancing the the value of renewables even more and the second thing i would add just because it's so cool and this is not a big focus for us today but i think it's generally going to be needed to help accommodate increasing. Renewables is what's called demand response so you can imagine a world where you have you put a lot more renewables on the grid but remember you don't always get to control that fuel. Never get control so on. Typically that means you have to build because on the days when you have lighter sun or wind in different regions. You're going to hope you had extra in other parts. One way to reduce that overbill or that overcapacity is by being able to dial down the demand every once in a while in different parts and doing it in a way that people don't even notice or that doesn't inconvenience companies factories homes. That's the holy grail. Because then you reduce this capacity that's needed to serve the community of load and many people don't realize this but there's no inherent storage grid. We make electricity and it is consumed instantaneously. There's no extra so we have to make it when you need it and when you need it you better make it. So the thing able to manage both sides of that equation for the first time in the grits. History will be a big lever of of opportunity for us as well. But i think the next frontier for how. Ai could be used in. The renewable space is is really around that resource itself for example the wind. You know getting better models and being able to use them in highly compute intensive environments around. What is that wind profile. Look like not just when it's propagating into the front of that wind farm of hundreds of turbines but as it propagates through the farm. What are the wakes. How're those eddies. Impacting the turbines behind it. And we can use that information to operate the farm much more effectively but getting that information is really tough so and again if we can do this well not only could. We operate the farm better but theoretically we could use it to build the broader sort of predictive capability to manage the grid. The grid should know what to expect from that resource knowing what the weather is like in the sun and the wind and be able to manage those that opportunity to create energy and a very very different way than we. We do much more passively today. Do either of you get a chance to get out to the wind farms as you're talking about it. I'm obviously the technology is what we're here for but i'm thinking about. It must be like to be on a wind. Farm full of hundreds of turbines. Have you experienced that. It's incredible. I would say i have more experience with our prototypes where i've got the runs. I've gone up. Have been at the prototype sites. And i didn't get to go up our offshore wind. Turbine it is at a port. So i could have but it was not an time. I could go up at just eats of engineering. That are inspiring hilarious mall. Yes i can't imagine. Been into been from in texas with tons of tobin's you know you. You think about the fact that the wind farms position bear means that you know you expect it to be a very windy area but i. I was dead in texas in october. And i didn't realize what a consistent two mile an hour wind feels like because you live suburban eight years like where they do now in upstate. New york you get once in a while but it kind of dies down. But it's something to be dan falling. I dunno like six dollars and the wind just nonstop because not because we're trying to do something else. They took us to the windy as part of the found. It was some expedient sir. something that's unpredictable so somebody gets a chance should go see. It's very cool. And i was going to mention this but arvin sent you mentioned upstate. New york i have to end with a shoutout to the schenectady capital district. Niskayuna area big. Ge big g. town. I grew up there. I haven't lived there for years and years. But i know that you both have ties to the area and i won't ask you to to get into it but just to say shoutout. Ge schenectady niskayuna high school leaving that for folks who would like to find out more about what g. Renewable energy is up to broadly specifically to the use of ai. Danielle and arvind are there places on the internet where people can go. Yes so we have our own renewable energy web page. Renewable energy dot com. That's kind of the one stop shop for all of our information. But you know we're also pretty. Active on social media can follow our accounts for businesses. I have a pretty active twitter presence ed. Dwi failed so it's pretty easy to get me. Dwi more feld ge. I think it is great and then of course. There's the talk. I alluded to at the top from Gtc digital. i believe it was an april of this year. Twenty twenty one And you can just look for danielle's namer feld l. m. e. r. e. l. d. on the invidious site At get to that talk as well Danielle and arvin. Thanks so much for taking the time to come on the podcast. And i say this everybody and i mean it but in this case we're talking about renewable energy in the future of the planet so sincerely all the best of luck to both of you and your teams in the work. You're doing it's incredibly important. Thanks for having us until.

arvind danielle murphy noah kravitz biden administration danielle ge renewable energy advanced manufacturing organiz gtc digital international energy agency ge us Danila
40% of Americans are Quitting Their Jobs! Should You?

The Money Guy Show

57:09 min | 3 months ago

40% of Americans are Quitting Their Jobs! Should You?

"Forty percent of americans are quitting. Their job should you. It's brian preston. The money guy restoring order to your financial chaos retired investing taxes. You got financial questions. He's got financial answers. It's brian preston. The money guy brian. I am super excited about this show. Because i think we're going to be able to wait into something that's pretty popular pretty common out there because there's a lot of things happening and what i hope we're able to do is either provide folks with some guidance on how to make a very big decision well or potentially avoid making a huge mistake if they have thought it all the way through well on here stab. Oh this is a shock and awe type stat when you hear. Forty percent of americans are changing the job. Bowie that's the glass half empty. Yep i wanna tell you. There's another side to this equation that we're about to discuss but when i see forty percent. I'm like wait a minute employees. We i notice they to say that's almost half are ever looking for jobs. I walked around this morning trying to get feel better about that. Brian did not make me. But i think it's all okay but it's it is one of those things. But here's what the reality of the situation and we and we dang put together a nice chart of this. If you want to know how many people are actually quitting their jobs you can see. We have spiked up. We went way down. Because of the pandemic i think everybody was in lockdown mode literally with their life but also with their careers and jobs. Because we just didn't know what was going to happen but now we're at a point and here's the glass half full. There are nine point two million jobs that are available so that this is an opportunity for folks that people are leaving because this is the chance. So there's so many jobs of and i was just going to clarify out there just listening. We have a chart that shows really since two thousand all the way through two thousand twenty ish shows the number of jobs available and then the quit rate seasonally adjusted and it is interesting just like you said is. It seems like win. There are a lot of jobs available in the economy. Seems to be doing well. There are a lot of folks. Quitting there are a lot of folks. Leaving jobs are changing jobs. And you're right now. We are at the near all time. High of nine point two million jobs available in the country right now so the negative stat is that forty percent of people are considering leaving their job but the positive is is that there are tons of opportunities out there and i wanna make sure i put together the put four the optimistic glass half full take on this and and this is. This is the article. That's kind of driving. I mean this is all over social media. this is all over. Commentary everybody talking about this forty percent considering we wanted to kind of figure out. Should you look at this and then also give you perspective of. Why is this the case. Yeah i think it's really unique. I think that there are some very specific reasons why this is happening right now and i think the number one reason probably is not going to be a surprise to anyone. It's probably pretty common sense as we came through. Twenty twenty as we went through sort of global shutdowns went to the pandemic. it's sort of caused a recalibration moment for a lot of folks often all through my life. I've had negative events that have actually created positive side effects. And i'm not minimizing. What we all have gone through in twenty twenty. But i do think i'm always looking for the silver lining or turning lemons into lemonade. And i think this is one of those things where we all came through this tough period of time and it is an opportunity to figure out. Hey is this a reset of something that could impact me. Because i think that's what a lot of you guys you're in your career. And the pandemic kitschy. You're working from home. You're working remotely. You're figuring out very quickly. What did you like about your job dislike about your job and then you're like hey. This is the time. Maybe i could move to a different part of the country. I can move to a different job. I mean all these things hitting it allowed a recalibration because you were allowed to ask yourself and my happy Is this what i meant to do on this planet and i think that reset and that reflection is what really puts a lot of weight of while. We're having a lot of people consider this. I think it's so common for most of us. We get so busy in our day to day. We just kinda start. We wake up. We do the thing we rinse. Repeat we do it over and over and over again. Sometimes we don't even realize how maybe unhappy we are. maybe how things are negatively. Impacting us one of the things. I feel like. I've heard the most over and over our folks who had a long commute in major metropolitan areas in nashville land so on and so forth well then the covert thing happened and there was a shutdown now started working from home. They recognize that there was an hour two hours in their day. There were no longer commuting. We've heard them say hundred ever want to go back. I didn't notice how much i dislike that until it was gone. And now i'm trying to figure out. Okay is there something. I can do about impact that somewhere. I can change my circumstance. I think folks recognize that in a number of different areas through the pandemic. So before you quit though this is the thing because we. This is a personal finance show. We are showing you the power of planning. We wanna help you figure out the why and the how to make sure that this is appropriate for you. Because i don't want you jumping off the bridge or jumping off into a new opportunity just because all your peers and everybody else is because just because of large group or doing something doesn't mean that it's well thought out. I mean we've seen a lot of people work in mass not for their own self interest in a lotta ways. I mean think about credit card debt closed the half. the population doesn't pay it off monthly. These things are horrible. So i'm just telling you this is something to pay attention to and don't leave just because you feel like your day to day functions are hard and you're not living you're your dream and that's because i think that there's a lot of steps that you need to go through before you make that cut. I think sometimes that's okay right like sometimes it's okay if every single day is not our dream day because ultimately what you hope. Is those days that you have to put in are working towards whatever that may be. I worried that the pandemic caused a quick reset where people are owner. No i got. I got to change something. I gotta make immediate rash decision. We weren't gonna walk you through before you make that decision. What are some questions you should ask before. You make the decision to jump ship. I mean look. And i. I hate the glass half empty. But i think it's powerful to go deeper and explore. What makes you unhappy. So the first thing i would ask people is. What are the pain points with your current job. That's actually do a deeper dive into what is making you so unhappy now. Would you agree brian. That every job every vocation every job that you've ever had there are probably things about that job that you did not like. There's there's never been a perfect other than being in the morning show. There's never been a job that you just loved every single part about it right. That's just a natural. Cause of being in the workforce. It's going to be something but some of those pain points are much more severe and some of those pain points are much more minor. When you agree with that i do. But i think you also need to be taken out of the conceptual and actually put it on paper and the fact that i won't you'd actually you know maybe it's the accounting emmy that i'm always doing teach arts where i'm taking the positives and the negatives i want you to write down so is at low. Pay is the lack of flexibility. You don't have any chemistry or you don't like your co workers actually go deep with. Why do you dislike your current work experience. And then that can lead to doing a happiness check and this is an important. Because i do want you to have a path forward to have fulfillment to have happiness. Because i don't want you doing something for twenty thirty years that you just a drudge in just not fun but you have to be very methodical or well thought out with your planning. You've told me brian in your past. There have been times where you've had jobs. Where like on sunday night. You just be chewing your fingernails. You would just be like man. The weekend went too fast. And get into this week again. And i just want to do that and i think you said then that was your sign that man. Something ought to change you when you did your happiness check you recognize man. It was more of an unhappiness check. How bad is it on sunday. Night before i go back in the workforce that was a sign that something might ought to change in your life. Yeah now. I do think there are big macro indicators like that chewing my fingernails to to the point of being super stressed out. You know having hard bosses things like that. Those are things that maybe you can't fix and this is the perfect opportunity but you need to document what those things are so then you can move to the next question to make sure you're not making a rash decision and that next question is what are you leaving behind. Yeah i think this is one so often we get caught in the grasping greener on the next thing. The grass the next opportunity being better the next thing being better not recognizing all the stuff that you've brought along with you experience in a specific career field a degree that aligns very well with one certifications that you've earned over the years. It's a big charge. Say you know what. I'm just going to walk away from all that and go do something else. You really need to understand you spin a career part of a career becoming an expert there just to shift into something totally new might not be as smooth or seamless as you think. Well i always. We look i love. How abound wealth has formed. We have all kind of associates planners and others that have come from other working careers we have. Doctors have actually an md. It's a financial planner. We have You know musicians producers you know from the music industry engineers. I mean all these things but every one of those people that made those big jumps in those big korea changes. They did walk away from a lot of other stuff and i just think before you leave behind to start a new freshman because sometimes the shiny side we always hear the gr- the grass is not always green on the other side of the fence. As you think. I want you to be reflective. Not only be optimistic about what you're going to but be realistic and honest with yourself about what you're leaving behind and then i think before you even make the decision. I'm going to shift. I'm going to quit. i'm going to leave. i'm going to go somewhere else. Are there opportunities right where you currently are. Are there opportunities maybe work with a big organization. And you don't like what you're doing and you're present job. You may not have to quit and go find a new company to work for their. Maybe shifts inside of the organization that might be a lot more streamline a lot easier to step into than having a full on job change one. I think that ties into the next question is is the timing right because this is something and look. I've i not as young as i once was but i still remember what it was like to be a my first five years of work and why do i mention the first five years of work as you guys know. We subscribe to the concept of ten thousand hours of become a master of whatever. You're trying to accomplish. You said something. We're quickly approaching our five year mark of youtube. And i do feel like it has taken a while to learn this but we have over ten years before that because we started in two thousand six a broadcasting all of that work. But it's the same thing with me becoming an accountant. A cpa a financial planner. I had to put the time in to develop mastery before actually had a marketable skill that was worth something somewhere else. And i do worry when i talk about is the timing right just because you're unhappy right now. Make sure you have a long-term onset because there are some things that you have to put your time in just enough to get the mastery before it gets a lot better. There's whole careers which are built on essentially breaking through your put making people put the time in. It sounds so negative to say but it is. There is something about paying your dues. I don't disagree at all. And i feel like it's unfortunate. I feel like that whether it's the media or social media whatever it is it has created this thing. Hey you should start living your best life right now. You start living your best life right now. And while there are glimmers of truth in that there is something to be said about. You know early on you want to have to do the things you don't wanna do. You have to learn the skills that you don't necessarily want to learn every single day that you wake up and go to work might not be your best day. If you've been a job and you just got out of college you've been a for six months and you're like all man i don't like this. I'm going to start my own. My own business. Perhaps you have not put in the time to be able to make that assessment. Well made sure you know before you do make that. Jump that the timing for what you've done up to this point substantiates. You making the joyce to leave what you're currently doing and there's examples something about doctors. What do they do with doctors. They come go through a residency. I were they. They work them. Gazillion hours. You know the kind of throwing them out there into it. I think about even beginning. Cpa years i mean the first few tax seasons law. They did comp. Tom back then which i think is somewhat illegal now but you know you build up so much time that it would get to the end of the year where you'd have just weeks and weeks whether they would during the holidays they tell you. Don't come this week or we'll pay you out but it's it's one of those things where you are worked like that investment banking the same way. There's all kinds of different professions that there is going to be a grind. And you need ask yourself in my in the grind. And and if i just can defer gratification for two years three years. There's the big beautiful thing i'm trying to get to. That just needs to be. You need to be aware of that. I'm not trying to. Because what i what breaks. My heart is when somebody's put four years into something in there so close to crossing a threshold but they leave right before the big break that. That's what i'm trying to do now. It's back to if you're chewing your fingernails and you don't see an optimistic path for that's something completely different but i do wanna make sure in this new instant gratification society. We live in that. You are being realistic about what the long term perspective for this career is. Now another thing that you have to think about too especially if you're thinking about quitting and starting something new or potentially starting your own thing is that potentially. It could be expensive decision when we look at this. If you look at the median income by age starting in the teens all the way out age sixty. it's sort of this trajectory. Where as time moves along as you get older as you gain more expense more experience. The median income tends to increase. Well if you're someone who's in your late twenties early thirties and you're making the decision to leave a specific industry that you've been in for the last five six seven ten years or leave a company you've been with and you've put that time and you may be leaving right before you're starting to hit some of your peak earning years now. That's a reason to stay and be miserable and be unhappy but it certainly something you wanna think about as you make that decision on whether or not the timing is right. Yeah i also based upon what. I'm seeing here. What's going on in your personal life. I mean 'cause guys. I'll tell you it was much easier for me to start my first endeavor in my twenties than if i deferred that out until my forty or some other time because i mean once you have you know a spouse you have children other things. I mean your your world out. Your whole outlook of life is different. So you do need to kind of take all those things into consideration to make. Sure the timing's right. But and also don't find yourself. It's so easy in this new social media driven world where we look at what we want. But we don't see the journey that got there because here's an example. I was talking. I was talking to somebody and every time out graham stuff it And they are talking about how great his life is living out in las vegas. Having all this money coming his weight i yet. I don't know that if you go back and look at those first two years of the grind are. There's a lot of work going on behind the background. You don't see i mean. Even who's the who's the social media that gives away a gazillion dollars and does all the shopping mr beast. I mr beast is the same way. Go look at go. Pull his videos. Go to the oldest i. You'll see he was trying to find his voice during a. It was a not the easy stuff that we all perceive now. It's the same thing with entrepreneurship. It's the same thing i think. A lot of people think they're just go walk through this threshold and it's going to be laid out. There's usually a lot of grind goes into success so okay so you have to answer. The question is the timing right. The other question. You have to answer. And i think this is one that often gets overlooked at and i think it gets overlooked because it's becomes an emotional decision instead of a well-thought-out decision as are you financially stable. Have you taken the steps necessary to give you the flexibility to make a transition wealth. This is what. I sound. Like a dad and i'll just go ahead and own. It is that. Because i think so much in society right now says if you have the passion if you had the talent go pursue your dreams i might. Those are powerful. Because they'll look to go. I'm i'm an entrepreneur. That's had many successful. Things have also had a few things that didn't work out but here's what i recognize that while we're successful versus others. That have failed is that yes at passion yes. I had talent. But i took and saved a lot of money to make sure i had enough bridge money or liquidity money to get me to the other side to reach success and i think a lot of people will skip that step. They think the talent and the passion is all they need to be successful and the reality is probably gonna take you three years to build something really good or to replace what you left. And that's the part that. I think people overlook because that's the unsexy part. That's the part where i have to tell somebody. Hey make sure you build up not just three to six months of cash reserves. If you're leaving to go start a new endeavor or to do something. That's that's that's potentially risky. You better have extra cushion. You need a boosted cash reserves. That's much higher than normal because you need bridge money and because in most often things don't go the exact way that we always think they're going to go and if you're gonna make a big shift whether starting your own business moving into an entrepreneurial endeavor or even changing industries you have an idea of how that might go but you know there might be some unknown unknown. Some unforeseen circumstances. It may be harder road than you thought. Well if you don't have that financial stability it is going to make that much more difficult to stay. The course one of the questions. We always ask career change with us. Say hey there's a chance if you're going to change career and come work with us. There's a chance there's going to be pay associated with that. What kind of planning have you been doing for you and your family to prepare for that. Because that's one of the things you want to see. Someone understands you might have to take two or three steps back in order to take four or five steps forward if you do that. Well you're going to give yourself that future staying power if things. Don't go the way that you planned. Yeah and i'd see this. Here's something else that i would encourage people in this kind of this hits not only. Are you financially stable buzz. The timing right guys. If you're like let's talk. Let's break it down into short-term if within a year do you have a bonus structure. Don't leave in october november if you have a year in bonus in december don't leave in the year that you're you know if you stayed an extra six months you would vest completely in a in a pension plan or retirement plan. I i found so often that i think people aren't taking into account all those different financial variables. 'cause they're going with the phil good passion talent and there's just more to this is you guys are financial mutants. A you understand. there's some analytics that also need to be respected in this process. Then the other thing you have to do if you are planning on making any change where there could be an uncertain adjustment to your income right. So maybe your income. I go down for a season or it might become more varied. Have you actually done the hard work of knowing what you and your family need to live off of. If you don't know where your money is going and what you're spending it's going to be very difficult to exactly how much you need to make. Sure is coming in so that this change so that this decision keeps you and your family economically viable into the future. I like it was so interesting to me as we financial advisors financial planners. We'll get to do this for for a living. I think about how often moving to a new career. Moving to a new adventure is similar to the vice. We have to give to new retirees to because the next question is what will you be moving to the human nature and this is why this is all interconnected is the human nature. Concept is we. We daydream about where we wanna go to. But we don't think about the fact of is that really as good as we have the green pasture view of. I mean we had this big beautiful view and you said it earlier. This is going to probably be a few more obstacles. There's going to be some pickups in the process you need to if you're going to actually get to that big blue sky opportunity you're going to have to go ahead and do the planning on the front end so that when those hiccups when those roadblocks win those obstacles show up. You're prepared and then you just you drive right over one thing. I've heard you say before. Brian is whenever you're doing in this sort projecting or whatever you're thinking about making a big life change whether it be retirement whether it be changing jobs whether it be starting a business you should write out you're three scenarios star with the one that you think is the most probable. Hey i think it's probably going to happen. I think this is the way that it's gotta go and have that be scenario one. Well then you want to have okay. Well what happens if this goes horribly wrong. What's the negatives now. What if all of my assumptions are off. What if everything of assumed was way too aggressive and it ends in the worst case. What does that look like. What's my contingency. What's my fallback. what's my base level. And then if you want you can do about okay. What if this goes exactly the way that i wanted and even better. What's the ultimate upside. And make sure that you constantly review all three of those. Don't just focus on that best case scenario and forget that worse case scenario can still happen in if you can make sure that no matter which one of those takes place. You're still able to stay on that path. You're going to set yourself up for long term. I think here's the power of a plan is goes. It's very powerful financially. Don't get me wrong because then at least if you go to a negative situation you have the resources you have a plan to to move forward but also here's another thing a plan does for its good insulate you from the emotional side effects of negative stuff two degrees because you will have already lived or experienced this at least on paper and i'm gonna give a strange experience share bow and the fact that we recently now this is a little premature. But i'll go ahead and share. We bought a building. We've owned this building for two weeks. We'll give more detail later and there's already been to. Let's just call them super issues. The superintendent of the building would be like. Wow so we bought this building and already had two issues. Yeah the super bowl like that. So but here's what i've noticed the more you experience the negative. It just seems like now. Hey if a pipe leaks are. Because i've experienced plan ahead prepare. The same thing happens when you create that negative plan is it will completely you. I'm not going. Take a diminished. That it's life can be scary but you'll lease will go into to where you don't just throw the whole thing out. Because you had your first hiccup or things didn't go ike. You thought if you have a plan it will insulate you from that. So you stay consistency. Stay motivating you stay on the path to creating success with most things in life. Begin with the end in mind you know. What is the this thing that you are moving to. Is it a step. it's ultimately allowing you to move in the direction you want him. If your goal is man you know what i'm just. I'm not spending enough time with family. And i'm working too many hours i don't feel like i'm paid adequately. Maybe don't take that job that's a pay raise in is gonna make you work one hundred twenty percent more hours because that's not ultimately moving you towards that end goal continue to think about. Is this decision on making. Is this thing that. I'm doing getting to me where i want to be at the finish line or am i coming up with a very permanent solution to a very temporary problem. And that's what and that leads us kind of the closing out of the questions before we get into how you do. This effectively is what benefits are are non-negotiable now now here's the thing is always tell people write down. What success looks like for you so you can kind of know. How do you know you've done this well. And i think a lot of people skip that step and every business conference you'll go to the one of the first exercises they'll have you do is write down. What your ideal customer or client looks like. They want you to go ahead and write down. What are you looking to expand into but how often does that. Same logic expand to individuals with jobs. I mean because this is very important is what is your ideal job. Look like what benefits does it have. I mean is it got health. Insurance is a guy retirement. Plan right those things down advancement for opportunity. I mean there's there's all kind of pro. I think opportunity for those completely backwards distorted but but you see what i'm saying is that i want you once again. Turning the dream into reality requires documentation and planning ahead. And i think people skip that. Well i think in order to even know what benefits are non-negotiable. This is a great exercise for everyone. You ought to sit and write down. What are the benefits at my current job right now and it's easy to think about okay. We'll have health insurance or yeah. They have a 401k plan. But really what are the benefits. Is it a flexible work schedule. Is it the ability that you have to be at a kid's baseball game or doctor's appointment you have the ability to go do that. Are there things where you have a career trajectory. You know where you are today and you know what you can work towards three five ten years from now. What are those current benefits. And if you leave this job this company this position this opportunity. How easy can you replicate those somewhere else because brown we talk all the time. There's a large financial institution in the state of georgia that we help them with their retirement plan and it is one of the most generous retirement plans we've ever seen in terms of what they do for their employees and so every year when we do their open enrollment meeting we remind them. Hey just so you know your employer here treats you guys incredibly well because they do this much for your benefit. We want them to know that if they were to change jobs or moves source or go somewhere else. Another employer might not do that exact same thing so make sure you have a true assessment of how good or how valuable your current circumstances. Yeah well in some of those things that can see that. Don't have as much sexy. Sizzle can actually be some of the most valuable things out there then. It is like a retirement plan because it's consistent so and that goes into income as well. There's a lot of people that i think. They under anticipate they see. The job has potential for big commissions. Big you know big high opportunity of high income versus the steady salary. That's coming in guys. There's something about something that's consistent and coming into two allows you to plan around and no versus the the the big bold opportunity that there's a reason those things are big and bold is they might have a high failure rate. Make sure that's built into your plan. As well consistency be incredibly valuable when it comes to building wealth and building wealth over the long term. You know in this study done by ramsey solutions. They've found that eighty percent of millionare's invested in their company 401k. So i'm going to say this a little bit differently. Eighty percent of millionare's had access to a 401k and consistently chose to utilize that benefit and take advantage of it. So just know that. There's nothing while you might have the opportunity to go start your own thing and go have the big commissions and have the big windfalls. There's something to be said just like you said brian for stability and consistency through time. Because that's a great way to build wealth. And i think we have a unique perspective in the fact that entrepreneur type endeavors have worked well. But i'm also not so caught up in the process of how sexy being an entrepreneur risk-taker or a celebrity of somebody who's got athletic powers. Power are ability or musician's anything that can we've done. We've actually done the research with our annual welt survey and tried to figure out who our clients at. How did they create their wealth. And it's actually somewhat shocking. How it's not through the virtuosos. it's not through. The entrepreneurs is not through the senior executives. The lion's share close to seventy percent of our clients are because there's just savers and there's consistency once again. So that's the way it goes back to idaho. I'm not trying to diminish the dream. Because i it would be very hypocritical for me to say. Hey don't go become an entrepreneur. Even though that's how. I had or had opportunity. But i do think people need to have the reality check of saying. That's not how most people do stone let instagram. Or somebody who's an influence. Or who has made it through that tough blender of the first years jay jew into leaving something that might be your path to success as well so okay so perhaps you're sitting there and you say you know what guys i hear you and i've done it and i've done the assessment and i've answered all the questions. I have a solid answer for all the questions and now i'm ready to make a change now. I'm ready to make that shift. Well the immediate next question you probably have is our right. How do i do you know. How do i go about getting a job. What are the ways. If there are nine point two million opportunities out there. How do i make sure that one of those opportunities is the perfect opportunity for me. And how do. I insert myself in there. So this is we're shifting now to. How do you get that job. So this is this is something we know a little bit about. We not only hire folks Hiring a lot of folks recently. But we've also had you'll get our first few jobs and i'll just go and tell you for my own experience. I was not what. I call a front row center in college in the fact that i didn't graduate the accounting program at georgia with the best. Gpa i don't know that. I was you know i've struggled with that. My whole my whole crew my whole life really if you look at standard. I have a daughter who's going into her senior year of high school. We're doing the whole standardized testing. And i and i was honestly i said look i never did great on any of the standardized test. Either there is so much more to being successful. Then the glossy brochure of what your resume can do and we want to help you figure out. How do you stand out so that people can say. Maybe you are that dyslexic weirdo. Like i am that needed to have some different things show through them. What was just on paper. And that's why the first thing we were talking about is how do you peacock audi you make yourself stand out. That's exactly right. Now look if you are one of those sitters and you are the person who has the fantastic grades in like the ten thousand. Sat in the fifty five act and all these things that are wonderful. That's great utilize that that's a way that you pika. But if that's not you you do have to find things find ways to make your self stand out. Even if those other candidates are those front row sitters are those folks with those grades so you have to do some self assessment to figure out okay. What skill do i have. Or what's unique about me. Or what action can i take. That is unique. Yeah and there's several ways this plays out you know this could be while you're going through the interview process. Make sure you're trying to find ways that you can do work that others aren't willing to do and then staying on the peacock type thing. How do you make yourself stand out and we actually had some experience on this. Is that like really our producer. She shared that. When one of her jobs they had specifically mentioned that they were looking for a creative creativity allocation process so she actually internalize and said hey. How can i do this process and actually show them on very creative and she did that. Going the extra mile with creating own website. She said she voted. A web coated our own website to to show her resume and over skill sets and all those things to show that she's willing to do work others are not willing to do and make yourself stand out guys. That is so important that you have to be willing to stand up. This is what her employer that we had. All these candidates come in. You're the only one that did this. You're the only person that built a website. The only person that liked put this skill set forth so it was no contest. It wasn't like we were trying to stop between you and someone else. It was you because none of the other competition did that if you can find ways to do that now for you. Maybe it's not coating a website. Maybe that's not the thing you do but there are some things that no matter who you are you can do really well. Well i mean my experience share also for myself. Was i coming out of an accounting major. Not having had good grades. I don't want you guys think that. Brian was on the verge of getting kicked out of college. I was nothing like that. But i was not like. I said the front row center. But i knew i was not going to be able to just rely on the grades when i got my my interview at the. Cpa firm that. I really wanted to work at. I found out. I tried to search around to find out who their who their clients were. You know look at audit reports. Look at other things that are published online and then you find out who their customers are leaving. Go interview one of their customers. That's actually it a hardware store. My hometown that i found out used this firm and i went and interviewed the owner of that firm and then i made sure i shared that in the interview sequence after i worked there for few years the partner share with me. That's why they hired me. They had never had a candidate. That actually was so interesting the job that they went and qualified and interviewed a customer to make sure that i liked the business. They said they're interviewing people but they never have candidates that are interviewing to make sure that it's a good fit for them to in that really stood out to them. I'll share mine now. Has hesitate to say this because we talked a little bit about this in pre show. Prep brian what. I would say that. I did unique in my interview. Process is i asked hard questions now. I'm nervous that. When i say that people are immediately going to jump to okay great interview process. I'm gonna start negotiating salary. We're going to talk about benefits. We're gonna go back and forth. That's not what we're talking about. We'll give you some insight on that but bryan when i first interviewed with you. Many many many years ago it went really well. I felt like we hit it off. I felt like we had a great reporter and then radio silence. Nothing happened a month passed and then two months pass and it was getting to the end of the semester. And so i just called you and said hey mr preston just want to touch base. I never heard back from you. I felt like we had a great interview. And i felt like we really hit it off and man. I just going to let you know. I feel like i'm perfect for this job. I feel like i would be the best fit for this. Would you mind telling me what it was. Why why did you not select me. And what i did. Is i put you on the spot where you had to one. Give me some advice about while the other guy or other girl was better or to give me some things to work on either way i was going to get value from whatever feedback you gave me just so turns out. The feedback turned out pretty good. Well the reality is situation. The other side of this guy's without going on too much of a tangent was. I'd already hired the position. It was one of my clients. Will my bigger clients daughters needed a job and she's a marketing. She wasn't even in the financial field. But i was like you know what i was having trouble getting clients time. What i need is a marketing person as well as in on it. When bo called and ask those hard questions i was like. Wow this is actually who i need and it is amazing. That bo was able to change my trajectory on who i was hiring and even create a very complicated hard conversation with that that client. That was no longer hiring. Her daughter with a clot is still a client. Well the daughter is now a clai and in which she jokes about that every time you have my my dad but it's It is one of those things. Where in but i think that that was very hard. We have Marci any of you guys who are customers or clients of the of the firm. You probably deal with marcy. Marcy kolkata if you think about You know if you look at the opportunity go stand out. Do the things other people aren't willing to do. And it can be be good and that also leads the fact that you need to be authentic and the fact that are you sending out you know thank you. Are you guys have a great interview. But then don't follow up with people and that's not going to go well. I know that sounds old school. But it's true as an employer this one so silly but something. That's like handwritten. And i know that email is like the way that we do things these days but every time we interview somebody and we get a handwritten note. We're like Yeah that's good. That's really really good. Another thing that you can just be authentic on your resume. Be who you actually say you are. Don't try to customize your resume for who you think the employer will want you to be be authentic about who you actually are and figure out how that can benefit your employer. Make sure that you are doing your research to know what it is the employers looking for and you can make sure that you are indeed a good fit for the job that you're applying for on an. I'm putting both of them together. But on the thank you letter and i don't think you can be you do too much if you wanna send a thank you email but then also write a handwritten letter. Nobody's gonna be like oh but they already sent me an email now. I got a letter to you. Can't do too much. So don't i'd rather you over do that. Because i'll tell you what could be perceived as excitement in azam that is going to get you over a lot of barriers whereas if maybe somebody interviewed a little bit better than you but they just came off as you know that you know. They don't really they're great and talented. But they don't have a lot of passion for this this organization. This might put you over the top and you really oughta consider that as an opportunity so okay so cinde thank you letter be authentic right personal cover letter again. Everyone kind of does cover letters. Got to figure out how to make your personal makers unique. This next one is the one i think is so exciting well but the cover letter even an email. I'm just telling you be. I know you were moving it on. But i just want to. You've got to stand out here. And i know a cover letter. Sounds old school so but it doesn't have to. Maybe it's email with a unique take short that major show that you did more research on on the company and then here's the last one. This is the one bose excited at the jump right into is really and this is more of a a behavioral hack a superpower if you can understand this use the rule of reciprocate and the fact. That guys were us humans. We have some weird coating and us in the fact that if somebody does something for you you feel like there's a social contract that's been created. Think about when you go to an ice cream store what they offer you free samples. Why do they offer you free samples because they know as soon as you take that free sample. you're going to feel the social contradicted. This you have to buy something from them guys. The same thing could happen. You could make yourself stand out. We have a few experienced shares on this is that we had a client that was trying to get into a franchise of a national brand. Couldn't get anybody to return as call so. He sent a tumbler With the the school mascot of the college the the head person he was trying to reach went to guess what he got a call back. 'cause he sent a twenty five thirty dollar gift to this thing. I know that sounds ridiculous. Because obviously we get your first job sending out thirty dollar gifts to. Everybody can kind of expensive but you could. You could target it. But there's another says when you show up to that interview you don't show up with some a plate of fancy cookies or cookies you made yourself or you could do something that simple because i also share week a an investment a little longer than we probably should have because he sent us every year so it was creating a social contract where i was scared to fire them. The same thing happens over and over again. Used that power guys. That's a behavioral. Hack that you need to figure out. How do you make yourself stand out in. At least stand out in their brain where they remember. Yes yup this. This could be a social contract. Could work to your benefit. Okay so you want to learn how to peacock. Here's the second thing and this one. I worry i'll see. I'm not an old guy and i'm about to say something to make me sound like such old guy. I worry about the next generation coming through. Because sometimes i feel like this gets a little bit lost but excitement and enthusiasm in the interview process and the conversation process can go a very long way. You'll probably have figured out to do this. Show and other things. I'm a people pleaser. I mean if you wanna know what drives ma wanting to be liked in making other people feel good and happy is been great for the show creation. But it's also one of those things where it makes me a little needy to get when we sit across each other kind of feedback that you're happy to be there. And i am amazed when i'm interviewing can't it. Sometimes where on paper they look. Awesome and brilliant and great but then have you know it's like they're kind of annoyed had to be there you know you can censor their going oceans. So if that is you. I'm telling you enthusiasm or excitement. Because you're thinking anybody who's interviewing you is trying to figure out. Is this somebody. That's going to part of my day family. That i'm gonna wanna work with if you come in and seem like you have better things to do that is going to show through no matter. How talented or how good you are. You need to be careful with that. Now be careful going the other way because if it is manufactured and it's fake and it's just sopping wet with like in office in authenticity authentic. If it's authentic people are going to see that they're going to notice that so you have to be authentic but it's okay to be excited about a job. It's okay to be enthusiastic about why you might be a valuable piece of this organization or this company. This person that you're interviewing with that's a big deal and confidence goes with his two i. I haven't experienced share and daniel had no idea exited. Make it in the show notes. You know when we were interviewing daniel. Daniel actually graduated. He was the quarter. We were interviewing. Interns was the the quarter or semester. I'm old school. But this semester that daniel was graduating college and we were interviewing for interns going back to school after they were summer with us and when we interviewed and we said dang you're graduating and This is an internship. I feel nervous about you. Moving here for you know doing a lease on an apartment all these other things when this is just a three month commitment that we're signing up for and i'll never forget dangles response to us and you have to know day daniels. Typical he's like. Oh if you guys give me this internship you'll hire me just very matter of fact if you give me this internship you'll hire me so it'll be okay. I don't mind signing the lease. i'll take that risk. I was just like. I guess we if he wanted this position. How could we not do this. So there is something about enthusiasm. Confidence and excitement goes a very long way. And i love the fact that i get the share that now post dangle being successful with with the whole admitted through the internship. So that's why we all hear me calling fulltime equivalent daniel. There's a journey there. There's a story that's actually exciting for us to kind of talk about because he talked us in just like you talked me into hiring you daniel kind of the same thing with that in the theme notice the theme with brian. Press all right. So here's the third one and this one is so easy but so overlooked. Do your research now for those of you out there watching us. You know about the money guys show. You've obviously founded. What's amazing is when we have financial advisors financial associates from other parts of the country that come and interview to be a financial associated are far about wealth. We're always amazed when they've never heard of the money guy. Show you guys do a podcast. That's kind of cool. Come on do your research. Look up the person you're interviewing with so if you can do a little bit of research about either the person that you're talking to or the company that you are pursuing it will set you apart from the crowd and let them know that you are serious and sincere about your desire to be with that organization well. This is a sibling of peacocking. And the fact that. I mean 'cause it really these are all interconnected we each other is because if you show up with an interview and you've done nothing but just go to the website and guys you're not yourself up to show that you are going to be different than all the other candidates that are out there interviewing for the exact same job so go out there. I mean i'm with you. I mean that is such a turn off when we 'cause we do use some recruiting firms and other things when we hire and i'm just amazed that these these people come and they interview. They had no idea we're doing had no idea they. Somebody oughta ask say. Hey you guys are growing at thirty five to forty percent a year off. what's going on. They just your curiosity of life and an opportunity for the future say they. Obviously you're doing something. It's be curious when you're interviewing and make sure that you done your research on the employer. So they can see that enthusiasm that you took the time because in that you're committed to this process as well the fourth tip that we would give you as when it comes to your resume or when it comes to your cover letter when it comes to your written communication. Get rid of the jargon. I can't tell you how many times i will be reviewing and look into financial instrument doing this for a while now and i'll read somebody's resume and just be like what i don't even know what this just said. Because they tried to put a bunch of it. Just make sure it's clear. Make sure you clearly express who you are what you do why you're valuable and what your experiences i think this goes on. One of the reasons were successful is that we do have a passion for what we do. So we don't have to since we know the material we don't have to try to spin people's head with fancy jargon complexity to to try to get a concept across and i feel like the same thing happens in this is a this is a fallacy that i think a lot of young people will do is especially if you're doing something that's a very specialized career is. You'll think i need to use the jargon. I needed to make myself seem smarter. So that i can be at the level these people. I'm trying to impress and get to. The problem is guys. you haven't had the experience completely of that person. That's probably interviewing you. So the reality is they can see through what you're doing and it will come off much emptier. It will seem off instead of coming off as a person that is transparent and week. There's opportunity to mold this into a great asset for the team. You come off as a faker and that is a. You just need to be careful. You wanna come off as the real version of yourself that that has the opportunity to grow within this organization and that leads to number five and this is a powerful. I mean we we saved. I want i won't say he would say the best. For alaska's peacocking is so powerful standing out. This is one that i think is. If you look at how people get jobs there network really is a powerful and a lot of people know. This is when i you know. I didn't grow up rich. I grew up poor. I don't have the network because i've done that too. Both of us come from very humble beginnings the whole reason i switched from finance to accounting. Is that i knew i graduated with a finance degree. I was going up at a bank or a brokerage firm trying to cold call people and i was like i don't know anybody with money they could even potentially be a client so i'm not going to do that. That's not what we're talking about. When i talk about networking remember how i told you. I got my first job in public accounting. I went to a hardware store in my hometown to interview that customer of the cpa firm. I was trying to work with. So you don't have to your network doesn't necessarily have to be your aunt your own call or a neighbor down the street if you don't live run in those circles but you can't expand your network to who do you go to church with businesses there in your community there are. There's a lot of intersections. Why do we have this game of the separation of kevin. Bacon is because you probably very much yourself or not that far removed from where you're trying to. I'm always amazed of people now. I don't know. I never had this issue but i know a lot of our clients and we have some colleagues and friends who are almost ashamed to use their network. Perhaps your parents were well known in the community or perhaps they had some business success and one connected. And there's this desire that you know. I'm gonna do this on my own. I'm not going to use mom and dad. I'm not gonna use the help. I'm not gonna do that. I'm going to go my own. I guess there's something noble about that. And i understand sort of the psyche there but if you do have tools at your disposal. It seems crazy not to use them. You know one of my best friends in the whole world. He has a son who is about to be a senior in college and his son is studying accounting at a university down in georgia and he's thinking about financial planning and so my buddy calls me and they're like hey you know. What would you think about my son. Maybe doing an internship with you guys. I was like hey you can't interview for him. He's got a call and tab and talk to me and we'll go through it and so his son called me. we talked and we gave him an internship. We've allowed him to come in and kind of see what we do and how we do things here. It was because of that personal connection that he was even able to land this internship. It might not have happened any other way. Had it not been for that so use those things to your disposal. There's wrong with doing that if you're going into a job interview you're going to interview with a small business with the business owner whoever and you've not at least check okay. Do we have common friends on facebook or linked in or you know. Fill in the social media to see what connections you have. You may be missing a huge opportunity to build a bridge. That could be very very powerful to the interview process or one of the things that i hate that. We've gotten to a size that i can't do it as much as we used to. But i love when an brand new employees like one of the first things i did with you bos. We sat down. And i walked you through where each client young in from and i call it. The spider web of relationships of hey. This person was referred by this person who was referred by. This person is just so fun. The same thing happens professionally too. I think about the fact of we got really from the producer for the show for for those that might be new from the fact that One of our associate planners here when discharge weather. Yep and then i think about. We got nate because really ran in circles within the the radio network that we were able to get nate. I mean there's a lot of the networks really do help create opportunities so so kind of. It's a culmination of everything we discussed. Don't be scared to stand out. Don't be scared to show your enthusiasm if you want a job. Make sure you tell them that. I mean a bone. I disagreed on a little bit. Because i wanted to. Put that in the show notes because it makes me so happy when somebody when i'm interviewing when they say look i'm excited about this. If you guys offer it to me. This is where i wanna be. I 'cause look. I was horrible a dating. You know 'cause there was one of those things where i had to have a girl practically club me over the head or literally like my wife situation where her best friend said. Hey my friend thinks you're cute. You'll ask her out. You know 'cause. I am just not the type of person that picks up on all context clues. You don't know you're the person you're interviewing might be the exact same way that just go ahead and let them know that. This is the opportunity because a lot of people will be in their career. Their dream job opportunity but i think they're trying to play it. Cool trying to play coy when you should probably just go ahead and be transparent and that leads to. I saw something on social media and i think i have a unique perspective on this because everybody was comforting. This person is it. Somebody had been offered a a really good job and then they came back and started trying to negotiate things and then the company said nope. Just kidding rescind the offer. We're not going to do that. And then this person was lamenting on social media and everybody was being very supportive of tone place must have just been jerks horrible and so forth but i have a unique perspective as as the employer and the fact that you should always and this is probably would be the six tip. That didn't make it on here. Know where you are in in in this negotiation or discussion if this is your big break your threshold year there and there's a chance that you could get to do something that has a chance of a lifetime. Don't screw it up with a little stuff. Because there are so many things that i look at. What would it take all. I needed a chance to get my foot in the door. Why do we have that saying. I just need to get my foot in the door. If you're good it will work itself out. I really do believe that talent can rising. You can do that. But don't let something because you read on a blog post somewhere that you should always asked for twenty percent more than what they offer you or some other number because there's a chance say vice there might be one hundred people that want the same job and they were going to go with you but now they're looking at you going man. This might be more trouble than we're thinking you know. So that's not saying you can't negotiate. I'm just saying no where you are. There's one hundred can is trying to get this job and you're one of the hundred. You might not have as much power as if they're your want a million yourself but be realistic when you evaluate who you are in that process. Because if it's just something. I think people need clarity on that. So they don't screw up that they're big shot. I you know. I feel eminem playing in the background. I just don't want you to start wrapping. I'm not gonna do that. But i do. Want people to be aware of where you are in the situation so you don't miss your shot. There are nine point two million open jobs right now so this could be a fantastic opportunity for you to make a shift to change jobs to adjust inside of your current job to start business to fill a new void but make sure you approach it. Well make sure you follow these steps to know that you're making the right decision for yourself. The right decision for your family and you're doing it the right way because with nine point two million jobs and forty percent of americans quitting their job. It means. there's a lot of competition out there. And just like you are financial mutant in your personal finances if you are changing jobs yet to figure out how to be a job how to be a candidate mutant to insert yourself in a very real and powerful way. We're gonna keep loading up on the personal finance side. If you've not gone to a website yet go to money. Guy dot com slash resources. We have tons of free resources available for you out there. We have tax. Cheats sheets food to levintv operation deliverables. How powerful are your dollar worksheets. If there are things that you wanna know tools you wanna use make sure you got your website. Money guide dot com slash resources and check those out guys. Thanks so much. We love that. We bring you this content all the time i mean i was. You know it's funny. We used to do. The show. started off biweekly. Now it's just we're coming at you all the time so i thank you guys going on this journey with us do check out. Those resources both talked about subscribe turn on the notifications. Because we're doing livestream. Were dropping dropping in all the time you won't know about unless you get in those notifications so take care of us that way and we're gonna keep creating content. I'm your brand preston mr bohannon. Some money got team out. The money guys show is hosted by brian. Preston about wealth management is a registered investment advisory firm regulated by the securities and exchange commission in accordance and compliance with the securities laws and regulations abound. Wealth management does not render or offer to render personalized investment or tax advice through the money. Guys show the information provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute financial tax investment or legal advice.

brian preston brian Brian Bowie ramsey solutions jay jew nashville cpa joyce korea georgia Prep brian
COVID-19 News: A Hospital System Overwhelmed, Booster Shots Update

Short Wave

09:41 min | 2 months ago

COVID-19 News: A Hospital System Overwhelmed, Booster Shots Update

"You're listening to shortwave from npr. Mattie safai here in the last two weeks or so the number of new daily covert cases in the. Us has increased by about forty percent. Compared to this time last year we have three times the number of new cases on average. I mean think about that last year we did not have the vaccines hospitals in the south and the sun belt are being hit especially hard right now so today on the show we've got a covert news roundup with npr's health correspondent alison. Aubrey we hear about hospital system in mississippi that struggling to find beds for patients talk about kids getting vaccinated and booster shots for people who are immuno-compromised this shortwave the daily science. Podcast from npr. This message comes from npr sponsor. Ford introducing the mustang mach e. Here's the global brand director of electric vehicles jayson castro iota on the challenge of creating an all electric suv. That drives like a mustang. The normal challenge of making suv go fast. Is the higher center of gravity. The beauty of the battery electric vehicle platform is that all of the weight was down low on the floor. Because that's where the batteries housed. And that's where the electric motors are to learn more about the new all electric pony in the mustang stable goto four dot com alright. Npr's health correspondent alison. Aubrey you've been looking into these rising case numbers. What are they telling you. Well you know. The viruses is circulating so widely really throughout the country. In fact eighty four percent of us counties. Have a high rate of transmission. That's according to the cdc but parts of the south mattie are really struggling including mississippi. Where only about forty. Two percent of eligible people are fully vaccinated. I spoke to dr luanne woodward she oversees the university of mississippi medical center now. They started delaying or postponing elective procedures. A few weeks back and now they're just struggling to find beds for the surge of cova patients. The beds are full. The s a useful but ers are full. patients are backing up and on top of that. We're short staffed. Everybody status short staffed. And we've got staff out because they are sick or they have family members that are sick. Ellison yes she says it is a very tough situation there and more than ninety percent of the people hospitalized with cova and right now. They're in mississippi. Have not been vaccinated and i have to imagine. I mean just from the tone of her voice. This has to be very difficult for the doctors and nurses and other frontline hospital staff. Yeah i mean. I think the observation of a lot of people is that it didn't have to come to this. If more people had been vaccinated and dr woodward says healthcare workers. There are frustrated. They're tired this has been going on a long time. And you know it can be especially tough when you have to tell a patient who was scheduled for say a heart procedure that no. You'll have to wait. There are no beds right now. It's not just adults in the hospital with kobe. It's kids to. She says the pediatric wards are also filling up. We have more pediatric patients. Right now hospitalized with kobe that at any point prior in this pandemic we are seeing a younger group of patients that are getting very sick with this and again many of them are previously healthy. You just so unsettling for parents to hear this especially as a new school year begins. And he's sippy. Several school districts have pivoted to virtual learning given the severity of the situation. There now it is true. Matty that most kids who get kovin heavenly mild infections. Or maybe they're even as symptomatic. But the cdc now has reports of about forty four hundred cases of multi-system inflammatory syndrome in children this is throughout the pandemic that they've been keeping count. This is one of the conditions that leads kids to the er and nationwide the number of kids diagnosed with cova in recent weeks as just shot up. Yeah i mean this has to be adding to the urgency of getting more kids who are eligible twelve and older vaccinated but also getting the vaccine authorized for younger kids right. Yeah there's a huge push by pediatricians to get more middle school and high school aged kids vaccinated. And i'd also like to see the vaccine authorized for kids five to eleven right now. Vaccine makers visor and moderna have been asked to expand the number of young children in their clinical trials to include thousands of more kids. Now the point of this is to be extra careful that they're spotting any adverse events related to the vaccine. The pediatrician say. They hope that this doesn't delay authorisation. I spoke to moderna about this. The potential timing and what they've seen so far in the clinical trial with children. Here's dr jacqueline miller. She's a senior vice president at moderna. The safety profile so far is really comparable to the adults and so far no safety concerns and then for the moment or targeting at the end of the year for the six to eleven year olds and early next year for the six month olds two six year olds but that actually could be done more rapidly. Depending on the rate of enrollment she says depending on where you are in the country. There are still opportunities for families who want to enroll their kids in this trial. All right okay. I want to switch gears a little bit ellison and talk about booster shots or an additional dose of the vaccine for people. What's the latest there well last week. The cdc authorized a third dose for people with weakened immune systems. Now i mean compromise. People make up about two point seven percent of adults in the us about seven million people and they're more likely to get severely ill from covert nineteen also overall. Though it varies they tend to have a lower antibody response to the initial vaccines and are more likely to transmit the virus to household contacts. So there's a pretty comprehensive list of people who are eligible for the additional. Does it includes people who are receiving treatment for certain cancers organ transplant patients who take medicines that suppress the immune system people with advanced hiv infection and people who are taking high dose corticosteroids or other drugs that can suppress the immune system. So if you think you fall into any of these groups. It's a good idea to talk to your doctor. So the third dose at this time is not being broadly recommended. That's right. I mean it is possible that the us could expand eligibility at some point right now. Vaccine makers are testing different formulations of the third dose moderna is set to study a booster dose that specifically targets the delta variant as well as different formulations. That could protect against multiple strains. Here's dr miller again. Antibodies wayne over. Time and i think ultimately the immunity after our vet seen will wane as well and because we have not really gotten the pandemic under control. I do think that people will need a booster at some point in time. She says by the end of this month the company plans to be giving the delta booster as part of their ongoing clinical trial. The vaccine all right ellison before you go you know you've been following the so closely i'm just wondering can you give us kind of an idea of where we're headed in the near term future. Sure a some models predict that this surge could peak in mid october. Recently on nbc. Michael oster home who directs the center for infectious disease. Research and policy at the university of minnesota said this surge could sustain itself for at least another four to six weeks. We're now seeing in the southeast georgia south carolina north carolina kentucky tennessee southern illinois all started to take off. We're seeing in the north west in states like oregon and washington and he says look at hospitalizations. Around the country the average daily admissions have more than tripled over the last month. I mean every day about ten thousand covert patients on average are being admitted to hospitals across the country. Okay allison aubrey as always we appreciate you. Keeping us updated. Thanks for coming on the show. Great to be here. Thanks many this episode was produced by thomas. Lou edited by jane greenhow. Andy it lay and fact checked by indie keira. The audio engineer for this episode was quickly. I mattie sify thanks. For listening to shortwave from npr npr's planet money. Summer school is in session. This season is all about investing. Like is it better to buy a lot of one stock or a little bit of a lot of stocks bonds. Is it ever too late to start. Investing new classes every wednesday to labor day in the planet money. Podcast feed this message comes from. Npr sponsor aspiration with an aspiration. Debit card you can choose to plant a tree with every purchase. You'll get up to ten percent. Cashback at environmentally friendly partners learned details when you sign up for a better world at aspiration dot com slash green.

npr Mattie safai mississippi jayson castro Aubrey dr luanne woodward cdc alison cova dr woodward moderna kobe inflammatory syndrome university of mississippi medi dr jacqueline miller electric motors npr
Tools To End Hunger  Katie Martin - Farm To Table Talk

Farm To Table Talk

44:03 min | 8 months ago

Tools To End Hunger Katie Martin - Farm To Table Talk

"I'm an optimist by nature. I think there's a lot of reasons to you know with kovin. All of us have had to give it and change the way that we do all kinds of things. I think people will be more nimble and more open to changes because we've had to go through so much upheaval this past year. It's a perfect time to be thinking. How can we reinvent the way that we run our program. It's time for conversations about our food and how it's grown on farm to table talk with your host. Roger watson informed the table talk we talk to people pursuing their dreams and doing something that fulfills them trying to make a difference and one of the areas were many people are trying to make differences dealing with with hunger not only in the united states but all over the world and so i really appreciate having a chance to talk to katie martin today because katie's in the middle of this and she's gonna be sharing what she's learned in a book that's coming out the spring katie. Welcome to farm to table. Talk so much for having me katie. We're going to get into the book. We're going to get into the issues of the book. But we're going to i to start with your the executive director of the foodshare institute. What is that so It's called the institute for hongo research and solutions and it's based out of a for bank in connecticut called share and We recently merged with the connecticut foodbank. So we've got a long name now through chair slash connecticut grouping The goal of the institute is to serve as a resource for other food banks food pantries community partners including academic researchers to find holistic solutions to the problem of hunger. And we do this in a number of ways We develop programs to increase access to healthy food. We evaluate programs to identify what works. And what doesn't work so well and we provide trainings and resourcesa. Other folks can implement in use these evidence based programs and one of our big goals and this is largely. What i talk about in my book is to create a paradigm cher to rethink the way that we think about hunger moving away from a short term band-aid approach to longer-term more systemic solutions. I talked to people that are raising food. And i talked to people that are consuming food certainly off and am one thing that strikes me is in area that they are kind of comes together. I mean people that are producing food companies that are producing food. People that want to help feed people and then people will wanna get fed When you look at the history of a food systems in around the country could you give us a snapshot of where this all started. I mean at at some stage. Where would you call them with a food. Banks food pantries or or other programs like this. Where did they originate now. It's a great question And it's i think really important to understand that history to know where we've been to know where maybe we can go where we should go in the future So in the us we have a host of federal food assistance programs. The largest of which is the snap program what used to be called food stamps And we have school lunch and school breakfast programs. The week program for women infants and children. Many of these programs were developed in the nineteen sixties nineteen seventies. We have great evidence to show big work. They help reduce food insecurity. They help improve health outcomes and in the nineteen eighties during the reagan administration. There were some drastic cuts to federal assistance programs namely the snap program and many families found themselves having a hard time putting good on the table. even backing up further A lot of When we think of agricultural policies in the nineteen seventies that changed on the way that food is is brown and the way that buddha's produced The first food bank was started in one thousand nine hundred late nineteen sixties and it was a way to tackle food waste and to help people who didn't have enough food Many of these banks started a little bit in the nineteen seventies but it was really in the nineteen eighties with the cuts to the snap program with stamp program and people recognizing that there were people in communities around the country. That didn't have enough food Very often these were started by faith based organizations Churches synagogues etcetera. That would build food. Pantries local based food pantries for banks are the large Warehouse style Organizations that help stockpile those foods in distribute to brew pantries and since the nineteen eighties. These banks and food pantries have grown in number and size So that we have for pantries and nearly every community around the country we have food banks that serve every county and the country and yet food insecurity and hunger are still pervasive public health problems affecting millions of americans in every county in the country. There's a program like this. Yeah so on. If you if you search on on the feeding america website you can put in your zip code or your town and you can find the food bank. That represents your local area so they are food. Banks that helped provide food and every county and the country and feeding america is the National umbrella organization helps to source food and build relationships with food donors For two hundred food banks and foodshare and connecticut food bank. i'm affiliated with. We are members of feeding america There are also about one hundred fifty or two hundred additional food banks that are not affiliated with feeding america that also helped to collect and distribute food. So it's it's when you talk about food systems. Typically we think about grocery stores school meals farmer's markets community gardens as being part of our food system and local farms of course very often people overlook the role that food pantries and food banks play in this national food system of ours that there are millions of americans who rely on a local food pantry chronically not just once a year but Very often once a week once or twice a month for their groceries now when people look at the history of programs like this trying to help people that are poor and hungry many go back and look to the roosevelt era and the time coming out of the new deal and there were many many programs trying to employ people and and i just assumed that food stamps started back then but they actually started. Later than that is entering. The pilot program was started shortly after the great depression. Believe my history serves me. Nineteen thirty to wish There was a pilot program that was run for a number of years not Very widespread And it was reintroduced as a formal program during the kennedy presidency in the nineteen sixties. Well and then as he's programs grew sometime. You're you're talking about the eighties is interesting to me. Because within that period of time there is a lot more attention starting to say. Well wait a minute. May we're doing too much where our taxes are too high. We've gone too. Were wasting a lot of money. So i am reading between the lines but what you're saying it sounds to me like kind of in that period that there was such a a cutback that the need became more clear for communities to do their own thing. an again. What i'm hearing you say is that it's one thing to recognize and wring your hands and saying gee isn't that a shame because we become a stingy or greedy and on the other hand people were saying well. They're wasting money. You know and people need to help themselves and all that sort of story too but somehow spontaneously these these programs were just a a recognition apparently of a need all the way across the country and they serve. What are we going to do about it if we're not going to get enough in a government program. How'd we as the local community take care of these people that just can't make ends meet and can't put enough on the table to feed their families. It's a great point and i think. Our charitable food system. And that's the way that i described food. Banks and food pantries It's charitable good. Really shows the innate compassion that we americans have our ingenuity to say you know went. There's a need we need to address it. let's go. Let's put this to work however it really you know it was. It was a turning point in the nineteen eighties shifting from the strong belief that it's the government's responsibility to provide an adequate social safety net so when people fall on hurt times. There's you know there's a safety net to protect you It really shifted from that long held belief that that is the government's role to a shift in feeling that this is a charitable response. This is something that local communities when you think about President bush the burst the idea of a thousand points of light of really encouraging 'anti-racism. That really We can have people in local communities that help their neighbors. There's a lot of good that comes from that but it also has morphed into this Really taking the government the hook for providing an adequate social safety net and it starts to me livable wages. You know that if people are Putting in time in job it should be the minimum by which you can Take care of your family and purchase enough groceries and food for your families and that has eroded since the nineteen seventies own back to the point that you were making about. How every county has some program like this because we've gone through a very political year where we've looked at whether you were in a red state or blue state or read county or a blue county or how suburbs feel versus how rural areas feel and and To what extent the government will be helped coming up with programs and so forth. But i wonder whether the facts are than as as you're suggesting here i think is that there's a generous kind considered people everywhere in the country whether or not they were from a quote conservatives area or rumour liberal area that that they may roll up their sleeves and say. Let's do something no matter whether they were republican or democrat or progressives or conservatives and am i putting words in your mouth or is there some truth to that now i think that's i think you're spot on and it's important to know also that this charitable food system would absolutely not exist if it weren't for an army of volunteers so in communities all around the country there are folks that gave up their free time To help provide sort food delivered. Pickup food from grocery stores delivered to food pantry Sort food in food banks to get it to the local communities so yes. We are a very compassionate national on regardless of political background That really wouldn't exist stepped word for lots of goodwill throughout the country. You know. I've i've done a little bit of this. Haven't done a whole lot more just talking to you. Feeling guilty that. I haven't done more than i have. But but My wife and i have volunteer before have gone in with a church group and spent Saturday's that we were loading boxes up for deliveries to families. In in this was like second harvest in watsonville and out in california. You've got a broader range of fresh produce to that makes it into the mix. Were it in in that way but it includes canned goods and other things too. And and i think of the team that all comes together. And you're in there working with them. Seemed like our casemates. Thirty people we were someone was organizing and so forth. You come away from that thinking. That was a great saturday. You know it might not remember one that just went out to brunch or something and took a drive but but dean together with everybody in that kind of setting and getting your hands on filling the boxes with with food and then also in that process. You're also looking at the farms. They came from. And you're kinda proud of it. You know you you notice these farmers in you notice that they're providing celery and they're providing almonds and and they're providing strawberries and It's a good feeling to see that happening. Yeah and i love the talk. I mean your whole podcast. Isabel farm-to-table right and thinking about how and where our food is grown in. How do we get that really good locally grown food. In too many different distribution areas thankfully there has been quite a movement to improving the nutritional quality up charitable food because historically most of the charitable food provided was nonperishable. You know when you'd bank up when this early started the idea was will bogle food pantries. Don't have the refrigeration in the capacity. The storage facilities to be able to handle fruits and vegetables dairy meats. i'm so it was all canned goods and when you think about the nutritional Can you know. It's it's certainly not as ideal as we would like in terms of fresh wholesome food that's shipley and i would encourage folks to really realize i'm in so possible to distribute fresh perishable food to preventative pantries. And we know there's demand for it from people who receive that food and Sometimes it's a matter of building the capacity of local food pantries to make sure they have the storage capacity refrigerators but there certainly is demand and so making that link between fresh ernest specially been slowly sourced into local communities to the people who Who need it is really important to point out. Rick quickly that it's just california or these areas that are able to produce fresh because because now we haven't greenhouses am we're having rooftop gardens. Were having people that are raising food in fact in some abandoned supermarkets back in the midwest that are being turned into farms. And and they don't come up with product that is all is in every case going to be able to go straight to the store or to the restaurants and they're producing product to. That's that's fresh. Even twelve months a year everywhere in the country absolutely and one program. That is Really a superstar in his work is The vermont food bank has a vermont. Fresh program where they Have increased the access to help you fresh food and i figure if you could do it in vermont. It anywhere around the country certainly little bit easier when you're in Fertile land lead california but air manny aggravate of ways that we can get helping them into. Today's gimblett comes back to is that supposedly close to forty percent of the food that we're producing doesn't make it to somebody's table let alone to be consumed in digested and everything. What a waste. When we have hungry people pulling back to looking at what might be a quick snapshot of something taking place of Is there such a thing as a typical formation of a community that puts together food bank or pantry or like second harvest like i was familiar with How did these come to be a so Many food pantries started in the nineteen eighties in the basements or closets of bank-based based organizations often churches and they were tended to be relatively small Non perishable food banks Started is very community based smallish organizations and the history of them They continued to outgrow their size so we would increase the size of the warehouse in the late. One thousand nine hundred eighty s and then about a decade later do another capital campaign and build a bigger warehouse build a bigger warehouse However i'm a fan of the Adage that when you've seen one food pantry you've seen one pantry and so while. There are similarities to these programs. They really are. It's it's very different than the school lunch program or the school breakfast program that are very standardized and regulated They each have their own unique local flair and layout out and hours of operation. So i often really encourage folks if you can find out who your regional food bank is and go visit them. Take a look. I think you'll be surprised at the scope and scale of the work that they're doing go visit a local food pantry And what i try to do. My book is really outlined. Some best practices and innovative approaches and planting the seeds to encourage people to evolve and adopt some new ways of thinking in terms of providing charitable food. You know when you talk about these systems changing from from county to county. That's what i really love about. A two is that it's spontaneous. I mean you think of programs that they're going to be rolled down from the government from a state government or government certain. Certainly like ballet. Jim uses example. Maybe like vaccines lately. you know. it's very a great deal but you think of them being somewhat uniform on. they're trying to roll him out across the country. But in fact that strength that you're mentioning of being able to make each one unique to what's needed in that area. I mean people get together in identify a need and they're kind of well intentioned and zion. Here's what has to happen here. And i envisioned candy that that Either in a church basement or some other group they get together with a white whiteboard and they say well. We have a problem here. Folks what are we gonna do about it. that's where maybe they can come and get your new book right. Well and one thing. I think is important to think about. Is you mentioned. Here's a problem in our community and what we do about it right. And that's how a lot of this started. Debt folks in a community would hear that there were people who were laid off or eat went through a divorce or had a health issue and they were having a hard time getting enough suit and the way we define a problem helps define our solution to that problem so if we think about the problem of hunger as people don't have enough food there isn't enough food then. The solution is quite simple. We need to collect and distribute more food. And i would say that's a lot of the history of how we've thought out the problem of hunger and how we have gone about trying to solve. The problem of hunger is very much related to collecting distributing more food to more people every year. And we've done a really really good job of that but if you think about the problem of hunger instead as being rooted in poverty and systemic injustices that make it harder for certain groups and certain people to access an afford enough food. Well then the solution becomes more complex on and solutions need to be more holistic and more rabah ring and addressing other causes of why people don't can't aboard and nothing similarly if we think about the issue of hunger or food insecurity as people don't have enough food then we can look at it as just providing more and we still empty bellies and calories are calories. You know it's just about getting people don't have enough. But if we think about the problem of food insecurity and hunger as linked very strongly to chronic disease risk we know the people who are food insecure or disproportionally higher rates of type two diabetes obesity hypertension et cetera. In our solution can really focus not just on pounds of food but the quality food and making sure that if you're providing charitable food that is nutritious and healthy as possible boy then opens it up a lot so on the one hand if you say people are hungry okay. Let's all bring food together. And here's the food but if you go back to the fact that people Have other basic issues that they don't make enough money that they're not able to keep their kids in child care in or whatever else what. Go get a job someplace else. So are you saying that these entities these food banks also on this broader role of trying to find Help people either make more money solve some problems and then then the next beyond that is the food is medicine issue. And and the fact is that the publicans paint a cost when you have so many people that have Obesity diabetes and other issues that are related to To the food habits That seems pretty ambitious. Katie that you can in these counties that in the past just says it. Let's get food. Let's get people to donate contribute and participate and let's bundled up and give to the people that are hungry so do this same institutions then. Decide that they're going to talk about why these people problems in the first place and say we're not going to stop with just giving them food but we're gonna help them solve this problem that they don't have enough money or enough knowledge about their their diets and we're gonna take take that onto our yes and ask so Increasingly around the country You know when. I go to conferences and i talk with other food. Bank staff from around the country increasingly folks are saying there must be a better way to do this like we have been. We've been doing this good work for decades so the history is important right because we've been doing this. Charitable food work for over forty years. And we do a really good job abbott. We become very efficient at providing food and collecting and distributing food. But when you look at the fact that the problem is still here and it largely mirrors the poverty rate will then it's time to think about other solutions and many are and there are a lot of different approaches were tackling this so there are some food banks. Like the oregon. Food bank is is a clear model. That's looking at progressive policies on at the state level in terms of living wages and other progressive policies to food pantries and food banks that are involved with healthcare partnerships. So just as you mentioned. How do we Link folks that are at high risk for chronic diseases. Wed healthy foods. There's really We've just conducted an evidence review looking at Research of health care providers like than in clinics that can screen their patients for food insecurity and when these grain positive on they can provide vouchers for fruits and vegetables. Help enroll them in snap program help reverse them to other Food pantry programs do help promotion. And there's a lot of great innovative work. That's happening there too. So part of the message that i get is There there are a lot of approaches that you can take to move beyond just the simple distribution food and The most important part is just getting started. I would think when when you're starting to do more. You need to have more volunteers. You start to hire people. I mean you're part of that. Problem seems to be able to help people deal with these other issues. You're you need more than volunteer. Help and and then you have to raise more funds and you have to get either what state agencies or companies to be able to contribute money so that you could have people that work on doing the things that you're discussing present is that fair yes yet. We don't have to do it alone. i think it's really important to think about collaborations partnerships between nonprofit organizations so foodbanks partnering with other community agencies that provide affordable childcare that provide mental health services that provide access to affordable transportation job training as a food bank or a food pantry. You don't necessarily have to recreate that. We all are very likely other community agencies that are offering those types of services. How can you partner together to do those more holistically and then partnerships with other government agencies for sure. How do we help. Make sure that the people who are coming for charitable booed are taking advantage of other federal food assistance programs like snap and webbed school breakfast suomi meals and then let's not forget corporations and businesses Partnering with them to make sure of it People can take advantage of other. You know job. Incubator programs and second chance employers. That can help folks that that. Need to get back into the workforce wondering wondering where this connects politically We have a new administration in washington. We have new chairman of the senate agriculture committee. And they deal with some programs like this not only within the farm bill but they have other programs that are going on and certainly across the country. There's their state programs as as well. So where did the people that you work with or even your organization. Where do you interact with the the political agendas. That could be able to help. Well i'm certainly really encouraged by our new biden administration First and foremost they. They're talking about food insecurity. They're you know putting these issues front and center recognizing that this is This is a problem in the united states and The federal food assistance programs are the first line of defense against hunger so many many food banks the majority of food banks around the country provide outreach for. Snap so helping enroll people in the snap program. I think that used to be considered outside of the parameters of what a food bank would do that was seen as maybe too political or seen as Stepping outside of the mission of a food bank but when we realized that when people who are eligible for snap when they enroll and snap. There's so much of a bigger bang for the buck for the amount of money that's provided through snap is way more than the food that you can receive at a local food pantry and those dollars feed right back into the local economy so it helps the local economy so i think that is certainly an area that most foodbanks regardless of political background have engaged in. I think when we talk about the causes of food insecurity as i mentioned when we think about these is not just about food but rooted in poverty. The fact that biden administration is talking about increasing the minimum wage. That's a surefire way to reduce hunger in america If people When you work and get paid for that work in a livable wage on then people can go and shop for their food with dignity at the grocery store and not have to rely on. Other charitable programs so i think There are still a lot of food banks that would say that is to political. We don't wanna go there We don't want to turn our donors But if we really are serious about ending hunger communities. These are the kinds of approaches that we need to be talking about that also leads to another problem. And that is that all counties have different situations which is one of the strengths of what's been done up to now and even when you talk about minimum wage If it did go to fifteen dollars and it's seven dollars and twenty five cents in mississippi in some of the southern states and some others right now but in california. It's already scheduled to be fourteen dollars without federal law. So there's a huge huge difference from one state to to the next i Tha that's required that flexibility ingenuity. Because every every state's going to be different you know. Even though they're trying to address with a across the board federal change right so they can they can buy your book and and. Why did you write this book. So i I'm obviously very passionate about this. Issue of hunger and I spent a lot of time visiting food. Pantries and banks around the country seeing some really innovative superstar programs and also same programs recently. That look like they were straight out of nineteen eighty two and by that i mean The mentality of on just providing food for today Less focused on nutritious healthy food And in my book. I'm fairly critical of the charitable food system and i argue for change and i challenged the status quo. But obviously i wouldn't be working at a food bank if i didn't believe in this work and one of the one of the themes of the book is that we're doing good work but we can do better and the goal of my book is bold yet simple. It is to reinvent the way that we provide charitable food in our country and moving away from short-term transactions of food to longer term transformations of lives. So we will likely always have some degree of hunger in our country but not to the scope and scale that we have right now. There are millions of americans. Their food insecure. That don't want to rely on charity. They want justice they want to be able to make a livable wage. They want to be able to provide for their families. They want to be able to buy fresh healthy food to nourish their families. All of us should have access to that. And when you when you do these kinds of programs is there a way that full local farmers in in one of the reasons. I'm asking that too. Is that there. There is food that is provided by say. Usda you know bulk commodities that they purchase and if used is going to be purchasing symbol commodities that are helping komo commodity market and distributing them. Some have said why. Can't they purchase local fresh foods and then the farmer in addition to donating what they can but the farmer can actually be able to sell some to an agency that is then providing him so the the farmers is into it into a system again that keeps keeps local food to be more distributed locally as well but also possibly have some compensation to it's similar in many ways when you think about Some states have put it in language that per school meal programs that a certain percent must be locally sourced right certainly this year during colin. There has been more got a government commodity food available to who banks and aunt to distribute through food pantries. You're right they could put in waivers such that a certain percentage is locally sourced to really reinforce that locally grown nature there are There are examples particularly in. The food is madison. Foodbank healthcare partnership models where. There's an emphasis on helping connect patients who are food insecure with vouchers for farmers markets Vouchers for food distribution programs Some food banks have partnered with local farmers and with healthcare providers to to make that full circle right so Making sure that the farmers are able to distribute their food and getting it into the To the hands of those who need it who are most vulnerable and disadvantaged and make sure that they have access will won't be long before people get some of those questions answered them because of get to get your book wearing shared yet so you can go on. Amazon reinventing food banks and pantries. It's published by island. Press so if you go on their website you can put in my last name martin and get twenty percent off. So that's a nice little trade for your listeners. Today they have to say farm-to-table tonker just foot in martin. I league rest listeners. That have stayed with us. This this long and this interesting conversation are interested in helping others there either in a program or i think we twist their arms a little bit and say there's a way for them to get involved in the way for them to help and that certainly way reasons that they should care. I have to ask you just one more. Follow up question. You see where you are with a journey. You've gone back to see where we were in the eighties and win. There was the need to come together and adjusting to the issues that we're facing today so if you look at this next period of time if you look at the next five years what gives you reason to be hopeful or optimistic about about this. Next stage of the journey route i'm an optimist by nature But i think there's a lot of reasons to hope for one from any of these programs that have been operating for years often decades. You know with kovin all of us have had to have it and change the way that we do all kinds of things because of this pandemic so we can no longer say you know what this is. How we've always done things. So i think many many programs who have been questioning the way they do things have been looking for a different approach. I think people will be more nimble and more open to changes because we've had to go through so much evil this past year Particularly for local food pantries who've had to really change the way that they're providing food we'd had to have social distancing having to Do drive through no touch types of food distributions. I think many of us are really well. We're all hopeful for the other end of calvin but it's a perfect time to be thinking. How can we reinvent the way that we run our program and my hope. Is that the timing of this book is going to be just right as people are thinking Okay we're going to be able to move back indoors and be able to have people shocked for their food at our. What might that look like. And how my wife Do things differently than we have before. one easy example is A best practice within food pantries is what's called client choice where people get to choose their food like they would at a grocery store and we know that this is a better way to allow people to pick out charitable food but before covid common practice i would say it varies food pantry to food pantry but probably less than fifty percent of food pantries around the country would allow their clients to choose their own food. If you just think about the nature of that would that would feel like to go get food. When it's it's handed to you you don't have the choice with kovin. Obviously with public health measures in place. We had to shift back to the more traditional model of volunteers. Bagging it up boxing. It up and having no touch my hope is that coming out of cove it more and more food pantries who maybe be worth considering thinking about client choice. Why not redefine. What that can look like an reshape. The nature of your food pantry. I hope you're right. I think there's gotta be some good come from all of these lessons. Were learning on how to be innovative. And and trying new approaches in an a really appreciate what you're doing katie martin and wish you the best with the book but but all the people that are following you and following what's going on and making a difference in the local communities there so so important and i'm i'm really glad you took the time to share that with farm-to-table talk and he so much for the opportunity to talk with you. You've been listening to farm to table. Talk with your host roger watson if you like what you hear go to farm to table talk dot com and follow us on facebook and twitter or go to itunes to subscribe and give us a review and a rating. Thanks for listening to farm to table. Talk with your host roger watson.

america katie connecticut katie martin Roger watson foodshare institute institute for hongo research a National umbrella organization Isabel farm california vermont food bank gimblett biden administration reagan administration vermont Obesity diabetes watsonville government Research of health
Emotional Compensation and Employee Retention

GovExec Daily

14:48 min | 2 months ago

Emotional Compensation and Employee Retention

"This exact date we bring you the federal stories that really matter. It's august sixth. Twenty twenty one. I'm ross john for today. Job losses during the cove in. Nineteen pandemic devastated. The united states during the early parts of the crisis while job numbers are slowly. Moving back up. There is a concern that more workers are quitting their jobs than before the pandemic and that some employers are having trouble finding workers for they're open positions. Recent microsoft survey found that forty one percent of the global workforce is likely to consider leaving their current employer within the next year and that forty six percent are planning to make a major pivot or career transition. The pandemic has caused many people to reevaluate. Their work. lives our guest today. Argues on our site that a key component for retention of employees is emotional compensation he writes that organizations need to provide an inspiring vision value people and to give workers voice in the organization. These and other adjustments can foster more connected office with employees feeling more emotional compensation michaeli stallard is a covering set contributor and the co author of the book connection culture. The competitive advantage of shared identity empathy and understanding at work. Now in its second edition. He has opposed on our site right now. Headlined to cope with the labor shortage. Raise emotional compensation after a short break. I'll talk to him about his post. And the concept of emotional compensation want to hear more from gov exac next of defense one and route fifty tune into our virtual events your interviews with government leaders about the most important topics today including the federal workforce health. It artificial intelligence five g. and more visit gove exac dot com slash events to learn more one thousand nine prices brought a potential reshaping of the way people approach work. A recent survey found that more than forty percent of the workforce is likely to consider leaving their current employer within the next year. Perhaps organizations can adjust to this new normal by creating a more connected culture by increasing emotional compensation like ali. Stallard is a governor that contributor in the co author of the book connection culture competitive advantage of shared identity empathy and understanding at work. Now in. Its second edition. He has opposed on our site now. Headlined to cope with the labor shortage. Raise emotional compensation. He joins me now. Discuss emotional compensation how it affects teams connectedness. Welcome to the program. Thank you russ. But what is emotional compensation. And how do you define it will. Emotional compensation is Represents the positive emotions that people experience on the job and it comes from feeling respected recognized for the work. We're doing a sense of belonging that we have to the people. We work with Autonomy to do her job without being micromanaged or having too much bureaucracy personal growth or in the role a role that is a good fit with their strengths in provides the right degree of challenges not over challenging so that were burned out or Or stressed out and or under challenging. So that we're bored and then finally we experience meaning in the work that we know we're making a difference in progress so those positive emotions. I describe as emotion. Compensation out does A culture of connection help team stay together and keep in place leaving. I mean how does that. Also connect with this this emotional compensation idea. We'll connection when we connect with other people. It produces positive emotions emotional compensation so it makes people more enthusiastic and energetic when they experience these positive emotions and it's interesting that new report that came out. Recently by the gallup organization shows that negative emotions worry anger stress. They've been on the rise for years in the workplace and they'd peaked in twenty twenty a work environment. That's positive has become increasingly rear so that people don't want to leave when they're in a in a healthy workplace culture and this becomes a a real advantage organizations during a time of labor shortage that we're facing as we are today. Let's sort of a little into that You know you in your post right about Two different case studies. I guess we can kind of go through each i cosco the big. The warehouse store It attracts it. Engages in it retains its employees. How does costco do it. Will you know it's interesting. Roster that year after year cosco is recognized as one of the top five large company employers in the united states and i remember asking jim senegal. The kovener longtime ceo of cosco will jim. How do you describe your culture. And he said do the right thing. My reaction was what nobody talked me about. That wasn't jury heard me but as he went on he explained it. He said it means we obey the law. We take care of our members which are their customers. It's a membership warehouse concept so that's their customer. We take care of our employees. We respect our suppliers in we reward our shareholders in that order and is. I've gotten to know more about cosco for doing work with them. There is a real sense of pride in your organization and they have There are many instances where they have done the right thing. Where if a vendor's don't live up to their quality standards they'll build their own so Because they really do take care of their members and they take care of their employees They've never not given employees in annual raise for example and they're well known for providing competitive compensation and benefits and they also have an apprentice like training program. Were constantly helping. People move up in terms of responsibility and compensation. And i remember one time when i was speaking to all the costco warehouse managers in seattle at their annual managers conference and they showed video after video of employees from all around the world. Who had come up with ideas to make house more efficient more improve member experience improve the employee experience. So that told me ross. Did they give their employees voice that they feel empowered that their voice will be heard whatever ideas they come up with in they celebrate those contributors who do come up with great ideas so they have very high annual like ninety five percent employee retention now that's multiples up most of their competitors the envio the industry. So it's made them while we successful on one reason wall street caused them amazon proof they really have just been continued to be successful year after year. And it's that culture that makes a difference. Amazon is certainly about the highest compliment. You can give retailer at this stage in in history for sure. The other case. Study that you cite in your post is the united states navy. We are very familiar with that. Obviously coming zach. How does the navy compete for in retain. Its talent will. The example cited was back in two thousand from two thousand two thousand by wind burn. Kark animal ruseler was chief of navy operations so he was on the joint chief of chiefs of staff because the highest ranking officer in the navy and when admiral clark came in the navy's first term reenlistment had dipped down at times blow twenty percent when their goal during that time was around thirty eight percent. So you know ballpark. Half of their goal in terms of retention and admiral car really changed the of the navy in a short time and what he did is he. Invested heavily in training enlisted sailors. He changed the job assignment. Process to more of a bidding approach if people were qualified so that they could bid on positions in locations that were more desirable to them and instead of being forced into roles in locations. That were less appealing. You know what they called in the navy slamming. You were slammed into position. While slamming for admiral clark with this new system in place which he called a revolution in personnel distribution slamming down from about thirty percent to about one point five percent. Another thing he did is he asked the master chiefs who leave the enlisted class to mentor. Young sailors remember talking to the head of the master chief's worldwide and he said the Admiral clark key would often tell a story about a master chief on his ship Who came up to him and put his arm around him and said you know Mr clark i like you and i'm gonna help make you a fine sailor and final leader and Admiral clark asked the master chiefs to do what this master chief did for him. The guy's name was master chief leading and help mentor him to become a better officer. A better leader Just a better sailor and better person. And the master sheets. Around the responded. The head of the massachusetts told me that you would often hear them say you know old burn is what they call him old vern. He knows he was running the navy. It's us we're on the hotlines and we're not gonna let him doubt in so this shift in the navy's culture release started value in giving a voice to enlisted sailors had a huge impact in about eighteen months. First term enlistment went from at times under twenty percent to almost sixty percent so it was you know went multiples and the navy had more enlisted sailors than they knew what to do with after the culture change. So there's another example a culture that really connected with enlisted sailors in this case that that made a difference in terms of employee retention. So we'll we'll end on this and you. You sort of talked about a little with the costco case. Study but you know the elephant Around a lot of this stuff is financial compensation I was just reading a study by Economists name sylvia allographs the stay that some of the notions of labor shortage are more about wages than there about anything else. So you know how. What is the relationship between wages. british compensation and emotional compensation in instances. Like these will. It's it's really both that matter note and there's no question that emotional compensation is an issue because for people on the low end of the pay scale. Their compensation has been stagnant for years. And so they're sensitive to a wanting to earn more money for their for their families for themselves so no question. That's an issue. However emotional compensation is a huge issue to and let me just cite some data on that gallup's research search. They mentioned earlier. That said Negative emotions have been rising for years. Peaked in twenty twenty. Here's some other research that stood out to me in gallup's studying they have far and away the most information on this these particular issues and they had studied. This is workers in the us and canada and they found that they reported on the previous day forty three percent. Ross responded that they had experienced stress forty one percent experienced worry twenty five percent experience sadness and twenty four percent experienced anger so these are negative emotions. That really have the heaven affect on people's health. They take these emotions home in the workplace in their family and friends experience. Their anger oftentimes. So it's a real advantage for organizations. You know this may sound bleak. Some of the things. I've shared. But i see it as a huge opportunity for organizations to improve their work cultures and gain performance advantage. If they do yeah. It's it's certainly something that i think you know as as you've written about there's a new work sort of culture from a lot of this remote stuff and that makes it much more difficult to feel that kind of connection and This certainly is a part of that in a such mike. Thanks for being on the show with us. Thank you us. Thanks for listening. duffy's daily. Our show is produced by them butler and hosted by me. Ross job for to wanna think. Michael stallard joining the program. Our music is a song signals. By catcher states. we should review reviewed. Subscribe on apple podcasts. Or spotify or wherever. You get your podcasts you can email any feedback podcast Dot com or hit us up on twitter at govett sec. We'd love to hear from. We'll talk to you later.

navy cosco ross john michaeli stallard admiral clark gallup organization costco Admiral clark jim senegal Stallard Kark animal ruseler us russ
The next COVID battle is already here

Daily Detroit

50:57 min | 3 months ago

The next COVID battle is already here

"Dilly detroit is brought to you by the community support our work at petri dot com slash daily detroit. The delta verion cove in nineteen is here. We're learning spreads faster in vaccinated and unvaccinated people. It's caused changes in cdc guidance and soon it means cove it will impact our lives again in even more everyday ways as of monday beaumont health system says that ninety nine point nine four percent of all covered nineteen patients in their hospitals are unvaccinated. Bad news for who there but good news and showing the vaccines are doing their job but to work vaccines need to be taken. Just forty percent of city. Detroit residents have one dose only oakland county locally has coverage over seventy percent the state of michigan less than half fully vaccinated leaving us very vulnerable to an outbreak and full vaccination is crucial in protecting against the delta variant. Last week it was ten counties in our state that fit under the cdc guidance to qualify as a high transmission area. Now it's thirty. One and two of them are oakland and mccomb. The cases per one hundred thousand people in metro has significantly risen week over week. This next wave of the pandemic will hit differently. L. impact lives both from a health perspective and an economic one. But without shutdowns and with mask us being spotty at best so as much as i know some of you don't want to talk about covered nineteen knowledge and acting on what you learn could save a life right now. I'm jared days. It's monday august. Second twenty twenty one and welcome to your daily detroit because the world has been dealing with delta for awhile. I thought i'd reach across the pond for some insight. John campbell is respected nurse academic and popular youtuber with the doctor. It focused on the development of open learning resources for nurses nationally and internationally as such. He's a great communicator. And understands what's going on a nurse and academic based in the united kingdom. Dr john campbell is one of the voices. I've been listening to the last sixteen months. He's been a voice of sanity science and gives me international perspective. It's my honor to welcome you to daily detroit. John thank you. Thank you for having me talk to you with the rise of the delta variant. I wanted to talk to somebody who has already been talking about it because the delta verion feels very new to us here in the united states. But it's not new around the world right. Yeah delta variant so i in the old days we used to call these various according to where they were first discovered and this one was first discovered in india. Like you might remember. We had that you can't bear in was first discovered in in in the uk and that was that was later called the alpha variant and then the world health organization wanted to start to use greek letters. I guess it sounds clever. And scientific an it's kind of not stigmatizing particular areas. What the saying so yeah. This delta varying arose in india probably last year wimbledon in india for a while. But what tends to happen is after rumbling. On for what it goes up steeply you get this exponential rise so unfortunately we were carrying on flights in the uk from india. I was bouncing up and down in this jazz. You might remember saying. Stop the flights from india who can get this. We're gonna get this india varying just record it and now called the delta varian still carried on it did go into what's called a red list but it was much later on. It was all done know. That's been a characteristic of this of this this pandemic Really i mean everything is so many things. Virtually everything's been done reactively rather than proactively you know the seems to missing in this sof inability to to think ahead and this is just another example of that so the time at the time of the uk we up this mostly alpha kent variant now the alpha can variant was about forty percent more transmissible than the original while type baron so that took over so that was the dominant variant while overnight ten of cases in the uk but this delta vary is is about twice about sixty. Percents is transmissible again. At least for now is looking at more transmissible than people are talking about a inau value. You know this reproductive value for this. None of about six. Which is is more than double. It really is very contagious. So basically what happened is with simple sort of evolution. It out competed the old Alpha very to now is replaced the now about ninety percent of cases in the uk Delta variant there have been a number of people who've asked me what is the difference between covert and variant. I don't think it's exactly clear to people. Just they're they're like well it's cova what what it vary at me. 'cause you know here in the motor city when you say variant. Let's say you know a chevy model of chevy of variant might have a nicer stereo system or better tires or something like that but this is a much different situation sauce. Corona virus to i is is the virus severe acute respiratory syndrome virus type two and that's the differentiated from a virus. That popped up back in two thousand and three which was saw which i guess would. Now call saas type. Wom- that the disease it the disease that the saas corona virus to is the covered nineteen corona virus disease. I identified in in nineteen ninety and two thousand nineteen so we did have a big pandemic buck in eighteen nineteen. But that was a different influence. So what happens with with this virus that is about just under thirty genetic instructions that comprised this virus remarkably simple remarkably simple hesitate to call you an organism viruses living thing or not. We could kind of debate. But it's actually pretty simple. But the is this mutations in these Bases the code for the night. This riber nucleic acid genetic instruction manual so this bars and made from iron age the same way as your your genetics a made for you all your body. Proteins obeyed from dna but with the virus. Mutated and when the genetic basis mutate that means the amino acids also can change and that changes the overall structure of the of the virus. So i wanna mutation of wrongly arises that gives the virus a- beneficial mutation that will be selected in because that's the virus that will be reproducing and the other viruses will be. We'll be excluded out from that. So these variations are our genetic variations with contrast that with genetics. We can taste it trace it to an extent with testing. Really we need this. Popper what we call genomic testing to identify that and that's what's so clearly been identified in this delta variant there's a few changes actually this delta variant one is called the spike protein which is where the virus actually fits into your cell on my cell. The person person's going to in fact. And that makes it easier to get in and as what is making easy to get. It means that the virus can reproduce more quickly. So what we're finding with. This dow to various people have a much or the shed a much higher viral load so some studies have shown. And it's hard to get your head around this but some studies have shown that some news infected with the delta variant can joking out hundreds of times more virus hundreds of times literally than some of the old time variance. In fact one study showed. It could be a thousand times more that putting out very very high amounts of virus so whereas with the original virus for us to say close contact constituted being say less than six feet away from someone for fifty minutes now close. Contact is passing in colorado wise so much more transmissible so this cases in australia. It was where people literally passenger corridor and they had the the the cpt tv monitoring and it shows the only contact the the people that had was when he passed in the gardo cases in the uk and denmark worldwide. This seems to be of trump be transmitted outside at the foot bowl. So if someone's inside they can transmit this variant really quite quite readily if they're inside and of course we're getting now because it's too hot so people are put on the air conditioning. The doors and or if it's too cold outside you shut the doors and the heating on and you know it hangs in the after a long period of time as well. The viruses always hung in the after a long period of time. But because it's so much more valuable load it's almost as if instead of having one infected person in the room is like you have hundreds of infected people in the room all breathing this virus. I get very high viral loads so that leads me to my first question really because listeners have been asking so many offices here in the states are returning back to work. I i have listeners. That are going to work. Places with thousands of people where vaccination is a. We'd like you to get vaccinated but we won't make you right and these are open office. Plans thousands of workers factories all this kind of stuff. When you tell me this hangs in the air this gives me a lot of concern versus earlier in the pandemic where we'll keep people. Keep things ventilated. Kept some space kept people separate could do. If it's spreading like your saying it. Is i feel like something like say You know a factory or a large mortgage firm or a bank or any of that stuff. It could just spread like that absolutely. I mean we were already seeing that with the wild type variant way way back. In last year we saw even more with us alpha. Uk very now. we're seeing even more with this delta variants. I mean if you've got someone who is in the active viable secreting sage. So if someone's going to be symptomatic then typically the risk greeting most virus the day or two before the become symptomatic and the first few days after they become symptomatic that choking out a lot of virus it will hang in the air and the less ventilation absolutely brilliant. If there's an infected person that shedding the virus basically the transmission is is pretty well guaranteed and there's just been a report from the us centers for disease control yesterday factors. The leaked report is just come out. I'm just assimilating now but people have been vaccinated even if the been w vaccinated still infected with his delta variant now. they're largely protected. They are very unlikely to get sick. That very unlikely. Get hospitalized in. They're very unlikely to die but they will get the infection and they'll choke out a virus so they can be spreading not to unvaccinated people and what concerns me in the mountain states at the moment is you've got over one hundred million people in the united states who are eligible for vaccination but have not had one single dose of vaccine now in the uk the population whole populations about sixty six million. So you've basically got another hundred million you got a whole nation of people there who have been vaccinated they're going to be mixing people vaccinated and people want vaccinated. Both of whom can get this. Both of whom can excrete large amounts of viral load and these people are going to get ago to get the infection now. The people are vaccinated are gonna get an infection as well. But they're ten times likely to get sick and Uh about ninety six percent protection two doses of fis. Roughly an even greater pretend protection against death the people unvaccinated to get going to get this infection but that their immune system is going to have essentially no immunity to this virus now a few of the mighty picked up and not realized it met met. May maybe fifteen to twenty percent of them but that still leaves eighty million people with no protection against viruses tool they're going to be exposed to it and therefore the the gonna get if the get it as a good few percent. John's is gonna made them sick especially the older especially if the co morbidity especially if they're immuno-compromised so what's going to happen in the states. I don't see any way round this. I'm i'm really sorry to revolt. I don't see any way that is not gonna follow a similar trajectory to the united kingdom with a dramatic increase in cases but because the the united states has got a larger proportion of unvaccinated people. A lot of a lot of these people are gonna get sick and unfortunately quite a few of the gonna be with us. In a few months. Time john this makes me feel something emotionally. Because only forty percent we just crossed the threshold city of detroit. Only four percent of our population vaccinated. We don't have access to healthcare. We are in a group you know. A lot of people like to label the unvaccinated as one thing but really it's really not like he. For instance the biggest hesitation to vaccination the united states is people who do not have health insurance. And i know this is anathema as you're unfamiliar to you in the uk but lots of people here even with some of the government programs have extended. They still don't have health insurance or they don't have affordable health insurance and so they're not familiar or dealing with the medical system and you have large sections of people in our country especially african americans who don't deal with the healthcare system and i know how many friends i lost in the first wave and just when you said that my heart sank and then i match that with some data that i saw out of san francisco that showed that even vacs there. It's like eighty percent vaccinated right and it's there in their second highest wave and i sit here and i don't wanna be chicken little. I want arm people with the tools to do what they need. And that's why. I have this list of questions from listeners because this situation is moving so fast and they don't feel like they're getting everything they need show i mean. You've got to differentiate between areas like detroit at forty percents in areas that california with with eighty percent because so many more people are going to get sick in hospital is where the vaccination rate is low not from what we know from the centers for disease control the infection rates probably going to be quite similar but the point is the people who vaccinated protected ten times less lied to get severely sick about ninety six percent less time less likely to hospital and public ninety six ninety eight percent less likely to die now. They really concerns me. The the african american population in the states now identified last year. The african american population has got lower vitamin d levels than the The the white population because simply dark skinned makes more slowly in the sunshine so the fact of economic differences here to a whole raft. I don't. I don't want to discount the idea that yeah there. There is the point that you're making but also when you're only making thirty thousand dollars a year as a household you're much more focused on sustenance foods things like that. Then you don't. Have you know as much as you know as much access to grocery stores all that kind of stuff so i wanna make sure. It's multifaceted i want to just leave it at just skin color. Oh percent hundred percent joe. Yeah i mean. And as well as that of course th that. Poor diet feeds through things like obesity diabetes Hypertension and all these things that disproportionately affect populations are healthcare. Has always multifaceted is the endogenous factors from inside the multitude of exogenous factors from the outside and they all play together. The reason i mentioned the vitamin d one is. It's just so easy to correct. You can come back. It's just you know things like this. Just not being done and i really find that problem what what are not sure about jurors that forty percent in detroit is not central detroit because my impression of detroit. It's fairly poor in the nfl ought and more affluent round. The sober does that kind of roughly wherever on. Yes that is where at so. The city of detroit has its own numbers within the city. What we call the city proper. And then you've got the individual counties around it that report and the individual counties that around it report higher vaccination rates the highest oakland county which also is by far our most wealthy county. All the inequalities of healthcare in america are showing out. Through this pandemic it really is highlighting this this inequality problem. It's always been there. The people have always known about. But it's just just throwing it in people's faces now isn't it. He's making it so obvious. And i'm just hoping that this is going to be the well. What do we need political motivation. Society poppies society motivation individual motivation to start correcting these inequalities. That start this is a bit of a away cuckoo because this is absolutely true. I mean i've been doing a series from a friend in africa for example and said obvious that the disease disparities between countries. But but here we've got you're talking about dispatches between so downtown detroit and the suburbs and you know th. They're just waiting to be identified and corrected. I couldn't agree with you more really hope. Not he's really hope that's going to be done. There are multiple things. I wanna make sure that people know about you mentioned about vitamin d. What can be the impact of it now to be clear. This isn't going to. This is not going to prevent you from getting the virus. One hundred percent clear about that. Because there are so many rumors especially. I don't know how it is in the uk but over here there's so much misinformation and information and unclarity and also you mix in with that to be very honest fear. You got a lot of people you know america. We're a nation that we are used to. You know we're the superpower we're used to having access to everything and we're not used to these kinds of threats you think about even world war two. We had some bombs on hawaii and some attacks in alaska but we never got hit right so we don't have internalize our culture has an internalized. These actual physical threats to us I think that's true everywhere i mean. We've got used to this idea that if you get sick you can get some antibiotics and we will go away from this idea of infectious diseases. But you know throughout human human history. Infectious diseases have been the big cause of death. You know if you think. Think about think about the the first nation americans for example they were completely Well decimated isn't enough it was more than temps and about ninety percent of them died from smallpox Th there's been this. We had this black death in in his famous in in my country in a thirteen forty eight and the great plague of london. Sixteen sixty six kind of brought up on this. But people. just don't have this kind of concept now in an this idea that there's a there's an infectious disease which is not immediately. Treatable is kind of hard for people to get their heads around. And that's part of the problem. We need to kinda just to that and realize that this is this is a real threat especially in poor populations whereas you as you say ryan for various reasons. There's i'm reduced. Immunity higher death rates on A greater amount of risk. You know. I think. I think the vaccines joe. One of the things is people are so focused on on the risks of vaccine and the possible side effects of vaccine now. Of course there there but there with any any vaccine any medication. Those risks are there and overall that they are pretty small especially with the the safeguarding. That's put into the notion program in the united states for example has a pretty small. I think we need to sort of saying that. The glass half full raw the novelty you know we need to look at the the the benefits of vaccination you know that this is gonna stop you getting sick very likely to stop. You're getting six gonna stop beginning all special and it's gonna stop you dying an over time if you're not sick is going to reduce the spread of infection to those around us as well as the whole community thing. We need to just suppress this virus. Anyway we can now. There's there's different views on how this can be done. But the bottom line is at the moment antivirals and not readily available whether thus us for political purposes or scientific purposes that not. We're not using them. So the two we have available is vaccination. You're mentioning ira antivirals. That leads me to question a couple listeners. had i have listeners. Who will never did. Dave straight said they will not get a vaccine and so they were saying you know. Well what about things like ivermectin and stuff like that where they hear about these things on podcasts or different places to me. It's diff- i. I'm trying to meet people where they're at to me personally. It's very difficult for me to say. Okay i will never get a vaccine. What am i going to do. Is that a viable path. Is vaccines the better path. Like how does that all shift together. Yeah that's right. I mean. I mean just before i answer that i think with the increasing cases in hospitalizations in parts of the state now i think the vaccination rate is just starting to pick up in the states. Now so i am optimistic. It will pick up his plateaued for long time the valley. Hopefully it will pickup now to me. This is completely obvious. We want to prevent disease of course and if we it we want to treat it and if we get a bacterial disease we would take antibiotics and treat it. The question is do. We have antivirals now. Traditionally we haven't had many antivirals without viruses refu- a few viral conditions. Such as cold. Sores can get you get acyclovir for herpes simplex virus. But the this guy elected you mentioned it is. It is revolutionized many parts of the poem by treating parasitic diseases river blindness in the y you get organisms. Greg in the lymph nodes that causes the legs to swell up and things like that is completely revolutionized. The entreating scabies then a few years ago. People realize ivermectin also had antiviral properties. Now the problem with this is there's been a lot of debate about it on both sides. Now i've read a lot of the information on ivermectin and talked to some of the main people on like the doctor tests me my country south african doctrine of course you're pierre corey who have also interviewed In the united states with the nfl ccc and looking at that and talking to them the seems pretty strong evidence to me. I've met tin would be effective as a preventive and as a treatment also talking to medical friends in india that they've been using it was the approach call to use it in india the they had a particular indication for they were using it for people with covered nineteen to stop them deteriorating and the consultants i talked to. They told me it worked now while the cop put seventy numbers to that. If doctors telling me look this is working than you know. If you're not gonna listen to your doctor so listen to be honest but and this got all complicated so Industry was saying. Don't use this for covered. Nine hundred ninety can understand that. Because i take care of and i'm sure you take never to say i'm advising taking a drug. I never do that. I always say go to your own doctor. Never ever take a drug. Because i say so obviously and i think the pharmaceutical companies because the drug was passed for one thing and not for the other. They didn't want the risk of Comeback on them like yeah. I think so i. She's understandable the these. These are companies of that to make money but then the world health organization came out against ivermectin except for the using clinical trials. Now i consider that the data is there indicates. And i'm going to choose this word catholic culpable puttable efficacy. So i'm not saying possible. I'm saying possible and i'm not saying certain and we have a new clinical trial in the uk at the moment but a lot of data out that metra analysis being conducted and what really disappoints me about government's a nine well not at the moment. The fda cdc. I'm not sure which one is a neutral rating on ivermectin. The no saying it's good or bad and the uk was saying don't use it basically. It's impossible for doctors to prescribe a hair. It's just basically do that. We need we need from fda cdc british authorities world health organization definitive statements but not just definitive statements backed by the evidence so if the world health organization says look with look tonight amac ten was satisfied. It has no role at all in saas corona virus to cover nineteen disease. Here's the evidence. Fine will accept now but they haven't provided the evidence that but that basing their decisions on we need understood ordinary. Bloat the same as you you know. Any practitioner was just an ordinary an ordinary. manoa woman. we don't have access to all these things. We don't have all these skills. We need to be guided but we need to be satisfied that the people that are guiding us doing on the evidence and they need to provide evidence. I believe there's a number of clinical trials going on right now to like. I was looking doing some research. I think there's something close to seventy of them right now. The is is that if you talked to put too much out there. The fear is you've got people who are going to crack. Open their pets anti their pets. Medication or something right. And that's what we don't want happening here in the united states. We've got some incidences that we got some incidences of when people get a treatment that someone talks about publicly there so wanting something to do it that they go to desperate measures. And that's what we that's what we want to prevent against so it's like we need to evaluate this and see if it's something that's good for us but we also need to be very cautious. That a lot of people in the world are looking for that thing. They're looking through that thing right and just the question i had can. Can i take ivermectin of getting the vaccine. Well i don't believe in the united states you even can. I believe that's an option in the states. No The there's there's a vague question there is people aren't vaccinated in parts of the world where the vaccine program is not available. Should they be doing that now. The answer to that question is i don't know but we need this definitively pro. I think there's enough evidence to suggest the possibility of that that these agencies and our our greatest and bettors should be making definitive statements on this. And i really feel there's been a severe dearth of leadership here because we should take drugs now. Doctors all around nurse prescribers or whatever it is tell us to take it but they follow national guidelines. I think it's the same in the uk so in in the uk. We in the united states rather so in the uk. We have these nice guidelines and you can understand. This doctor will prescribe on the by the nice guidelines snow if he goes against the nice guidelines and something were to go wrong and then all all lawyers Was where you following. The nice guidelines says no wasn't following the nice guidelines. Then why won't you follow him. The nice guidelines some. It's doctors need this kind of support as well. The things need to be made official. That's why we have governments. That's why we have elected officials to take responsibility at the moment. It just seems that the not nothing is i think surreal picked because i want to prevent disease and if at all possible i want to treat it as well having said the squad to research going on from some of the big pharmaceutical companies on new antivirals the republican to be out pretty soon. I think i'm not quite sure about this figure. I think it's three point. Two billion dollars has been provided by the american government. Faw For antiviral drug research. Yeah and i wanted to mention also monoclonal antibodies. Because i know of personal stories. People in my family have been rated by monoclonal. Antibodies and it was very successful for them. Someone i know who is a senior citizen so this was before all the vaccines hit and it was really improve their situation. However the rigmarole to get a hold of those and i learned so much about how they're not widely available in case you end up in that situation. The only way that she got she was at one of our top like to medical facilities in the entire state. My isn't this more available for the. Yes absolutely we're we're looking at this continuum of prevent things like let's do vitamin d. Let's do these things to help. Help you get us ready. Also also if we're gonna get it or if we end up getting it having all the tools at our disposal to handle it. Because this is i look at. This is a continuum. And i feel like this conversation for so many people online is about one thing and needs to be a continuum. Yeah yeah so monoclonal. Antibodies basically people would use as a treatment. The former president of the united states of course was famously treated with monoclonal. antibodies in president trump. Got sick now. The thing the thing is these monoclonal. Antibodies monoclonal means mono one type that they come not clone is a genetic variant like a identical twins would be it will be close so they come from. They come from one. Type of cell produces these antibodies. And you have to get biological agents to produce these monte body so you actually produce the antibodies. You find these. Antibodies and then you give them to someone now. These are the same kind of antibodies that your body will produce itself but of course it can take quite a few days or a week or two to produce those antibodies. Whereas you're you're injecting it. They hit the ground running. So this is what we call a passive immunity you give anti-business up form of passive immunity. Is that making your own now. The key thing about this is the studies on this of been a bit difficult to interpret because the thing about the thing about cova nineteen is. You're going to get the virus a few days before he gets him because then again again the symptoms. Then you're gonna have the simpsons for maybe five six seven days typically but then the body is going to get rid of the virus after that so if the body's already got rid of the virus. There's no point giving extra antibodies after that time to get rid of the virus. The body's already gotten rid of so. This is a phase disease so the monoclonal antibodies would only be effective as in president. Trump's case there were given about twenty four hours after fatter. Think less than now after it was diagnosed and they did seem to be highly effective but a lot of the people that get sick with this disease. The not getting sick because of the virus the getting sick because of the inflammatory reaction in the body's immune logical reaction to this virus. And it's not inflammation that causes your socks and you look drought road out of philip. We fluid the same. As if you twist your uncle. Joe if you twist your ankle swells up. That's the inflammation swelling. This this time. It's swelling inside the lungs and that's not caused by the virus it's caused by a immunological reaction to the virus. So if you had a drug which specifically antiviral preparation that was specific Delight monoclonal antibodies. What would you do. would you give it to everyone. Who had the virus we know about ninety five percent of those are going to be absolutely fine because we can't predict that well who's going to get sick. I mean we know older people are more likely to get sick People with komo's buddhism. All i had to get sick. So it will be tough districts very very expensive so it wouldn't be practical to produce enough to give it to everyone and then when people are gonna get sick it's too late for the monoclonal. Antibodies at that stage when people are sick and the variety gotten rid of the virus. That's why the steroids are so helpful because steroids are massively massively. Anti inflammatory so yeah. The monitoring launch is good idea right stage of the disease but is got those complications that go with an andrey cost that goes with it. One thing i wanted to ask you or the. I wasn't sure how we know. The scenes free in the states is is testing free. In fact my in fact my roommate just got tested. Two days ago right but did they have to pay for the swamp being taken or the whole the whole caboodle hoke in caboodle was free. Wasn't it was all. It was all taken care of it was it was it was just it. I don't know the particulars and he his case. He paid nothing out of pocket. He does have healthcare right and like. I know that there are lots of free testing centers all over all over the city and so i have not heard any reports of getting charged for them out of pocket at this time here. That doesn't mean that it. it hasn't happened. It's not something i have heard of. Okay tha- tha- that's reassured because that obviously would be a major disincentive for testing and the testing in the united states at the moment is about four times low a three or four times lower than it is in the uk. I will tell you that the state line for testing when my roommate went through that routine tasks it was. The state. Phone line was overwhelmed. And they're like we'll call you back because it's it's not as the testing facilities are not as smooth is. It could be and a lot of times. These tests are picked up by employer so an employer. A large employer will have a a nurse or a facility that does healthcare and then they'll do the test you know there at the facility or there's various churches a lot of cvs in rite aid drugstores or where tests are It's very distributed. The plan with the administration has the spandex was going on. Wasn't to say okay. We're going to do this at hospitals and this it was okay. We're gonna do this at your drugstore near the community is possible. Absolutely no that's That's reassuring thanks for that. Yeah one thing. I wanted to talk about was The idea of vaccines going bad and one of the things that caught my eye earlier this week was four hundred thousand doses going to expire just in michigan just in our state and it's frustrating to me that a we aren't taking them but that's my personal opinion but it's doubly frustrating to me that we can't like no other states want them because they don't have the demand it something where to me. I feel like there's so many places where if we're already there. Why can't we find more ways. Are there more ways to internationally work together to say goes from here and you know what even if even if a quarter of those four hundred thousand shots get used. It's better than none of those shots getting used. Yeah i mean these videos have been doing for. Uganda uganda's is a hands on healthcare provider and he hasn't been vaccinated yet and not not one single dose. It really is quite frightening now. What happens when manufacturers make any any any pharma so any pharmaceutical preparation. There was an expiry date on it and and with vaccines. That's particularly true. Because if you think of the fis of madonna vaccines for example that basically this strand of our with liquid captured on it and those those chemicals the storm much better colder temperatures as we know but they do tend to degrade so the manufacturers always put an expiry date on it and because the manufacturers don't want to get into trouble they tend to put on a date which is some people might say that it'll conservative but in in healthcare. Every every time i give out a drug i'll check. It's the right dose of the right drug to the right patients at the right time by the right route but also check. The drug has an expired absolutely have to do that. And if it's expired we don't give it because we've we simply would operate operating outside the law. We did that so the shelf life of vaccines even if the kept code is actually pretty short. So you need this kind of cold chain and this logistical setup. I mean the united states started off very with military involved the ad logistic spreading vaccines out of using fedex and different agencies like not but at that time in the space of course the vaccine supply was much less than the vaccine demand now in the states because of your quite superb national production facilities will be producing huge amounts of accident. You can produce. Huge amounts of max vaccine more than people are ready to get it so you up more vaccine than demanded the moment and I it would be good if the demand was high but it but it is. It is so unique. Anticipate this you know these vaccines. We're gonna run run our and say two weeks time. Then you could say well you tell me what. We've got two weeks to get this vaccine to uganda. Let's get it there now because this is going to run out but you know for whatever reason you know as well as i do not tends not to happen is an absolute travesty. Off completely agree with you. But that's why that's why they notice a safety thing. Yeah and it. It's a real travesty here. Because it's actually a point of pride for michiganders' One of the large factories is in our state. So many vaccine send out around the world come from. I believe it's near kalamazoo right here in michigan. You know and so it's a big point of pride for a lot of us that this is a place that we're we're doing this and there's so much healthcare in fact here in detroit. Although they've moved over the years. I think it's a park. Davis was actually founded here and like a bunch of pharmaceutical companies. And things like that. So there's there's a lot of pride in that but there's also the worry of okay you know. Why can't we just get it across the border. Although our friends in north in canada have been improving vaccination far more than we have as of late. they've really catched up and overtake us. Well the the well and truly overtaken you. I the overtaken the uk actually canada is the second most vaccinated country in the world after israel in fact the public overtake israel. Probably any day now. They have done remarkably well despite a slow start. And that's despite their big no domestic vaccine production at all in canada. Now thing not something. They're addressing prettier gently. I wanted to ask you. I don't know if this is the last question. But i wanted to ask you because i know so. Many people who are hesitant about the vaccine. What your patch to take. Well th. there's there's no question that we have to follow the national guidelines now in the uk in the uk rowley vaccinating over eighteen at the moment and people that were there were all within a few of the raging birthday on on younger people with coq mortgages now the particular vaccine that's taken is a bit of a is a bit of a debate. So the the like the johnson. Johnson johnson vaccine in oxford atherogenic vaccine. There is very rare. Instance of blood clots condemn what we call flambeau site. Opinion every in those mostly in younger females But for that age. We haven't differentiated between males and females in. Who gets watson. we've kind of age categories on it whereas Of course the oxford astrazeneca voxy jacoby. Well ryan the states as well but it hasn't actually been authorized that because he simply didn't need it. Because you've got loads of the mr rene vaccines the pfizer. And they are the pfizer in the moon. So you don't need the the zenica and the of course the slight receive. You can get a sore arm. You can feel to bit ale after the first or more often after the second dose of the fis madryn defended knocked off for a few days. That's just because the body's amounting an inflammatory response and this is if you've got be the device for short periods on but most people don't get that most people absolutely minimal effects. Of course there's a few people small minority people to get severe allergic reactions. But again we know how to treat them. Now there's been a lot of talk about a young men especially The the risk of this condition called Myocarditis and pericarditis which is inflammation around the heart. So i i think it's idea to just rest review days after you've had the vaccine and of course if you had any clinical that the or anything was wrong of toll you go into medical advice on that so for example if someone did have a bit of chest. Pain is very important the arrest and get medical advice. But it's the same way that you get a little bit of side effects from the fis maduna vaccine away side effects from one of the edina virus vector vaccines. the doctors. Now know about these things and they're much better about treating it so for the vast majority of as group certainly everyone older that the risk benefit analysis of taking the axes completely overwhelming. I mean i was on just couldn't wait to get mine. I was i was. I was on the book and i've been vaccinated yet off. I was in line down at our mass facility and it was kind of neat dispiriting to me because there was all this efficiency and you can still walk in and get a vaccine in fact in the city of detroit you can call a number and someone will come out to you and give you a vaccine right like it's that available but right after that first rush of thirty forty percent or whatever where we're really excited then it just kind of petered off and i think in that same vein. I think there's a portion of my listeners. And i know more of my listeners are going to be more friendly towards vaccines than not How are they going to navigate. All of this like like a mask mandate our governor who was among the most aggressive mandates has already said a mask mandate is not coming. It's not coming. And i think about those workplaces i think about when you say those outdoor spread. How do you navigate this. If a are concerned about this. And i think we all have to accept. There is no cavalry in the united states. Coming for there is no mass mandate in my state. You're not gonna see if you're not gonna see at my state you're definitely not not gonna see in most states right because our governor was among the aggressive right. We're on our own. So what do we do. Basically i mean the. Cdc has got a lot of things you can say wrong about it but it is the national authority and the cdc has said a few days ago. That people should be wearing masks in most parts of the united states. Indoors at least in indoor settings and the reason that's come out with this Sort of leaks report that we've just had and the reason for that. Is that people that of course before. It was an honor system. Wasn't it you know. The people vaccinated didn't need to masks people that were vaccinated should wear masks on an honor system. But now we know that people who are doubly vaccinate can release. We believe almost the same amount of viruses people unvaccinated much less likely to get sick. Took a load of this var. If they do get sick if they are sick they can spread the virus right. If they get the virus can spread. It took a virus. So if you take someone who's vaccinated they can get infected still quite likely to get infected and they will choke hold load of virus now. That person themselves will not get sick so they might have. They may not that. This is not remind me of that. that the symptoms. They're likely to get the most likely intern. They get is a headache. Which is the same as you get with a cold anyway. Headache runny nose sore throat sneezing and now the most likely features and then likely to get over that. I think i've got a code of got a bit of hay fever but when they're screeching that when that you not vise out they could give it to someone else who is unvaccinated or immuno-compromised in they could get really quite ill. We have this law in multigenerational households as well if someone's garden around to visit parents or grandparents situation where you had a a young person who may be vaccinated who go round to say parents or grandparents who are not vaccinated. Then they can pass that virus and the unvaccinated older person all the person with cobalt Quite likely to get sick from this and in fact even even if even if the person or you've got someone who's who's vaccinated auburn vaccinate steak is still take the news vaccinated. They can still get the virus brought. The vaccinated person is protected from ten times less likely to get severely ill. So that's the reason. I'm a bit pessimistic. About the number scooting up in the states now because we know that the vaccinated and the unvaccinated a both going to be spreading this disease well and the case numbers show that even in a low spreader right now. We are not in that red area from the cdc but our case numbers show that even in areas that are highly vaccinated. I'm pulling up the numbers right now and we're almost within a week. It's gone from about two cases three cases per hundred k. And we're now already up to almost seven cases in oakland county which is that well off well vaccinated country county right. So it's it it's it's people are saying it's coming. I think is a fair to say it's here. Yes it is. I mean the delta variant now is probably i think the last last information assault from the cdc was the delta. Barry was about eighty six percent of the of the cases which are diagnosed in the states. But now i i would suspect now is well over ninety percent so basically the delta variant as in the uk has taken over and that means the numbers will increase now in the uk. The good thing about is even though the numbers of cases increased dramatically. An increasing again next week seemed to be just started to go up again. Now hospitalizations is still relatively low. Deaths relatively low because of the protection against severe disease and death hospitalizations afforded by the vaccines. And it really. Is it really distresses major. I think think think of so many people in this particularly as you say. The people often disadvantaged that they're going to suffer. Most you know just for just for change. The poorest people suffer. Most you know it's just it's just in a we. We need to get that message through. You need to protect yourself when you need to protect your family this massive benefits associated with vaccination you know just just get it get it you know president biden's right just get it. Yeah i mean listen. This is a personal story. But i have a neighbor two doors down in the hospital for thirty days on a ventilator you know thankfully she made it through but like these are all real things. It's been in my family. I you know. I it something where i don't want what happened. That first wave to happen again here. And i don't want it app and other people not personal the ventilator. They're not going to be fully well again at another year. There's going to be a long term thing and the the other the other thing because the so many cases now we're getting a lot of cases it so the cat the moment population of about sixty sixty six million there's about a million people with long covert at the moment this long term one but the actual percentages higher than that and about a third of million people have had long with for over a year so another really important reason for getting vaccinated. Protect yourself and your family against long covert now. These are people that congo back to work for three four five six seven. Who knows how long is going to be. They have a really low quality of the competences normal activities. They can't make living for their family. Because the suffering from this long term effects of covered and to be honest. I think that's part of the issue that's happening here in the united states. I don't know you've heard with the lack of people. Finding employees has been a real problem. Here you know like this is something that a lot of businesses are worried about because they can't get people to fill these positions well. The number one reason isn't unemployment benefits it's disease and worries about the disease and affects and you took it the different things with a survey that was done by a regional chamber here recently. Number and reason isn't unemployment. It isn't that check. It's those worries about the disease. It's the i'm still dealing with the facts or people who have retired early because the facts writing the worries and this is going to have like an. I know we were talking the medical side but as for me as a more general reporter i look at it like a bigger case and i go okay. We may not have mandates but this could economically. Be really a problem. If roy up you have all of these the spread and all of these issues and reverberate through the economy in so many ways and if. We're not having lockdown which. I don't think we're going to have in the united states and we're not gonna have mass mandates. You're going to see more places you know. And and this plays into the partisan divide where i joke. Almost it's the dr seuss the butter side up and the butter side down butter side up of you know we're getting vaccines butter side down. Come in here. If you don't have a vaccine right and that just reds people apart even more and that worries me for the fabric of our nation device absolutely and you're gonna end up with a lot of untold economic destruction. You are small businesses. Can't do another wave even if you don't lock down let's say let's say the the third the one third of who are most concerned about the virus self not quarantine but self restrict right. Let's say i'm concerned about the virus. And i don't go to a football match. I'm a soccer fan to detroit. Cdsc larouche you don't go to a football match you don't go to a football game like our american football. You don't do a bunch of these things you're not spending money in the economy who's gonna have more is those those small businesses and there isn't going to be the political support to help them like there was before on this the effects on the individuals. So you've got the most disadvantaged communities who are got the least rates of vaccination therefore they're going to get more disease therefore they're going to get more long it then there's go to be more people who are not simply well enough to go out and for their families because there's gonna be more long-term Morbidity in those poor communities an scared of accelerate this downward spiral it was such a such a tragedy to and it's all avoidable. Watch yet well. Not ninety percent of it will also is avoidable. Yes absolutely yeah yeah. Get that message out niger. You're doing a good job. Well thank you. And i appreciate all of your time and as i said listeners will. We'll have to laugh because this is a little bit of a personal joy for me. Because i feel like i'm talking in the voice. It's been talking to me through my television sixteen months. And frankly frankly i can't can't wait to go back to can't go to the uk. My team is nottingham forest. By the way i used to watch those when it was boy yeah a smear world small world. Well thank you so much i appreciate. You know no problem thank you. I'll admit this episode gave me a little bit of the feels but let's not be afraid. Let's be. I'll put a link in the show notes to follow john campbell on youtube. You can also search for him. I'm sure you'll find him. You too can be in the know what matters and is fun in southeast michigan. If you follow our daily detroit podcast or an apple podcast. Spotify overcast or wherever shows found. Of course if you have feedback daily detroit gmail.com or leave a voicemail. Three one three seven eight nine thirty to eleven. We've got some great shows in store for you this week. Reminder that it's our members on patriot dot com slash daily detroit who helped fund this show. It makes a huge difference and keeps us able to do depth local coverage that matters to metro detroit with that. I'm jay stays to care of each other and until next time. I'll see you around detroit.

detroit uk united states india cdc oakland county Dr john campbell delta varian acute respiratory syndrome corona virus disease world health organization
Sixty-Six Percent Of Alabamians Still Need The Shot. Can Tommy Tuberville Help?

NPR Politics Podcast

14:05 min | 3 months ago

Sixty-Six Percent Of Alabamians Still Need The Shot. Can Tommy Tuberville Help?

"Hi this is andy. I'm aboard the miss ashley out here in the middle of the chesapeake bay trying to catch some fish. It is really hot out here in. The fish aren't biting and this podcast was recorded at two. Oh eight eastern on wednesday. July twenty eighth things may have changed before you hear it and hopefully we will catch a walker. Okay here's the show so funny story. I was on that boat and we. We only got one fish and he told me that he had recorded a time stamp and i didn't believe him. You were there with him while he was recording we. We're out there for four hours. Multiple people threw up and we only caught one fish. Hey there it's the npr politics podcast. I'm scott detro-. I covered the white house. I've ever keith. i also cover the white house. And i'm dominica montenero senior political editor and correspondent. So i mean. I think it's clear what we're going to talk about today. Suddenly the pandemic seems like it is not in the rear view mirror. The delta variant is surging particularly in places with a lot of unvaccinated people and now the centers for disease control and prevention has revised its guidance. On wearing masks the agency is now recommending that fully vaccinated people wear masks in indoor public spaces if they live in areas with significant or high spread. Tam what is going on here and there are actually a lot of areas of this country with significant or high spread. And what's happening is things have changed The delta variant is now the dominant variant in the us. It is significantly more contagious than earlier. Variants and dr rachelle wolinsky. The cdc director said that they needed to make this change in guidance. Because they have new data showing that people who are vaccinated and get a breakthrough. Infection may actually be able to transmit the corona virus which they didn't think earlier When they put out that earlier guidance it's pretty big change. yeah it is and It results in a bit of whiplash. And you know the politics of it. I think are possibly more complicated than the science of it. So this is a recommendation and i think you know one of the biggest trend lines if the last year is that these recommendations have have carried a lot less weight with people over time for a wide range of reasons burnout frustration. People feeling like they don't trust the cdc or they just never get the message to begin with What are we seeing in terms of how these recommendations are turning into new local rules that people would see in their lives about about mask-wearing. Well here in the bubble that is the white house that the signs have gone back up and masks are required indoors at the white house for white house employees but out in the real world. It's not clear exactly how this is going to be applied. You've seen California bring back mask mandates you you've seen it in some other areas but it isn't widespread and immediate and In in some states they are actively saying no you can't have a mask mandate amassed mandates or a thing of the past and we're not bringing them back. You've seen republican governors basically say. Yeah no that that time in our lives is over. Domenico this is this is obviously a huge political problem for for president biden right he. He has his put so much of his political future betting on getting the pandemic under control and back to normal and that you know big football spiking july fourth events and parties of the white house and ice cream trucks around the country from the dnc and many other things. I mean it kind of looks bad. Obviously the situation has changed. The did not know variants. We're going to search the way they had but this is a huge political problem. Well i mean they can't control the delta variant and they've seen the pattern from other parts of the world Were sort of behind what's happened in other parts of the world and they've other parts of the world have had it far worse than the united states because the united states has higher vaccination rates than most other places in the world. Still in the united states Only sixty percent of the adult. Us population has been fully vaccinated. So it does have the chance to be a potential political problem for president biden. A because this has been his strength so far you know. Six months into his presidency. He gets very high marks for his handling of the current virus. Pandemic you know and it's a little iffy on some of the other issues. If this starts to slip it's an even bigger problem for him just to be honest with both of you. I think you know this. Because i've i've a moated he about this but like this is just been a particularly tough twist to to process. I mean you feel like life is almost entirely back. You feel like this is in the rear view mirror and this comes back but at the same time i feel like it's morphed into this other incredibly depressing story that defines are political times and that is just the trench political warfare identity politics viewing every single thing in the world through the prism of politics and just to wrap up the conversation on washington in particular dominica. How is this going to play out in the house of representatives where i feel like every day. Expect another fight to break out like it did in the eighteen fifties now now there's mass mandates again in the house. I mean that's not going to go over. Well no it's not and you know that's obviously a place where we see this partisan trench warfare as you call it taking place First and foremost ever-present That happening there people calling each other names not really wanting to follow guidance and in fact not following guidance in some corners of this country is actually seen as a political plus. So when you have that it makes public health very difficult. Public health is not the kind of thing that is supposed to be political. You know unfortunately over the past year and a half it has become so and like everything else just partisan and makes it that much more difficult to get something like a pandemic over with. Yeah i was talking to an infectious diseases expert today about this mass guidance and sort of the evolution on mass guidance and he said you know they they get an a for basic science and following what the science tells them but they get an incomplete. He argued for social science. And the fact is that social science is just as important in tackling a pandemic getting people to get vaccinated getting people to do take public health measures. The social science is almost more important than the basic biology. I think the country as a whole probably is getting an f. In social science at this point people want to believe what they believe first and foremost and it makes it hard. I've a lot more thoughts about that side for now tam before we take a break though there isn't important next step to come and that's what the white house does when it comes to to the powers it has to issue mandates to federal employees among other things. Yes so the president is supposed to make a big speech tomorrow to outline the next steps to help breakthrough what has been this very low plateau in vaccination rates and there are three million civilian federal employees in the united states. They are not going to mandate vaccination. But they're gonna make it a little bit uncomfortable For for people who choose not to be vaccinated. And i should say they are strongly considering this move will know for sure when the announcement gets made but a person familiar with the deliberations as they are strongly considering a system where federal employees have would have to verify their vaccination status and if they are not vaccinated undergo weekly testing and be required to wear masks indoors at all times even if they are in areas with low viral transmission. I think we need like maybe a time stamp at the end of this conversation because this is a lot of stuff to process and a big change dominica though we're going to let you go. Before we continue the conversation with the focus on alabama. But but thanks for hanging out all right well stay safe out there or in their in your case i guess all right. We're gonna take a quick break and come back with. Debbie elliott talking about what this looks like an alabama. Npr's planet money. summer school is back. This season is all about investing. We've got stories of big bets. Bubble spotting and cute animals to every wednesday to labor day from. Npr's planet money we are back with npr's debbie elliott. Hey debbie hi there. You are joining us because you have been some reporting on the fact that Kovic cases are spiking especially in the south alabama. Hospitalizations are up five-fold. Since the start of the month what does it look like there right now you know. It's pretty rampant. Officials are saying the combination of low vaccination rates in this delta variant is causing what is an unprecedented spike in cova cases in kobe hospitalizations and the scary part of that is that most of those people are unvaccinated which means it can hurt them more right because vaccinated people can still get sick. I actually have some friends who were vaccinated. Who have breakthrough cases of kobe right now. But they've got a bad cold but if you're unvaccinated and you end up in the hospital those are the people who were having you know serious serious illness and even death and i think you know the the rising numbers caught all of our attention but one thing that really cut through and made a lot of national news was the way that the alabama governor has reacted to this high rate of unvaccinated people. Yeah so i think alabama governor. Kay ivey is just become really frustrated with all of the questions. She's getting from reporters about things. Like mask mandate safer k. Through twelve students kids under twelve. Can't get the vaccine. Will she saying they shouldn't have to wear masks in public schools. Even though you've got a clear message from health officials including the cdc that that's the right thing to do to protect kids and teachers. She's frustrated with being asked all these questions she doesn't want to have to go back to curtailing business or using mask mandates and in fact the state legislature passed a law and she signed it that forbids businesses governments Schools from even requiring vaccinations. So there is very much. This government should not be forcing people to do anything But reporters keep asking her. Look at these numbers. Shouldn't you be doing more. And when she turned and said it's it's the unvaccinated people people need to get shots. That's what our problem is. And it's time for to start blaming the unvaccinated folks not the regular folks style unvaccinated. Folks letting us night. She said she's done all she can do. And it's up to people to get shots and be responsible for their own families and tam. Can you remind us how the white house the cdc all the different federal operators here are trying to reach people in places like alabama who are unvaccinated so the the strategy is to get vaccines into every single location. You possibly can. And to essentially beg people to go talk to their doctors and hope their doctors can convince them. Because you know. Joe biden knows that he's not going to persuade a bunch of people in alabama to go get vaccines. The message has very much become. This is a pandemic of the unvaccinated complicated. A bit by the breakthrough infections and the white house is saying. These things are available You know where they're working with preachers they're working with community groups. They're doing everything they can without putting too many fingerprints on it to make it to you know to turn people off. Will you know the interesting thing down here. Certainly in alabama we love our college football. Right roll tide. They recruited the coaches to help. You know alabama coach. Nick sabin says his team is ninety percent vaccinated. He wants fans to gets back sonate so that it doesn't jeopardize this year's football season We also have a former football coach. Who is now in the. Us senate from alabama republican Tommy tub val. He's recorded a facebook message trying to encourage people to get their shots. Were on the one yard line but we just need one more. Play to run it in. You can help us. Get the win against kobe by getting vaccinated. So we'll see if those work. Are we really on the one yard line. We were then. We got a ten yard penalty. We're still in the red zone. The red side. Yeah all right. debbie elliott. You're welcome back anytime. Maybe we can just talk football next time. You're on the podcast. We can do like breakout. Football podcast does that sound good roll tide and before we go before we go senate negotiators have now said they have made enough progress on an infrastructure deal. Move ahead on a bipartisan test. Vote in the senate more on that on air online. And that's right. it means probably another infrastructure. Podcast come to your feet sometime soon. I'm scott detro-. I cover the white house and i'm tamer keep. I also cover the white house. Thank you for listening to the impair politics.

white house president biden scott detro dominica montenero cdc Us dr rachelle wolinsky Debbie elliott alabama white house npr chesapeake bay Tam Domenico ashley dnc andy keith Kovic
Broke again

Post Reports

24:09 min | 2 months ago

Broke again

"From the newsroom of the washington post this is post reports. I'm martine powers. It's tuesday august third so today began as another day. Were people all over. The country have been wondering how long before the eviction notice shows up. The thinking was it could be weeks or even days depending on where people live. The federal ban on evictions expired this past saturday and then just as we were about to publish the show. Our colleagues broke some news. The biden administration is expected to announce an action that will limit evictions. And it's not clear. How many people. This could help this. All comes after intense pressure from liberal democrats in the house for biden to do something for the millions of renters who were still behind on payments. And we're going to hear from one of them coming up know but people are scrambling and it's not totally clear yet. What this could mean for them. The moratorium on evictions had been in place for eleven months of the pandemic. The cdc said that it couldn't extend it further because of a supreme court ruling last month that ruling said that for a band to keep going congress would have to take action so there was a situation where president biden was calling on congress to act but liberals and congress were saying that biden could have signed an executive order. This was gene sperling on monday afternoon. He heads up stimulus efforts for the white house on the eviction moratorium issue. We have run into so far What seems to be very difficult. Obstacle from the supreme court ruling and again the president went out of his way to push the cdc today to look even at thirty days even targeted to high counties with higher infections and the cdc independently came back and said that they could not at this time. Fine the legal authority. I don't think this means this president's gonna give up i he's going to keep looking and pushing and kicking the tires and v six looks but we're going to do everything we can. There is other help out there. But as we're gonna explore today it's often not enough. A lot of american families are now getting monthly payments under an expanded child tax credit that congress approved a few months ago. I believe this is actually a historic day. Historic dan sensors. We continue to build an economy that respects recognizes dignity working class families and middle class families. It's historic and as our effort to make another giant step toward ending child poverty in america so in march when the american rescue plan was passed by congress it included expansion of the child tax credit program and what it basically did is create a income source of cash assistance for working parents. Regardless of how much money they made cal swenson cover social issues for the post. It's about three hundred dollars a month for children under six and it's about two fifty a month for children under eighteen and so what. It really is of universal basic income for parents. You know it's this experiment in this really kind of progressive approach to tackling poverty which is putting money in people's pockets directly for parents who are struggling and the ambitions are bolt. I mean they say could you know raise as many as four million kids out of poverty in this country. This can be. Life changed because of the way the tax credit was structured. There's one kind of big problem with it and that goes back to how we about poverty in this country which is about income you know. How much money do you make. That's how poor you are and that makes sense to me right. That like the your. I don't know how how else you would measure poverty. That is true. That and that's a definite basic ingredient into what makes a person poor or not. Poor is how much money you have coming in. But the truth of the matter is that standard was set in the nineteen sixties. It's actually really interesting. Was part of the lyndon. Johnson administrations war on poverty. You know if we're going to tackle poverty. The federal government's going to tackle poverty. We have to figure out how to tell if someone's poor not and so. They came up with a criteria that was based on income. But you know the back in the day. Poor people didn't have debt because they couldn't get credit they couldn't get credit cards. There were no payday loans. Medical bills weren't as high. They weren't taking out loans to get further their education and basically today to be poor is not only to have maybe lower income but then also to be saddled with these huge amount of debt from missed payments from late fees from things like payday loans. That you're doing just to get by and now the federal government's lofty expectations for similar programs. Like the child tax credit are crashing into the reality of debt for many people also made up of back rent and lead utility bills. All of this has been made worse by the pandemic. a lot of families are finding these payments helpful but there's simply not enough when a large portion of the money has to go toward paying debt. Jury wakes up rewarding coaching where he is not hurting. Caitlyn woman named brittany baker. A mother of three small kids in dayton ohio. I had a little more in on july second. Twenty nineteen nearly half of all black households with children in the. Us are in a situation that economists refer to as net worth poor. That means that when you take their assets and subtracting their debt payments with leftover isn't enough to cover basic needs for three months before the pandemic things were manageable for brittany's family. They had savings they could cover the rent and bills. They were making things work. She met her fiance when they were both working. At arby's on those one of a number of fast food jobs she'd had for a long time and they got together and in two thousand nineteen she kind of got a big break when she was hired at a local hospital on the cleaning staff and she made when this new position fifteen dollars an hour now at the time she and her fiance had a child their first child and they had a decision to make you know it was whether or not they pay for childcare which can be quite expensive up to eight hundred dollars. Really for a single child in the dayton area or whether or not her fiance jordan would stay home so they would lose one kind of potential flow of income but they would not have to pay for childcare at the time because britney had good opportunities. She was making fifteen dollars an hour. This new job. It seems secure. The family decided that jordan would stay home and take care of the kid and later more kids while britney worked so with britney working at the hospital in this good job. The family was in a good place economically and they decided to have more kids they eventually had a second child and then going into spring of two thousand twenty. She finds out. She's pregnant with a third child. She was in her mid thirties. By this point she had asthma. Chronic asthma and her doctors cautioned that she was probably going into a high risk pregnancy situation but at the exact same time cova nineteen is beginning to kind of bliss through the country and her doctors also tell her that she is probably at very high risk for suffering the worst consequences of cova nineteen if she catched it so now britney has decision to make. Does she continue working with this high risk pregnancy and possibly expose herself to co vid or does she go home and collect unemployment and have a child and then get back to work as fast as she can so she can get back to getting a regular paycheck into what is bringing decide to do so. Brittany leaves work in april and she immediately applies for unemployment assistance. That claim would actually take months to kind of grind through the system. Because there's such a traffic jam of other claims documents. Everything actual turned to the email. I know the state rent i. I called him every single day. I the way. And actually when she finally gets a response in midsummer. It's a rejection. What the state had decided was that she was actually not leaving work because of code. She's leaving work because of her baby. She was taking a leave of absence now. Her doctor's immediately disagreed with this. They said no. It's really both. She's she's at risk for the pregnancy and she's at risk for kovic. She should not be working as the bottom line so she appeals that decision which basically puts her at the back of a line and again her appeal now is grinding through the unemployment system. Very slowly and the meantime. She has the buy groceries for the kids. She has to pay the bills that she can. She has to pay the internet. She has to pay the light bill all these utilities so she immediately goes through her savings which is a couple thousand dollars. That's gone and matter of weeks. Then she is taking out small emergency payday loans which have five hundred to a thousand percent interest payments on top of them just to get cash in her hands so she can buy groceries Very quickly she realizes. That's kind of untenable. So she basically starting to get desperate. She begins going to food banks or asking for food assistance to be dropped off at her house. Those boxes of donated food go only so far and again she also for the first time as missing rent she begins not making her monthly rent payment because she has to pay for everything else so on top of all of this pressure she has with her health with his unborn baby. She now knows that every month it's going buys basically a month where she's not paying rent. She's getting closer to a possible fiction eventually. The state here's her appeal and reverses their early decision and grants her unemployment benefits. They say okay. We were wrong. You're right it is about kovic and your baby. You do deserve unemployment benefits so that comes in late summer and by that point britney is probably a ten thousand dollars in debt with all the payments she's had to made these high interest loans so the money begins coming in but literally the day after she gets that letter she goes into labor with her third child and it was a premature birth. The baby was in the nick. You for a number of weeks. She was exhausted in an incredibly physically drained from the pregnancy. And when she gets home she develops a blood clot in her leg and his rushed back to the same hospital with a life threatening blood clot that they catch in time but in terms of not only her health but in terms of the families economics this delays her return to work which is basically with his family is hanging onto their hang on his idea. That eventually britney can get back to work and start making that fifteen dollars an hour again and the family can hopefully begin to crawl out of debt so finally in december it takes almost the whole year for britney to get there but finally in december. She is okay to go back to work. She gets the chronic virus vaccine. She gets a checkup from the doctors. And at that chaco. They deliver kind of a surprise to her they say. Hey you're pregnant again a fourth time. Now this is overwhelming to her because she had basically just gone through this whole process where she had to choose between the life of a child and their steady income as a family and she was terrified about what that would mean. She was terrified of missing work again of losing out on her steady paycheck with that would mean for her other children. She was terrified of what this fourth pregnancy would do to her body her ability to work so ultimately she decides that she has to get back to work that she's the provider for this family for these three children soon to be four children for fiancee. He offers to go find work. She says you know who knows how long that'll take. It's easier if you stay home with the kids still. It's a relief on my mind. And no i'll be clocking in and they're taking care of so she decides. I just have to get back to work at the same time though. She is going through what turns out to be a really hard risk pregnancy. Everyday she's feeling the pains in her body. They gave me rollbacks in which the muscle take makes me feel like eventually contractions. She becomes dilated in. Our body is really telling you to stop and the doctors are saying. You need to be on bed rest. You don't need to be working but in her mind. I have three kids at home. I have to take care of my fiance and doesn't feel like there's an option there. There's no other options. So that when i got to spend time with brittany she was getting up every day at five. Am taking a shot. Those trying to kind of stabilize her body. She was getting on a bus for an hours drive to work. She was working all day long. Very physically grueling happy sometimes my nerves just stuff like know as a co worker. I can't stay. And what did she say about what this was like for her. This feeling of looming financial stress and potential disaster. It was incredibly difficult for her to go through at one point last year the very end of last year she felt like she was in such a bad situation that she called children's family services on herself she called and said. I don't think i can be a mother anymore to my children because of what's going on unless i get some help from the government i knew i that i fully alchemy i. I wasn't even asking for. Just just go pay my bills. Food really remake using colin diapers. I wasn't really. I was never asking people for money. I would ask for him. She's asking for help from someone and i'd asked her. Will you pick up that phone where you worried that they would come and take your kids away and she said you know. Of course you know that was in. The back of my mind started crying. Sh- wrong seat here or something. When i wanna call you real. She knew she was just trying to be a good mother but she also just didn't know where else to turn. Or what else would help the situation. That's the biggest thing is i. I actually feel like a bell no matter where turn. Nothing's working out and what happens. Is that children's and family services come out. they visitor. They look around the premise and what they see is a really well maintained home. You know happy kids a family. That's together with they don't see are usually the red flags that would cause them to take children out of the situation and so they don't really have a solution for britney in the end. They sent her a letter. Saying you know there's no closing your case. We have nothing we can do. There's going to be no assistance provided for you. So here she goes on this ledge you know and and takes his dramatic step asking for help and in the end she gets a letter back saying you know sorry. We can't do anything i mean. I was kind of like we'll beat the system backwards like that because what you want to china healthier fail. So what did she do after that. I it seems like she got to this. I don't know worst case. Scenario of saying i'm willing to potentially risk custody of my kids so that i can make sure that they're cared for and then even that doesn't work. It doesn't help so what ended up coming up. Was the child tax credit. Just about right around. That time that she had made that call and they were inspecting Her house this very large package of programs passes the american rescue plan in march of this year and that included the expansion of the child tax credit and eventually you know brittany hears about it and she thinks this is. This could be a really good thing for her on her family. But as you were saying at the beginning. I mean these are. Checks are based on income and not necessarily taking into account the debt that people are facing and it sounds like britney is also struggling with debt so how did that affect what she ultimately received so with three kids the top lines for this one year program she could get about Little under eleven hundred dollars and her debt basically that she accrued throughout kovin in the last year and everything was really within a within thousand dollars of that same number so really whatever she got was very close to what she owed and then that doesn't taking a fact that she's still buying groceries and feeding hungry growing kids and trying to pay a little money on the rent so the reality is that when that payment comes in a monthly check she got about nine hundred dollars for the three kids and within a few days you know it was gone and she had said to me now. I'm broke again even though this check was coming in and it helped. It's a big deal. It's a lot of money for someone in her situation. One hundred dollars big deal. That she couldn't apply that money to the dead it had to go to the necessities of just getting by for her family for until the next check comes so because of the situation because of the hard choices she's been put into. She has so much debt. She can't use the money that's coming in. It's supposed to free her from poverty to get ahead and she's definitely not alone. One of the weird things about debt though is kind of a foggy concept you know we have some hard numbers on mortgages. We have some hard numbers on credit card delinquency. But you know some people might be take payday loans at high interest rates. Some people might borrow cash from a family member. So what somebody does you know what they have hanging over them. It's not necessarily a number. That's easy to read. But one way that we kind of gotten a peak into people's anxieties about debt is through their responses to surveys about how they use stimulus money. So we've had three rounds of stimulus checks that have come through in response to the pandemic and each time. The federal reserve bank of new york conducted a survey asking people. Like what do you use that money for. You buy groceries and you saving it. Buying a new. Tv what are you using. What where's the money. Go and every time on those three occasions when those checks were cut around thirty five or thirty. Eight percent of the money people reported went to debt went to things they owed you know when we talk about raising people out of poverty. We can't really conceptualize it without thinking about debt. You can't just give somebody. Let's say one hundred dollars when they have to turn around and use seventy dollars of that to pay back someone they owed from last week. You know like there's no way to really get ahead even when you're getting this money which which is which is generous in. Its bold new substantial. It's hard to get ahead. When you have to divert most of that money not necessities and getting ahead in life but to what you already out kyle swenson. Reports on social issues for the post rennie's for ski produce. This story Washington post journalists are working around the clock and across the world to bring stories to light. If you'd like to support their work consider a digital subscription you can get a whole year of unlimited access to our original reporting for just one dollar a week. Good this offer at washington post dot com slash subscribe today officials in new york city announced that they will start requiring proof of vaccination for indoor dining and going to the gym. There are questions about whether other cities should do the same thing. It's just the latest development in the new reality of life with the delta variant. And we're all trying to figure out how our behavior is supposed to change in this world. Where kobe cases are rising even as more and more people get vaccinated yesterday on the show. We asked for your questions about this latest surge of the delta variant and tomorrow we will be entering them with a guest host. Hello this is maggie penman. She is our executive producer and she'll be filling in as guest host. Yes i have been going through all of the great questions we've from our listeners and so many people are asking about how to keep their kids safe as they go back to school or what. The delta variant surge means for plans like travel or weddings. We'll have been guarino. Our science reporter on to answer some of these questions so the more people who get vaccinated and unfortunately the more people who get infected and produce all kinds of immune fighters against future infection. That's like an immune wall that were starting to build. And we're going to keep doing this so it's not too late to send us a voice memo. Just tell us who you are and what your question is and email it to post reports at wash. Post dot com. And we'll do our best to answer it maggie. I am very excited to listen. That's it for post reports. Thanks for listening today. Show was mixed by rennie's for naski. I'm martine powers. We'll be back tomorrow with foreign stories from the washington post eight years ago. Journalists austin thais was abducted in syria while covering that country's ongoing conflict. It's time for the united states government to bring him home helped. Bring attention to austin's case by wearing a free austin bracelet from the washington. Post press freedom partnership available free at wapo dot s. t. slash tastes.

britney congress cdc biden administration president biden gene sperling biden cal swenson brittany baker supreme court Chronic asthma brittany dayton federal government washington post
The end of a small town's prison economy

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

23:07 min | 3 months ago

The end of a small town's prison economy

"Susanville northern california can be small town mountain living at it's finest pine scented evenings striking views rivers lakes and isolation the nearest big city reno. Nevada is eighty six miles away. Good paying jobs to in the form of prisons more than half. Susan villes population works at the town's to steve facilities at a nearby federal correction center. Now one of the prisons is scheduled to close and this charming town of just over thirteen thousand five hundred residents roughly forty percent who are incarcerated. They got to confront a truism small town american light when you rely on one industry for your economy. You're eventually going to get screwed. I'm gonna stop them. You're listening to the times daily news from the. Elliot hines today's july eight. Two thousand twenty one haitian president giovanelli's is assassinated at his home. A heatwave is expected to hit southern california in the coming days and researchers with uc. Berkeley found that using a cell phone. For more than thousand hours increases the risks of tumors by sixty percents That was my main june. Today we tell the story of susanville with la times reporter haley branson pots. We also hear from some residents and an advocate for prison closure who says there is a future after lanka gets closed up a job at one. Is susan villes. Prisons used to be a sure way to get into the middle class now. An anticipation of the closing of the california correctional center by twenty twenty two. Some residents are thinking of leaving town. Altogether healy branson. Pots covers. Rule california for the la times. She recently published a front page story about susanville. Struggles haley sissonville has been through the pains of shuttering industry. That residents long relied on right. That's correct susan ville and all of lesson county much of northeastern california in general these are logging communities and so they have been struggling for years and years. After the decline of the timber industry. There was actually a small town nearby that once had the world's largest sawmill that is now at a tiny tiny town. You know a shadow of what it once was so yeah. This is an area that it's saw its primary industry go and this was decades ago because his fifties sixties and most of these towns ended up dying off in susan what saved it was the rival the california correction center in nineteen sixty three that another prison opened in ninety five and a federal facility in nearby her long fourteen years ago. All of this was happening. During an era of mass incarceration that the state of california is currently trying to remedy. Did residents ever think that. Maybe it wasn't the wisest thing to build an economy around prisoners. Reaction was mixed when the california correctional center came along. You know. initially you had people who said you know we. We don't want inmates here. This is back when the mills had. I started closing but then there was a large portion of the community at that time did see an economic benefit and in many small rural towns across the country. You had people in town asking for prisons but you also had you know the state came in and they said this will benefit the economy People in town say they promoted what was called a good neighbor policy. You know they would buy from local businesses and they would. They would be a good neighbor. They would help the town out. Ultimately that one out and they built a california correctional center and it became part of the town fabric and then when the second prison came in the nineteen nineties. After that that's when you started seeing more than half of the employment locally was out there there was some mixed reaction but ultimately they kind of accepted it for what it was. Which was you know. Really good paying jobs in a really remote area. A stable retirement and many of the businesses came to rely upon it as well. It's so remote. That families visiting inmates stay. At the local hotels they eat at the local restaurants. You have schools that rely upon the families of correctional officers because there are so many there and so it really kinda filters into all parts of life. They're one of the examples that you mentioned was dairy farmer correct. This is a company called morning glory. Dairy and i got to spend some time with both the longtime fairly newly retired owner of the dairy farm who owned it when the prisons i came in and then i got to speak to the current day owner. Josh mckernan. who's thirty. Two years old bought the company 2017. He's panicking. he's most likely going to have to lay off some of his employees. The dairy has been selling milk and eggs and cheese to the prisons in bulk for decades. Now about a quarter of their sales. Go to just the california correctional centre more goes to high desert state prison. Which is the maximum security. Prison built right next door and one of their big selling points. Was you know their local. You know this remote area you know. It snows in the wintertime. They never miss a delivery. They've had what they consider to be a really good relationship. And so that's gonna be a huge chunk of sales if they're already trying to adjust to. Yeah because that shows how important. This prison is too livelihood of so many people in susanville. It's it's not. Just the people in susan ville the residents there. Inmates are also affected as well. They're also concerned. This actually does not help with lowering the inmate population. They're merely being transferred. This is will. President is actually one of the few in the state that is not over capacity and so yeah there are certainly inmates. An inmate families have their concerns as well. There are a lot of people who are are fighting it. And they know including elected officials people with the city people at the county. They are right out on on preventing the closure. I did speak with them. You know school officials both at the k. Through twelve level and the local community college. They are working on backup. Plans the k. Through twelve the county superintendent said she is trying to get a reprieve from attendance based funding So she can figure out you know if she needs to consolidate schools or lay off staff. I think if the elected official level right now they they are intensely fighting this And there are a lot of people in town who are doing so as well and they You know they're really holding out. Hope that they can get the state to change their mind. And know i i will tell you. The story got a really strong reaction. It's a complicated relationship with that town. Everyone spoke to said they you know. Of course they're happy to see the number of inmates declining. You know nobody wants to be known as profiting off of someone being incarcerated It's it's complicated. I did hear from many people who were disgusted by it. The economic realities in in a very small rural town. You are very different if you are a correctional officer or someone who works at prison. You know you've had a path to a middle class life. Unfortunately that has come with working with people who are incarcerated. We'll have more for my colleague hailey branson pots and after this break. Get it for hugs. Get it for date nights for live. Music home games and haircuts. Get it for eating at your favorite restaurant for grandma's birthday for graduations. Get it for your loved. Ones and the essential workers. Get it for all of us when it's available to you. Blue shield of california encourages you to get the cove in nineteen vaccination. Get it for california. The world is built on relationships from building wealth to building a business. It takes a dedicated team working together. And the only difference between success and failure is who you have in your corner when the going gets tough at city national bank. We aim to be the people you rely on when it really counts. That's why your relationship manager will take the time to get to know you after all it's only by knowing your goals that we can help you achieve them see what personal can do for you at c. n. b. dot com city national bank member. Fdic excuse me. Is this seat open. There are no assigned seats on a southwest airlines flight. That means your net. Seat-mate could be chest about anyone. Hi i'm quentin jenkins. I li community outreach. At southwest airlines and welcome to. It's this seat. Open on this podcast. We'll hear twenty stories from south west history from people like chief marketing officer ryan green. Leave it to southwest airlines to save the company by offering a bunch of free booze. Managing director of culture and engagement whitney ike inger. All of it coming together was probably the greatest piece of humor. I've ever seen at southwest and retired vice president of cargo and charter matt. Luckily i look back on it. I get goosebumps. Sit back relax and enjoy stories of south west fifty years of flying. Because you never know who. You'll meet the next time you hear. Is this seat open for doing. California officials offer a couple of reasons for why they're closing the california correctional center and susan ville. It's too expensive to maintain the state's prison population is shrinking and because california's no longer on jailing as many people as possible as was the case in one thousand nine hundred and nine hundred ninety s. That's what the california department of corrections and rehabilitation or cdc are for short told the times and they also tried to dispel the big rumor in town that susanville was targeted. Because it's trump country. My colleague hailey branson pod says residents. Don't believe the cdc are one bit. This closure is coming while the number of inmates has declined dramatically and especially during the pandemic. They announced the closure of the susanville. Prison in april and the frustration in susanville is that they said they weren't given a heads up that it was even being considered and so there's a lot of anger that this was the one chosen because there was a california legislative analyst's report this february that that recommended four other prisons. That were older and that office said they were more expensive to repair and operate. They're in susanville. I mean it is a very very conservative community. More than seventy five percent of the county voted for donald trump for president you know it was the highest trump voting county That county really strongly supported. You know recalling governor newsom. It was one of the highest percentages of support so a lot of people there you know they feel like this is political retaliation. The department of corrections denies this but it is palpable. And so now actually. The city of susanville is planning to sue the state over the closure and they say that they've gotten very little information as to why this facility was chosen. It's a sentiment. I heard from lassen county administrative officer. Richard egan he says susan vilma county were left to figure out what happened with no clue from state whatsoever in so we're curious about that a lot of speculation that maybe it's retaliation because is a conservative stronghold not favored by the governor. It's also just simply a political mathematics that you know. There's not that many voters up here. But i don't think that it's based in comparative analysis about what's best for the state taxpayers and so has the state offered susanville to help absorb the loss of over a thousand jobs. Revenue to local businesses and fear of an exodus of residents will according to richard egan since the announcement of a potential lawsuit by susanville. Not much the cdc are in the governor's office have basically not basically the have told our legislatures that since that has occurred we are not gonna participate in any kind of negotiations to mitigate the effects of this abrupt closure which we find again almost unbelievable retaliation to To the residents of this area and so there you have and then there are the other residents susanville who will also be directly affected by this closure to prison inmates themselves. More than two thousand three hundred. Inmates live at c. c. According to how both the city and the us census bureau tally populations. All of those inmates are counted as fulltime quote residents of susanville missy. Out of the guys watching the debate over the scheduled closure and from a unique perspective. She owns a home in susanville and works at a nearby army post and she's also married to an inmate at c. Okay so like when my husband. I got to ccc beck in nineteen or two thousand seventeen There wasn't a lot of programs when he first got there. Mike art at the serving a life sentence for murder without the possibility of parole but he's enrolled at the local community college and also advocates for other inmates. Missy is also hopeful. That michael might be able to win a commutation and be eligible for parole as california reduces. Its prison population. A big part of that is keeping up with his education and his rehab programs. Something that may be a lot harder if he gets transferred elsewhere. Now yes my husband at this. Time is not eligible for parole board. That's the whole point of life without the possibility of parole but we are still working very hard on his commutation package and hopefully will be approved by the governor so that we can have that chance at that pro war. That's why he's working so hard so he fought him and the other incarcerated. People fought really hard to get programs up here. Good programs that they can use for parole boards so that was very important to them if the california correctional center closes misty. Do you leave susanville. So as of right now that would be a no. Because i do have a really good job at the army base I'm a permanent employee. And so i would travel Again i would try to visit as much as possible but They're they're changing our systems so much within. Cdc are on how to apply for visits and and video visits. They're going within ten seconds so it's just really hard so probably stay here. Do you think your neighbors would also stay in susanville. Or would they leave. Depends on what neighbors so we have a lot of good retired people up here. We have a lot of people that do work at the base as well. We have people that work. At high desert it will change There's gonna be a lot of homes going up for sale. I own my home. I'm kind of concerned about the pricing of homes dropping of course As people leave town and it's just about bringing more people in so at that point we'd have to find something some type of industry some type of something to bring into the town so we can keep our economy up the of any hope that the state of california will help. Susan villain whatever's next. I would hope so since. They're kind of i blame for this situation. We're in this pickle yes. I do hope that they do think of something. Come up with something. Assist us some way just to get something else in here. That's maybe not as large as the prison but something that's comparable something and we can figure out and at least get started and then let us take over a year as as crazy short time to try to figure this out and Yes i definitely hope. And i i wish i would just kinda slow. The process a little just to give us a time to breathe again. I understand the whole. We shouldn't be dependent but it's a little too late for that. Thank you so much for this interview misty. You are very welcome. Thank you so very much coming up. Susan bill isn't the first town to rely on a prison economy. My next guest tells us what others are doing with their shattered lockups. Stay tuned frank. Carson was a criminal defense attorney who spent years accusing police and prosecutors of corruption. Then they charged him with murder. I'm christopher gothard writer and host of the l. a. times podcasts. Dirty john and detective trap. I'm inviting you to follow and listen to my new podcast. That trials of frank carson. This eight episodes series is a story of power politics and the law. In california's central valley new episodes of the trials of frank carson are available to find them search for the trials of frank carson. Wherever you get your podcasts thank you. We reached out to governor gavin. You sums office for a response to some of the questions and concerns that residents of susanville shared with us. We received no response like susanville. Other small remote towns across the united states welcome prisons into their communities in the past decades as their economic salvation and like susanville fears. Might happen these cities and hamlets were left wondering what comes next. One prison shuttered. My guest nicole porter studies this trend. She's the director of advocacy at the sentencing project. That's a nonprofit that works to reduce imprisonment and criminalization of youth and adults porter said that what's playing out in susanville. California california's a direct reaction to how the us has typically viewed incarceration. There was a strategy at the federal level and within states to expand the prison footprint But now you know thirty. Forty years into the mass incarceration era. There is a growing Interest to challenge mass incarceration to undo it in so now in the conversation around what comes next door. Other opportunities that the residents in susanville can be considering can be looking to and hopefully will be motivated and inspired by. The sentencing project has studied those prison towns and effects both of prisons opening and also prisons closing. What are the bane findings at the sentencing project has found in such cases. Well people should know will. Particularly the residents of susanville should know that there is an opportunity for something next after the prison closes down and there have been a handful of experiences around the country in new york Close prison was converted into a movie studio. In north carolina. A closed president was converted into a agricultural hubs so that farmers and other local workers could trade ideas on farming techniques and there are a handful of other examples around the country in terms of reusing closed prisons. There's a future for their town. There's future for their community in. They should not be fighting to keep the prison open. They should be Seriously considering what comes next in susanville for the economy and for the residents of that community residents of susanville responding well look. Prisoners are prisoners. Were good people. And now our economy's gonna be shattered because of that and it's just not fair to us. What would be your response. Well first of all prisoners or people but the way in which we imprison people in the united states is fundamentally a problem because the united states since people to prison that they just don't get sent to prison for in other parts of the world particularly other parts of the western world in the united states lacks people up for longer and that is been a driver of mass incarceration not just in california but across the country so the residents of susan will who are concerned about the prison closure in the impact on the local economy rather than focusing on the harms associated with mass incarceration in keeping jobs associated with the violent and harmful policy should be working with the state on address transition economy That can help move the state into what should come next for susan bill which should come next for prison. Towns is not just happening in susanville. It's actually happening in other parts of the country and possibly in other parts of california as well and that's it for this episode of the times daily news from the la times tomorrow. A conversation with chet the himself. Danny our show is produced by shannon. Lynn steven cuevas said skara are executive producers abby venture swanson our engineers mario diaz are editor shawnee hilton. Our intern is ashley. Brown and our theme. Music is by andrew ethan. I'm just adriano. We'll be back tomorrow with all the news on this monday. Frank carson was a criminal defense attorney who spent years accusing police and prosecutors of corruption. Then they charged him with murder. I'm christopher gothard writer and host of the la times. podcasts dirty. John and detective trap. I'm inviting you to follow and listen to my new podcast. That trials of frank carson. This eight episodes series is a story of power politics and the law. In california's central valley new episodes of the trials of frank carson are available to find them search for the trials of frank carson. Wherever you get your podcasts thank you.

california correctional center susanville susan ville california hailey branson Susan villes la times Elliot hines giovanelli haley branson susan villes healy branson Richard egan haley sissonville lesson county california correction center Josh mckernan
Promise, peril in push for electric cars

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

21:56 min | 2 months ago

Promise, peril in push for electric cars

"President joe biden wants forty percent of new cars to be electric by twenty thirty envisioned in the future. That is now beginning to happen. Future of the automobile industry that has electric battery. Electric plug in hybrid. electric fuel. cell electric is electric. And and there's no turning back as automakers race to meet the man they're setting off a mining rush worldwide for rare earth and critical metals. Cobalt lithium manganese and nickel. Here in. the united states are hard to come by but existence sensitive habitats like the ocean floor in indigenous lands. Now environmentalists and activists are questioning whether electric cars are the wisest way to tackle climate change. I'm gonna stop adriano. You're listening to the times daily news from the la times. Today's monday august sixteenth. Two thousand twenty one kabul. Also the taliban as afghanistan's president flees the country earthquakes in haiti. Kill hundreds as a tropical storm heads towards the caribbean nation and a newspaper in colorado apologizes for saying new mexico. Chiles are better than pueblo. Chili's as the guy who wrote the book about the history of mexican food in the united states. Let me say both chilies are delicious. And both lose to cheat. The venus from sonora the state of california has long prepared for this one thousand nine hundred has promoted the production of cars that run on electric batteries when california sneezes of course the rest of the world catches a coal so production and sales of electric vehicles has risen dramatically in the past decade. Here's a ceo. Ford motor company. Jim farley earlier this month we're number one in vans. That vehicles getting electrified. Mustang is number one sports car. that's electrified now f. One fifties number on pickup truck. Thats electrified when those volumes. Really come on next year. That's really gonna help our our performance quite a bit but in the rush to embrace this technology are we damaging the planet even more in this episode. We take you to lithium minds of the western. Us nevada to the geothermal vents of california's salton sea and to the sea floor of the pacific ocean our guide la times reporter. Evan helper and this episode will be the first in an l. time series called the united states of california. He'll look out public policy that the golden state has pioneered and how it has affected the rest of the country. Evan welcome to the times. It's great to be here. Kosovo your story does a great job of not just explaining the current controversy but also how california has figured so prominently into the development of this electric car renaissance. So what's the background. So california's been pushing electric cars for a long time. I mean it goes all the way back to nineteen ninety. When the state passed these mandates for zero emission vehicles. It was a pipe dream at the time. It seemed like cars run on batteries. Were far off. But the state kept pushing and eventually these cars started rolling off the assembly lines. And when they did they were so undesirable that they were called compliance. Cars were created just to meet the mandates of california. But you know the state kept at it and the cars became more popular. And now we're looking at emissions and the need to cut them and meeting. The challenges of climate change. Electric cars are going to play. Really bic and there's going to be a need for a lot of millions of them in the coming years and this isn't some long ago history. I mean i still remember when one of the reasons why people wanted to buy. Electric cars was. Because you'd get the sticker that would allow you to be able to get in the carpool lanes. Yeah getting into the. Hov lane was a a really big sell to the electric cars. And you know the people who are the early embracing who bought the nissan leafs. That was a big reason to buy them. It used to be though that if you had. An electric car is sort of needed to have another car you know. There weren't many charging stations. It was kind of something that you'd have as a as a second car but soon electric cars will be the main car that most of us are driving the internal combustion. Engine will be pretty much outlawed in california by twenty thirty five. At least the sale of new vehicles will all have to be something other than internal combustion engine. Oh god the nissan leave. That takes me back that early. Toyota prius has all boxy and ugly and look in california. We love to be seen what we're driving but eventually as technology caught up and also the cars started becoming frankly better looking like the tesla's and as people started realizing climate change is definitely an issue. Those vehicles started become popular. Yeah absolutely and this year was a particularly big moment because we saw ford came out with a you know electric pickup truck a fully plug in pickup truck. That was something that just seemed unimaginable a few years ago. These battery cars were always considered kind of wimpy. They didn't have the horsepower. Now we're talking about being able to use them as pickup trucks and suv's. Oh yeah i drive seventy nine ford ranger super cab and anytime i these little cards on like act could run you over but then seeing that big huge for a truck. You're like okay. I guess this is actually a real thing and the it administration has also largely backed this push for electric vehicles as well transportation cars. They just make up so much greenhouse gas emissions. That you've gotta make a big dent in them. You've got to get rid of these cars that run on gas to be able to meet those targets and so the by administrations fully embraced moving toward electric vehicles. And they're also embracing california's push because when california changes. Its rules changes the rules for the whole auto market. You know. there's a coalition of states that are committed to doing what california does on tailpipe emissions. But even before that coalition so many cars are sold in california that it's like for automakers to try to make one set of vehicles for california another set of vehicles for everyone else is just is impractical so when california changes its rules the whole auto industry has to go with after this break we take you to lithium minds that will supply the materials needed to power all these electric cars and why some communities say it's an environmental disaster waiting to happen so my friends at lemmon. The media have a new podcast. I'm excited to tell you about called. I'm sorry i'm sorry is all about apologies. And how they play out in the court of public opinion. It's hosted by comedians muhannad el-sheikhi ohio lopez and kiki monique each week. This show on facts. The latest and greatest in twitter gaffes petty beef and not so subtle. Schade forgive forget or cancel checkout. I'm sorry to explore the latest. In celebrity apologies help guests in listeners. Get their own redemption and say sorry to stars. Who never got the apology. They deserved hash. Tag free brittany. I'm sorry premieres. August twenty seventh. Wherever you get your podcasts. Frank carson was a criminal defense attorney who spent years accusing police and prosecutors of corruption. Then they charged him with murder. I'm christopher gothard writer and host of the l. a. times podcasts. Dirty john and detective trap. I'm inviting you to follow and listen to my new podcast. That trials of frank carson. This eight episodes series is a story of power politics and the law. In california's central valley new episodes of the trials of frank carson are available to find them search for the trials of frank carson. Wherever you get your podcasts. Thank you so have an all. This demand made car makers run into a supply problem. China dominates the market on the production of electric car batteries and also the raw material. You know getting these electric batteries. Not as easy as just going to autozone and buying something for like seventy five dollars so the united states is now trying to figure out how to mind these rarer domestically for your sorry you went to nevada to find out more about the consequences of mining out there in the part of nevada. You went to there's rich stores of lithium i. What part of nevada are we talking about. So we were way up north of reno. We were near the oregon border. You know and it's it's not an easy place to get. You gotta fly into reno or drive to reno and then you go about three and a half hours to four hours to get to this place. Called thacker pass. you know. It's on bureau of land management property. it's a beautiful largely untouched. Very windswept landmass. That's high up in the hills and there's there's all kinds of sagebrush. There's eagles there's hawks but yet it's a remote part of the state so you go up there. Who did you meet. We met folks who were protesting. The creation of this lithium and this is the largest lithium reserve in the united states. Right now there's only one lithium mine. It's elsewhere in nevada and it really only produces enough lithium to make small fraction of the electric batteries. That will be needed. This lithium mine could produce enough nearly to cover the whole. Us vehicle fleet and so that's a really big deal. So there's an indigenous tribe that as reservation nearby and that land is sacred to them. You know they say their ancestors are buried there. This was the site of a massacre. You know we're talking in the eighteen. Hundreds during the gold and silver rush. They go there hunt. They go there to collect plants for medicine. They go there for ceremonies and so this tribe initially had reached an agreement with the mining company that they were gonna start having what's called engagement agreement and participate with them and see how you know maybe the mining company that tribe could work together. This all happened. During cove and a lot of members of the tribe said they did not realize what was going on. Did not like the idea of this agreement. Thirty during this is brenda hinky. She's a member of the fort. Mcdermott pilot and shoshoni tribe. We do a huge and growing number of people think. Hey i don't want this here. I don't wanna see my great grandchildren. You know not live in a place where we can go and get our would sources for ceremonies or you know some of the medicines. I was just actually talking about with my grandma over there in in the mountain you know. And so we see like a generational issue. Why are we going to be showing like the next few generations below this mind. Gut greenlighted by the trump administration in its final days and it was fast-tracked and when the tribe looked closer at what this would actually mean for this property while there are many people in the tribe see potentially get jobs. They're ultimately a tribe has decided that this is really a big problem. So i didn't get your name my given name or my mind. Go by name what you would prefer day. He they see major potential environmental problems with sulfuric acid. That's involved in extracting the lithium that worried about the water table. The hazardous chemical has sit in their backyard. I mean maybe if people had their heads has chemical pet sitting in their backyard. And maybe they'd have a different. You know a vision on it. You know if it's polluting or groundwater if they're getting cancer their families died and cancer. I they might have a dominant society. Men have different stand on it and so now the tribe has come out against the mine and this is a real problem for this canadian mining company that had pitched their project is something new something green when the tribe said and we started looking into this. This really. isn't that green at all. And this is going to have a major negative impact on the community and you also talked to a rancher who initially said. Oh this is going to benefit me but now looking more into like maybe not so right so we did talk to edward bartell who owns a large ranch. That'd be adjacent to the mind. And he told us he said he heard about this in initially thought greats. You know this is green. We need the lithium. This is the kind of thing we need to be doing. And then he looked closer at the environmental impact documents and realized that in his mind his ranching operation can't even survive if the mind is built as plan as springs start to dry up as the water table drops it becomes uneconomical to haul water vast distances to provide Drinking water for our cattle. So we see a huge potential this absolutely destroying our livelihood. He's worried about the pollution that'll be created and he has cattle that are grazing on this large expanse land. And he's seeing this becoming a big industrial hub with all kinds of trucks coming through in this giant mine pit so he is suing to stop. the project. mining always affects the land but the mining for rare earth. They brings particular problems. Yeah i mean these minds you know depending on who you talk to extraction industries. Say this is not your grandfather's mind that things have changed. We're doing the different way. But you bore down into these documents. You're still talking about having to bring in all these tons of sulfuric acid to extract lithium in the case of lithium cobalt right now. A lot of that mining is happening in the democratic republic of congo because the mining is so environmentally challenging. It's also a problem there in the democratic republic of congo where they've got tens of thousands of children working in the minds so these are one of the things that everyone. The auto industry by administration environmentalists are struggling with people who are driving these cars. They feel like they're doing a good thing for the planet but a lot of the may not realize okay sourcing. These materials creates a lot of social problems that had of itself so from the northern parts of nevada. You also then talk to people who are trying to mind for these rare earth minerals and the deep sea floor. Yeah and that's kind of a new thing so we went out on the vote of this company called. It used to be called deep green there now called the metals company and their plan is to go way out into what's called the clarion clifton zone of the pacific where the floor is like two and a half miles deep and there are these modules that form over literally millions of years the najah have i think four or three or four the elements that are crucial for electric vehicle batteries and are hard to come by for the us rate. Now nickel manganese copper and what they wanna do is scrape these najah jobs from the sea floor and there's so many of them down there that they're saying we can just kick them up like golf balls as the way they put it and create enough of these materials that you'd be able to source batteries for the entire us vehicle. Fleet oceanographers are deeply concerned about this more than five hundred. Scientists have signed a petition urging the international seabed authority which is kind of an obscure organization. That's headquartered in jamaica but they have ultimate authority over whether this mining can happen or not. Saudi scientists are asking the international seabed authority to please not allow us to push moratorium. And they're trying to push companies to sign onto the separate and refuse to source materials through this kind of mine. Who are some of the people that you talk to regarding the ocean floor debate. I talked to jared barron. He's the ceo of the metals company. He talked to us about why he thinks. This is environmentally sensitive and why the company believes this is saving the planet. The great thing about nigel's is that every single. Part of this nudge. Ally holding my hand is usable material. It's like having e battery in iraq. And if we compare that to the alternative on land where we're having to ripped out. Forest trees plans. Dig up our soil's to get to metal bearing. Aw that has enormous unintended consequences it releases carbon sinks it changes the sequester in cycle. It destroys biodiversity. We also talked to in oceanographer. Who's involved in the campaign to create a moratorium for this kind of seabed mining. The oceanographer talk to us about the scientists concerns about what can happen. The unintended consequences about there being habitats down there that we may not even know about and lifeforms that actually rely on these modules. That haven't even been discovered yet. Yeah the company isn't just picking up the nachos but would eventually scrape to see floor. The deep sea is like the most unexamined part of the world to the point where you also gave a cameo to like this little octopus that lives on these modules that became viral sensation. It was just discovered a couple years ago. The internet gave it. The nickname casper and casper might have to find another home so casper. Is this kind of milky white octopus and as you said unknown to humanity until a few years ago when some scientists discovered it. This octopuses now can using several shore-based scientists had never seen anything like this. And it relies on your these modules that these companies want to mind and the question is if you start collecting these nachos joel's in using them for electric vehicle batteries. How does that affect. Casper's habitat and not just casper but lots of other organisms that we may not even know about yet so digging through indigenous land in nevada child labor in africa. Nice occupy down on the ocean floor. Are there more ways to mind for lithium and these railroads that are more environmentally friendly so in california in the sultan sea region. There's a big push to at least find a way to extract lithium that is potentially environmentally sensitive. There's a lot of geothermal activity in the solvency area there's geothermal plants and some companies have been experimenting with the idea of taking the. Brian created these geothermal plants and producing lithium outta them. This is something they've been trying to do for several years. There have been some attempts at it wasn't economically feasible. In the past of course the market for lithium is like exploding right now and so what may have not seemed economically feasible. When electric vehicles were such a small portion of the number of cars being sold may now make a lot more sense and be able to be scaled up much easier and more quickly as the electric vehicle market is exploding. The salt in syria is of course a complicated place. There's been a lot of environmental injustice there. there's been run off agricultural runoff. That's run into the sea. And the water evaporates. That has created all kinds of air problems and so the community there while they're excited about the potential for this development and jobs being some kind of hub for electric vehicle batteries. They're also taking a very careful approach so it seems we have a sophie's choice a rock and a hard place. Whatever cliche you want to use when you have two things in front of you and neither of them are good but you have to go with one because on one hand we do need vehicles are not running on gas to help save off climate change on the other hand you have these damaging consequences of mining. What are your sources stand on this issue. Well i didn't talk to anyone who said we shouldn't have electric cars. I mean generally. The thinking is is helpful. This needs to be part of the solution for climate change. I mean you did have some real more. Radical activists say we should drive less cars. We should there should be more public transit. We should be walking more. I mean that's something we hear a lot but the realities of how many cars americans are going to drive are going to be with us. So you're also hearing more practically the there's a lot of mining going on all around the world right now. These companies have a lot of power to change the way the minds that exist operates so while there are these cobalt mines that are operating in the democratic republic of congo. Right now could this car. Manufacturers actually changed the way that industry operates instead of have to create new minds in different parts of the world and create more environmental damage. But the question is whether these companies that are saying we have to do all this. Extracting are being opportunistic and using climate change as a kind of a vehicle to boost their profits or are they being realistic and we do need to do more of this mining in the us. It's a big debate. And it's robust and biden administrations involved in it and it's playing out in real time. Evan thank you so much for this interview. It was fantastic to be here. Thank you friends. it's a fact. Death is inevitable and so as grief and let's be honest. The world is collectively grieving right. Now that's why. I want to tell you about good grief. A new podcast from lemonade. It's a six part sixty minute. Binge of true short stories grief is often lonely and isolating. but it doesn't have to be fine comfort catharsis and even a few laughs in this audio portrait of love and loss. Good grief premieres august third. Listen wherever you get your podcasts. Frank carson was a criminal defense attorney who spent years accusing police and prosecutors of corruption. Then they charged him with murder. I'm christopher gothard writer and host of the la times. podcasts dirty. John and detective trap. I'm inviting you to follow and listen to my new podcast. That trials of frank carson. This eight episodes series is a story of power politics and the law. In california's central valley new episodes of the trials of frank carson are available to find them search for the trials of frank carson. Wherever you get your podcasts thank you. And that's it for this episode of the times daily news from la times. Tomorrow schools reopening californian beyond. Should parents be worried in the wake of covert nineteen. Our show is produced by shannon lynn. Denise gadot melissa kaplan and mighty finger our engineer is mario de is our editors are shawnee hilton rebecca bryant and lauren rabb. Our intern is ashley. Brown and our theme. Music is by andrew liebmann. I'm gustav channel. We'll be back tomorrow with all the news and this mother good see us.

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1568: 12 Ways to Make Yourself Recession Proof by Philip Taylor of PT Money on Regaining Your Financial Balance

Optimal Finance Daily

08:31 min | 4 months ago

1568: 12 Ways to Make Yourself Recession Proof by Philip Taylor of PT Money on Regaining Your Financial Balance

"Thanks to anchor for hosting this. Podcast anchor is the easiest way to make a podcast little tribute podcast for you. So can be heard everywhere. Spotify apple podcasts. Google podcasts and many more you can easily make money from your podcast to with no minimum listenership anchor gives you everything you need in one place for free which you can use right from your phone or computer creation tools. Allow you to record and edit your podcast so it sounds great. Download the anchor app or go to anchor dot. Fm to get started. This is optimal finance daily episode. Fifteen sixty eight twelve ways to make yourself recession proof by philip taylor of pt. Money dot com. And i'm your host an personal finance enthusiast diana mariam. This is the show where i read to you from. Some of the best personal finance blogs on the planet sometimes a little too enthusiastically. But i can't help it. Money is an incredible resource that we can use to craft the life of dreams and before we get to it. Have you subscribe to our other. Podcasts we cover. Personal development minimalism health relationships entrepreneurship and life advice on the other shows just search for optimal living daily. Wherever you get your podcast to find them but for now let's get to today's post as we optimize your life. Twelve ways to. Make yourself recession proof by philip taylor of pt money dot com in the latest issue of money magazine. Stephen gondal presents special report on survival strategies quote the economy and the markets may be in for a hard fall. Here's how you and your family can land safely and quote. I thought i share the twelve points that the article makes as well as my comments on each all this after the markets have had their best one day gain in five years. Oh well i think. These points are applicable regardless of the outcome number one recessions. Learn the facts. Apparently the last time we were in this kind of economic downturn was in the early nineties the article states that it took about three to six months for the economy to turn around. Once it hit full recession. I have no idea what this current downturn entails but if history repeats itself and we go into a recession will be up and out of this thing before too long. I'm not going to panic. But i still think is a good idea to brace yourself a bit. That's with the other eleven points are all about sure up your balance sheet number to stock up on emergency funds in the article suggested that you move from a three months expenses emergency fund to the six month variety. I think more emergency cash is always better. So i'm all in favor of this move if you can move towards more short-term savings than do so if you don't have an emergency fund you should today number three slimmed down the debts. It's always a good time to do this. But apparently even more so and a potential recession. When you're stocks are flying high you can afford paying a little debt interest but not now you can read more about how i paid off my high interest credit cards on my blog. Sure up your portfolio number four. Regain your balance. It's easy to set your retirement savings on autopilot and just forget about it. Have you checked your 401k. Lately what funds are you invested in. Are they properly balanced for someone your age and my opinion target date funds are a good way to make this happen number five venture carefully beyond our shores a quarter to a third of your equity holdings should be in foreign stock says the author that seems high to me again. I let my target date fund. Do the work for me here. Number six scared than embrace bonds if you think we're still headed downward than you may consider moving more of your portfolio into bonds. The author says who do this instead of trying to time. The market with stocks work harder and smarter number seven. Get to your company's core working on key projects for your company will apparently make less likely to lose your job of times get tougher. Make sure you're generating revenue for your company. Any position can add value. Be proactive and find the little things that add up to big savings for your boss number eight. Get to the office and stay there. Make sure you're getting plenty of face time with her boss. If you work from home often consider stopping that practice for a while also you might wanna be the guy or gal who is i in and last out can't hurt number nine cozy up to a head. Hunter get on facebook or linked in now and connect with recruiters in your field. Believe me they'd love to hear from you will. You don't necessarily have to begin your job. Search make sure you have a few connections. The few wanted interruptions. I do get from these recruiters. I don't mind because of how they've helped me out in the past number ten. Get ready for next time. The author mentions laying the groundwork for an industry switch. Healthcare is now and for a long time will be a very hot field. Consider a career switch and begin investigating the path need to get their focus on the homefront number eleven be picky buyer the author mentions offering ten percent below asking price if you are in the market for a new home and offering your home for slightly less than comparable homes if you're selling. I don't know much about real estate. So i won't comment but to say i think there are plenty of deals out there right now. I wish i had a lot more cash. In order to take advantage of some of the deals available number twelve and a savvy for if interest rates continue to fall. Then you may be able to justify refinancing your mortgage. Apparently the biggest savings may come on jumbo mortgages above four hundred seventeen thousand. That's a big mortgage one of the things my father taught me is that the. Us government has long since learned that the housing market is what drives our economy. Therefore they will do anything to keep propped up look for plenty of bailouts to lenders and borrowers like i said while. I think it's great to look at the stuff now. Most of these points are things you should consider all the time with your finances. Not just an downturn serve you listen to the post titled twelve ways to make yourself proof by philip of pt. Money dot com. Okay so i just want to point out. This article was written in two thousand eighteen. What is simpler time. It was back then my right but most of the advice here applies anytime during a recession pandemic or when times are good the thing is even if the economy is booming. Your own personal recession could happen at any time. A health scare unexpected job loss or other hit to your income is bound to happen at some point and that's not to be negative. We shouldn't live in fear. We should expect these things as a normal part of life. This is why we create financial safety. Nets ourselves so that we're prepared for what life throws at us good or bad when it comes to my investment portfolio. I be hesitant to make any changes due to fear of a downturn remember will invest worse signing up for the roller coaster ride. My strategy has always been to hold a years worth of cash so that i can better tolerate. The volatility of the market and clearly. This article was written in the housing market. Wasn't completely insane. While the low interest rates are great right now for buyers it is absolutely a seller's market and so buyers don't have the luxury of being picky or offering ten percent below asking price and the current housing market where inventory is low. Many people are willing to overpay for a home nearly every article. I've seen lately regarding real estate recommends to not buy right now if you can avoid it but if you're going to go for it don't be bullied into paying for something you really can't afford or settle for a home that may lead to buyer's remorse just like any other economic cycle this seller's market won't last forever so it may benefit you to hold off on buying a home right now and that will do it for today. Have a great day and start to your weekend. Thank you for listening. And i'll be back here reading to you tomorrow. Where optimal life awaits.

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1615: 7 Lame Reasons People Don't Save for Retirement by Philip Taylor of PT Money on Planning For The Future

Optimal Finance Daily

08:07 min | 2 months ago

1615: 7 Lame Reasons People Don't Save for Retirement by Philip Taylor of PT Money on Planning For The Future

"Thanks to anchor for hosting this. Podcast anchor is the easiest way to make a podcast. The distributor podcast for you so can be heard everywhere. Spotify apple podcast google podcasts. And many more you can easily make money from your podcast to with no minimum listenership anchor gives you everything you need in one place for free which you can use right from your phone or computer creation tools. Allow you to record and edit your podcast so it sounds great. Download the anchor app or go to anchor dot. Fm to get started. This is optimal finance daily episodes. Sixteen fifteen seven lame reasons. People don't save for retirement by philip taylor of pt. Money dot com. And i'm your host and personal finance enthusiasts diana mariam. This is the show where i- sereny g with the sweet sounds of personal finance knowledge from some of the best blogs on the planet with the author's permission of course are you loving optimal finance daily. Why not share with a friend today. Invite them to join the party by sending them a link to o. L. d. podcast dot com. And while they're there they can check out our five other shows on topics like personal development health and relationships. But for now let's get right to it and continue optimizing your life. Seven lame reasons. People don't save for retirement by philip taylor of pt. Money dot com. Us workers aren't saving enough for retirement. Nowhere near it. The annual retirement confidence survey put together by e e r. I dot org found that quote more than half of workers report. They and or their spouse have less than twenty five thousand dollars total savings and investments excluding their home and defined benefit plans including twenty nine percent. Who have less than a thousand dollars and quote are troubling numbers. But they're not new over the past few years. The survey has reported similar results. Obviously people should be saving for retirement right. So why the disconnect if it's as simple as periodically taking some of your earnings and putting it into a retirement account why aren't more people doing. It made a few excuses in the past. And i occasionally here a few from others. Let's look at some of these excuses and knocked them down one by one number one. It's selfish this excuse burns me up saving for your retirement is the complete opposite of selfish if you have retirement savings you won't depend on the tax payers the church your kids and relatives etc to feed you in house. You and you can't work. The survey numbers mentioned should destroy this. Excuse people aren't saving. Why most likely because they're being selfish with current dollars. They aren't choosing to give it to their future. Self saving for retirement doesn't mean that you have to retire to bali with a yacht and personal chef. Saving for retirement is about affording life when you can't work. The retirement industry certainly likes to package it in a flashy way. But that's the icing on the cake in my opinion 401k's and roth iras are about helping you. Your basic needs if you have some leftover. Give it all away if you'd like number two it's pointless. This isn't really an excuse. It's more of a give up. And truthfully the comment can't really be taken seriously. There certainly is appoint to retirement savings providing for you and your spouse when you can no longer physically work or take care of things. I can't stress this enough number three. It's too complicated. it doesn't have to be. You can save for your retirement using a regular free checking account with the occasional twenty five dollar contribution. I don't recommend that method but it could certainly be used and in a year's time you'd likely be better off than the pitiful thousand dollars reported. Here's a wake up call to have a little success in life. You might just have to learn something. The beautiful thing about the information age as that the best investing advice is available to everyone. Visit your local library. Pick up the highest rated personal finance or retirement book and get cracking too lazy for a book. Download an audio book or read through this blog number. Four it's only for the rich. There are many people who retire each year. Who never had more than a lower or middle class income. Take leonardo mccracken a hundred and seven. Who retired back in nineteen sixty nine after having never made more than ten thousand dollars a year. You don't have to be rich to afford retirement if you can save ten to fifteen percent of your income then you can really give yourself some cushion for your retirement years number five. It's only for old people the earlier you get started the easier time you'll have in coming up with adequate retirement savings when you're young. Retirement is a long way off so it's easy to avoid the topic altogether however as a young earner you have most of the same opportunities to save as older workers to and you've got time on your side. You even have the chance to retire early. Get with it number six. It's too late to get started. This one is tough. There does come a time when it's too late. But for people in their fifties and sixties the ship have valid. Excuse will it require our herculean effort. Probably will you need tests slash expenses to rack it up some income. Yes but with things like ira catch up contributions and the benefits that come from postponing social security. You have something to help you get there number seven. It's too risky. Isn't it worth a little risk. Let's see here your two options one retired with nothing because you didn't save and to retire with something that's an easy choice. Still even without that simple equation makes sense that you can have control over your risk if you take control over your retirement savings. You can invest in whatever assets fit your risk tolerance if all you can stomach is. Fdic insured cds bonds. Then put all of your money there. A hundred seven year old. Leonardo mentioned earlier never entered the stock market with his retirement savings. I don't recommend this completely risk adverse approach. But it can be done you. Just listen to the post titled seven lame reasons people. Don't save for retirement. By philip taylor of pt money dot com. I totally understand why young people especially don't think about saving for retirement. Because i was in the same boat when i was in my twenties. I just assumed saving for retirement with something. I do later when i was making more money. When you're twenty and assume you will retire in forty five years. You just feel like you have so much time to figure it out and when retirement seemed so far away. It's difficult to prioritize it. When i discovered the fire movement which stands for financial independence. Retire early. It totally demystified retirement savings for me first of all. It helped me wrap my head around how much i might need for. Retirement and seeing real numbers made the whole thing feels so much more accessible. I also learned that saving for retirement doesn't just benefit me when i'm actually going to retire aggressively saving while my income is good and i'm relatively young opens up some options to take my foot off the gas prior to traditional retirement this year. I realized that. I hit what's called coast fi. Which means that. I've saved enough in my retirement vehicles that if fighting contribute another dollar what i have invested now will grow to what i need for traditional retirement thirty years so that means i can take a break or take on a lower paying job if i'd like and simply coast traditional retirement by covering my expenses until then my relatively short period really aggressive saving put me in a position to not have to worry so much about saving for retirement moving forward and that should do it for today. Have a happy rest of your day. And i'll see you on the thursday show. Tomorrow where your optimal life awaits.

philip taylor diana mariam sereny leonardo mccracken apple google bali Us ira Fdic Leonardo
1556: Retirement and Financial Independence Equals Apples and Oranges by Helene Massicotte of Free To Pursue

Optimal Finance Daily

08:04 min | 4 months ago

1556: Retirement and Financial Independence Equals Apples and Oranges by Helene Massicotte of Free To Pursue

"Thanks to anchor for hosting this. Podcast anchor is the easiest way to make a podcast little tribute podcast for you. So can be heard everywhere. Spotify apple podcasts. Google podcasts and many more you can easily make money from your podcast to with no minimum listenership anchor gives you everything you need in one place for free which you can use right from your phone or computer creation tools. Allow you to record and edit your podcast so it sounds great. Download the anchor app or go to anchor dot. Fm to get started. This is optimal finance daily episode. Fifteen fifty six retirement and financial independence equals apples and oranges by a landmass mascot. A free to pursue dot com. Welcome to another sunday edition of optimal finance daily. I'm your host an personal finance enthusiasts diana mariam. This is the show where i- saremi g with the sweet sounds of personal finance knowledge from some of the best blogs on the planet with the author's permission of course and just in case you didn't catch this in the optimal living daily newsletter. I wanted to make sure you know that. We have a workbook available for purchase. The optimal living daily workbook is a two hundred and sixteen page hardcover workbook and journal designed to help you solidify your takeaways from your favorite episodes and create action items to move forward with your personal relationship and financial goals. It's available in the shop at o. L. d. podcasts dot com. But for now let's get right to it and start optimizing your life. Retirement and financial independence equals apples and oranges by a landmass caught of free to pursue dot com most of the rhetoric. We hear about saving money. These days is the same old stuff yes saving is important but the messaging is all wrong. Here's what we hear. Most of the time safer rainy day save for retirement. See for your family's future. What i don't hear as often is saved to increase your options. Save for peace of mind save to reclaim your right to think. Save for how it makes you feel today. It's a fundamentally different type of thinking. And it's what differentiates those who seek financial independence from those who merely seek to retire. Traditional retirement thinking traditional retirement thinking tries to get you to think about retirement which is often decades away. it's just too far out to be meaningful. Were to save so that our future selves have enough to live on to meet their needs. But we can't even relate to this person. We don't want to really to this person yet. Combine that with the belief that our will always go up and it's why many of us week up in her fifties and starts scrambling to save enough traditional retirement. Thinking also makes us think of saving money as the denial of pleasure through budgeting budgeting tells us that we need to put money aside for emergency savings retirement and for larger purchases. That's all fine and good but the message that budgeting sends us is that once that money's dated were entitled to spend the balance whether it makes sense to or not that's the wrong mindset and it tends to lead people to think about the minimum. They need to save to get buy. It makes saving feel like a punishment. Finally traditional retirement thinking makes saving a duty as opposed to a worthwhile activity telling us that we need to save to ensure we survive a disaster that we need to save. Sarah family will be okay. If we croak doesn't feel good if anything it makes us not wanna save because maybe it will mean that nothing bad can happen to us and that will live forever. This whole approach is based on fear. And i think that's what makes people not want to save here the messages as provides. You're going to grow old. You're going to die. Bad stuff is going to happen to you and you need to think about it every time you consider your budget and savings rate. Yuck that's why there's so much talk about automating retirement savings it makes. It hurt less. Who wants to do something that hurts. Financial independence thinking unlike traditional thinking. Financial independence thinking. Get your savings behavior working for you in the present because it's not about retirement it makes you consider yourself as a free agent able to change course in your life when you want to you save because you like the possibilities money offers you now you save because you like being able to follow your moral compass and only work in settings and for people that make you feel good about yourself and what you're doing you save because you like not having to worry about debt bills the next paycheck etc because you know how much mental energy that consob from your body you save because he gives you a chance to listen to what it is that you want not what others want from you the latter being the unfortunate default you save because it makes you more effective at what you choose to do with your time because you can focus on the activity itself not the potential externalities associated with it you save because it reduces the feeling of needing to compare yourself to others who has their net worth stamped on their foreheads anyway you also save because it just frequent feels great that's a completely different way of framing the activity we call saving savings turns from an obligation to a rewarding activity and because we focus on what we're gaining as opposed to losing itself reinforcing a saving mindset our lifestyle and check by getting us to ask ourselves whether spending the money will really make us better off it makes us value our time and money much more than the traditional alternative it makes saving joy not a punishment and the more joy we feel the more likely we are to save in fact with this mindset savings rates often increase not decrease as our savings balances increases. How cool is that serve you. Just listen to the post. Titled retirement and financial independence equals and oranges by a land mascot. A free to pursue dot com. Ir liked how this article reframe saving as something boring and daunting to something. A little bit more exciting. It became easier for me to save when i stopped thinking about it as something. I should do or have to do something that i get to do. I recognize that many people struggle to see. And i'm extremely fortunate to be in the position. Where i can so i don't wanna waste this opportunity. Money is a really powerful resource for creating options and creating the habit of saving and investing has made me feel like my life is full of possibility. There have been times in my life where i had very specific reasons to save so for example when i saved take a two month sabbatical to walk the camino which is a five hundred mile trek across spain. But i don't think you always need a specific reason to save. I've been motivated simply by the idea of having money available for things that i can't foresee right now. One thing i often tell myself is that i can't anticipate today the opportunities that will present themselves tomorrow but i can be prepared to jump on those opportunities if i've got some money on hand. It's true that we need to save for a rainy day but preparing for the emergencies. Life may throw at you as using fear as a motivational tool. This contained your financial goals with an air of negativity. And make it harder to stick with your goals over time recognizing that life throws you opportunities just as much as it throws obstacles your way can create a much more positive mindset around saving and a positive abundant mindset around money will make your habits more sustainable and enjoyable and that's another weekend edition of optimal finance daily in the books. Thanks so much for your support and for listening every day. Of course have a great rest of your weekend. If you're listening in real time and i'll be back tomorrow. Where your optimal life awaits.

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The Cam Newton Conundrum

Greg Bedard Patriots Podcast with Nick Cattles

35:37 min | 11 months ago

The Cam Newton Conundrum

"This is in regard Patriots podcast with Nick cattles these Greg Bedard. I'm Nick cattles. This is the Greg Bedard Patriots podcast with Nikki number 27. Don't forget to subscribe rate and review the podcast. Let's jump right into a Greg a little short on time today. The Cardinals the win it was a win, but it was awful. Yeah, I didn't watch him back the film. I thought look they they obviously had some successful plays on on defense, especially special teams came up a couple of times, you know, I thought the general schefsky pump was really more about the poor punt by the Cardinals how short it was and didn't allow their their return unit to set up home certainly some timely place on defense including the 4th down stop. But you know, I had a real hard time watching that game and say and saying it was highly successful for the Patriots. I thought that offensively they were completely challenged and at this point they are they're being hindered by the quarterback at this point and thought my column off of the game. I'm ready to look at other options because at this point it's it's not good enough. I thought defensively it was it was tough for me to really dead. You know get excited about what I saw for a couple of different reasons. Number one. Kyler Murray was obviously diminished in this game. He was that if you thought that was the full Kyler Murray experience. What what Nick and I have been talking about what other people have been talking about. This season terms of it could be an MVP candidate offensive player of the year candidate what you saw on Sunday was not that long. It's just that's not who he was the right shoulder that he heard against Seattle what we saw in the second half of that game was pretty much what we saw in this game. They didn't really want to put his health at risk kill probably till there was about twelve minutes left in the game and you know also, You know when the when the Cardinals get the ball with like almost seven minutes, I'm just looking it up right now 657 left in the first half and they whole football for the rest of the first half. I'm sorry, but I have a tough time saying that you're playing really good defense in that game. And so that's over all that sort of where I was in this game. See I've got a little bit of a problem and I want to push back on the idea of well, you know, Marie was compromised. I feel like we had the same conversation when the Patriots played well against the Chiefs and my issue is I do think we can give this time credit and if we keep going well this team didn't play as well as it could and that's why the Patriots won that's a disservice to the Patriots. I do think when they win even if they win ugly. Hey, they want a team is not a very good team and and they're going to go through some things. They're going to have halves of football that they don't play. Well, I certainly don't expect this defense to be spectacular, but the way I look at it is dead. Are atrocious against Houston they took a step forward on Sunday. And I think that is a positive and I do think that early on Arizona try to call some runs and some options for Marie. I thought the Patriots did a decent job on the edge. They weren't it did not call they didn't do that. They didn't call any design runs for for Kyler Murray early in the game. They didn't they just didn't they they didn't turn them loose and in Iraq, I respect the opinion, but when the team has drives of 12 12 plays 63 yards 15 plays 71 yards 16 plays 78 yards. I'm sorry. I have a tough time saying it happened to bend don't break. Like what happened to the idea of okay, they gives you weren't good either which we learned in hindsight what the I'm not saying that the defense is good. What I'm saying is every time this defense goes against a good offense and they play better than expected. It's because the offense didn't do a good enough job. It's like what are we doing here? Like, let me ask you this Nick Nick. Let me ask you this. What percentage do you think Kyler Murray was on Sunday? I don't know. I hate percentages 72.7. I don't know. I mean he was one point like like for people to say like this is the fact they just stopped the the highest rated he was he wasn't the same guy obviously, but he played he was he was healthy enough to play football, right? He was out there and and maybe they held off on the called plays and maybe I'm wrong. Maybe I didn't see the two or three plays that I thought they called from in the first half and I thought the edge played. Well, maybe I'm wrong about that. Maybe I'm wrong. But all I know is it seems to me that when this game wins we find reasons why the other team didn't play well enough to say, well that's why the Patriots won. Well, I do think the Patriots did some good things. I do think the Patriots defense played with better-than-expected against this Cardinals offense. I was the guy last week saying that oh after seeing Houston, I can't imagine even if Kyler Murray isn't one hundred percent. I can't imagine this offense not scoring 12 a.m. Ben points are more and and here we are they they scored 17 like so I'm just wondering what are we supposed to do we crap on this team when they play like crap which we should but now when they play and they win a game against the team that I thought they were going to lose too and I thought their defense was going to get eviscerated. Am I supposed to criticize them now after a win like again, I think we can nitpick and say well this wasn't good. This wasn't good. But it's a sliding scale. Like when I go into a game with this team Greg I look at I look at them and I say this is what I expect. I don't expect great football. I don't expect this defense to be Nails. I hope that they play better than they played the week before and to me they played well enough to win on Sunday and I just go back to that maholm staying was well, I don't know if he was healthy. You said that after that game and it's like well, so when they play okay against a good quarterback, it's because the quarterbacks not healthy or something wrong with the offense like I just dead. I don't my brain doesn't commute that way like compute that way. I look at it and I say, okay. Well Arizona has been pretty good on offense all season long. And even if Murray isn't one hundred percent the way the Patriots have played defense even with Amory at 80% I think that team could score up to Thirty points and the fact that they held them the 17. I'm sorry. I think that's a pause. I think that's good news. I don't think it's something well. Oh, well, they, you know that this happened and then add happened. They said 75-yard Drive Super Bowl seasons when defenses weren't great. That was the bend don't break. They didn't give up, you know any any touchdowns good job by them. They let them they let him gain yards between the twenties but they shut it down. Now this year when the team's not good. It's well, you know, they were just lucky. They thought they had they gave up those long drives man, but they were lucky because if this play happened for the Cardinals, they might have scored a touchdown if that play happened. I mean, I just you made your point. Okay, can I have your phone number? Yeah, like like I understand I looked some of what you say is valid in some of what you're you're bringing years of baggage into this you're bringing your bringing earlier games. I'm going off of this game and coming into this game. I picked the Patriots. I picked them to win twenty four twenty. Why because I said they were going to be a nun the Cardinals were going to be an undisciplined mess, which is exactly what they were on special teams on offense on defense that Kliff Kingsbury would get his ass out coached which he did because he made stupid mistakes, but I'm sorry I go on and and I'm not I'm not I don't care about Patrick Mahomes. I don't care about five Super Bowls ago. I care about what happened on Sunday. And when I saw on Sunday was a Kyler Murray who clearly did not want to get hit he got rushed. He's thrown off his back legs. He didn't even think about scrambling. He didn't do anything. That was not even that was fifty percent of what Kyler Murray usually is and that's just a fact that's a fact that is not dissing the Patriots. I'm giving you a job. The fact that that was not Kyler Murray on Sunday and also, you know getting getting lucky Christian Kirk dropped the touchdown pass the time rocked it found out about it and look I'll get the papers credit and I did for you know for Jason McCourty making that that that tackle to hold them up with the one-yard line and Adam Butler working in you know, I give them credit for the place that they deserve but like I'm sorry, but when they miss a game-winning field goal and then you're playing basically to get the overtime where you probably would have kicked off to the other team has your offense is so bad. I'm sorry, but I in this circumstance just in this game. I have a tough time saying that the Patriots like clearly won this game. I thought the carnival gift of this game to you. So you took it which is good which is because earlier in the season, I don't think they were capable of accepting a game like that. So history doesn't matter Trends don't matter got it. Just break it down game. Game, I disagree with that, but we'll move on. I'll also say that you know, if we're going to play the whole Christian Kirk drop the touchdown. Well, the officials also called the double, you know, double pass interference which gave the Arizona Cardinals and extra down name is DeAndre Hopkins punching Stephon Gilmore in the face before getting recalled offensive p i on on on Hopkins on that. It was clearly it was it was a one way it should have been a one-way should have been on Gilmore. Okay, I'm just giving you my opinion on these calls cuz I know you're a big guy. Here's what I think here's what I think on that play cuz we ever need Jenny's play was absolutely correctly called. Okay? Well before we get gas Jennings call, let's talk about the double p i that I just talked about I disagree with you. I think it's both guys. I think they're both fighting for the football. I think they're both fighting for position. And in that situation, let him go down the flag Let It Be I thought Hopkins got away with some stuff. I thought Gilmore got away with some stuff and to me it was like an MBA double technical. Don't call it. There's no use for it. You know, the Cardinals punt the ball. That's it. Hopkinsville messed around Gilmore messed around it's a wash that's it down over. Let's move on the double p i is ridiculous the play in the end zone and I know you went at me on Twitter about well, he grabbed and there's no doubt that Gilmore held him in the end zone but there's also no doubt that Hopkins punched him in the face when he was trying it before he got to the top of his route. So what are we doing to the helmet? So this is telling you what are you you're giving me your opinion on on the hotel my opinion. Hold on. Hold on so you can go to the side of the helmet. You can that's legal you can hit him. So I brushed the side of his helmet brushed Gilmore grabbed his jersey and pulled it towards him. Okay. Well, maybe it was clearly a foul on differently. I thought that Hopkins went hands-to-the-face and then I thought Gilmore Girls acted to that to try to hold him back because he just got swatted in the face. As far as the Jennings play, you know, we can talk about that as well as the momentum going towards the goal line. Did he stopped at that point and set himself up to block the guy all those kinds of things and we can go by the letter of the law and we can say well this happened and that happened and you know to me that's when the guy has like ten yards of lead in time in Jennings stops his momentum and stands there and blocks the dude, you know, I think you let that go and I understand about the oh he's carried wage. To me. He was not running towards the end zone which I think is what the rule is for its for a guy that's running towards the end zone. Everybody is running towards that goal line in a dude blindsides them from the side or behind that to me is a Blindside block when you've got somebody who is trying to block a kick a punt return and he clearly stops his body at what was it the twenty or so in the the the dude that is on the kick team on the punt team is running directly at him and they're looking at each other and he gets blocked. I think that should be let go. I think that's a block. I think that's a block so long again, we can that's a difference between let me just give you my okay. I thought I thought I want that play called. I thought Jennings stopped launched himself towards the upper body. I want those calls out of the game. I am fine with that call as far as your offsetting. Let them go in the moment. I said, yeah, I I agree with you, but also let's also not off. Forget about the fact that that play call happened at the Arizona 40 and the Patriots failed to stop Arizona on the next one, two, three, four, five, six, seven eight nine, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 plays including two two penalties in the Red Zone, you know, when they were, you know, basically tackling people. So I just want to I just want to give the other side of those calls sure sure. So the stop that happened that was taken away doesn't count because they didn't stop them after that play. I got I just you know, I think when we look at these things they tend to even out and you know, the Isaiah Simmons call On Cam Newton was was questionable, right? So it evens out I just yeah, but you're complaining about you're saying that the calls were slanted. Usually we were gifted a field goal at the end of the game. Well, what what I'm saying is is if you want to go tit-for-tat and say the Hopkins play wasn't there then then you could say. All right. Well the Simmons play wasn't there dead. My point that's why I don't get into officiating because it doesn't matter cuz we can overcome play which I think if you're good enough, you can only thing I mean, I think it's ridiculous. I think to overlook bad officiating and so Overlook injury like some people do those are my two favorite things like two favorite things. Oh, we're going to we're going to overlook things, you know, when it's convenient for our argument like bad officiating exist choice and if bad officiating allows a drive to continue or allows a score to happen, then then we should talk about it. Like if there's a penalty that doesn't get called or does get called and it affects directly on a touchdown drive to not talk about that is disingenuous to just say, oh well, they're supposed to play up, you know play better and just you know, stop them after that. Well, they did their job in the first place and then it was taken away right on an officiating call and I'm not talking about just Sunday. I'm talking about an overall philosophy like officiating as part of the game whether you want to accept it or not. And if it's bad it gets in the way of a game. It gets in the way of touchdown drives and field-goal drives and if we just try to wipe that out and go oh officiating doesn't matter. I mean, I think it's I think that's borderline ridiculous officiating does matter. What does it cost teams games all the time? No, but critical calls at critical junctures. I think deserve to be talked about and not swatted to the side. Let's talk about Cam Newton because he obviously deserves to be talked about I find it interesting because earlier you said you're now pretty much off of the camp thing and I saw Tom Curran right something similarly over the last day or so and it seems to me that some people who were saying hey, you know cam in 2021 would make some sense are now backing away from that including you. So what was it like specifically this week that that changed you from saying well, maybe you know, he he deserves an opportunity next year to prove himself or whatever the case may be. So you saying I'm totally done with them. This is it forget about it. Well to tell you the truth, I'm not totally done with camp for 20 21. I'm done with her season. Okay. All right. It current said that he's done for next year me. I'm open to it depending on what gets paid because you know, I don't think it's been it hasn't been a total disaster or anything and I think that you know with a whole offseason in more indoctrination into the office in normal certain more normal circumstances than he could be a viable player in obviously brings a lot of intangibles including leadership and I don't off the you know, there's a value on that and so I'm I'm not completely done with 2021. I am done with this year. I thought he's made very slow incremental progress this year. And so, you know, but this was week 12 like it's been a long time since covid-19. He just he couldn't function as a quarterback. Basically. He was Mark Sanchez on the field the other day where the team where the other team and they're this is becoming more and more of a factor. We all thought and I did I said that cams legs are going to make a difference for this offense. They're going to open things up there. It's going to make the passing game better just by his presence. Well, we're at the point now where his right arm his decision-making in the passing has completely negated that and it's gone. The other way like teams are now completely stacking the Box they are daring the Patriots to throw they cannot he cannot complete any he can't complete a few simple passes. That's about it anything outside the numbers, you know, without a large cushion from the other team. He can't complete. It's just wage. Its they can't function as a passing offense and I don't see how they can continue to win games without that element and and I just think that Unless Jerod stidham's a complete disaster. Then I would take a look at that. Now I will say do I think that's going to happen? No because I think Belichick has painted himself into a corner with this team. Oh blush with you know sort of the lack of Talent on this team, but also with cams contract like I think he I think there's some overriding guilt on his part or he knows he completely screwed Cam Newton on his contract that he didn't even give him more money when he had more money which they do right now like this again. This is another reason why I said give Cam a boost guarantee his incentives keep some incentives in where he could go to another level if they do really well, but now Belichick's to the point, where now he knows. All right. Well, I've already screwed cam on the contract and everybody on this team knows, you know now like what now, I'm going to bench him wage. I think if he was paying him seven million dollars, he could bench him and and have some standing. I just think he's painted himself into a corner at this point. What confuses me is, you know, I watch them each and every week and I feel like you and I discussed this last week where there was progression like we saw can make some throws and we saw this offense move the football at least somewhat with the passing off. It's not all the time not consistently. I'm not saying cam has been spectacular but you know, we sat down last week and we said he's not really the reason why this team's losing and you know, he's playing well enough money and he's you know, he's he's making some of the throws and McDaniels has figured out what this offense is and then Sunday happens and it reminds me of like going back to the San Francisco game. He was just bad and I don't know whether to just throw him out and say it's over. I feel like you know, I would be going against what I have said for the past eleven weeks wage. You know, he has shown the ability to come back from an ugly game. Like we saw on Sunday. So, you know against the Chargers on on Sunday this weekend. Is he going to go back in and be okay not great. But okay. I don't know that this might be who he is. Right? I mean the way I look at this is if you can get three or four good weeks from Cam and not a clunker then is that better than going with cinnamon, maybe getting you know two or three conquerors in a row like that's kind of where I'm at with this like there is no yeah, you know, there is no perfect answer. Yeah. That's the that's the thing about this and we you and I don't know nobody really has any idea right about you know, the whole X Factor is how good is Stidham like is he ready. He wasn't ready without an offseason, you know coming into his second year. It's week 12 or 13. Maybe he's doing a lot of great things behind the scenes. None of us has any idea and I haven't heard anything about that long. You know, I'm just looking back at sort of my grades for Newton cuz I've been doing this year long comparison to Brady and uh, you know Sears San Francisco. I had him for three and half out of five the Jets three and half two and half against Baltimore two and half against Houston. This game will be probably a half and I was off at my grades for the for the Houston game and he actually he was more like fifty fifty maybe a little bit more on the minus place in that game. That's if you don't document for the padded practice, but I just my thing is like look now, we know what now, we know what camping the Newton is and now the whole rest of the league knows what Cam Newton is and now teams are playing the Patriots differently off their Narrow Path on offense has gotten even more narrow and just we know a cam is like, let's take a look at Stidham like with a real real prep dead. a whole week's worth of starters reps you know camps not going anywhere nobody's handing them and starting job after the season but what he's put on the field and so you know why not look at home still them without any preseason and things like that why not give him a real look right now with games that really mean something like knows maybe would think maybe pops it's a tricky situation because wage I understand what you're saying and I've gone back and forth in my head over the past couple of days thinking about what they should do with Cam and how to handle this quarterback situation I think it's made more difficult because you know they have been winning some games and so what do they want three out of the last four I think so you know maybe Belichick is looking at this and going yeah you know maybe Stadium could be slightly better than cam but we've won three out of four you know we kind of have this team going in One Direction right now why throw a different element in the middle of it like if if we can get by with Cam a.m. We win a game with that as bad as he played on Sunday. We don't think he's going to consistently be that bad. We think we can win some games here with him towards the end of the season. So, you know, why why throw the bash unknown element into all of this and maybe you know, some of the locker room is Pro Cam and they believe in him and maybe Belichick saying listen, it's not great. It's not going to be great. But if we find ways to win and the team believes in this guy and he's at he's at least leading us then we're going to leave him in and I think if this was a three-game losing streak baggage check might be talking differently, but because they've won the, you know, three out of last four or whatever, you know, if you look at the Houston game, obviously then they want to before that they win against Arizona. So he's looking at it going on the offense didn't play terrible against Houston. The defense was awful. So if the defense played better against Houston, we might be looking at a four-game winning streak and everybody's talking differently about this team at 6 and Thursday. so I think Belichick's looking at it in the hole and I think we're looking at it individually, which I understand but I think Belichick's looking at this and saying Well, you know, we're five and six we've we've won three out of four before Sunday against Arizona. He wasn't great but he was he was good. He was okay. I don't feel like students going to be that much of a boost. So why am I going through that wild card into the middle of a season that we're dealing with all this other crap already? Yep. I think that's a lot of it. I think a lot of it is locker room and things like that. I just think it's awful. I think it's unfair for Belichick to conduct himself this way when if if Cam was place a cam was playing safety on this team and he bought a terrible game, you know, like he did on Sunday and he had actually been declining which that's my opinion that since like Buffalo and the Jets. He's been steadily declining since then almost like earlier in the season when he was, you know, good against Miami and Seattle and then you know Vegas was terrible and then he came back from covid-19 was terrible against Denver and San Francisco wage. Like we're on another downward Trend but I just think I think I think Belichick is treating people differently in this case. And I just I don't think it's fair and I think it's I think there's enough evidence there to say it again. This is going on the you know of the opinion that that Stidham would be some sort of upgrade in the past month. We don't know that and and that's my question. You know, my my question like with these safety analogy. If you feel like you've got a safety who could play better or you know, you don't lose much out of it. Then of course you make that move also a safety as you know is is not a quarterback and the quarterback has that leadership mentality and he talks to the media and he plays a much different and bigger role within the landscape of a long-lost are so I think that goes into it and you know, I try to pull myself away from everything and it's it really comes down to a simple question like to me if Belichick thoughts didn't was better wage. Keep playing like if you think the guy not to see I don't know if that's true. Now with the contract. That's and that's sort of my point. I don't know if that's true. I don't okay. Yeah, unfortunately we'll never know because I'm less we see sit and play we'll never know and from what we've seen of Saddam. He hasn't been good. And I was a student guy. I liked them at Auburn. I thought he had a chance to be a starter in the league. I liked Stidham coming out but you know, we haven't seen it translate to the NFL level. So at this point, you know, it's either you say the contract and you know, maybe that's what's going on them or you just look at it from what we've seen and say, you know students not that much better if he's even better at all. And so why throw that into the mix right now during a crazy season as it is off. Now you've got the L A Trip coming up where you're staying out there like I just feel like this is one of those years. If you're a head coach in the league, you're trying to find some continuity and consistency dead. And to take him out to throw stay them in if again the premises if Saddam isn't a giant boost or even just better Belichick probably looks at that and says it's too much of a risk right now like in this year without funky it is let's just try to ride the wave let's let's try to fight through this thing and you know not pull a move just to pull a move but it's awful hard to say because again, we don't know what Saddam or who stood in his we haven't we haven't seen him with full weeks of practice and out there with the ones and you know, he really hasn't been given a fair shot as it is either like jumping into Kansas City at halftime or after the first drive a third quarter, you know that game that that's not necessarily a perfect spot for him either. So it's an interesting debate cuz if if you treated him like a thousand quarterback, maybe he does play better or maybe Belichick see stuff at practice see stuff, you know in the facility that makes them say, I just don't think this guy is going to be an upgrade. So why am I going to pull off? Login during a crazy year already make that move quickly before we get to the member question of the day. I did want to ask you about n'keal Harry. Listen, I thought he was awful on Sunday. I would think most people thought he was awful on Sunday. What are you seeing from him? And I don't know just how ugly is it? Yeah, it's it's bad. He has no clue and I thought McDaniel a quote today was in any basically. He said something along the lines of you know, normally they say, oh we all have a lot to work on and he basically said like, you know, basically that that McGill has no shortage of stuff he needs to he needs to work on and so I thought that was pretty pretty pointed for a Patriots assistant coach to say that you know his badge for you know, you had a holding penalty those bad he had to drop even though Machine by the way. Yeah, not the drop was not a good pass from Newton, but he still needs to catch that yet another poor dog. Unblock where it costs Damien Harris eight yards. That was nikhil's blown block on that play Let's just it's it. I would I would assume now with Dave Moncrief being more in the mix eventually you think Isaiah Ford would be active and maybe play at some point then the kill Harry's Snaps are going to plummet to what have you down. Let's just let's just move them too tight and get that going for next year because I'm done with him and receiver. It's time to make him a move tight end inside will come up a little bit. Maybe he can do something there because it's right now, he's not a receiver. He's that's an interesting idea and like, you know, it's a shame because I felt like earlier in the season. He was showing signs of improvement and I thought I could build off of that and then right around the Covent time San Francisco right around that time. It just a marked decline again from him and You know if things went differently, who knows but at this point you watch him and he's not adding anything to the team. And so, you know, you've got to try something else I would imagine and you know, I still think McDaniel should have tried to get him the football a little bit more early in the season with some simple things simple Concepts just to get the football in his hands to try to build that confidence. But also thank you know some of this is Kim as well. Like Harry was open underneath on Sunday and cam doesn't just give them the football and see what he can do. He holds it he holds it he holds it any waits for Harry to track it to the sticks and it's like well, I mean at a certain point he's the under just thrown The Crossing route or whatever and see if the guy can make a play like just give him the football and so I think there's a a combination of things in factors, but there's no doubt. Harry has been a big Miss and it's it's just, you know, it's one of those assets that you spent on a position of need and it looks nice. You swung and missed big time which is critical to this team success and try to find that next step for this offense Boston Sports Journal member question of the day check us out over at bsj eleven cents a day off on the annual plan. Not only do you get top-notch analysis of all the Boston Pro Sports, but if you're a Pats fan and of course, you are a membership at bsj gives you access to a ton of video analysis, but our does on the coaches film and gain access to him and weekly chats and Hey listen to this don't forget the Cyber Monday deal, which is the only deal that bsj does every year it's going until Wednesday at midnight. So take advantage of that. Let's go to torque 01 Greg you have followed this team for a long time. You followed Belichick for a long time. And when Jimmy G was kicking around a lot of the players stated Jimmy had it what it is, but it was positive. Do you hear that ever went around the players about Stidham off the record of course Belichick is about to get very stubborn the more the populace shouts for Stidham wage. Do you hear the kinds of things you heard about Jimmy G about Jarrett Stidham? Yeah, that's it's it's tough to answer because you know number one at or co-worker, you know, we're in the middle of the pandemic. So we're not in the locker room. Like we normally would be and be able to pull a guide to the side and that's where you get those answers really like, you know, now we're on a zoom we're dead, you know, everybody can see everybody's listening, you know, certainly we all have our sources within the team and and within the players but still The Cove it's even made that tough. So foul don't have the same opportunities and I also I don't know how much of that stuff I believed at the time about Jimmy. I think a lot of the reports that you heard whether we spell check would be thinks and this and that, you know, a lot of it is, you know, it's you're serving somebody somebody's interest is being served by that stuff being out there and I think a lot of the Jimmy stuff was there to irritate Brady dead. And to hit back at Brady and also to motivate Brady and I think even this offseason after Brady left and a lot of guys rest about Stidham. I think a lot of people said a lot of really nice things about jerks denim that were very similar to Garoppolo a lot of the players. You haven't heard much since cam got here, but I think that's part of the cam Dynamic that he's just this he's the whole presence he's as powerful presence and and I think he just sort of dominates the scene and so he sort of he's like a fire that sort of takes all the oxygen around and so yeah, you know, I just think it's it's tough to say one way or another know we haven't heard the same stuff since cams been here, but I'm not ready to make any big sweeping conclusions on that other than the thing. I think that stuck with me and a lot of players and a lot of people around this team is what happened to Cinnamon Camp when he basically tapped out because he was sore and never really mounted a challenge. Of like was just happy to be there and carry the clipboard after that and I think I think he that's a lot for him to overcome this season. And I don't know if he's going to be able to do that. Yeah, I feel like listening. It's we've said this a couple of times you and I Greg during the season. It's unpopular to say but it's the truth. We will find out about this team in the off season and we will find out what public really thinks of Cam and really thinks of Stidham and all that kind of stuff. We will find out because they are in a position that they've got to make moves. They have the opportunity to make those moves and we're going to find out an awful lot out some of these guys the n'keal Harry is the stems of the world and and what the plan is moving forward and if obviously the Patriots go a completely different pathway and and and find two different quarterbacks be a draft trade whatever they do then, you know, Statham wasn't really the guy in Belichick's eyes at all, and he he wasn't feeling it and also that cam was just hey we're kind of stuck in dog. Of this thing. Let's just fight through the rest of the season and then once we get to the offseason, let's just kind of reset the whole damn thing. So we'll find out in the offseason. Unfortunately, that's all we can say like, we don't know what's going on. As you said, you're not in the building covid-19. And we're just trying to fight through this thing and we'll eventually see when all is said and done how Belichick truly felt about some of these players. He's dead. I am Nick cattles. It's the Greg Bedard Patriots podcast with Nick cattles episode 27 in the books later. This week will catch up with you. Of course, we've got a preview Anthony Lenz Los Angeles Chargers and I think one of the first questions I've got to ask Craig and that show is going to be how will Anthony Lynn screw it up on Sunday because that's what he does every single week until then be good. Be safe Kathy the podcast coming up later this week page really book.

Kyler Murray Patriots Cardinals Belichick Gilmore Nick cattles Greg Bedard Stidham football Christian Kirk Houston Arizona Jennings Cam Newton Hopkins 63 yards 71 yards 78 yards one hundred percent Nick Nick
1637: The Darker Side of Keeping Up With The Joneses by Helene Massicotte of Free To Pursue on Financial Cushions

Optimal Finance Daily

08:51 min | Last month

1637: The Darker Side of Keeping Up With The Joneses by Helene Massicotte of Free To Pursue on Financial Cushions

"Thanks to anchor for hosting this. Podcast anchor is the easiest way to make a podcast. The distributor podcast for you so can be heard everywhere. Spotify apple podcast google podcasts. And many more you can easily make money from your podcast to with no minimum listenership anchor gives you everything you need in one place for free which you can use right from your phone or computer creation tools. Allow you to record and edit your podcast so it sounds great. Download the anchor app or go to anchor dot. Fm to get started. This is optimal finance daily episodes. Sixteen thirty seven the dark side of keeping up with the joneses by len mascot of free to pursue dot com. And i'm your host and personal finance enthusiasts diana mariam. This is a show where i read to you and to myself. Frankly from some of the best personal finance blogs on the planet every single day. Do you have a question. You'd like answered here on the show. Go ahead and send it over to finance at o. l. d. podcasts dot com. And you will hear from me soon even if your question isn't answered on a qna episode. I do my very best to answer every email and with that. Let's get right to today's post and start optimizing your life. The darker side of keeping up with the joneses by a land mascot of free to pursue dot com financial bloggers often speak of the downsides associated with keeping up with the joneses the folks who seem to be living that elusive good life. The thoughts go a little something like this. You spend more than you intend to because they make you want things. You hadn't even considered important. You're never happy because you keep thinking about what they have and you don't he feel the need to get bigger and better versions of the newer things you own. As soon as you see they've upgraded their lifestyle. You feel that if you're a good provider like they appear to be. You need to be giving your family. Everything others are providing like education leisure experiences and material goods. You feel that if you go to a good school you have a chance at a better life like there's and you never save enough because no one has their bank balance printed on their forehead but folks will sure notice that you're driving a beater or that. You're not wearing the big brands. If only that were the extent of the consequences associated with aspirational spending. The reality is that for many keeping up with the joneses has far more dire consequences as the movie of the same name clearly illustrates if you're lucky. You just feel unhappy most of the time because you simply can't feel content with what you have for many however it doesn't stop there some of us experience depression associated with seeking external validation of our self worth financial worry caused by a large and or growing debt load or insufficient savings strain family relationships caused by heavy work responsibilities associated with jobs that pay enough to maintain a given lifestyle stress associated with procuring. The lifestyle that leads to health issues fear of the potential shame associated with being found out as living above our means and frustration and anger at never having enough that can lead to isolation and substance abuse. If a few or many of these manifest it can lead to the ultimate sacrifice giving up your life to finally be free of the burden that you believe will never ease. Suicidal thoughts are reality for many and unfortunately as many movies documentaries books and nearly sixty eight million hits on. Google for debt and suicide elucidate a significant number of people and even families through building up our immunity. The joneses are not bad people. They're part of our increasingly materialistic society. And they don't know the damage they're causing. As a matter of fact. Some of us are likely the joneses to other people. What's worrisome is the effect the joneses have on people who find themselves emotionally vulnerable becoming vulnerable to the lures of their lifestyle is easy if you feel. You're not enough in your professional personal academic family or social life. One small taste of affluence can easily make you want another hit soon. The small hits aren't big enough and you want something bigger better batter. Affluency is not much different than addiction. When you really think about it how can we avoid the darker side of keeping up with the joneses number one. Identify the problem and stay away. I we need to recognize the signs that were dealing with this type of influence. If we find were around people who are overly materialistic and make us want things. We need to stay away period. It may even mean that we're living in a toxic neighborhood and we need to move number to build a financial cushion second. We need to ensure that. We have the financial wherewithal to address. Monetary slip-ups big and small and that means having an emergency fund of three to six months of expenses to deal with unexpected high-spending emergencies job loss and other events that can pull the carpet from under us and lead us to feel. We don't have our life. Under control counter-intuitively money scarcity can often lead to more spending and or poor performance at work that only served to exasperate the problem number three invest in what matters most third. We also need to be vigilant and build up our immunity by staying mentally and physically healthy. We need to ensure we're taking care of ourselves by focusing on what really matters the quality of our relationships gratitude for what we have our uniqueness as individuals and our ability to continue to learn and develop. Interestingly enough these activities have little to nothing to do with money and that means they're available to everyone if you're currently dealing with the darker side of this issue please seek help when we feel we're in trouble is easy to think that our problems are bigger than they actually are and we don't have the mental bandwith left to help ourselves. That's why asking for help is so important so please talk to someone. Get some guidance. Get some help so you can get through it. You just listen to the post titled the darker side of keeping up with the joneses by a land mascot a free to pursue dot com. I think lend makes a great point in this article about being mindful of our circle of influence. It's easier to not play the game of keeping up with the joneses if we're not hanging out with them and that may not just apply to the people we surround ourselves with in the real world. Social media has a funny way of making us feel inadequate when we see a carefully curated presentation of another person's life on instagram. for example it's easy to forget that that's not the whole picture. The grass may not actually be greener for those people. Perhaps what you're seeing is just an instagram filter. I also think the key is not feeling a need to keep up with. The joneses is to develop a deep appreciation for what we already have. Just imagine what would happen. If we spend as much energy being grateful for what we have as we do comparing ourselves to other people i think that's part of what it means to have an abundance mindset it's letting yourself be so consumed with gratitude for your own good fortune that there is no mental bandwith left for comparisons. Most of us are surrounded by incredible abundance. And we don't even see it. I also think we make assumptions about how happy others who have more than us actually. Are i have the pleasure of having dinner with a friend. The other day who just moved into a gorgeous house nearly triple the size of her previous house as she was giving me a tour she shared with me the stress of maintenance for a house that large rather than feeling jealous. I felt a sense of appreciation for my cute little house that has been a breeze to maintain. Bigger is not always better. My friends and that'll do it for today. In another installment of optimal finance daily have a happy thursday. Thank you for being here everyday. And listening and i'll see you on the friday show tomorrow where optimally awaits.

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