35 Burst results for "28%"

Morant, Jackson lead Grizzlies past 76ers, 117-19

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 13 hrs ago

Morant, Jackson lead Grizzlies past 76ers, 117-19

"John morant and jaren Jackson junior carried the grizzlies to a one 17 one O 9 victory over the 76ers. Morant was high man for Memphis with 28 points and Jackson headed 22. Both had 9 rebounds as a grizzlies improved to 12 and 9. Memphis pulled away by outscoring the 6 or 63 46 over the second and third quarters. The grizzlies had 60 points in the paint and out rebounded Philadelphia 57 42. Joel embiid provided 35 points 11 rebounds and 7 assists for the 76ers who dipped at 12 and 11. I'm Dave ferry.

John Morant Grizzlies Jaren Jackson Morant Memphis Jackson Joel Embiid Philadelphia Dave Ferry
Adebayo, Herro lead Heat over Celtics after Brown forces OT

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 14 hrs ago

Adebayo, Herro lead Heat over Celtics after Brown forces OT

"Bam adebayo and Tyler hero combined for 54 points in the heats one 21 16 overtime win at Boston. Jimmy Butler had 25 points and 15 rebounds after missing the heat's previous 7 games with the sore right knee. My team welcomed me back and let me do what I do. It was just a big dove overall. At a bio dropped in 28 points and hero added 26 for Miami, which had four players score at least 20. Jaylen Brown was high man for the Celtics with 37 points, and sent the game to OT by draining a three pointer with 1.7 seconds left in regulation. I'm Dave fairy.

Bam Adebayo Jimmy Butler Tyler Jaylen Brown Boston Miami Celtics Dave Fairy
Davis scores 44, LeBron passes Magic as Lakers beat Bucks

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 15 hrs ago

Davis scores 44, LeBron passes Magic as Lakers beat Bucks

"Anthony Davis and LeBron James pushed the Lakers past the bucks one 33 one 29. Davis poured in a season high 44 points to help the Lakers overcome Yanis intend to kupo, who had 40.7 rebounds of 5 assists. We went to come out and set a tone for our road trip. Against a great team, one of the top teams in the league. And we were able to get a victory tonight. James felt too shy of a triple double. Finishing with 28 points and 11 boards. James put LA ahead for good by sinking a tie breaking three pointer with three 22 remaining. Los Angeles shot 54% from the floor against a Milwaukee team that led the NBA in defense of rating. I'm Dave ferry.

Yanis Lakers Kupo Anthony Davis Lebron James Bucks Davis James LA Los Angeles Milwaukee NBA Dave Ferry
A Prayer for Times of Disappointment

Your Daily Prayer

02:15 min | 3 d ago

A Prayer for Times of Disappointment

"When we're disappointed, we're given an appointment to praise God no matter what. The psalmist David proclaims in psalm 34, I will bless the lord at all times. His praise shall continually be in my mouth. When our expectations are met, we should stop and praise God and bless his holy name. And when our expectations are not met, we should still stop and praise God. And bless his holy name. He's worthy of our praise and our Thanksgiving. In his sovereign Providence, we can trust that he works all things for good for those who love him and are called according to his purposes. Romans 8 28. Nothing with God is a coincidence or happenstance. He's sovereign, and he's in control of every detail in our lives, guiding our every step. His work in our lives is providential through and through, and he causes all things to work out for our good, and for his glory. Next time your expectations are not met. Remember, it's an opportunity to make an appointment to praise God for his goodness. We can trust that his plans for our life are so much better. Let's pray. Father God. I'm struggling with disappointment. Help me to guard my heart from discouragement. This contentment and complaining. Teach me how to find ways to praise you when my expectations are not met. I know I need to trust in your sovereignty and lean upon your ways over my own. Your grace is sufficient for me, and I thank you for always guiding me into truth and convicting my heart when I fall into the sin of grumbling and complaining, thinking that I know better than you. My lips long to praise your great name. Thank you for your love for me. And for changing my heart to reflect yours. I pray you would use these unmet expectations to transform me and strengthen my faith in you. In Jesus name, amen.

Providence David
California police: Virginia man killed family, took teenager

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 4 d ago

California police: Virginia man killed family, took teenager

"California authorities say a Virginia man killed three members of a family and took a teen, I Norman hall. Police in riverside California say the suspect drove across the country to meet the teenage girl before killing three members of her family. He was identified as 28 year old Austin Lee Edwards. He was in law enforcement. Edwards was a Virginia state police trooper and was recently hired as a sheriff's deputy. He was portraying to be someone younger and probably someone different. Edwards obtained information, including her address, he took the teen, but was killed in a shootout the same day as the homicides. The girl was not harmed. I Norman hall

Norman Hall Austin Lee Edwards California Virginia Riverside Edwards
Kevin McCarthy Needs to Stop Embarrassing Himself

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

01:18 min | 5 d ago

Kevin McCarthy Needs to Stop Embarrassing Himself

"Speaking of horrible horrible men, you tweeted about Kevin McCarthy, which can I just say how hilarious it is that he probably is not even qualified enough to actually get the votes together to be speaker. So we'll see. I mean, do you remember Nancy Pelosi had to put down more than one rebellion? That's why she's such an amazing negotiator, vote counter and leader, but I thought, oh my God, this stumble. He's not going to be able to figure out how to piece together enough votes. It doesn't seem like right now. Yeah. But yeah, and you talked about his oh, and the very first day wolff read every single word of the constitution allowed from the floor. You just said the thing is this yutz knows what embarrassing this is, but he'll do it anyway, cringe or not. Also, they've done that every Congress forever. I know. I know. And it is so cringe. Whenever whichever party does it, you know, it's like this big show. Nobody's watching. I mean, if you're watching, what is wrong with you? It takes you, it takes 5 minutes to read the constitution. You know, instead you're going to sit there and listen to them for a couple of hours. It's the right wing version of virtue signaling. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, it is so, and you know, they all carry the constitution in their pockets. They don't read it. Like, it's not available on their phones.

Kevin Mccarthy Nancy Pelosi Wolff Congress
A Friendly Reminder: If You Feel Sick, Test for Covid

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

02:53 min | 5 d ago

A Friendly Reminder: If You Feel Sick, Test for Covid

"Oh, hi, rudeness, hi. Good morning. I want to add something to your warning there. Which is that even if you're fully vaccinated, that if you are feeling sick, test yourself. Get tested because you want to catch it early. And that's what happened, you know, my stepdad's in the hospital and that was one of the things is he waited to test until it was advanced and you can't get on the pax lova and all of that. So that's why I didn't have symptoms, but I tested yesterday because I was like, yeah. Don't you think that's part of it, rude, and I know you're in Louisiana now and so we're sending our love and light because we've all been through it and it's just I know you've had it like Chris and I have had it. Wait, oh yes, you've had a two I forgot. You finally. I got it in August. Yeah. But yeah, it is terrifying. We have a mom that's almost a hundred with Alzheimer's. It's just the sense in society that we're supposed to take care of other people or at least not be a to other people, right? Just depress me in the airport and on the plane and even in the nursing home. Like, nobody's wearing a mask anymore. I've gone back, you know, on the flights I wore a mask, you know? Obviously in the hospital, I. Just, it doesn't make any sense at this point not to, especially, like you said, as we're going into winter. And you know what? I also don't want to get the RSV bug the time. Right there. Yeah. So yeah, Doctor Fauci was talking about that. RSV flew, here we go. Hang on. We have vaccinations for clearly COVID, particularly with the updated boosters that are now available. We have vaccinations for influenza. We're already starting to see an early surge of both flu and RSV. We don't have a vaccine for RSV. This particularly problematic for children 5 years of age and younger and for the elderly. But there are things you can do with RSV is avoid congregate settings in particularly if you have a cold or a sneezing and stay home, wear a mask, wash your hands. And as Ruth said, get tested if you're feeling anything, right? But anyway, have some tests on hand, you know? Yeah. And by the way, some places, some pharmacies and I hate to be like, you know, you know, mister information this morning instead of making sodomy jokes. Oh, we'll get to those. We're going to want in with those. I saw what you did there. That's a mouthful. Anyway, there's, but you know, you can also some pharmacies if your insurance will allow it. They'll give you the test for free. And they will take care of it. Like a prescription or something like that instead of going through the whole, you know. Thank you. Thank you, mister. They will.

Alzheimer's FLU Louisiana Fauci Chris Ruth
The Numbers Don't Look Good...

The Trish Regan Show

02:06 min | 5 d ago

The Numbers Don't Look Good...

"Let's turn to the overall economy right now because as we get more and more earnings in, I don't think it's looking so hot. I mean, I've been watching this market and you know I've been watching it with a ton of skepticism because since October, we've been watching it just go up up and away. I think up about 13% on the S&P 500. But what happens once the panacea that investors are planning for doesn't actually pan out. Then what do we do? And I don't know if it's going to pan out. I just want to point out, we're looking at basically the slowest earnings growth for the third quarter sends 2020. I mean, in 2020, it was really, really bad. Corporate earnings are just not coming in. And we've got, well, nearly 95% of companies reporting already. And so I would just say, if it's that bad in the third, what happens in the fourth, when you get those numbers in? What are people really going to say? I do know this week are going to be watching a few biggies. We get Dollar General coming out with get Salesforce. We've got Kroger, the grocery store. And what we're looking for here is whether or not we're starting to see much in the way of pullback on behalf of consumers. One of the good things about companies like Dollar General is that sometimes you see a trade down effect when things get kind of tough. People start trading down to the walmarts to the dollar generals, so we'll be watching all of this to see what the consumer trends really are. I would just say a lot of companies having reported and this is all according to facts at which trax and for the third quarter we really are looking at a pretty miserable showing. So unless things somehow turn around, big time in the final three months of the year and we'll get those reports of course in 2023. I would think that a slowdown in consumer spending coupled with a Federal Reserve that even if they're not doing 75 basis points is still trying to come through with 50 basis points each time I would think that you are going to start to see some softening. I would point out that the stocks are trading right now around 17 times earnings. It's a little bit higher than their historical ten year average. Not as crazy as it was. I mean, I think we're up around 21, 22 times earnings before. So we're back in a more normal range, but still in a very bullish optimistic range. And

Salesforce Kroger Federal Reserve
Desperate for Oil, Biden Turns To Venezuela

The Trish Regan Show

01:59 min | 5 d ago

Desperate for Oil, Biden Turns To Venezuela

"If you haven't heard the news yet, the vitamin administration is now going to allow Chevron big American oil company to pump oil out of Venezuela. So what's unusual about that, you might say, is, well, the fact that we had previously been sanctioning Venezuela because we have repeatedly accused the regime there of being a dictatorship. You see, we have recognized a totally different politician and totally different guy Huang Guaido as the real president of Venezuela. So now we're doing a deal with Nicolas Maduro. And the reason we're doing it, let's be honest, is because we have to. We absolutely have to. I am a realist and I've said all along, it really hasn't made a ton of sense to treat Venezuela like such an enemy in light of the fact that they're so close to us. I mean, let's just go back to the Monroe doctrine for a second, right? They're right here in our hemisphere. You're talking a few hours from Florida and for some reason we've treated them in a more hostile way than we treated Russia until recently. In a more hustle way than we've treated countries like Iran. So why the change now? What's so special about this moment in time? Well, oil prices are through the roof. And it just so happens that this week they're likely going to go even higher because now these sanctions we are putting on European countries and others Vis-à-vis Russia, they're going to go into effect. And that means you're going to have even less energy on the market. And so what do they do? Well, they get all this oil sitting down there in Venezuela, and it's getting sold anyway, frankly, illegally on the black market. I've walked you through this whole triangle before. Because you're a Caribbean island where they switch the flags on the ships, and then those container ships filled with oil, go over to Asia where again, they switch the flags and then they go eventually to China. My sources have walked me through this and I've walked you through this. The oil is making its way onto the global market in one way form or another.

Venezuela Vitamin Administration Huang Guaido Nicolas Maduro Chevron Russia Iran Florida Caribbean Island Asia China
"28%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:34 min | 5 d ago

"28%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"On today's program we are going to take a closer look at some of the stories making new set of the World Cup in Qatar. I'm joined in the studio by our own Fernando I was the Pacific hello fan under how are you today? Very good, very good markers besides, of course, the exciting football match is a bit later today. But I decided to select a few stories, I think about the World Cup that is not necessarily just about football. If I may start, let's talk about the TV ratings for this World Cup. I was very curious about it because there's been a lot of talk about boycott in the event. Because of the human rights situation in Qatar, their treatment to LGBT, Q populations and the treatment for migrant workers, but the reality is Marcus even with all those problems people still want to watch the matches. There's been record breaking numbers, look at the U.S., their match against England, which was a little bit of a boring match. I have to add. I had the record of the most watched man's football match ever in the country 15.3 million viewers of Americans watching this. This is remarkable, remembering that the Americans, you know, I think football is becoming more and more important there, but it's not their main sport. I'm wondering if this ratings reflect whole football is indeed getting more but more popular over there in that country. Absolutely. I think, you know, especially women's football that was the case already, but I think we can say, you know, we can say this with confidence that man's football is doing the same as well, but it's not just the USA. I mean, even football mad countries like France in Brazil, they're recording their highest ratings. Look at France. Their latest match was the best rating of the year, and even in Brazil. It's been the highest audience on television since 2000 6. So, you know, clearly there's still very much a desire. And I'm wondering if you're going to ask me, are there any countries that are bucking the trend? There are many countries. So it was forcing that question and you apparently saw apparently Germany. The ratings are a little bit down. It's not a disaster, but apparently some people there are boycotting or perhaps German is not doing that well. What's the mood in Brazil now what is making headlines in your home country? Well, that's the second story. I think this is interesting because people say that football can heal a nation in a way. I think this is can be an exaggerated statement, but I think it could happen in Brazil. In the first match, a player cohesion on his court two goals, beautiful goals as well. And it's interesting because a lot of Brazilians they were supportive of the Brazilian national team, but they were a bit embarrassed because some players like Neymar, he voted Bolsonaro and he was very clear about that. And as you know, the country is very divided in political terms, so it became a little bit awkward, supports the national football team without thinking that you're also Bolsonaro supporter. But with his Charlotte swims different, he is a man who supports several charities. I remember doing COVID in Brazil. He was one of the first ones to go on TV and say, please go and vaccinate. He's always supporting anti racism groups among else. He didn't declare his vote. But people think he's progressive and they're happy to have someone like him. Did the Brazilian team at every point have discussions of the kind we saw in the UK, for example, how the whole team wanted to wear those one love arm bands and so forth. Is the Brazilian team? Is it the cultural therefore for the team to make a statement and to stand for good things? Less so than in the case of England, for example, but I wouldn't say that they don't they can be a little bit political. There's been quite a big movement in Brazil and anti racism movement, anti homophobia as well, but perhaps not in the same way as you see it in England. But I hope it's changing. I mean, I think some players are feeling a little bit more brave to show their political convictions as well. Finally, we should talk about obviously what's been making headlines today. What happened in Belgium after the country lost the match against the Morocco a lot of unrest. Oh, a lot of them rest. So basically, some people were lifting fires in the streets. They were throwing missiles at the police. It's been huge, and the reason for that, apparently, I mean, I can't say for sure that that was the only reason, but was the fact that, you know, Belgium lost to Morocco. There was quite a bit of a surprise. So there's been a lot of unrest in Belgium for that. That just shows how people feel very passionate about in a very bad way when it comes to football. But yeah, the scenes in the city center of Brussels there were the frankly quite often I think even the mayor said avoid the area if you are a football fan as well. That's always so confusing seeing that who are those people who want to go and break, break windows when their country loses a football match. Just finally Fernando what are you looking forward to next? I mean, if you do like football today is a very good day for it. I think just in about 2030 minutes for now South Korean Ghana will be playing, Brazil's Switzerland as well at 4 p.m. UK time, but I think, you know, I have to say at 7 p.m., there's a very special match Portugal in Uruguay, there are two very good cut. One of the best countries when it comes to football. So that's definitely a match I'll be watching. A busy day ahead. Thank you very much. And that's all for this edition of the briefing. It was produced by Reese James, our researcher was Emily Samuelson, our studio manager was Adam heaton. The briefing is back tomorrow at the same time, that's at 2000 in Beijing, midday here in London and 7 a.m. in Washington, D.C.. I am Marcos hippie. Goodbye, and thanks for listening.

football Brazil Bolsonaro Qatar World Cup Neymar Fernando England France U.S. Marcus Belgium Morocco Germany Charlotte UK South Korean Ghana Brussels Reese James Switzerland
Jags edge Ravens 28-27 on 2-pointer, Tucker's 67-yard miss

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 5 d ago

Jags edge Ravens 28-27 on 2-pointer, Tucker's 67-yard miss

"Trevor Lawrence threw to Marvin Jones junior for a ten yard touchdown with 14 seconds remaining, then hit zay Jones for a two point conversion, giving Jacksonville the upset when Lawrence finished with 321 yards passing and three scores. We've been on the wrong side of these a lot and it's cool to see even though that's happened a lot that we still have never lost faith, always trusted one another and it felt good to be on the other side of this one. Baltimore is Justin Tucker tried a 67 yard field goal on the game's last play, but the ball landed just short. I am Mark Myers

Trevor Lawrence Marvin Jones Zay Jones Jacksonville Lawrence Justin Tucker Baltimore Mark Myers
The latest in sports

AP News Radio

01:59 min | 6 d ago

The latest in sports

"AP sports, I'm Ben Thomas, on a big day in college football and the big game had Ohio State hosting Michigan. Then in cap on how it played out. CFP number three Michigan stuns number two Ohio State 45 23 JJ McCarthy threw for 263 yards and three touchdowns and ran in another to help Michigan outscore Ohio State 28 three in the second half and approved a 12 clinching a spot in the Big Ten championship game. Job's not finished. We got so much more to do. CJ Stroud sauce for 349 yards and two touchdowns, but it was too late interceptions that sealed the buckeyes fate, Ohio State drops to 11 and one. Number one, Georgia overcame a slow start to beat Georgia Tech 37 14 and finish another undefeated regular season one number four TCU crushed Iowa state 62 14. But Michigan's decisive victory over Ohio State does offer some hope for playoff aspirants. Correspondent Mark Myers reports in USC took a giant step closer with a 38 27 win over Notre-Dame. Quarterback Caleb Williams encountered for four touchdowns, one passing in three running for the now 11 in one Trojans. Williams is now considered the leading candidate to capture the Heisman Trophy. But LSU tripped up falling to Texas a and M 38 23 head coach Brian Kelly. We just, for some reason, we're off today. In Clemson lost by a point to South Carolina, Alabama took the iron bowl 49 27 over auburn, coach Nick Saban says, despite two losses, the crimson tide merit playoff consideration. This team didn't give up on themselves. They didn't give up on each other. They kept fighting and won some tough games. Tennessee thrashed Vanderbilt 56 to nothing while Oregon state stunned Oregon 38 34. In the NBA, the raptures Lakers rockets and sons all winners, the NHL, oilers, hurricanes, blues, Maple Leafs, Devils, islanders, avalanche and Canucks at the World Cup Argentina over Mexico, France towns, Denmark, Australia beat Tunisia and Poland topped Saudi Arabia. Ben Thomas AP sports.

Ohio Michigan Jj Mccarthy Cj Stroud Ben Thomas Mark Myers Caleb Williams CFP AP Buckeyes Georgia Tech TCU Football USC Georgia Brian Kelly Iowa Trojans
Ayton has 29 points, 21 rebounds as Suns edge Jazz 113-112

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 6 d ago

Ayton has 29 points, 21 rebounds as Suns edge Jazz 113-112

"Deandre ayton led away with 29 points and 21 rebounds both season highs as the sun's edge at the jazz one 13 one 12, 8 and scored a season high for the second straight night following 28 on Friday. For this team I have to be that energizer that dude who making them plays was on the glass. It was Duncan the ball was getting the crowd in it, setting the hard screens setting the tone of the physicality. Devin Booker added 27 points as the sun picked up their fourth straight win to improve the 13 and 6. Jordan Clarkson 22 points, Kotlin Sexton 20 to lead the jazz. They've lost four straight and 5 to 12 and ten. George Canada, Phoenix

Deandre Ayton Devin Booker Duncan Jordan Clarkson Kotlin Sexton George Canada Phoenix
No. 3 Michigan beats Ohio State for 2nd straight year, 45-23

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 6 d ago

No. 3 Michigan beats Ohio State for 2nd straight year, 45-23

"JJ McCarthy accounts for four touchdowns as CFP number three Michigan stuns number two Ohio State 45 23, McCarthy threw for 263 yards and three touchdowns and ran in another to help Michigan outscore Ohio State 28 three in the second half and approved a 12 clinching a spot in the Big Ten championship game. At the end of the day, this one doesn't even matter. This doesn't matter. It's a job's not finished. We got so much more to do and so much so many places to go. CJ Stroud saws for 349 yards and two touchdowns, but it was too late interceptions that sealed the buckeyes fate, Ohio State drops to 11 and one. I'm Denny Capp

Jj Mccarthy Michigan Ohio CFP Mccarthy Cj Stroud Buckeyes Denny Capp
Thompson-Robinson rallies No. 17 UCLA past Cal, 35-28

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | Last week

Thompson-Robinson rallies No. 17 UCLA past Cal, 35-28

"The UCLA bruins used the late second quarter touchdown to build momentum as they held off California, 35, 28. Ruins quarterback Dorian Thompson Robinson was 21 of 30 for a 189 yards and a touchdown. Dealing with these guys all year. And being able to be a real brotherhood and lean on each other at times when things get harder or adversity hits. So again, I'm just so thankful to be able to play with these guys again and enjoy this win for sure. Meanwhile, the golden bears lost 7 of their final 8 games. In the loss, Cal's Jack plummer was 24 of 34 passing for 294 yards and four touchdowns. Ryan leong, Berkeley

Dorian Thompson Robinson Bruins Ucla California Golden Bears Jack Plummer CAL Ryan Leong Berkeley
Adebayo scores 38 points to lead Heat past Wizards

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | Last week

Adebayo scores 38 points to lead Heat past Wizards

"Bam adebayo scored 38 points 12 in the fourth quarter as the Miami Heat beat the Washington Wizards one ten one O 7. Adebayo shot 15 of 22 from the field and grabbed 12 rebounds. It was one of those things where, you know, my teammates was giving me the ball and I was just taking advantage of the mismatch and the shots they would let me out. Caleb Martin scored 20 points for Miami while Tyler hero added 11 points in Tennessee. Bradley Beal and Kyle Kuzma led Washington with 28 points apiece. I'm Adam spelling.

Bam Adebayo Adebayo Washington Wizards Miami Caleb Martin Tyler Hero Bradley Beal Kyle Kuzma Tennessee Washington Adam
A Prayer for Times of Uncertainty

Your Daily Prayer

02:22 min | Last week

A Prayer for Times of Uncertainty

"Sometimes things don't go as planned. And many times for reasons beyond what we can understand. This is why it's so important to remember where to place our hope in times of uncertainty. Our focus first reminds us that our trust is not to be placed in our circumstances, predictable or not. Instead our trust is meant for the lord, and the Bible is clear that it is safe for us to place our trust in the lord even when it doesn't make sense to us. We can do this because unlike our ever changing circumstances, our God remains the same. Hebrews 13 8. For those in Christ, we can safely build our entire lives upon the promises of God's word, knowing he has secured our last for eternity, Isaiah 33 6. And as for the temporary things that happen in this life, we can trust him to use those for our benefit too. He takes everything that happens to us, both good and bad and uses it for our good, the good of others, and his glory, Romans 8 28. The good news for those dreaded times of uncertainty is that our understanding and God's ability to work all things for our good and his glory are not mutually exclusive. Meaning one does not depend upon the other. We don't have to understand our situations to know that God is holding every detail of our lives together in his trustworthy hands. And praise God, he does not wait for us to understand to accomplish his plans and purposes in and through us. Let's pray. Dear lord, you know how much my heart desires predictability and security? But lord so often, I hope to find it in my circumstances instead of you. Lord forgive me when I don't trust you, when fear wells up inside of me, God let it prompt me to acknowledge your presence and your sovereignty over every detail of my life. Thank you that you are faithful, completely dependable, and trustworthy because you never change. Unlike the unpredictable circumstances that daily let me down. God, you never fail me. Joshua 20 one 45. And Jesus name, amen.

Lord Joshua
Coast Guard rescues man overboard on Carnival cruise

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | Last week

Coast Guard rescues man overboard on Carnival cruise

"A cruise ship passenger who was missing for hours is found alive in the Gulf of Mexico. The coast guard says the 28 year old man was last seen Wednesday night and was rescued on Thanksgiving night. Carnival cruise line says the man was with his sister at a bar on the carnival valor at 11 p.m. Wednesday. He went to use the bathroom and never returned. His sister reported a missing the next day. A cargo ship saw a person in the water about 20 miles south of Southwest pass Louisiana and the mouth of the Mississippi River after the man was hoisted into a helicopter at about 8 30 Thursday night. He confirmed he was the missing cruise ship passenger. He was taken for medical care. The coast guard calls the rescue, a miracle. I'm

Coast Guard Gulf Of Mexico Mississippi River Southwest Louisiana
Cowboys 21 second half unanswered points leads to 28-20 win vs. Giants | UNDISPUTED

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | Last week

Cowboys 21 second half unanswered points leads to 28-20 win vs. Giants | UNDISPUTED

"The Dallas Cowboys rallied to defeat the New York Giants 28 20 on Thanksgiving overcoming a 13 7 deficit with 21 unanswered points in the second half. Cowboys coach Mike McCarthy says the cowboys time of possession keyed the win. Excellent division win game we had to have and I love the fire team and really tried to break their method and one of the things I'm talking about is controlling the ball was a big focus for us today. Dad Prescott threw for 261 yards and two touchdowns to Dalton Schultz, CD lamb caught 6 for one O 6, while Daniel Jones threw for two

Dallas Cowboys New York Giants Mike Mccarthy Cowboys Dalton Schultz Prescott Daniel Jones
"28%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

07:51 min | Last month

"28%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"A look at what else is happening in the news, the United States has cautioned that any attacks by Moscow on American satellites would be met with retaliation after a Russian official said that any involved in the war in Ukraine would be considered legitimate targets. Pakistan's former prime minister Imran Khan is expected to begin a protest march today from Lahore to Islamabad to call for early elections. And Elon Musk has completed his takeover of Twitter, closing a deal worth $44 billion. Do stay tuned to Monica 24 throughout the day for more on those stories. Now the Ukrainian president Vladimir zelensky has accused Russia of launching more than 30 drone attacks on Ukraine in the last 48 hours. He said that in addition, Moscow had also carried out some 4500 missile strikes and over 8000 air raids in total. While joining me now on the line from Kyiv is carlotta rabelo monocle 24 senior producer, Carlos a good morning to you. I understand you had a very disturbed night. Good morning to our Gina. Yes, we were all prepared here to put the potential of spending a night in a bomb shelter. There had been a few air raid sirens throughout the day in Kyiv. But does it in last for long about half an hour, but overnight at around one 20 a.m., the air raid sirens went off the mood and the city was very much to take it seriously because Vladimir Putin had in speaking earlier at that day and all the talks that have been happening over the past few days about a dirty bomb being accused on both sides and just as a precaution as we went off to the bomb shelter. It was quite interesting to see how different and how much more seriously people are taking it now compared to last time I was here back in July and it's in the subtle signs last time in July, there was also an instance where we had to spend a few hours at a bomb shelter overnight. And it very much came across back then as just a nuisance to have to leave your room and nothing is going to happen. What's the point? And this time, everyone that was down there, you know, had a go by, they grabbed back. So the bag that has all your documents enough to sustain you for a few days if needed, what a warm jacket. So people are going to the shelters prepared to the eventuality that they might stay there for longer. One of the fellow journalists that was in the bomb shelter with me last night who has been in key for the past two weeks or so told me that just a few days ago they had another air raid siren, they went to the shelter and it coincided with electricity blackouts. So they were there in the darkness just with the torch light. So there's that added element as the electricity grid remains volatile as Ukraine starts to rebuild from the strikes that Russia did earlier this month. And of course there were overnight strikes in the city of Nicole. Yes, so last night when that air raid siren went off, it affected 7 regions in Ukraine and slowly sirens and alerts were lifted, but we do have indication that the worst strikes in the overnight out of the 7 regions, it seems to be the only one that were counter defenses were not able to be successful. Now, what about these drone attacks? Because zelensky said overnight that Russia had carried out over 30 drone attacks in the last two days. What can you tell us about that? Yes, and it's quite interesting because the statement prerecorded statement from zelensky was recorded on a blackout key for where you can see just how dark the city is at the moment to spare the energy grid. He was talking about a total of 4500 missiles strikes leading to over 8000 air raids, but drone attacks specifically 30 of them. Now this is significant. These are majority, the drones that the west believes Iran has supplied to Russia despite both Moscow and Tehran continuing to deny it, but here on the ground is very much taken as a fact. And it has not been disputed. And there's a protest today, but excuse me, there's a protest today by the Iranian Diaspora. Yes, this was called the late yesterday. And it's happening at the independence square here in Kyiv at around midday. And this is organized by a group that represents the Iranian Diaspora here in Ukraine. Speaking to the media earlier today earlier yesterday, sorry was God ashima sued who's a member of the territorial defense forces of Iranian descent and he was saying that the representatives of the Iranian community in Ukraine declared that they do not support the actions of the Iranian authorities who are supporting Putin's dictatorial regime in this war against Ukraine. And then they added how they are a big part of the community here in the country and they want to continue to fight for its rights to exist and freedom. Now talking about Putin, he gave this very, very long speech yesterday. In which, I mean, it's clear his worldview is different from those in the west. What's the reaction been to that speech? It is interesting because when Putin was speaking, I was out and I was with a few people and they notification just popped up on my phone. So I mentioned that a table was like, oh, did you know that Putin is speaking now? And I was met with the mix of let's not talk about it. And a few eye rolls. And very much being asked, so what is he lying about now? But of course, that's the immediate reaction. And then an hour or so later once the speech was over, and these stories started to come in. People here were reading it. And it's like, particularly the sentence where he was saying that because of what's happening here because of the war he has inflicted upon Ukraine that there was a sentence in a speech saying that the world is facing its most dangerous time since World War II. And the reaction here is very much like, yeah, of course, because of you. So, but there is worry and going back to the beginning of our conversation. When the air raid sirens went off last night, if when the speech went on people gave me an eye roll, it was like, oh, he's just going to lie, what's the point? When the air raid sirens go off, it's like, we need to take it seriously because he was speaking today. So who knows what might happen? So the reaction here is to never take anything that comes out of Moscow as truth. But to act towards your best interest and try to stay safe because you never know what might happen next. Carlotta you stay safe too. That's color to rubella in Kyiv. And this is the globalist on monocle 24. The foreign disc is monocle 24s weekly global affairs program. We tackled the world's biggest news stories,

Ukraine Kyiv zelensky Moscow Vladimir zelensky carlotta rabelo monocle Russia Elon Musk Imran Khan Putin Islamabad Lahore Vladimir Putin Monica Gina Carlos Pakistan ashima Twitter
"28%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:30 min | Last month

"28%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"This is the globalist broadcasting to you live from Midori house in London. I'm Georgina Godwin. On the show ahead, we cross live to color lotta rubella who's in Ukraine for us for the latest on the situation there. Then, to Brazil. For an accusations of satanism to Peter Philip, he was in the prettiest one took over. But the final days of the campaign are here. Culminating in the all important TV debate between both candidates. Ahead of the presidential election on Sunday will analyze the likely outcome and what that might mean for the world. We'll also be in Northern Ireland where the deadline for a resolution to the legislative stalemate passed at midnight without an agreement. Plus, we'll examine record profits from Shell and the impact of windfall tax could have on energy giants and a population struggling to pay the bills. We'll have a rustle through the front pages from our Zürich studio, chat with our business editor about the latest financial news and finally, we'll have a little light relief. Former prime minister Boris Johnson had bolted back from his most recent holiday when his old job became available, displaying an alacrity and commitment that generally escaped him when actual crises interrupted his loafing during his stints in various ill deserved officers. That Sanjay Miller, who ran up the week for us with a rye look back at the last 7 days. That's well ahead here on the globalist life from London. First

Midori house Georgina Godwin lotta rubella Peter Philip Ukraine Brazil London Northern Ireland Shell Boris Johnson Sanjay Miller
"28%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:49 min | 2 months ago

"28%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Co director of the university college London center on U.S. politics. Julie, thanks for joining us. Firstly, how big a role did roads and his group have in January the 6th? Sure. Well, there were obviously many people involved in January 6th, but what this trial is looking at for roads and his associates is actually seditious conspiracy. So not only their actions on that day. But even more so, their actions leading up to it. Were they part of an ongoing plot and actual plan to go to the capitol to try and oppose the transfer of presidential power. So much of this trial is going to focus on the months before when they were recruiting, training, and conspiring to allegedly use force on January 6th. And how serious are the charges the groups now facing? Well, they are quite serious and that is one reason why this trial is getting so much attention. This is the highest level criminal charge that we've seen so far in over 800 arrests that we've seen around January 6th. And so just to conspiracy, it's a pretty specific crime in U.S. law. It's a conspiring to overthrow or destroy by force the U.S. government or prevent or delay the execution of any U.S. law. So it has a max sentence of about 20 years in prison. It does stop short of treason, which is waging war against the government. So it's not one of our highest crimes against the state, but it's one of the highest. And so it's taken quite seriously. And for anyone who might not have heard of the group, how and why was it founded by Rhodes who himself is a former U.S. Army paratrooper and a Yale law school graduate, so it's someone who on paper seems pretty highly educated. That's so true Vincent. And the oath keepers is an interesting group. They are a far right militia group. They were founded by roads himself back and I think 2009. So during the Tea Party movement in the U.S. of people remember that. And what's so interesting about this group is roads formed it, really with the aim of recruiting former and current military veterans or law enforcement officials and the idea was that they would swear an oath to sort of disobey on unconstitutional orders from the state or from the government. So he himself has a military background as you noted several of the other associates who are also part of this who are also charged in this trial also have military background. So that's one of the reasons why this group is so interesting but also so concerning because of the potential pull or reach that they have in the security services themselves. And how big a test will this be for the Justice Department and its prosecutors? Certainly, this is a big case because of the charges, but also just a big case for what it means for justice. The Justice Department really needs a win here. This is such a central charge. And it's very key to their central assertion. And I think that of the January 6th committee also that this attack posed such a threat to American democracy. So getting convictions in this case is really key for just underlining the seriousness of January 6th and the threats to the U.S. that were endemic within it. And rose's legal team have been complaining about getting a fair trial. How hard is the jury selection going to be? Yeah, so we saw it starting yesterday and some of the jurors themselves have been or potential jurors themselves have been very clear that they can not be impartial about this. Many have likened it to 9 11 in terms of how they see it as such a traumatic event for the nation if not for themselves personally. Obviously it's an event that everyone saw and is aware of and probably had many emotions to that day. So I think just the jury selection itself was probably going to take a little while. But with that said, there have been numerous other jury based trials around January 6th for other lesser crimes, and they have been able to find impartial juries for those. So it's certainly not impossible. And just a final question to you. The talk here is that they spent weeks planning this that there was a lot of coordination. There has been some suggestion that the Trump administration itself was coordinating with people on January 6th. Is there any credible link between the administration and the oath keepers and what's Donald Trump and the maga movements response been to this trial? Yeah, that is something that, again, will be interesting to see how it plays out in the trial, because in fact, the main defense for the oath keepers and their lawyers has been that they were essentially waiting for Trump's orders that day that they actually went to potentially follow his orders to quell unrest from his point of view. And so they are framing their defense in terms of being very much in the service of Trump, if you will. Again, whether that will actually come out in the proceedings and that would be interesting to see, again, some of their correspondence dates back months before Trump started organizing for January 6 to some of that might be tricky, but as we know Trump was certainly egging on the big lie from very early on himself. So it'll be interesting to see if they can draw this direct connections or not. Julie, thank you very much. That was Julie Norman. You're listening to the briefing on monocle 24.

U.S. university college London cent Justice Department Yale law school Julie U.S. government U.S. Army Rhodes Tea Party Vincent Trump administration government rose Trump Donald Trump Julie Norman
"28%" Discussed on Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

04:27 min | 3 months ago

"28%" Discussed on Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

"Maybe

"28%" Discussed on MiraStar Podcasts

MiraStar Podcasts

03:01 min | 5 months ago

"28%" Discussed on MiraStar Podcasts

"So what? Merkel. Miracle. That's easy. You know, everyone doesn't really see. I do not like cheese. All of that. Cheese beef made me pickles, Mayo. No, I'm having like the burger I eat, maybe meat, lettuce, cucumber, nuts. You must hear combat in a burger. Lettuce is okay. Pork flipping too comfort in the blue, are you mad? Yeah, that's basically saying, let me have a sandwich in it. That's amazing. Let me have a summer but some local waters on, but. Okay, so let's head on to the next quest to. Who is most likely to write a bestseller. And by Selena, I mean my top myth, easy, me. You want to be around. A long time. I think I took my 85 days out of my mind. Amanda, yes. Like a bestselling book. Be a writer, to be a walk, like a writer, to publish a group. I don't think you know what that is. That's the thing I do. Who is most likely to write a bestseller, like a book. I heard you have to let me just go real quick. Oh my gosh. Okay. I did not know who your local you my kids call it dollars this one. Keep turning off the ball. He went to such a bestseller book, like a book that's really trending in public. Like a really good book. Right. Holy cow. Mother think you'll be the right. My left. Why does it name have a unit?

Merkel Selena Amanda
"28%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:35 min | 7 months ago

"28%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Think people have realized that you can not rob Peter to pay Paul. There was a huge amount of complacency in governments across the world who thought, well, you know, it's very unlikely this is going to happen. It's a once in a century sort of phenomenon. It hasn't happened lately. It's probably going to be okay on my watch. So they've underinvested both in surveillance in global conversations to make it sure we keep tabs on how these things work. And in mechanisms for controlling outbreaks were they to occur in a country no country was very well prepared for this because they'd sat on their laurels, and this is in the face of evidence that this could happen and probably was going to happen and so I think the government in many countries governments do have something to answer to for under investing in these things. So the learning points really will be, you can't afford to do that, there needs to be better joined up international conversation and sharing of data around these sorts of things are best practice. But we also need to have really better healthcare that's capable of doing better infection control and I think that's the other thing that's going to be foremost in people's minds as they build the health service provision of the future is more single occupancy rooms, et cetera, so we don't get big outbreaks in places like hospitals so that we don't end up with our healthcare services being paralyzed by a handful of cases which is what is happening at the moment. That's our health and science correspondent doctor Chris Smith, thank you very much. You are listening to the briefing on monocle 24. Israel's prime minister Naftali Bennett has said that he will now like the rest of us pay for his family's food bills from his own pocket. It follows a report into lavish expenditure at his private home. Let's get the latest now with Alison Kaplan summer, a journalist for harrods in Tel Aviv. Thanks for joining us so Alison. So Bennett's expenses have made a fair amount of headlines in Israel. What exactly has been revealed? Well, Bennett was trying to be, I guess, transparent about his living expenses and what was being charged to the government. He's in an unusual living situation. It's a little bit like first family refusing to move into ten downing or The White House and deciding that they want to stay in their private residence. There have been various excuses that the Balfour residents in Jerusalem, the official residence, is under repair, et cetera, but Bennett's family remaining in their home in renan means that there's been a lot of controversy over how much of their costs and in this case their food costs, their takeout food costs are being charged to the state. There was an outcry over it, and as a result, the prime minister has recently announced that he has decided to pay for his own food. So how much has been spent in food? Well, the bill came to approximately $27,000 a month, which in takeouts. So that's several $100 a day, which given that he does have four children. And it's a large family. It's quite an extravagant expense. There are many there are many mouths to feed, but how do you spend that amount of money? Do you know any details where this food has come from? Well, he actually did a list of the restaurants that he had been ordering from. You know, it's all very convenient now, right? You just hit an app and you order from it, Israel has Walt. And so it's very convenient. But listen, a sushi dinner for a family of 6, that can add up. And several meals a day, you've got two busy working parents, unlike the official residence in Jerusalem, there is no cook on staff, right? So while former prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu took a lot of heat for ordering takeout in addition to the official meals that were prepared at the residence, the Bennett family does not have a cook on staff, part of Bennett's defense has been comparing his expenses to that of Netanyahu who did not have any young children when they were living the residents and his outlet is substantially less than that of Netanyahu. I know you have to be careful with those takeout apps. I'm wondering what's happening next. So benet has promised to be a bit more careful with spending money. What is the opposition saying? Well, it really is the opposition that's been driving most of this. All of the publicity, you know, the so called scoops that are coming out of the media have been fed, so to speak by the opposition, which, you know, like I said, Benjamin Netanyahu came under a lot of criticism constantly for living high on the hog and having a high flying lifestyle. So it's the opposition that has been really pushing the story in this narrative of Bennett wasting wasting the taxpayers money and you all have to understand this in the context of the fact that Naftali Bennett, before he went into politics, was a successful high-tech entrepreneur who made an exit, which is estimated to have been about a quarter of a $1 million. So it's not as if he couldn't afford to pay for his own takeout. Maybe the public would have more sympathy if you were a little less wealthy, but I think he is trying to make people stop talking about it by saying that he's now going to pay his own bills, which he probably should have done in the first place. Is this damaging for him? Does.

Bennett rob Peter Naftali Bennett Alison Kaplan Israel Chris Smith Jerusalem Tel Aviv prime minister Benjamin Netany Paul Alison Netanyahu White House Walt benet Benjamin Netanyahu
"28%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

07:24 min | 8 months ago

"28%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Live from London. First a look at what else is happening in the news. Russian and Ukrainian negotiators are expect to attend a new round of peace talks in Istanbul this week. The Chinese city of Shanghai has announced it will implement a two part lockdown starting today in order to carry out widespread COVID-19 testing. And in an historic first, foreign ministers from Israel Bahrain, the United Arab Emirates and Egypt, are gathering for a two day summit in Israel, where they'll be joined by U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken. Do stay tuned to Monaco 24 throughout the day for more on those stories. But first, on Saturday, U.S. president Joe Biden gave a speech in Poland, saying that Russia's leader Vladimir Putin can not remain in power, remarks The White House officials said later were meant to prepare the world's democracies for extended conflict over Ukraine, not back regime change in Russia. Well, this comes as the western city of livres, which has been spared the worst of the fighting, came under heavy rocket fire even as Russia says its focusing its invasion on the east in the already occupied territories of Luhansk and Donetsk. Ukraine's military intelligence chief says Vladimir Putin is seeking to split Ukraine into two creating a situation similar to North and South Korea. Well, let's get the latest from the ground in Ukraine where the Yulia Maurice and anti corruption corruption activist and former Ukrainian civil servant and analysis of Biden's remarks in the U.S. stance on the conflict with Scott Lucas, adjunct professor at the Clinton institute at the university college Dublin. First of all, let's remind ourselves of what Biden actually said. A dictator bank on rebuilding an empire will never erase the people's love for liberty. Brutality will never grind down the wilder degree. Ukraine will never be a victory for Russia for free people refused to live in a war with hopelessness and darkness. We will have a different future, a brighter future, rooted in democracy and principles. Hope and light of decency and dignity of freedom and possibilities. For God's sake, this man can not remain power. Scott, those last 9 words there, they sparked a global uproar for God's sake this man can not remain in power. We'll almost immediately The White House made an attempt to defuse the statement. Can you just run us through what happened? I mean, was that comment unscripted and how's it been road back? Yes, the comment was unscripted. Because Joe Biden was saying the quiet part out loud. And the quiet part out loud is that, you know, this is very much Vladimir Putin's invasion. It's very much his ongoing decision to try to conquer most of Ukraine. Including the killing of civilians. And that a person like that should not stay in power. The reason why it was rolled back by The White House to say this is not regime change is because Iraq 2003 is still very vivid memory for many people, where regime change failed. And because the U.S. and the international community bungled Syria, where Russia intervened and killed tens of thousands of civilians. Because they weren't sure what to do about president Assad. I think it's important to note a couple of things, however, first is those words should not overshadow the rest of the speech. And the context in which it was given. If you listen to that clip that you're applying before he gives his impromptu statement, he's talking about the necessity for freedom and he's talking about how freedom was defended. During the Cold War and afterwards, as a marker for 2022, and he's doing it in a country Poland next to Ukraine, which was very much on the front line, very much in the mix. In terms of what freedom meant, which is why he was quoting at the start in the end of the speech, Pope John Paul the second. And I think it's the second thing to note, which is essential in this bubble is, is that at the end of the day, you know, pro Putin activists, including in the UK, and the U.S. and Western Europe will see on this to try to make Putin the victim rather than the aggressor. Putin will try to make himself the victim with the Russian people and mobilize support. He's not the victim. He's not the aggressor. He is the aggressor. It's the Ukrainian people who have been the victims here. And it's not Joe Biden who will make the final decision on this. It's not Vladimir Putin, who will make the final decision on this. It's the Ukrainian people. And the Russian people presumably. Well, you know, the Russian people, the line is on this is, look, it is up to the Russian people to decide what they want to do. Regarding their country and its way forward. And again, if you look at the rest of Biden's speech and indeed, if you look at the very important interview that president zelensky did with independent Russian journalists last night, I think a far more important statement, both men talked about that the necessity is for the Russian people to realize. That they have a choice here. They can bear the cost of the war that latter Putin has imposed upon them, as well as upon Ukrainians. They can bear that economic cost from a country that will become a basket case, including facing long-term international assumptions. They can bear isolation for much of the international community. Or in their way, they can mobilize, they can decide to speak out. Even at the risk that they face of being a prison for it, but they can decide in their various ways to say that this war should not stand whether or not that means Vladimir Putin should not stand anymore. Julia, if we could come to you, Vladimir zelensky has made some important concessions. I think we have to be clear here that the last decision about the Ukrainian status will be made by Ukrainian people not zelensky himself. I think he and his team is doing a great job. In a diplomatic field in defending Ukraine. But we have a long tradition of democracy in Ukraine. And we have a huge sentiment and support of the NATO direction. Among Ukrainian people right now, we have a huge support towards Euro integration right now in many cranian people and if neutrality means not to take this direction, then I have huge doubts that Ukrainian people will support the statues. Even if it ends the war, I don't think it will end the war. And Ukrainian people, we are not foolish after all of what happened. We know that Putin is not fighting because of the NATO status. That never was the reason. So playing by his rules, playing his game, will never end the war. And that's clear. Can you bring us up to speed on what's been happening over the last 24 hours on the ground? Because of course, all these conversations are taking place with Biden and the rest of it. But it's miles and miles away from actually where everything's happening..

Ukraine Vladimir Putin Russia Joe Biden U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blin Biden Luhansk White House Yulia Maurice Scott Lucas Clinton institute Putin Israel Poland livres president Assad Donetsk university college Dublin United Arab Emirates
"28%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:05 min | 9 months ago

"28%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Week for the latest insights and opinions from UBS all around the world. Finally, alongside the conventional warfare we are witnessing on the ground in Ukraine in cyberspace, a second will unconventional battle is being weighed, waged, and Josh Cole's a researcher at the University of Oxford's Internet institute is the man to tell us what is happening. Good morning, Josh. Good morning. So how is this parallel battle being waged? It certainly taking place on multiple fronts and in many, many different ways. So I think one evidence of the sign that the Internet is here as part of going forward is just how many different ways in which it is being weaponized, different aspects of the Internet are being used and abused in order to score points on both sides. One aspect of this is, of course, something we've been hearing a lot about in recent years, which is Russia's quite sophisticated use of disinformation designed to poison the well of political discourse and even elections across the west. And because of that, I think some of the larger networks such as Facebook and Google have now been a bit more prepared and ready for taking action when this has taken shape. So amongst the moves that they've made in Reese just in recent days has been to demonetize and sort of down rank the platforms such as Russia today that have previously made both a lot of money and got a lot of attention on their platforms. So that's a one step in the direction of trying to take on the narrative power if you like over Russian propaganda in the midst of the broader war. And now anonymous has started to get involved as well. That's right. So anonymous is somewhat shadowy, so called activist group. It's been around for many years now, operates online. And recently declared essentially cyber war on Russia on Thursday, again, in parallel to the violence that we're seeing on the ground. It's had many former victims in the past at this time, it seems that Russia is very much in the crosshairs of anonymous efforts. And it's doing many, many different things. It's currently claiming credit for having taken down many Russian state websites. So for example, the website and the Kremlin and other leading Russian departments. And there's even apparently hacked Russian state TV to force channels there to play pre Ukrainian content, which is quite an original way. I think of pushing back against Russia's Russian propaganda in its own country. And so this is a really interesting shift, I think, because where we might have expected it to be Russia on the front foot, both in Ukraine, of course, on the ground, but also inside the space. Actually, it's anonymous and its other anti Russian forces which are really seem to have taken the initiative and maybe in court Russia a little bit by surprise at least if the evidence of these attacks are to be believed. So another really interesting development in how this is taking shape on the digital side. How much difference could all this make? It is easy enough to see what a land war looks like, but online could the effect be even more powerful. I think we still have to defer to the power of guns and the power of missiles in terms of the effect on people's lives, of course. But one way in which this could make it a big difference going forward is the way this sort of augments the violence we're seeing on the ground in Ukraine from Russia. By really strengthening the power of those attacks. And so this is where I think there was a great fear around Russia's disinformation being able to sow Discord within Ukrainian populations and even within the westman lines about what should be done to about Ukraine maybe with the idea of these Western countries holding back from providing support through Ukraine. What they didn't see coming ironically is, of course, the Ukrainian resolve, but specifically the social media smarts of its very social media savvy president. Zelensky of Ukraine who seems to be an armed only with a smartphone has been able to really turn around the narrative of around what is going on in Ukraine. Refusing offers to leave the country and filming himself in central Kyiv in order to demonstrate that he is then he is fighting. That I think compared to the images of Putin at acres long tables in the Kremlin, it really paints quite a stark contrast. Josh, thank you so much for joining us on monocle 24. You're listening to the globalist and that's all we have time for today's program. My warmest thanks to all my guests for those joining us on the line from Ukraine and from Poland as well and from the Polish Ukrainian border and also to our producers patrons and Charlie filmer court are researchers Sophie monahan coombs and lilian fawcett and our studio manager Christy Evans. After the headlines, there's more music on the way, we will be updating you live on the headlines at the top of the hour to bring you all the latest from Ukraine and the world's reaction to it at midday London time tune in to the briefing where will we be having a half hour in depth look at all the events in the last few hours, including the imposition of sanctions and what's happening to the Russian financial markets at the moment as well. That's all for me, Eminem, and goodbye. Thank you very much indeed for listening. Bear in mind the globalist is back at 7 a.m., London time tomorrow. Hope you can join me for.

Russia Ukraine Josh Cole University of Oxford's Interne UBS Josh Reese Facebook Google Charlie filmer Sophie monahan coombs Kyiv lilian fawcett Christy Evans Kremlin Putin Poland London Eminem
"28%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:56 min | 9 months ago

"28%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"And in fact, the thing that has historically in an unprecedented way brought rather and strengthen western institutions is what he's done. So he has, by this action, taken us into a seemingly into a new era where states and institutions that weren't cooperating, I won't work in very effectively before. Are now working. It's quite remarkable. James, let's talk a little bit about Vladimir Putin. Bruce has mentioned his ability to unite his enemies in a way that has never been seen before, but let's talk about him as a person. I mean, physically, extremely isolated. He withdraws from the world when COVID comes along and we can only see by the size of the negotiating tables how much of a distance he wants to keep from other people. He is, is he still the one sole person from this one single figure from whom all this chaos is emanating? Because when he starts talking about having a nuclear option here, are there people around him who will stop him from pushing the button? Well, there may have been people around him who thought that this was a bad idea in the first place. I mean, one thing and we've talked about this before and the one thing I would love to know and probably won't know for about 20 years is where was the United States getting its intelligence from because those sources have turned out to be pretty much accurate and I wonder if this is idle speculation I don't know, but I wonder if there's somebody who was really, really privy to the plans who was leaking them in a hope of making trying to stop them happening. I do think though part of Vladimir Putin's genius in his first two decades in power, if that's the right word, which his ability to understand his constituency when he first came to power at the turn of the century. He understood what Russia wanted. He presided over economic growth, rising prosperity, largely due to oil prices, of course. And then afterwards has sought to reassert Russia's role on the world stage with wars in Georgia with the annexation of Crimea. I think though now who could be feel that after 20 years in a job like that, they've got any sort of touch with reality. When was the last time we went to a shop to buy a loaf of bread or a pint of milk? And I wonder too, if given the way that his political structures are, there is really very few people and maybe nobody who's willing to tell him it's the truth, and it's a bad idea, otherwise we might not be where we are. So I think he probably is isolated, and he has been very physically isolated during COVID to clearly very, very concerned about catching the virus. He was the stories of these plastic tunnels, people had to go through to meeting people had to go to isolation for ten days before any personal meetings and then we saw those sort of almost comically large tables. With people who wouldn't take a sort of a Kremlin approved PCR test before meeting him. So I think there must be a degree of isolation after being in that role for the last 20 years and particularly over the last two years. And how unpredictable does that make him? Given the fact that let's look at what's been happening in the last 12 to 24 hours. The European Union has banned any Russian planes from flying in airspace with a specific reference to oligarchs who are arguably the people who are sort of protecting cocooning Vladimir Putin. But looking at the markets today, the rubles drop by 28%. There is a very, very strong sense that Russia is being isolated properly now. This will be worrying people in Russia and I'll tell you why because this happened twice in the 1990s it happened in 1991 92 after the end of the Soviet Union people found their savings were pretty much worthless in 1998 Russia defaulted on its foreign debt and it was a run on the bank. So this is not this is not something that happens way back when this is something that really is within living memory of this concern about this. I mean, there's some really, really surprising figures. You mentioned the interest rates are going up to 20% the Russian stock market is not going to start trading until 3 o'clock this afternoon Moscow time and I've just seen that the governor of the Central Bank elvira now building it is supposed to be making a statement at 4 o'clock. So there is real danger of real economic turmoil in Russia. And when you have a very unstable situation with the very unstable president at the heart of it, who has already mentioned the nuclear option, how worried are we that actually the worst the situation gets the less stable Vladimir Putin becomes that he will do something which is much more serious? And I think we've had a lot of shocks and surprises over the last few days, but I think it's worth bearing in mind there is no, it's not as if there is an opposition ready to take power in Russia. One of the system that Putin has built up over the last 20 years relies entirely upon him, there may be people who will be willing to say to him actually, I think it'd be a good idea if you moved on, but I don't think they're willing to say that yet. It is still early days. There is every chance that the Russian army given its size will prevail in Ukraine, but as I said, it's very surprising that it clearly I would imagine it's not at all going to plan. So I think we're a bit away from that, but as I say, things have happened in a very unpredictable way in the last few days and it wouldn't be the first long-term leader who suddenly when things start going drastically wrong is gone from power in a surprisingly short space of time. I don't think we're there yet, though. James Rogers, thank you so much for joining us in the studio. My thanks also to rest dim and to Olga to karaoke joined us on the line from Ukraine. Still to come on today's program, we get the view from the Polish Ukrainian border and we take a look at what the European papers have to say this morning. Stay with us. On the globalist on monocle 24. UBS has over 900 investment analysts from over 100 different countries. Over 900 of the sharpest minds and freshest thinkers in the world of finance today. To find out how it could help you. Contact us at UBS dot com. 8 28 in Warsaw 7 28 here in London for the first time the European Union will buy and ship weapons to a third party to Ukraine. And Germany appears.

Vladimir Putin Russia Crimea Bruce Central Bank elvira James Georgia United States European Union Soviet Union Moscow Ukraine Russian army Putin James Rogers Olga UBS Warsaw
"28%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

08:04 min | 11 months ago

"28%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Begin in Kyiv today, while much of the focus of the past weeks has been on the possibility of a full scale Russian invasion of Ukraine, the reality is that the country has been fighting Russian back forces in the east for nearly 8 years, but beyond that, it is also faced a so called hybrid war, a battle of disinformation and continuing efforts to destabilize Ukraine from within. Monica's page Reynolds and Chris chermak spoke with Aaliyah Chandra, an expert on hybrid warfare, and the editor in chief of Euro medan press, an English outlet founded after the 2014 maidan revolution, they began by asking Elia where most of the information is coming from. It comes from many places and of course Ukraine is very vulnerable because it is close to Russia and it is very easy to penetrate for Russian influence in many, many ways. I'm also an author of a report. It's called the circle leaks. Which was published in russi institute together with British and P bob ceiling. And there we examine exactly how Russia does this in Ukraine, how did during 2014 2016 based on leaked emails of Putin's aid vladislav circle. So with the Ukraine, Russia operates through very various agents of influence. And these agents they can be very versatile and very different. They can range from people who really believe in the Russian world and they want Ukraine to fall back into Russian influence and surrender its sovereignty. They can also include people who are just willing to make a few bucks. They just implemented as a project and get paid from the kumlin. They're also politicians that like Kremlin money in order to promote their political agendas. There are media outlets and don't have very good ethics and they take money to cover these, for instance, pro Russian rallies that take place. So during all of these years, are media outlets the honest media outlets. They have a good feeling for what is a real protest and what is really a fake protest. What is a protest that where they're just fake protesters that are paid that are holding up signs that are have been mass printed and what just doesn't look real that just looks like part of Russia's efforts to create a virtual reality. But the other media outlets that cover these things, they probably just get paid for the Kremlin, and that way they amplify this. This narrative. Well, for instance, in the circle of leaks, there was this very great detail. The worst covered a series of protests near the American embassy in Q where people just protested against so called American interventionism, where against external control stop creating the war here and et cetera et cetera. These are all Russian narratives that Russia is pushing in order to present the war in Ukraine, not as something that Russia created. But as something that somehow international powers were managed to create. They are part of the Kremlin's virtual reality that aims to show that, oh yes, look, look at that Ukrainians are protesting American intervention. And when it gets amplified by these Kremlin paid TV channels, then of course, landfalls of this rally is greatly enhanced. You did mention also there, the manipulation of the west, if you will. And one aspect of that has been all of these western intelligence reports coming out of the U.S. and the UK suggesting that an invasion is imminent, including the UK, for example, suggesting that there is a coup that is being planned in Kyiv using pro Russian politicians in Ukraine. What do you make of those kinds of intelligence analyses from the west? Are they helpful? Are they overly hyped? Are defense officials? They say that creating mass panic is exactly what the Kremlin wants. And our officials, including the ministry foreign affairs there have been critical of the decision of UK and U.S. embassies to withdraw their staff. And they say this is creating more panic. I do not see these military reports of the officials of what their western intelligence agencies are using. So I can not judge, but I can only say that by the logic of the hybrid war. Russia does not need to just occupy Ukraine. It needs to make Ukraine take a political concession. It needs to arrive in a situation where Ukraine comes back to the Russian sphere of influence. And a full occupation is not how you do that. Because it will be just a very long drawn out guerrilla war that will just lead to Russia's isolation from the west. I mean, everybody who's hesitating with sanctions, they will have no choice basically after this full scale invasion. So I don't see how it could work out actually. And many military analysts concur. But regarding this coupe, it's actually interesting that it just fits so much into this logic of the circa leagues that we analyzed because indeed Russia has put its beds on many politicians, pro Russian politicians, and they don't have to be major politicians. No, so he is sort of a marginal figure. But it is quite possible that Russia is working with him among the many, many plans that Russia is working on. So we must understand this is not like a foolproof 100% education of what Russia was doing, but it's very likely that they have been developing this plan. And second, it's very worrying actually that Maria's mentioned because Morris is from car cable list. So after the year right on evolution, there was like a series of pro Russian protests. That's sprung up in southeastern Ukraine. We know that these were paid for by Russia. They were organized by Russia because of leaked intercepts of conversations of Russian officials. They were published by your security service. And also, from the circle leaks, we see that the two main obelisks that Russia was targeting was odes and carcanos. There were the old lists that Russia thought could have the most support for such a narrative. And actually in car cable list in 2014 during all of these protests was one of the few obelisks where a Russian tricolor flag was actually hoisted above the state administration and Russian national climbed up there and hoisted it there. Well, that he was able to do what tells about the scale of the protests and that it was very, very vulnerable spot. And Russia kept working with this region, actually. And among the plans that we know were being discussed in circles office was also an invasion plan for Harvard takeover of another Ukrainian region. And it was actually well developed plan with the price list of how they would manage to just subvert it by finding agents in the law enforcements that would work for them, finding pro Russian people and all of these force agencies that would be willing to facilitate this takeover. So, you know, it's just underscores this information from the UK that's brush and might be planning not for a full scale invasion of Ukraine, but for something some other operation that is meant to destabilize Ukraine to weaken Ukraine even more to re given more heloc. We've seen in the last so a few weeks, this sort of showing of support from western governments, we've seen the arrival of defensive weapons. We've seen quite a lot of rhetoric in terms of what kind of defense western governments are willing to give tangibly or in terms of the hot war. Do you think it would be more useful for governments in the west to be more coordinated and to help with disinformation efforts? Do you see in the same kind of help in that hybrid warfare as we do in this kind of hot water? One of the points of Russia's operations right now is to test what the west would do if a full invasion was to come. Let's testing the resolve of the west react basically. And this is just I'm not making this up this is part of the Russian hybrid military. Dog train that's one of the classic harbored war operations you move your troops and see how the opponent will react. Just like sort of probe the waters..

Ukraine Russia Chris chermak Aaliyah Chandra Euro medan press russi institute bob ceiling Kyiv Elia ministry foreign affairs UK Reynolds Putin American embassy Monica U.S. Kremlin Morris Maria
"28%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:47 min | 11 months ago

"28%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Portuguese voters will go to the polls on Sunday after only two weeks of campaigning as stipulated by election law. Well, I'm joined by Monica 24 producer and presenter and also Portuguese citizen carlota rabello, carlotta, welcome to this side of the glass. One day. Hello, Georgina. Now for decades, Portugal has been dominated really by two political forces. Tell us a little bit more about that. Yeah, so since the carnation revolution in 1974, we're talking about 48 years this year. The Portuguese government has largely been dominated by either the center left. This is the Socialist Party or the center right, the social Democrats. Of course, with true out all these years with coalitions with other partners with smaller parties, but largely its safe to say that these two parties have dominated the Portuguese government. Now, the socialists have an empower for the last 6 years. They didn't get a majority, they were closed, but they didn't get a majority. And instead of entering what we can describe as a formal traditional coalition, they entered a parliamentary agreement. So basically, the left block and the Portuguese Communist Party, which are left, left parties. They said, okay, we want put up our ministers to be part of the government. We want enter coalition like that. But will do parliamentary agreement where we will support the motions by the government, therefore acting as if the more or less had a majority because the MPs of these parties would vote with the government in most proposals. So that's more or less how the country has been running for the past 6 years. Obviously, COVID happened, which is something that no one could predict expect or even begin to know how to manage. And the budget for this year had to be passed at the end of last year. And over a few differences of opinion, the despite the fact that this was described at the time by experts and analysts in Portugal as one of the most left leaning and really socialist budgets proposed in years, this didn't satisfy the criteria that the other partners on the left needed. They said it didn't reflect what the views of their electorate. And to a bit of a shock really, they sided with the right in voting against the budget, therefore, the president had to trigger early elections. And that's why we're having this elections ahead of schedule. Now, as we know, parties are only allowed to campaign for two weeks. The election is coming up on Sunday. How have these final days of campaigning been going? They've been quite intense, so it's been a traditional going up and down the country. Obviously, with restrictions still in place, the traditionally flag banner waving rallies at the parties would have are not happening. But they've been traveling party leaders and party representatives across the country promoting their messages and asking voters to support them. We started the campaign with television debates, and then they went off on the road. Now the past couple of days polls really have changed quite significantly. At the beginning of last week, we saw ten point difference between the socialists and the social Democrats at the end of the week. It was more or less four or 5 point difference, which can forward in what's described as a technical margin. So it can really not be a difference at all, because it falls within that margin of error. And then it swung back again. And the latest polls that we got on Tuesday this week shows a difference of around 5 .6 percent between them with the socialists having 36.6% of the voting intentions. And the social Democrats with 30.9%. So it's still quite close because if we assume the margin of error is four or 5% is really just a two point lead. So it really is going to the result is really going to be anchored more than anything in how many people actually turn up to vote. When we had the presidential elections also through the pandemic here years, I guess in one of these many months, we had one of the lowest turnouts ever. So it really is going to hench on that. How many people actually get out to vote? And how serious is the threat from the far right? It is serious but not life threatening. I think that's the best way to put it. There's no chance there will become government at least not in their selection cycle. But the big question is just how big of a jump they're going to have. Last time we Portugal went to the polls for the legislative elections. The far right party got one member of parliament elected. Its leader. It's highly expected that they'll go way beyond that number now. And their whole campaign hasn't even been on electors so we can change the country and be government is we're going to become the third biggest political force in the country, vote for us so we can basically become the second opposition. And that it's what it can be tricky. That's thirds political force spot has either been held by CDS, which is also on the right, has been in coalition of the social Democrats in the past. So not an extreme right, just right. Or with the left. Also parties that then were into this parliamentary agreement with a socialist..

Portuguese government carlota rabello Portuguese Communist Party Portugal carlotta Georgina Socialist Party Monica government parliament
"28%" Discussed on The Pelvic Floor Project

The Pelvic Floor Project

07:55 min | 1 year ago

"28%" Discussed on The Pelvic Floor Project

"This is coming from and why raise i'm gonna make sure to lancashire knox. I love the book by stephen. Hodges the pediatric urologists called event. I'm gonna make sure the legs are every parent should read that. Just to understand the urinary system that the defecation system just so that you understand it. Because yup i'll never forget this one client. I had the She came into me at. I'm getting guest. This was a while. We're all the details. But i wanna say around thirty years old and she said my battles run. My life can't have a relationship can't do anything but work from home and she said ever. Since i was a child i was always planning toilet and i nobody. Everyone just teased me in my family. And i didn't realize until i went to university that you should poop more than once every two weeks. She's i thought that was normal. Then i started seeing my roommate's go to the have abou- almost every day. And i thought something but i realized i was horrendously octa and i now. She's having all sorts of issues that she she couldn't into Get to the bottom of it. Definitely a journey to understand her body. But i wonder because i think what i wanna talk a little bit now is treatment Because most people just think constipation equals. Laxatives or constipation equals animas or the people who adopt wait till i really undock basically and then just hours at all out so totally. Can we talk a little bit. Obviously we'll get to what we what we do is ios but yeah maybe if you talk a little bit about some of the main things that you've heard your clients are doing to treat their constipation. So a lot of people say that. They increase their fiber intake. Which actually sometimes can be damning. So you wanna be really careful again finding the why not just going. Oh let's just increase your fiber. Like i hear that all the time and it's scary. I can understand that it it. It's often recommended so it's not you know it's it's not for lack of trouble like trying to find a solution but sometimes the solution like again white swiping. Everybody with the same brush is not going to be the primary. Sort of treatment straights Because the why isn't being fully understood. Now there's a lot of things that will come with understanding the why so trying to figure out you know. Okay what's on looking at motilal looking at all these other things but we won't get into that but in terms of treatment. Yes you know. Of course the water. The You know i would say in nutritionally valuation checking to see how you are nutritionally and and if you are meeting your needs rate and demands appropriately if there is any underlying intolerance or allergy. How are your hormones especially on the female side of things like you know how are your periods. And do you noticed cyclical stock with your periods and or other stressors so life stress. Are you sleeping. While like all of those things are gonna really hugely impact And potentially when addressed improve your bowels When we look at kids and stuff on your there's tons of different things that that obviously can be done to support you know we're looking at defecation dynamic so like You know what is the pelvic floor. How does it work with the diaphragm. You know postures on not talking perfect postures. I'm just talking like different postures to help support breathing for pelvic floor. Relaxation sitting on towels balloons. sitting on You learn how to blow bubbles learning how to breathe breathing techniques positional positions on the toilet You know all of those things really important and then of course you get into the bowel schedules and hygiene scott like issues. Managing that and the fluid intake being of course scheduled them the timed voiding schedules and keeping track of it. Make sure that you are maybe hopefully improving and finding changes getting bristol. Still chart printed off so dr hutches website and can actually downloaded child-friendly one printed off inhabit. Laminated that's what i have in my home and You know working on You know with Public physio for adults that is trained in understanding and getting to the y. On and then of course for kids you have to work with someone who has education In pelvic floor physio for kids because it's not same as treating adults at all Ideological movement kind of treatment based stuff So release work learning how to manage yourself because this is the primary thing. This is a lifestyle change in shift possibly. So what do you need to manage yourself on a daily basis. So the release were the mobility stretching the exercise in the importance of exercise. And what that is for that person. People don't wanna run or they don't wanna go for long walks. So what did he enjoy movement wise And then of course You know if laxatives come into the conversation of course you have to have an understanding of that and training behind back but knowing what is recommended for different like the different stool tights. So a tight You know how much i type one versus a take two the type three to help improve the stools and knowing the difference between the different laxatives And you know Peg in the kids and so it it that's the complexity piece of that rage and making sure that they are. You are working with other medical practitioners to support that side of things to right not just You know Guestimation and. I think if everything that you've said like we always talk about treating the whole person and if you pick out of this person coming in and picturing sal for example sitting there and saying the rarely do people come in and say. I'm here because i'm constipated. I mean i always ask yet. They filled up their whole life. Story i but then. I say tell me what brings you in and i would say. It's often like yeah A diocese is bothering me. I'm the king. I have prolapsed i have rights. They come in with a something. That's bothering them in effecting. That you've life and constipation is usually something that comes secondary. Obviously we're we're screening. They don't see it as a relationship between there yet that they're coming in for but are using we ask is because the the constipation is in very likely contributing to your symptom so then. I think it's our job as physios to explain that this is more than just.

Hodges knox stephen allergy scott
"28%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"28%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"But I think that everybody who is going understands that this is not a particular snub to cop 26, he hasn't actually left China since February of 2020. He didn't go to the United Nations. He delivered a message by video link both on both occasions. He isn't going to G 20 in Italy in Rome, which is regarded as a key precursor event to cop 26. And he didn't even go to kunming to open a cop 15, which is the biodiversity cop, conference of the parties, which China was hosting he delivered that also by video link. So it noticed though he'd been getting around the world glad handing everyone but those who will attend cop 26. He just hasn't budged. And so it's very, very unlikely that we will see being in person. And what's unfortunate about that? Is that although Biden and Xi Jinping have met in the past, they haven't met since Biden was elected. They've talked on the telephone. They have a scheduled virtual summit before the end of the year. But that's sort of the warming of the personal relationship can't happen virtually, and that is a pity, because on occasion, on big moments for the world, personal chemistry has changed things. Thinking of the meeting in Reykjavík between the USA and the USSR, which triggered major arms control. So it can happen. It's not going to happen in Glasgow, however. But, you know, a lot of other things can happen in Glasgow, and I think that it's not the end. It's not the end of the process that Xi Jinping is not there. How much does that allow the other difficulties to worsen when it comes to the relationship between China and the U.S.? It's only a matter of hour since Joe Biden told Southeast Asian nations at the U.S. will stand with them in defending freedom of the seas. The new U.S. ambassador to Beijing has already said that China is the United States biggest competitor. It doesn't set things on a any kind of remotely hopeful footing, does it? There is quite a lot of shall we say unfortunate language in the run up to cop 26, one could add to that list, the fact that the Brits have made it very clear that the Chinese are going to be squeezed out of contracts to build nuclear power stations in the United Kingdom, which the Chinese were very keen on. They put a lot of money into point C and they were very much hoping that they could have the experience of going through the British regulatory process, which is a kind of kite mark for power stations for their own model power station, which would mean that they had a much easier time selling it in the rest of the world and just this week. It has been made very clear that that's not going to happen. So there are a whole bunch of things that are negative factors in the relationship of China, both with the United Kingdom and with the European Union and with the United States, slightly on the positive side the trade talks that the U.S. and China have been holding whilst as I think robust, which means they didn't actually come to blows. Pragmatic candid and constructively were called. So that's a fairly fairly strong language in diplomatic terms. But the readout from both sides was rather more positive than, you know, talks on almost anything have been with the U.S. and China for several months. So given that the first phase of the trade agreement has not been a great success. That's the one that Trump negotiated and it comes to an end in January. There is room for some improvement there. But I think that in geo strategic terms, we're in for a long confrontation with dangerous flashpoints and we're going to have to learn ways of living with and managing that. Perhaps the direct conversations between Biden and Xi Jinping will at least put management systems in place. So we don't find ourselves in a live fire fight because of an accident. But none of that is going to is going to be in place, I think, before cop, which is which is imminent. Isabel Hilton, thank you so much for joining us on Monica 24..

China U.S. Xi Jinping Biden Reykjavík Southeast Asian nations Glasgow kunming United Nations Rome USSR Italy Joe Biden United Kingdom Beijing European Union Trump Isabel Hilton Monica
"28%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"28%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"Italian <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Music> <Speech_Male> <hes> archery <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> talk about <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> day. Galley <Speech_Female> also won the <Speech_Music_Female> first ever autry <Speech_Female> gold for italy. <Speech_Female> He went on to <Speech_Female> win another for the <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> team event at london. <Speech_Music_Female> Two thousand twelve. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> But i didn't <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> see him when that <Speech_Music_Female> truth be told <Speech_Music_Female> i never <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> really followed autry again <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> but for <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> that day in two <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> thousand and four. I <Speech_Music_Female> was a huge fan <Speech_Music_Female> of the sport. <Speech_Female> Those who are into <Speech_Female> watching these <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> smaller events at <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the olympics will understand <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> what i mean <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> intense glimpse <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> into a passion <Speech_Female> nurtured and trained <Speech_Female> away from the <Speech_Music_Female> spotlight. At <Speech_Music_Female> least most of the time <Speech_Music_Female> can give viewers <Speech_Music_Female> an outside <Speech_Music_Female> sense of <Speech_Music_Female> meaning and purpose <Speech_Music_Female> so <Speech_Female> bring on the shot put <Speech_Female> the hammer throwing <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and discus <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> will always <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> make time for them <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> for <SpeakerChange> monaco. Twenty <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> four. i'm <Music> <Advertisement> mala. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Thank you very much gary. <Speech_Male> We were just talking <Speech_Male> here in the studio <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> about how each <Speech_Male> country has a very <Speech_Male> different focus <Speech_Male> when it comes to the <Speech_Male> olympics. And what they're <Speech_Male> watching. I personally <Speech_Male> remember being stuck <Speech_Male> in the uk <Speech_Male> watching curling <Speech_Male> for <Speech_Male> for hours <Speech_Male> upon hours when the <Speech_Male> uk was doing fantastically <Speech_Male> well <Speech_Male> and couldn't get <Speech_Male> anything else on the days <Speech_Male> before streaming <Speech_Male> natalia. <Speech_Male> What about you what. What have <Speech_Male> you been watching. What <Speech_Male> are some of the more obscure <Speech_Male> sports that. <Speech_Male> Catch <SpeakerChange> your eye <Speech_Female> well. This <Speech_Female> year <Speech_Female> there have been new. <Speech_Female> Sports and peru <Speech_Female> that <Speech_Female> is not particularly <Speech_Female> olympic. <Speech_Female> nation has been <Speech_Female> aiming for both <Speech_Female> skateboarding <Speech_Female> and surfing. <hes> <Speech_Female> managed to get <Speech_Female> quite high up but <Speech_Female> didn't quite make <Speech_Female> it and it was <Speech_Female> very fun <Speech_Female> to see these new <Speech_Female> sports and also have <Speech_Female> been following the debate <Speech_Female> on on <Speech_Female> soccer football <Speech_Female> and how it should <Speech_Female> be <Speech_Female> adapted or <Speech_Female> nod of <Speech_Female> the big stars are not. <Speech_Female> They're interesting <Speech_Female> to see some of <Speech_Female> the upsets with tennis <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> gymnastics. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> just like watching the <Speech_Male> sports. That i <Speech_Male> do not spare a <Speech_Male> single thoughtful <Speech_Male> for most <Speech_Male> of every four <Speech_Male> year cycle. I got massively <Speech_Male> into the sprint <Speech_Male> canoeing. The rio <Speech_Male> olympics for some reason. <Speech_Male> I'm not sure whether i <Speech_Male> can go through all that <Speech_Male> again. It gets <SpeakerChange> quite tense <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> under old-fashioned. <Speech_Male> I'm afraid and <Speech_Male> i <Speech_Male> you know i was listening today <Speech_Male> to they. Were talking <Speech_Male> about the surfing <Speech_Male> and the <Speech_Male> The skateboarding <Speech_Male> and i'm thinking <Speech_Male> and bmx. <Speech_Male> Biking i think <Speech_Male> the olympic <Speech_Male> sports i'm sorry and <Speech_Male> and when when <Speech_Male> when the <hes> paris <Speech_Male> olympics come <Speech_Male> up next. <Speech_Male> This irving <Speech_Male> is going to be in tahiti. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> And that's not really <Speech_Male> bringing together <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> paris. And i will <Speech_Male> say just before <Speech_Male> we go. The <Speech_Male> stephen deal <Speech_Male> cynicism there <Speech_Male> about the bmx racing. <Speech_Male> If anybody hasn't <Speech_Male> watched it is entirely <Speech_Male> misplaced. <Speech_Male> That is mesmerizing <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> In somebody <Speech_Male> seems to have sat <Speech_Male> down <Speech_Male> and thought let's think <Speech_Male> of a sport which <Speech_Male> will maximize <Speech_Male> the chances of <Speech_Male> fracturing the skulls <Speech_Male> of every single participant. <Speech_Male> In it <Speech_Male> it's fabulous <Speech_Male> to watch and i believe <Speech_Male> it starts on saturday. <Speech_Male> That is <Speech_Male> all for this edition <Speech_Male> of the monocle. Daily <Speech_Male> a big thanks to our guest <Speech_Male> today. Natalia severe <Speech_Male> pereira. Stephen <Speech_Male> deal Suzanne <Speech_Male> lynch in washington <Speech_Male> dc and of

olympics italy uk olympic london gary gymnastics soccer tennis football paris tahiti Natalia pereira Stephen Suzanne washington
"28%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"28%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Following the massive chemical explosion at the port of beirut on the fourth of august in twenty twenty a number of glass artifacts once housed in the archaeological museum of the american university of beirut which would damage in the blast. Also be restored. James fraser who's curator for the ancient vanson anatolia at the british museum. Which will undertake. The work joins me now to tell us more. Thanks so much for coming in james. It's always lovely to see somebody across the table in person Tell us about the process of finding these shattered items amongst the rubble. I mean what's bits of recent glass. And what's an ancient artifact. How do you. How do you tell that's a really good question on. This is what we're doing in the british museum. These are our colleagues who of acuity is in the conservatives at the oculus museum at the american university of bayreuth and i had the job of going into the museum die off to the explosion and just saying what damage had been done to the museum and one of the things that they found apart from all the infrastructure damage which ripped through by route. Was that a case. Display case of seventy four gloss vessels running classical elliot's lemme periods had been blown off the wall by an force of the explosion. Imagine a you know. A case of seventy four fragile allows vessels just being smashed on the stone floor and so they then had to very carefully go through this mixture of broken gloss from the vessels pro plus broken glass from the display case plus broken glass from the surrounding windows and Stopped to do the first of working at what goes where And so how then have had. They focused on which pieces will be restored. Unfortunately of those seventy four vessels Most will probably damage to restore which is real tragedy but What they've been looking at is to say you. What what fragments. They can put together because the glasses might be different. Sizes different colors and by grouping like fragments would like fragments. They can start to imagine. Say you've got seventy four puzzles and you mix all always paces from the different puzzles together. The first thing you want to do is workout which paces go which puzzle box. And so as they're doing that realized that this at least eight vessels with a probably good enough pieces to put back together into the original puzzle. And that's why you've come in and that's where we says eight pieces have been or will be transported to the purchase museum. What happens then. Once they get to the british museum they go to al conservation lab and this is really wide british museums. Able to help. Because we've got such a great Conservation and the expertise of conservatives to go with it so this is really highly technical work so those vessels will go into a conservation lavar conservatives will make an assessment and although the first date has been done in lebanon the reconstructive surgery if you like and they will then start to to assemble those fragments together. Listen funded this has being funded by the european arts foundation. They have a funding grant. Kula museum restoration grant so we applied to them as the british museum but as a collaborative project with the archaeological museum by route on a very generously funded it and that's the allows us to bring the the broken vessels to london. Do those conservation work which is very timely. And then of course. The complete vessels back to byron to be displayed. Where will the archaeological museum be restored. Fortunately the rest of the archaeological museum is relatively untouched. There's been a lot of infrastructure damage across the entire city of course but that's that's slowly being restored Once these vessels have been reconstructed. We hope to display them temporarily in the british museum and showcase this projects and of course they go back to lebanon where there will be on display permanently quickly before we go. How does this fit within the the larger project restoring beirut. It's one very small part of one very big problem. I mean by route apart from the explosion has got Hyperinflation which is why out of control so getting materials and getting different talks materials for cd. That's material poor because the explosion is really really timely. So it it gets towards the end james. Thank you very much indeed. That was james fraser from the british museum. And that's all for today's per gone. Thanks to our producer. Daniel bait alexis self and charlie film. Of course our researcher sophie monaghan coon's and our studio manager some impede with editing assistance from jack jurors after the headlines. There's more music on the way. The briefing is live at midday in london. And i'll return on the globalist at the same time tomorrow. I'm georgina godwin. Thank you listening. Monaco and ubs a proud to present. I'm nobel cause a book that celebrates more than half a century of the nobel memorial prize in economic sciences nobel calls gives an overview of the anti four winning laureates and their influence on global society. It builds excitement around economics by talking to the laureates and unpacking their theories from a pioneer in the field of the economic climate. Change to an israeli psychologist who changed the way we think about thinking the winners stories make an incredibly diverse read as well as real life case. Studies have applications of the prize winning theories. You'll find an illustrated history of global economics alongside a look ahead at what we can expect. Over the next fifty years you can discover the story of alfred nobel himself and the legacy of his awards on sale from october. Two thousand nine hundred monaco. Ubs.

british museum archaeological museum of the a James fraser oculus museum american university of bayreut beirut al conservation lab anatolia european arts foundation Kula museum elliot james lebanon james fraser alexis self charlie film sophie monaghan coon byron london georgina godwin
"28%" Discussed on Paul Pickett Podcast

Paul Pickett Podcast

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"28%" Discussed on Paul Pickett Podcast

"Milwaukee phoenix. I mean they both got kind of a big three. Because the audrey eyton is and i'm getting to that in a minute This audio andrei dane. 'cause the kings i mean you. Deondraye wants to the sides king screwed up because they could add luca dockage or trey young. It could add either one of those guys. I mean if you gotta you gotta trade out. Dr fox somewhere else. Are you got to move him to to guard so be it. 'cause dr fox ain't better trae young. You know so. I got the bucks beat the signs in the finals. They go to the finals. I just think the buffs experience them playing together longer as most of the core The fact that janas is a baton back. Mvp he's soup. I mean i know. Chris paul is hungry but i'm gonna take the big guy with a little guy day. The big superstar little superstar any day specially what is evacuate vp. Goddess chris. paul. I dunno chris policy but one. Ap i gotta check. I could be wrong. Could be wrong. But i don't know chris boswell. Adp so i got the buds beaten. Assigns the bucks go. And if the hawks go gets decides probably got the suns beat knobs. 'cause the pause experience trader limited this kings kings like kings toilet food up. I mean because you got deondraye number one. Marvin bagley went number two to the kings. Marvin is not panning out and see a chain as change of scenery. Make like really doing that. Much justice for. Marvin bagley is not the problem. That marvin back not getting enough touches in that like that. It's marvin bagley space floor. good enough. he's not a good of a defender. He's not as dominant as he wasn't college. We gotta stop acting like just 'cause you dominate college that you dominate the pros. I seen plenty guys dominate. College degraded college players. The great most of the greatest college players.

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