2 Burst results for "33 Plantings"

"33 plantings" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

07:31 min | 1 year ago

"33 plantings" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Good sense to tread lightly, no pun intended on the grounds and respect the history and add to it rather than subtract from it. And this evening. This definitely includes, uh, first Lady Trump's, um, recent renovation, Rachel Lambert Melon Bunny Mellon. Specifically, even in 1989, she returned to the to the White House to spruce up the Rose Garden under Mrs Mellon, the original creator of the Rose Garden, was was actually advocating for the removal of all or some of those crab apple trees that which was sort of the crux of criticism that Mrs Trump received. And this was because, well, the roses and the other plants underneath it needed more light. I mean, it's kind of, you know, bigger. The bigger tree gets as it grows, the more the more it's going to shake things out. And so she Mrs Mellon was even in in favor. Of removing some of them. And those trees that were removed just last year were actually the second or third iterations of the crab apples. They were not the historic trees from April of this year in Compton, formerly with ABC News. The conversation with Jonathan Prisca, author of the book A Garden for the President. Well, I must confess I don't take sides on politics, but I missed the trees, especially when I was doing a new stand up in the Rose Garden. And you had the beautiful blossoms behind you or those beautiful magnolias in the corner, But the but the trees all around. It also gave the the the Rose Garden a bit of, uh, of seclusion. It gave it part. It gave it a definition so You as an historian have a phrase that I don't really know how to translate into average that, um, what does the phrase to professional historians mean? A period of significance isn't the last 230 years a period of significance for the White House? Well, you took the words right out of my mouth in at the risk of maybe summarizing this a little bit too much for some of my fellow his story. And a period of significance is basically a fancy way of saying when the historic thing happened for a lot of historic places in the United States, Uh, think Gettysburg National Battlefield Park Well, the place there is more or less significant because of the two day battle fought in 18 63 during the American Civil War, So it's pretty easy to wrap your head around a period of significance in a place like that, But with the White House, it's different with the White House grounds. It's different. The Entire 200. Plus odd years of the White House grounds is the period of significance, and there's very few places in the nation that you can say that about even more significant to me is that the period of significance is open ended, but but simply because it is the White House. Whatever happens tomorrow or next week or next month or next year is going to be historically significant. Can I tell you one will Story that affected me and that this has to do with the beautiful Jackson Magnolias, which are how old now the Oh well, if you believe that if you believe the story associated with them they were planted by Andrew Jackson sometime around 18 28. So they are gigantic and what you what we see close up is there are huge metal poles going up the entire life. And they are wired together because the president's Marine one helicopter comes out the downdraft beats against them. But one morning I got a call from the ABC News desk it about 1 10 in the morning. They said a plane has crashed into the White House. Get there quick. Well, I got there. It turned out was a little tiny, ultra light plane and it had a kook had tried to land at one o'clock in the morning on the South Lawn of the White House, But there were bleachers set up for a police event the next day, so he pulled up, hit the ground Gaza and went straight up through the Jackson. And smashed in, broke the windows in the White House Medical office right underneath the president's bedroom. That kind of moment. It damaged the tree a little bit. It damaged the window. But my goodness is scared all of us. Absolutely. And I My hat's off to you because I write about things after they've happened. You're there covering it live, and I can only imagine what that was like It was during the Clinton administration. Correct. And I believe the thankfully the president and first lady weren't home at the time. Which is why I wasn't at the White House at one o'clock in the morning, right? Real quickly. The Jackson Magnolias. Um there are lots of trees on the White House grounds that presidents have planted for very significant historic reasons. Do you have any favorites? Yeah, I wish I the Gerald Gerald and President Gerald Ford and first lady Betty Ford planted a American elm to mark the bicentennial of the United States. Unfortunately, that tree no longer survive. But it was a very important moment and a great way to celebrate the 2/100 anniversary of the nation. Was it Dutch elm disease? Was this the era where we're losing so many elms? I believe so, yes, unfortunately, And the good news is that there are some genetically resistant hybrids available now one of which was originally discovered literally on the National Mall. So those are beginning to be planted at the White House and Laura Bush when they redesigned Pennsylvania. Avenue, asked that there be American elms. Perhaps these hybrids planted all up and down literally at the address of 1600, Pennsylvania Avenue, and some people said that was bringing about kind of the restoration of elms, which had died off and oaks had become. Had become so so predominant but the but the historic nature or the whole historic importance of presidents planting trees. Um, it that's a real legacy for the White House. Absolutely the For many years, the oldest tree with a known presidential association was an American elm planted by John Quincy Adams in about 18 26 front or back lawn South Lawn. It was actually on one of the large mounds. On the South Lawn. You probably remember it The it's an enormous tree in a section of it is actually on display at the White House Visitors Center the so so that was the oldest tree with its presidential association, and you can see how far back that goes. But currently there are 33 plantings that were either planted by a president or first lady. The the Jackson Magnolias are the oldest. But some of their their history is a little bit in doubt, because they, in fact, don't show up in early photographs of the White House, So it's a beautiful story that they're associated with Jackson, but it might not be entirely historically accurate..

Jonathan Prisca Andrew Jackson 1989 John Quincy Adams United States Compton A Garden for the President 33 plantings Lady Gettysburg National Battlefiel American Civil War tomorrow Clinton second next year Gaza next month Betty Ford Rachel Lambert Melon next week
"33 plantings" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

08:21 min | 1 year ago

"33 plantings" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"But currently there are 33 plantings that were either planted by a president or first lady. The, uh The Jackson Magnolias are the oldest. But some of their history is a little bit in doubt, because in fact, don't show up in early photographs of the White House, So it's a beautiful story that they're associated with reaction, but it might not be entirely historically accurate. The oldest tree with a known association with presidential administration is actually a beautiful Japanese maple on the south grounds near the South fountain, one of the smaller trees Is on the ground. But for my, uh, for my money, it punches above its weight class. Such beautiful particularly because it's you know, it's red in the fall, and it really stands out that was planted in 18 93 by first lady Frances Folsom, Cleveland So many of the plantings around the White House Therefore, security when a hotel just a block from the White House reopened after years of being closed, The Secret Service actually went up to the rooftop restaurant, checking on the sight lines so the president wouldn't be exposed in public. I guess that's the kind of thing we have to worry about, At least in the 20th 21st century. It is and sort of touching upon the role of security and the need in the modern world. We live in one of the more Recent plantings. It was of of flowering dogwood planted by, uh, President Bill and first lady Hillary Clinton in honor and remembrance of the victims of the Oklahoma City Federal bombing. Gerald and Betty Ford put in a swimming pool. You can't see it from the street. I can't see it from West Executive Avenue, which is a street that's now just a parking lot. But they did that because he had been vice president for about a nanosecond and his friends had raised money for a pool at the vice president's residents, he became president up is that do some people consider that an eyesore? Or is that kind of a a charming edition and certainly something that American first families? Have enjoyed since the Ford era. Well, I don't think I know anybody that considers it an eyesore and and that's really because of what you just said. Nobody can really see it until you you're right up on it. And for that matter that same goes for the White House Tennis court and a number of other spots on the White House grounds. They've been very carefully installed over the years, so as to not impinge upon the historic character of the grounds, damage any of the significant tree plantings and really, to not interfere with views to and from the White House, the through the iconic the iconic shots of the exterior of the building, so no, I don't think anybody would considered an eyesore. Do you know who probably quit first lady? Use the pool more than anybody else I believe. That was Barbara Boy, It was Barbara Bush, who loved to swim, and I think she had to be very careful to make sure when she wore her white terrycloth bathroom down the colonnade past the Oval Office. She got by with anybody seeing here, Jonathan plus CA a garden for the president, in conversation with in Compton. Formerly of ABC News. Yes, I remember old pictures of the White House showing they had a greenhouse or conservatory. Yeah, so the the greenhouses and the conservatory or both 19th century aspects of the White House and of the White House grounds. The conservatory was A private space rather for the president and first lady. They're invited guests and it was this beautiful, exact kind of exotic place. It was located on top of the West terrorists or the West Colonnade, and it was accessed through what was at one time President Grant's billiard room and the greenhouses were just exactly what it sounds like a series. Of working buildings that that produced Camelia says ferns. Orchids. There are actually two rows house is at its peak and so again with two rows houses shows you where the priority has always been for presidential flowers, and these were not small enterprises. They covered significant acreage, and they were located where the modern day West Wing is, in fact they were removed in 19. No. Two with when Theodore Roosevelt built the original West, we ran out of family space inside the White House. So he built the West Wing so he would have offices that didn't have six kids underfoot. Well, that and again I think those of us working from home today can really relate. Today. Pandemic taught us all a lesson on that did it. I would love to wind up on something that touches on that. I know it doesn't technically have to do with the gardens and the growth and And the design, But every family I covered at the White House had pets. I was not there for the Kennedy ponies or the historic, you know, Well, uh, goats and sheep. Whatever. I was there for Gerald Ford's Dog Liberty, who I think got one of the first splashes into the Gerald Ford pool and liberties puppies, of course. But dogs and some cats were and I think some of the kids had a gerbil or two. But, uh, that also shows how the White House although it's a tribute to the to the glory of the United States. It's a centerpiece of our civic society. It's also a home. Uh do you think? Well, do you have any favorite pets back in the, uh, back in the archives of presidential history? Absolutely. So, putting aside the dogs and the cats for you know, for the purposes of this, I would, uh well, I I should confess before I say anything else. I'm urgently from the state of Wisconsin and I'm a little biased because of that. But my personal favorite presidential pet of all time was a dairy cow named Pauline Wayne also possibly the greatest pet name in all of presidential history. That was the also the proud pet of President Taft and Pauline Wayne grazed on the White House grounds, as well as the grounds of the Eisenhower Executive Office building, and she she was something of a local celebrity. She was interred. Viewed by members of the press. She never really said much, but, uh, she it was. It was a good time. Everybody liked her very much. And she was a gift from Wisconsin senator who had heard that President Taft who it's fair to say it was probably the largest president. He was not a small man £300 or so as legend has it. Yeah, and he apparently was having trouble getting enough fresh milk and being a good reference. Tentative of the dairy state. He he sent the president Pauline Wayne, and the president loved her very much. He did not generally let Pauline travel because she needed to provide milk and she was also a pet. But one of the few times she did travel. She traveled by her own personal railroad car, so she really traveled in first class. The problem with this is she was going to the Wisconsin state fair bit of a favor from the president and the somewhere along the lines. Her train car was detached and was on its way to the Chicago Stockyards on a different train, and it was just caught just in the nick of time..

Barbara Bush Gerald Theodore Roosevelt Betty Ford Pauline Wayne £300 33 plantings 20th 21st century West Executive Avenue Barbara Boy Pauline Today 18 93 Gerald Ford two Compton Wisconsin ABC News Jonathan Cleveland