35 Burst results for "24%"

Amber Athey: Liz Cheney Is Going to Waste a Lot of People's Money

The Dan Bongino Show

01:31 min | 22 hrs ago

Amber Athey: Liz Cheney Is Going to Waste a Lot of People's Money

"So that federal money could be transferred into a presidential account So the fact that she didn't spend like ten or 13 of the 14 million in an effort to blanket the airwaves and win this seat tells me she had no intentions to win in this damn thing and has other office in mind Yeah I think that's a really good point Dan And look Liz Cheney and rich herself enormously when she was in Congress the latest reports say that she went into that seat with about $7 million in net worth and now she's worth about $40 million Now she's tucking away this money for a future presidential run So perhaps this was always the plan perhaps she never really wanted to be a real member of the Republican Party She thought she was too good for that and wants to elevate herself to be this sort of centrist like pro democratic hero is sort of how she's painting herself But she's going to be wasting a lot of people's money if she decides to run in 24 because she doesn't have a base There isn't anyone who actually likes Liz Cheney right now She is a useful tool for the Democrats They're taking advantage of her stupidity and Republicans are never going to accept her back into the fold She's basically like the modern day Evan mcmullin back from 2016 So this is just an exercise in vanity And she's going to learn pretty quickly that this loss in Wyoming has much broader implications than just that specific race

Liz Cheney DAN Congress Rich Republican Party Evan Mcmullin Wyoming
 Plan to end railroad contract dispute calls for 24% raises

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 1 d ago

Plan to end railroad contract dispute calls for 24% raises

"Could 24% raises end a railroad contract dispute I'm Lisa dwyer with the latest A special board appointed by president Joe Biden to intervene installed railroad contract talks has suggested the rail workers should get 24% raises and $5000 bonuses as part of a new agreement to avert a strike The board also recommends keeping the same basic health insurance plan but having employees take on a larger share of the cost through higher monthly premiums railroads and unions will use those recommendations as the basis for a new round of talks over the next month It remains to be seen however whether both sides can agree on the higher wages and find ways to address union concerns about working conditions If an agreement can't be reached by mid September federal law would allow a strike

Lisa Dwyer President Joe Biden
Do Senate Democrats Have Any Reason to Believe They Can Win?

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:07 min | 1 d ago

Do Senate Democrats Have Any Reason to Believe They Can Win?

"Senator Scott, our people on the Hugh Hewitt radio program are very in the weeds about the mechanics of winning. As the head of the NRSC, you are in charge of making sure we take back the Senate. Are people are people who are concerned because the regime narrative is that we're in trouble in Georgia with Herschel Walker that we're in trouble in Pennsylvania with Doctor Oz. What's the NRSC doing to ensure that we win those crucial Senate seats? Well, Kurt here's where we are. We have great candidates. We've got wonderful individuals that have gotten through their primaries. They're clearly focused on running good races and representing their state. If you look at all over the country, it's actually all these states where we have competitive races. Biden is numbers are horrible. The democratic agenda is not well received. People shocking people don't like high inflation. They don't like to defund the police. They don't like critical race theory. They don't like the fact that there was a raid on a former president House of potential opponent in 24 to the existing administration. So, but we've got to do this as long as we raise our money and we get our message out. I think we have every reason to believe that we can get a majority.

Nrsc Senator Scott Hugh Hewitt Senate Herschel Walker Kurt Georgia Pennsylvania Biden House Of Potential
Kelly Tshibaka: Alaska Is the Foundation for the Nation

The Dan Bongino Show

01:45 min | 2 d ago

Kelly Tshibaka: Alaska Is the Foundation for the Nation

"Thought kind of a lighter note I have a very close friend husband and wife in the neighborhood here we hang out with a lot And we were recently we went to Jackson hole Wyoming and it was really an incredibly beautiful place and they said Dan it's great but they said I got to tell you Alaska you got to see as well I said really they said they did a little cruise at around Alaska sedan I have never seen anything like it and they've done a lot of traveling On Planet Earth Alaska they couldn't say enough about it It is so beautiful You've got to realize we're over the size of the state of Texas What we think of mountains in the lower 48 are hills to us in Alaska Our mountains are that big they're huge But most people don't realize Alaska is really the foundation or the piggy bank for the nation We feed the United States most fish on your menus are caught in Alaska We build the United States the logs you use for building your homes the wood it comes from the timber and Alaska or it did before Biden shut us down and you got to import it from Canada and elsewhere We power a lot America your fuel your gas it comes from here except they shut us down We create America all the minerals you need for your phones your tablets your gadgets and gizmos your electric cars they could come here but now they're having us mine over in China And one of the front lines of national security for America we're the further state east not just north and west but we're closest to Russia More close to China and North Korea Indonesia we could be the front lines of national security the second Pentagon with is and years up over the east because that's how close we are Russia is our border state So if you're going to take out America the first thing you take out is Alaska which is why Joe Biden has launched more than 24 direct executive actions against our state because if you level Alaska you take out America

Alaska America Wyoming Jackson DAN Biden Texas China Canada Russia North Korea Indonesia Pentagon Joe Biden
The New York Post Need to Do Better When 'Shipping' Pete Davidson

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:21 min | 3 d ago

The New York Post Need to Do Better When 'Shipping' Pete Davidson

"Reading papers over the week, and I see this story. Pete Davidson and they show a picture of Pete Davidson holding Martha Stewart's hand. And they're insinuating like this could be the next romance and I'm going, what are they talking about? What? You know, it's a popular thing where Pete's gonna go next. I had said, maybe he'll go after that shit from you for you that sexy young blond chick, Sydney Sweeney. She does all the nude scenes in the sex scenes. That seems to be perfect match for him. She's like 24. He's 28. That could be good. But no, the New York Post actually floated the room with a Pete, Davidson, and Martha's Stewart. What is she 88? Not really, but of course they're not dating. There was a picture when you enlarge it and you see the whole picture without it being cropped, you see Pete has his arm locked in Kim Kardashian's elbow. And his right hand is holding Martha's hand. They were obviously at a party and all walking toward a certain part of the party. But the article chops came out and just shows Pete and Martha. Come on, do better. It's so embarrassing. You can't do stuff like that and make a story out of it.

Pete Davidson Sydney Sweeney Pete Martha Stewart Martha New York Post Davidson Stewart Kim Kardashian
Howard delivers playoff-clinching win for Liberty over Dream

AP News Radio

00:29 sec | 3 d ago

Howard delivers playoff-clinching win for Liberty over Dream

"The liberty earned a playoff birth with an 87 to 83 victory over Atlanta Natasha Howard scored 18 points including a three pointer that put New York ahead by four with 55 seconds remaining and a pair of free throws in the closing moments Stephanie dolson had 15 points and 12 rebounds for the liberty who finished the regular season 1620 but one 6 of their last 8 Ryan Howard had 24 points and 7 assists for the dream who missed the playoffs with a 14 and 22 record I'm Jane ferry

Natasha Howard Stephanie Dolson Atlanta New York Ryan Howard Jane Ferry
1 dead, 17 hurt in crash during fundraiser for fire victims

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 3 d ago

1 dead, 17 hurt in crash during fundraiser for fire victims

"Authorities in Pennsylvania say one person was killed 17 others injured when a car struck a fundraiser they were attending Saturday then the driver left and killed his mother State police identified the driver as 24 year old Adriana's Waldo sora Reyes He was arraigned Sunday on two counts of criminal homicide and denied bail They say he drove into a crowd and berwick that was raising money for victims of a fire that killed ten people earlier this month Police say Reyes was arrested shortly afterward in the beating death of his mother nearby the first funerals for the fire victims were held Friday and more were scheduled for Monday I'm Julie Walker

Waldo Sora Reyes State Police Pennsylvania Adriana Berwick Reyes Julie Walker
Agent: Rushdie off ventilator and talking, day after attack

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 4 d ago

Agent: Rushdie off ventilator and talking, day after attack

"The satanic verses author Salman Rushdie was taken off a ventilator and able to talk Saturday a day after he was stabbed while on stage about to give a lecture in western New York The 75 year old's agent confirms whose breathing on his own but remains in the hospital with serious injuries on Saturday 24 year old hottie mutal was in court pleading not guilty to attempted murder charges The judge denying the New Jersey man who was born in the U.S. to parents who emigrated from Lebanon bail prosecutors calling the attack targeted unprovoked pre planned the DA alluding to the fatwa as a potential motive That's the death threat and bounty on rushdie issued by Iran's leader in 1989 over the satanic verses and its depiction of the prophet Muhammad I'm Julie Walker

Mutal Salman Rushdie New York New Jersey Lebanon U.S. Iran Muhammad Julie Walker
Salman Rushdie: Author on ventilator and unable to speak, agent says

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 5 d ago

Salman Rushdie: Author on ventilator and unable to speak, agent says

"Author Salman Rushdie has been attacked on a lecture stage in New York State Rushed his agent says the writers on a ventilator after being stabbed in the neck and abdomen on a western New York stage where he was about to give a lecture the 75 year old rashti was flown to a hospital and underwent surgery after Friday's stabbing his agent Andrew Wiley says the writer has a damage liver severed nervous in an arm and an eye he was likely to lose Rushes novel the satanic verses drew death threats from Iran's leader in the 1980s Police have arrested the man who attacked the writer and identified him as 24

Rashti Salman Rushdie New York Andrew Wiley Iran
A Rather Suspicious IRS Job Posting That Has Since Been Deleted

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:05 min | 6 d ago

A Rather Suspicious IRS Job Posting That Has Since Been Deleted

"So yesterday, there was a job posting that someone found on the wet on the Internet. Now, it seems as if there's a lot of enthusiasm going on at the IRS right now. The IRS is really excited. They get 87,000 new IRS agents that would never have happened if we would have won the Georgia Senate runoff. There would have been blocked. But the IRS decided to post a job opening. Now remember, the IRS has a weird and bizarre amount of ammunition and bullets. They've been buying up ammunition all across the country. The IRS is now posting jobs that says the following. In order to get this job, you must adhere to the highest standards of conduct, especially in maintaining honesty and integrity. Okay. You must be able to work a minimum of 50 hours per week, which include irregular hours, and be on call 24/7, including holidays and weekends. Okay. Maintain a level of fitness necessary to effectively respond to life threatening situations on the job. Wow, wow wait, wait. The IRS? I mean, that audits people and tells people they're late on their taxes. That's weird. Continues. In order to get the job at the IRS, you have to be able to carry a firearm and be willing to use deadly force if necessary. This is it right here on screen. This is on the IRS's website, everybody. They just scrapped it as soon as we and many other Sean Davis, the great Sean Davis, started the publicize it. The IRS then says be willing and able to participate in arrests, execution of search warrants, and other dangerous assignments. That's the internal revenue services new job posting. 87,000 new IRS agents made possible by kyrsten sinema and Joe Manchin and Mark Kelly and Raphael Warnock, the house has to still vote on it, but the IRS is now advertising. You have to quote maintain a level of fitness necessary to effectively respond to life threatening situations on the job and carry a firearm. Again, this is these are the tax people.

IRS Georgia Senate Sean Davis Kyrsten Sinema Raphael Warnock Joe Manchin Mark Kelly
A Parody of an FBI Recruiting Commercial by Paul Shanklin

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:57 min | 6 d ago

A Parody of an FBI Recruiting Commercial by Paul Shanklin

"We now take you behind the scenes to a taping of an actual FBI recruiting commercial some months ago. You got me G man. Ladies and gentlemen, that was yesterday's FBI. Hi, I'm Jim Comey, head of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Sure, we used to go get the bad guys, but I changed all that to help the FBI take on a more meaningful role here in Washington. Now thanks to the leadership of president Obama, today's FBI has deeply engaged in political activism like here in our deep throat texting division. I hate Trump. More than you do, beautiful. Great job, struck. And our apology center is now second to none. We are deeply regret to go out. We are not a call from us to do better this is not our best promise. We promise those guys have to be on the ball 24/7 because when. Somebody please get the stupid say something phone, they they hung up, sir. Yep, probably for the best. Now, where was I? Never mind. Let's take it from the top. Join us the next time our secret hidden microphones take you behind the scenes. Well, welcome back to the Todd stars radio program. It's amazing what the our brand new addition to the Todd star's radio team, the great Paul shankman, parodies are emeritus of the Rush Limbaugh show. It's amazing what Paul can come up with. Well done, sir. You gotta laugh, folks. You gotta have a little bit of humor these days.

FBI Jim Comey Donald Trump Washington Barack Obama Todd Star Paul Shankman Rush Limbaugh Paul
The FBI Did All That... For What?

The Trish Regan Show

01:42 min | Last week

The FBI Did All That... For What?

"So we learned that a little more than 24 hours ago, the former president of the United States had his home Mar-a-Lago rated in Florida by the FBI. The search allegedly, now again, we don't know the full extent of this seems to be centered around whether or not he may have taken some classified materials when he departed the Oval Office. And the thinking was that they would then be in Palm Beach, Florida. And so the FBI was there to try and find them. This is kind of wild. What could he have possibly have taken? So that's one question, right? And that's one that Andrew mccabe, who I believe now works for CNN is out there asking mccabe who got fired by Trump from the FBI? So mccabe is asking these questions. A lot of people are thinking maybe could it be something more? We don't know. We don't know, but we know that there's some concern that not only have we just descended into banana republic territory, but in fact, this may be an overreach by our government. Now, again, we'll see where it all shakes out. We'll see what they have, but some judge signed off on this. And the last experience we had with a judge signing off on something to go after Donald Trump just happened to be that fake dossier. And you said to yourself, how could it be that our FBI wouldn't have investigated that more properly before asking a judge to sign off on that to actually spy on an American citizen? Well, now we're looking at a situation where a judge has authorized the search, the search of his home,

FBI Andrew Mccabe Mccabe Florida Oval Office Palm Beach United States Donald Trump CNN Banana Republic
Malcolm Nance Reminds Everyone That Warrants Are Lawful

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

01:53 min | Last week

Malcolm Nance Reminds Everyone That Warrants Are Lawful

"You know, warrants are executed every day. Hundreds by the FBI, the U.S. Marshals. You know, it means that law that judiciary has found adequate evidence in order to have your place searched waving the Fourth Amendment, right? Unlawful search and seizure. This is lawful search and seizure. And they can't wrap their heads around it. What they're really upset about is that laws are applying to Donald Trump and people like them. White people. And Malcolm, this is your area of expertise, national security. This is again none of us know all the details, but certainly the speculation is this is national security related. To get a warrant to raid the home of a former president, means, you know, this clearly was classified information as Joyce Vance just told us, I don't care what they say. They obviously didn't properly declassify it. They're trying to claim that now, but in order to get her do a raid, Malcolm talked to us a little bit about, you know, because obviously there's a lot of speculations. Are they selling the secrets to the Saudis to the Russians? Like, who knows, right? Oh God. Oh my God. Or they're documents which are implicate them in crimes that they classify. Yeah. You know? And they know that these documents are missing because there's a sequence of numbering one up numbering every one of those documents. And they're missing. And I understand, it wasn't 15 boxes they're looking for. 27? Yeah. I think 24, 27, 20 5 is what I heard this morning, but a lot. My understanding. They took 12 more. They were originally 15. They took 12 more boxes out of Mar-a-Lago so bring the total to 27. I'm sorry.

U.S. Marshals Joyce Vance Malcolm FBI Donald Trump
More Reactions To The FBI's Raid of Mar-A-Lago

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:51 min | Last week

More Reactions To The FBI's Raid of Mar-A-Lago

"Here's The Wall Street Journal editor. Well, first let me play a little audio because there's a lot of great audio on this yesterday. Let's start with senator Rick Scott on Fox business with degan McDowell, cut number 8. Well, first of all, it makes you mad. I mean, this is unprecedented. A former president potential opponent to Biden in 24 is house gets rated. We know the Biden administration targets their opponents. Merrick Garland's targets, democratic opponents. This is well, here's what needs to happen today. Separately, mayor Garland, Christopher wray, Joe Biden need to do press conference, take all questions, explain why they're doing what they're doing, what each of them knew when this should scare every American until we get answers. This should be, you should have unbelievable concern. I got more phone calls. Let's go over to Ted Cruz. Cut number 13. That's exactly right. What we've got to do is win control of the House and Senate so that we have the authority to engage in oversight. It was interesting that the director of the FBI was there for one round of questions. At the end of the round of questions, we were supposed to have a second round. He said, no, I got a plane to catch. I'm sorry I gotta go. He didn't want another round of questions as chuck grassley observed. Wait a second. You've got your own plane. The FBI has a private jet just for you, so you're playing to catch it. You just don't want to have any more investigation. We need serious oversight. We need accountability. The people who have been political and partisan need to be fired. And if they broke the law right, let's hear Marco Rubio say the same thing. Cut number ten. You know, an FBI raid looking for supposed classified documents is a ridiculous alibi. Unlike anyone else in the federal government, no president can be guilty of illegally handling classified information because a president has complete and final authority to decide whether something is classified or not.

Senator Rick Scott Degan Mcdowell Biden Administration Merrick Garland Mayor Garland Christopher Wray Ted Cruz Fox Business The Wall Street Journal Biden FBI Joe Biden Chuck Grassley Senate House Marco Rubio Federal Government
JJ and James Nitties Reminisce About Playing Slow Golf With Tony Romo

Fore The People

02:39 min | Last week

JJ and James Nitties Reminisce About Playing Slow Golf With Tony Romo

"We get there, and I can't remember who was first to hit. I think mitts hit it first, and it was way right. And I hit it infinity right. And Romo hits it. At least as far left as we hit it right to start this thing. And so now we got guys like all over the place. Well, they call each of us to the two to the T, whatever. We do our bullshit, practice swing hit, whatever we do. Flare went out there. They call him, and he's still like, he's on the cart path when they call him to hit. Like, usually all three guys are standing on the T when you're like ready to roll, right? He's on the car path, and he's got, I don't know, it was probably the tightest, the tightest band, whatever it, whatever the tightest band was, the black level. I know there are different colors, but the one where you can barely move your legs apart and he's doing like these hard freaking squats slash kegels slash, I don't know what you call them, but he's going up and down the cart path in a line before he even starts. So no practice doing any rips it off. You know how those things are a pain in the ass to get off anyway, like imagine wearing a golf shoes, like rips it off, then he gets to the first tee and hits it 50 miles left. Well, it was one of those holes, ninny, did you ever think we were going to finish that hole? No, I was like, has there ever been a group that's been put on the clock before they've completed one hole? We was standing up on the grain for at least at least 15 minutes and golf club time. That's so long. And he still had what? He stood and he was and JJ's pacing around. He's like, damn, this is a Connie show already. Oh, my relax mates all right. We're just getting started. He's now waiting for the group to hit off the next hole, which is a par three up right where he is. So now he's taking a drop off the path which he got a rules official took like 15 minutes he hasn't hit yet. We're like, we could have hit putted out. And but we didn't know if he was going to send some meteor over our heads while we were in the middle of the grain. Anyway, so then he finally drives down the fairway after all of this. He's like, hey boys, I'm going to hit now and then drives back over to his ball again. And now we're waiting for him to hit up up and bloody hit it a hundred yards short of the green, then we tip up, we're like this is crazy. So then we chip up, he finally hits it on the green, and now we're all on the grade, probably whatever. I think that teton was 8 24. It's probably like 9 a.m. by now. And then we'll somehow I made my part in JJ made his for a good bogey on the tent and yeah, so that was he too part of it and that was fun.

Romo Golf JJ Connie
China's youth face bleak job market as COVID slows economy

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | Last week

China's youth face bleak job market as COVID slows economy

"China's current job drought echoes the struggle of young people worldwide to find work in depressed economies but is especially sensitive politically in a year when president Xi Jinping is expected to try to extend his time in power China's unusually severe approach towards COVID-19 with repeated lockdowns has kept case numbers low but a social cost has sworn the economy shrinking in the three months ending in June and consumer spending plunging the official unemployment rate in June for people age 16 to 24 was almost 20% compared with 5.5% for all ages and that's expected to rise once the latest jobless graduates are taken into account they often come from urban families who are the biggest winners for China's economic growth and important source of political support the ruling party needs them I am Charles De Ledesma

President Xi Jinping Covid China Charles De Ledesma
Everything You Need to Know About the FBI Raid of Mar-A-Lago

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:04 min | Last week

Everything You Need to Know About the FBI Raid of Mar-A-Lago

"24 hour period we saw some of the most significant expansions of federal power ever. This is more significant than the creation of the Department of Homeland Security in 24 hours you saw to seemingly disconnected data points that are trying to achieve the exact same thing. You saw 87,000 new IRS agents approved by the U.S. Senate and you saw an armed raid of a former president and his home. What exactly happened yesterday? Well, Mar-a-Lago, for those of you that have never been there, it's a phenomenal spectacular property. I've had the blessing to be able to visit there a couple of times is the residents, not a property, is the residents of Donald Trump. It is his home. A hundred FBI agents showed up with weapons and a warrant that was signed by a judge we're still learning more about the judge because there's some information circulating about the judge saying that he might be connected to Jeffrey Epstein. We're going to get that confirmed. Shows up to Mar-a-Lago while he is in New York City. And walks out with 15 boxes, opens the safe, splinters the safe for what? The only action that could possibly justify that is if Donald Trump had an act of dirty bomb in the living room of Mar-a-Lago with an impending intent to try to blow up Miami. Or if Donald Trump was sex trafficking children via the Lolita express to some unknown island in the Caribbean. The idea of going in with armed federal agents, they knew exactly what they were doing though. This for weeks they were methodically planning this. Christopher wray knew about this raid when he was testifying smugly in front of the U.S. Senate. We even said last week on the program how smug and arrogant Christopher wray is, as he is in front of all the senators because he said, oh, you have no idea. Your boy's about to get rated next week. This was all planned.

Donald Trump Jeffrey Epstein U.S. Senate Department Of Homeland Securit IRS FBI Christopher Wray Lago New York City Miami Caribbean
Ukraine: Shelling hits town near Russian-held nuclear plant

AP News Radio

01:11 min | Last week

Ukraine: Shelling hits town near Russian-held nuclear plant

"At least three Ukrainian civilians have been killed and over 20 wounded by Russian shelling in the last 24 hour period including an attack not far from a Russian occupied nuclear power plant The office of Ukraine's president since the Russians have fired over 120 rockets from grad multiple rocket launchers At the southern town of which is across the dnieper river from Ukraine's largest nuclear power plant several apartment buildings and industrial facilities were damaged Meanwhile drones are playing a crucial role in Ukraine's military operations in the myco live region where shelling from Russia has been escalating in the recent weeks A Ukrainian reconnaissance team named fireflies operates out of a derelict house They jump back into the room following an explosion The leader who goes by the nom de guerre baton tells the AP his unit is using drones to monitor and combat any Russian attempt to seize more territory in the region I'm Charles De Ledesma

Russia Dnieper River Charles De Ledesma
"24%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:54 min | Last month

"24%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Today, so the Chancellor Rishi sunak who's often is often suggested that he might be someone to resign that this might then precipitate a crisis and ultimate crisis for Boris Johnson, but he was saying, you know, look, we all take responsibility for the by election results and he was determined to continue tackling the cost of living. It seems like lots of people are kind of throwing little snowballs and little stones down the slope and they're kind of hoping that an avalanche is going to happen, which is going to be the only thing that ultimately pushes Boris Johnson out, but you very much get the sense that we're not quite there yet, though it might happen. And that Boris Johnson certainly doesn't want to go. How big of a problem is Boris Johnson for the party at the moment? I think he is a problem certainly it is his own backbench MPs. Let's not forget that although he survived the confidence vote, a 148 of his own conservative MPs said they didn't want him to carry on as leader. So there's a lot of issues here that are causing in trouble. And some of the policies he's coming up is responses with, for instance, sending of asylum seekers to Rwanda, which is hit all sorts of legal obstacles. The trouble is that once it comes down to the character of the prime minister and people finding that a problem and his behavior and what he has done, that's something that's very difficult to change. A prime minister can promise to change their style, change the people around them and so forth. But if people ultimately think that your character is at stake, that's something that is fundamentally difficult to change. A terrorist, thank you for joining us. You are listening to the briefing on Monaco 24. It is 2016 in.

Boris Johnson Rishi sunak Rwanda Monaco
"24%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:02 min | Last month

"24%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"If NATO still determined to stay out of the conflict, what will be on the table there? Everyone's kind of awaiting this NATO summit in Madrid next week indeed and Ukraine will be a major topic. Either directly or actually indirectly. That's the usual suspects on the agenda, of course, which is deterrence of Russia, hence NATO's capabilities on its own territory towards the east. And continuous support for Ukraine. But NATO has always made it very clear and everyone knows that and this will stay that NATO troops, for example, NATO, whatever equipment will not be directly used or committed to Ukraine. So it's about this delivering weapons to the Ukrainian army, which has shown that it's very capable to use this equipment that is the ultimate goal. NATO is obviously very wary of any further escalation of the conflict in terms of spreading to neighboring countries and we've seen that already that with latest dispute around Kaliningrad, where Lithuania tightened the restrictions of traffic that can go through Kaliningrad, this Russian exclave. That there's a very big worry that things could escalate. So NATO stays out, but let's be fair, Putin already considers himself in a war with NATO. He can define this kind of conflict, however he likes, but NATO is quite adamant to make its own red lines very clear. A lot of you mentioned that weapons are needed yesterday. There's a lovely press report that a Ukrainian politician and TV personality says an online fundraising pitch aimed at helping Ukraine by three offensive drones raise over $10 million in 24 hours. Is that the case and are we seeing Ukrainians actually coming together to do a lot more of this themselves? Well, we're not only seeing Ukrainians come together and do it themselves. The international support from the corporate world is also quite impressive. Just the other day, a Ukrainian organization called the povidone received permission to actually import arms. It's a humanitarian organization, a non governmental organization that now has gotten that green light and is working closely with western states. So it's and we're also seeing a movement towards the development of an Iron Dome because it had a Ukraine skies been closed. This never would have happened. This disaster would have never happened. And now, because Ukraine's partners, including Israel, were having a very difficult time admitting that Ukraine needs something like an iron zone. They're working on it. They're creating these engineers from numerous countries, including Japan, are really forced speed ahead in order to protect the Ukraine in a manner in which other states have not been able to do. So I'm going to finally turkey wants to gather the United Nations Russia and Ukraine to organize a UN plan that would allow the safe shipment of agricultural products from Ukrainian ports, obviously we're looking at a huge food crisis globally. Do we have any details on this? There's been some details about the proposals generally speaking the port of Odessa is key on that, of course, which is mined by Ukrainian forces to obviously keep Russian invasion forces out of its harbor. And that's the talk of 20 to 30 million tons of Ukrainian grain that could be exported that kind of sitting there and waiting, but obviously these maritime routes are very disputed. Turkey being very key in the Black Sea and having stakes itself, of course, in all of that, has suggested numerous times in the past to actually allow or escort such kind of grain tankers, but so far Ukraine is reluctant rather looking into actually land, transit that would still allow them to keep their support blocked with mines. So it's unlikely. There is efforts at the UN as secretary general Guterres has been very involved as well. Turkish president Erdoğan has pushed for that, but it's kind of still the same stumbling blocks. But at least give a tiny sign of hope last week from mariupol is now sadly Russian controlled Ukrainian port one ship of grain could actually leave. Maybe that's a tiny sign that actors get more pragmatic because as you say, Georgina does a global food crisis looming or already happening. And ladder Ross Lake there, thank you both very much. It's.

NATO Kaliningrad Ukrainian army Russia Madrid Lithuania Putin UN Turkey Israel Odessa Japan general Guterres Black Sea Erdoğan mariupol Georgina Ross Lake
"24%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

06:32 min | 3 months ago

"24%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"35 future leaders. Monaco's carlotta rebella caught up with Annie, who started by explaining what be healthy is all about. What we do is can really put the patient in the driver's seat of their own healthcare. So traditionally, healthcare is actually focused a lot around doctors, but if you think about yourself as a kind of living your everyday life, there are a lot of health concerns that you need actually immediate access to and what we try to do is to get you kind of on demand access to healthcare for a doctor's advice and even if you end up going to a surgery or needing really serious medico help, we can support you through that through the digital tools. So that's basically what we do. And we have done it in Finland with 1.5 million users. And now we are actually doing it and helping other healthcare providers to do the same leap. So now we are operating in ten countries with the platform. How can the platform help then, I guess, bridge that gap between you to use or in this case a patient with the services as a way of making cities more connected of making living in an urban area a bit better. One key thing is that to have like the really kind of low threshold to care so that we organize things so that you can kind of whenever you are, wherever you are, you can kind of get to help there on the spot. So you can imagine that if you have sick children next to you and you have your food working day ahead, then we can kind of actually have, you can start chatting with the doctor and get access in a couple of minutes, and then you get your prescriptions. You might have the local farmers in next door, get the medicines delivered at home, and then you basically didn't need to go anywhere. And you get kind of get rid of your concerns immediately. And that's kind of one case example. And then of course one other things could be that if you actually kind of need to you are recovering, you can kind of get the monitoring and advice from a nearby station kind of really easily. I think that's kind of something with what will probably happen in the future of CDs. We're here at the World Economic Forum in Davos. Why was it important for you and for be healthy to be represented here? We strongly believe that what we have achieved in Finland is that we have really transformed the way we are taking care of a lot of patients. So we are kind of really making healthcare a bit more efficient, accessible, and then also transforming how we do chronic care treatment, things that we are traditionally not that good in the healthcare. And if we want to achieve that kind of change, we actually kind of need to change the systems. And in here, we have many different parties gathered. We're changing the incentive structures like how big actually monetize and finance healthcare. It's kind of inspiring to think that here might be some of those key people who can actually make an impact. And of course, when such a group of people gathered together, there might be something totally new coming up that we can not foresee that helps us to make even greater impact. And perhaps having some fun as well. It's important to also have some fun in the middle of all of the work. What about you personally? What are you hoping to take with you at the end of this week? A meeting of this size in this importance in person hasn't happened in a while. So everyone is quite excited about that. What are you hoping to take away? I really hope to meet inspiring individuals who can kind of actually sparkle something new for us as well. I've already kind of met some people here and I feel that there is quite a unique group of people gathered in here and of course having something to get back to. So hopefully some kind of concrete ideas that we can follow up on. And that's unison musta yarry and she's the director of be healthy. We'll have more coverage from the World Economic Forum in Davos throughout the day here on monocle 24. UBS has over 900 investment analysts from over 100 different countries. Over 900 of the sharpest minds and freshest thinkers in the world of finance today. To find out how we can help you. Contact us at UBS dot com. Poland and Ukraine have announced an historic joint customs control agreement, which Vladimir zelensky says marks the beginning of our integration into the common custom space of the European Union. Well, for more, I'm joined by Michel potoski whose op-ed editor of genetic gazette upon a newspaper in Warsaw. Michelle, thanks very much for coming on the show again. Can you tell us about the practical side of this arrangement? What does it actually entail? Well, in practical terms, hello, and thank you for invitation, first of all. And second of all, in fact, it is a quite technical technical point. I mean, when you to cross the border, first you go usually to the customs of one country, then you arrive some hundred meters, and then you go to the second one. And border checks control always cast enormous cues and publish Ukraine border. I mean, you could take a car and from Warsaw to Levi, it is like 400 kilometers. So in theory, you should have 5 hours and you could be in the vive. But because of these border keys, you never know. You never knew if you could if you could stay on the border like two hours or 7 hours or 8 hours. The same with buses. So it was like a tremendous problem in national or even popular contacts between poles and Ukrainians. And nobody cared for many, many years. Nobody tried to do anything with this. While this published presidents visit to Ukraine and this proposal is to connect these two custom controls into one. I mean, then you would have one Polish and one Ukrainian border guard or a customer. And to control these cars on one place, not done two places. So it's very technical..

carlotta rebella Finland World Economic Forum Davos Monaco Annie musta yarry UBS Vladimir zelensky Michel potoski genetic gazette Ukraine Warsaw Poland European Union Michelle Levi
"24%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:41 min | 5 months ago

"24%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"I think that's right. And she had even just recently, I think, in interviews prior to her death, let it be known that she considered Putin a threat, not just to a Ukraine. But to the west and to western ideals and certainly to the notion of democracy. And what about this role in albright played as a somebody in the Vanguard in terms of a top women in politics in the United States? I think the most senior woman in the Reagan administration did that resonate to her experience in form your own. Do you think that we have moved on positively, has she paved the way for others to follow now? Do you think? Oh, absolutely. I was, by the way, the top ranking woman in the Reagan White House. There were cabinet secretaries who would have outranked me. So I wasn't the top woman in the entire administration. But I think Matt on albright, the fact that she was the first woman to occupy the position of Secretary of State, women had served in cabinets prior to Madeleine Albright being appointed by president Clinton. But they thought played the kind of role that she played in foreign policy. And I think that was part of what made her unique. She was also in addition to being an academic, she was fluent in several languages, as you mentioned, she was a refugee. She came to the United States as a young girl, her parents having fled Czechoslovakia at the time. And they first fled the Nazis when the Nazis moved in. To the Czechoslovakia, then when the communists took control, her parents had to flee again. She was also Jewish. And her parents were Jews, but they converted to Catholicism in order to prevent the whole family from being persecuted under the Nazi regime. And Madeline albright did not know that. She discovered that when a reporter asked her about it at the time that she was appointed secretary of state and it was a revelation to her, she had been raised Catholic later married an Anglican episcopalian and converted to episcopalianism as her as her religion. But she was just a trailblazer in so many ways. And what do you think her legacy then is? If we look longer term, and it's interesting, particularly on that foreign policy stage, is there a, I don't know what you'd call it, and all bright doctrine almost Linda that you think could be used as something of a template. For the U.S., which is recalibrating its relationship with the wider world at the moment. Well, I think battle at albright was fortunate to have served during the Clinton administration when the United States was not actively involved in those kinds of situations. We see today. I was a relatively peaceful time. She did get heavily involved during the breakup of the former Yugoslavia. There was, in fact, fighting in Bosnia and the administration did eventually come into play a role in the air with no ground troops. But I think that it's a little difficult. I think she was certainly in favor of the expansion of NATO. I think her own personal history taught her that democracy, freedom, was a very precious thing. And that it affected the lives, not just to people in government, but it affected all lives. And I think that made her a champion for peace. Linda, that's a beautiful summary of Madeleine Albright. Thanks for being with us on the program. That was our friend Linda Chavez on the line from New York. You're listening to the briefing on monocle 24. Now, if you thought the Orient Express had been consigned to the dusty land of Sunday evening period, dramas well think again, because part of the route has just reopened in a new high speed format..

albright Madeleine Albright Czechoslovakia United States Reagan administration Putin Ukraine president Clinton Reagan White House cabinet Matt Linda Clinton administration Yugoslavia Bosnia NATO Linda Chavez Orient Express New York
"24%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:36 min | 5 months ago

"24%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"And so to us, I think it's important to keep the Russian aggression on the agenda of NATO countries. And so far, I think we've been successful in sharing that anxiety and concern with our allies. I think they are on the same page with us. We do see other in support. Would you see continuation of different talks and specific actions being taken? What is important, of course, is just it's not only words and symbols, but also the ability to continue with a sanctions regime for as long as necessary sanctions already biting on European countries and ordinary Europeans. So I think to us, it's important that the politicians explain to the people that the prices that went up are there because of the Russian aggression that this is something that is a sacrifice for their security. This is something that is a real solidarity with the Ukrainians. And I hope that this message comes through and support remains there for as long as necessary. Absolutely. And I think it is interesting how continued the how continued the momentum is. That rhetorical support, what more though should western leadership be doing as well as making that case that you've explained Sega very clearly there. What's more concrete support that's zelensky and the administration requires. We know there won't be boots on the ground, but is it, is it financial.

NATO Sega
"24%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

08:51 min | 6 months ago

"24%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Reminder there that this, of course, is going to have an international dimension far beyond any military responses to this, but returning to that thought sir Richard. How wary will NATO be, even as it shores up its eastern defenses of the possibility of some kind of escalation by accident. When it's got to be really wary. But it's equally the response has been. It's got to assume the very worst that there will be an incursion that we've heard Putin say that the most appropriate security settlement for Europe is a new yelta, and of course the old yalta of February 45 was the blueprint under which Stalin dominated Eastern Europe under the Warsaw Pact. And then subsequently. He also will have similar contempt I suspect for other Soviet republics, such as Latvia, Estonia, and Lithuania, which were part of the Soviet empire, part of the tsarist empire, which the Russians think of as theirs. And so we have to assume the very worst. And that means that NATO has absolutely got a step up to the mark. Interesting listening to Jens Stoltenberg earlier. Not a bad start. But fundamentally, this requires the mobilization of conventional capabilities by sea by land and in the air by NATO. Not seen on a scale since the end of the Cold War. Now that's got to be a challenge for NATO because the bucket is pretty damn near empty as a result of the cumulative disarmament, particularly in Europe over the last decade plus. Well, actually, on that subject, sir Richard, I did want to put to you a statement extraordinary statement really released in the last couple of hours by the former German minister of defense. Who has said and I quote, I'm so angry at us for historically failing after Georgia Crimea and Donbass we have not prepared anything that would really have deterred Putin. Do you think that's accurate? It is absolutely accurate. Absolutely accurate, which is why I wrote my book in 2016 forecasting precisely what is happening now as a wake-up call. And what we have seen is the smug complacency of politicians unprepared to recognize that their first duty is to protect the nation. And our defense in the UK, for example, the defense of every nation in NATO starts in the forests of Latvia Lithuania and Estonia and on the frontiers between Romania and Moldova and in Bulgaria. Stephen, to bring you back in, is there you are a veteran Russia correspondent Russia watcher has there been a fundamental misunderstanding on the part of Europe, whether out of naivety, complacency, wishful thinking, and assumption that Vladimir Putin really he's basically just like us a bit rough around the edges, but ultimately rational and reasonable. That's exactly what's been happening. And I think we've seen very good examples of it lately, for example, president Macron, I'm not wishing to single him out to criticize him personally, but I think his missions to Moscow sitting at the end of that absurd long table where he thought, you know, you can, you can talk to this guy. No, you can't. Putin is not a politician, Putin is a Secret Service agent whose view of the world is totally different and whose view of the world has changed dramatically in recent years. If we go back to 2000 when he was put in that position of president, he shows a certain amount of uncertainty. He shows a certain amount of discipline with his own people. He clamps down on the media, he imprisons her to kosky, he starts taking business back under state control. But it's really that there's a turning point at the end of 2011, which is when Putin is still ostensibly prime minister although everyone thought he was still running the country. But there are mass demonstrations in Russia about rigged elections to the Russian parliament, the Duma. Putin three months after that comes back as president, and that has been a huge warning sign to him. I've got to clamp down on this. And we see the screws being tightened on freedom and democracy in Russia from that point and then, of course, also as he's losing popularity through 2012, 2013, he thinks, what can I do to bring it back? And he seizes Crimea from Ukraine and does it in a hugely cynical way. He actually at first having said nothing to do with me a year later, he acknowledges that what he did was in the Kremlin at his desk, he signed the order to seize Crimea from Ukraine and then got on a plane and flew down to Sochi to preside over the closing ceremony of the Winter Olympics, how cynical is that. And from that point on, we've seen him going further downhill. And I think in the last couple of years, he's shut himself off from the world because of fearing coronavirus and his mindset has changed so much. He's become obsessed with this idea that there is no such country as Ukraine and I've got to get rid of it. And I think that is possibly his biggest weakness because those around him and many of the Russian people are not going to support this. Sir Richard, these are all excruciating questions to even have to consider, but NATO will write now be considering them and to remind our listeners you were deputy supreme commander allied forces at NATO until quite recently. Is there any kind of halfway house variety option here for NATO some suggestion of perhaps threatening or enforcing a no fly zone over Ukraine or is any contact whatsoever with the Russian military basically the beginning of something that one would hope even Russia doesn't want. No, there is no halfway house. And to even suggest a no fly zone over Ukraine is naive claptrap because to do that requires a massive military capability and the ability to dominate it to dominate the airspace against Russian the Russian air force and against probably one of the most sophisticated defense systems in the world. And that is a guarantee of World War three no, the only thing NATO can do is to man the ramparts effectively and on that note, I fear. I have to go, I'm afraid. General sir Richard sheriff, thank you for joining us. Chris Thomas, if the only options are diplomatic, and if they all have been priced in, do you get the sense that western leaders that we're hearing so far are still trying to find a way to recapture some of the initiative back from Russia because it does feel like over the last weeks and months. It has been a persistent recurrent game of catch up. That is a good question. No, frankly, I don't necessarily, I certainly don't get a sense from western leaders that there is a diplomatic track at this point, the focus has been 100% on a response. If there is a diplomatic track and an attempt to regain the initiative, then it is a hope that a strong sense of economic and financial sanctions will somehow get Vladimir Putin to change his mind, but that doesn't seem likely at this point, frankly. And just a final thought from you, Steven. It's going to be very hard, I think, overcoming days and weeks to get a clear sense of actually what is happening inside Russia certainly in terms of inside the Russian leadership. But what kind of straws in the wind one way or the other would you be looking for? What kind of clues might tell us what's actually occurring in the Kremlin. In the Kremlin itself, I think that's going to be very difficult to know exactly what's going on. But in a wider Russia, there is a newspaper called norva gazier literally means new newspaper, which has always been something of a thorn in the side of Putin's regime. They have come out today, I've just seen and actually produced a next edition will come out in Russian and Ukrainian. They said that they are openly declaring themselves against what has happened. And I think we need to look out for Russians putting their head above the parapet. They've realized in the last couple of years, particularly in the last year when the. Police have been particularly brutal and any demonstration to have been stamped on very, very hard. They've realized that you're causing trouble for yourself, but I think if there will be conversations going on as Russians used to say around the kitchen table, they will people will be saying, this is awful, we shouldn't have done this. And who knows, it might actually begin to have some effect..

NATO Putin sir Richard Russia Crimea Ukraine Donbass Latvia Estonia Lithuania Europe president Macron Jens Stoltenberg kosky Russian parliament Vladimir Putin Stalin Eastern Europe Sir Richard Moldova
"24%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:33 min | 6 months ago

"24%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"You're listening to the briefing, first broadcast on the 24th of February 2022 on monocle 24. Coming up, president Vladimir Putin of Russia chooses war. Air raid sirens are heard across Ukraine's capital Kyiv. President volodymyr zelensky of Ukraine pledges resistance. And the world faces the possibility of Europe's biggest conflict in 80 years. This is a special edition of the briefing on monocle 24. Russia has invaded Ukraine. Europe's largest country is now under assault from land air and sea with a tax reported right across Ukraine. Ukraine's president volodymyr zelensky has declared martial law and pledged that his country will resist. I'm joined first of all by la de rositi founder of black trident, a defense and security consulting group in Kyiv. Anastasia galuska a governance specialist and an expert in foreign policy and international law at Ukraine's international center for policy studies. Well, I am actually not in tears right now. I left the country two weeks ago, but of course the situation is extremely dire. I'm in contact with my entire social circle who's there. My apartment is right near the military hospital in central key. So the stress is very high of bombardments happening there. As far as the message is being spread, that's so far there are only attacking military infrastructure. It is Russia is very infamous for sometimes losing sight of its initial goals that it's setting. So the series very much for the fear for civilian casualties is very high right now. They're saying that at 13 so at 1 p.m. GF time they're going to be founding the sirens. As a practice in the entirety of keys. But after 1 p.m., anytime the sirens will be will be allowed and clear, it is assigned for civilians to go and hide in the bomb shelters. Which is you can imagine enormously distressing. There's also a very large line of cars heading out of Kyiv. Trying to get to the west as soon as possible. There's a problem with gas with benzene people are not able to fill up their cars, the situation is highly dire. This is a full on invasion. And lada, it's been noticeable over the last few weeks that the leadership of Ukraine has been trying to take a low key approach trying to calm things down. What sense do you have of how prepared they have been for this moment? Well, I mean, Kyiv, as we speak, and the sense is that we are waiting for some sort of leadership. Things are relatively calm. Despite the bombings, we have to be really careful to make sure that we're using the correct language and discern if there are rockets or bombs because there are diversionary acts that could be taking place all over the city. I'm speaking just about Kyiv because that's what I know. The military base is the critical infrastructure. Those are the places that we are should be seeing the territorial defense and the ministry of interior and ministry of emergency doing their job. So they better be doing their job. Anastasia, to come back to you, what is your sense of how many other people are planning or trying to leave Ukraine? Honestly speaking, it is especially the expat and international community that is scattering to get out. But from what I see, especially in people my age and actually also older, Ukrainians are very steadfast in seeing and fighting. I even see foreigners or Diaspora like myself trying to find a way to get back into Ukraine. I now see as well a lot of probably this new student from the ministry, there have been officially they have just, this is just in. That's a defense ministry has allowed send.

Ukraine Kyiv President volodymyr zelensky Russia volodymyr zelensky la de rositi black trident Anastasia galuska international center for polic Europe Vladimir Putin lada ministry of interior and minis Anastasia Diaspora
"24%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

06:04 min | 7 months ago

"24%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"And lifestyle reporter Amy Werner joins us on the line from the French capital. Good morning, Amy. Good morning. Although for fashion, people, somewhat of a sad morning. It is really sad day given the unexpected death of cherry mugler. I mean, he was 74 and despite the fact that it's what a good two decades since he in official terms retired, he was so active and doing so much work. Well, there is a in fact currently at the museum in Paris. There is a retrospective on newsletter that really brought to new generation introduced a new generation to the extraordinary nature of his designs. Indeed, I mean, just describes them to us. I mean, this was a man who took the 1940s in the 1950s and reimagined them for the 1980s and cinched in wastes and grew shoulders and made things incredibly powerful and very sexy. And just to remind us of his great achievements from the 1980s and we'll move forward a little bit further into the last couple of years. I think you're absolutely right. His silhouette was very unmistakable. And some people describe it as almost triangle shaped because it was very exaggerated in the shoulders with a waste that seemed almost impossible. But I think in many people's minds, new glare, she embodied the golden age of 80s audacious sexy verve provocation. There was this idea that he could merge fine couture tailoring with kind of a kink even. Somewhat fetishist. And he wasn't afraid to depict women this way. And as a result, he gave women a sort of persona of. Very daring, very bold, very self empowerment called it. And, of course, there was continued until very, very recently as well. By all accounts, he was going to announce new collaborations this week. And it's not so long and since he squeezed Kim Kardashian into something dripping with its diamonds, but it certainly sparkled a couple of years ago at the Met Gala. And many pop stars and celebrities were embracing his vintage designs too. There was a rediscovery of how truly fabulous they were. So you were seeing his creations once again on the red carpet, even if he himself had sort of withdrawn to some extent from the fashion world, but then like I just said a moment ago, he was back. This exhibition really confirmed that. Let's move on to another really sad development in fashion. A Virgil abloh dying at the tender age of 42 just a few weeks ago. But in Paris, it was the opportunity to see his final collection for Louis Vuitton. Well, you know, really, it's a scene that seems to be percolating through the season because the other big news of the week was the revival of kenzo by a new designer nigo and kenzo also passed away last year. So you have two major designers, different generations who have left us. But at the same time, these were two of the most palpably energetic shows of the season people really came out to sometimes you hear this word celebrate. But there was a sense of honoring of celebration and of finding what their contributions were and really putting bringing those to the four. It was something to absolutely save or wasn't it every time version of blue created a new season of new collection. Many saying that he was, you know, he was representing a generation that hadn't been represented before. Indeed. I mean, he didn't see any walls between generations. He actually towards the end, didn't see walls between genders. This most recent collection had men in heels. He said at one point, we are a generation that's searching for what rules to break or which rules are the real ones. And I think that really drives home how he wanted to take a house like Vita and bring it to a whole other level. Finally, briefly, tell us about Pharrell Williams and the most amazing almond shaped pair of sunglasses that he was wearing in Paris. Well, it really was a key. We don't know that much about them yet, but these as you point out, often shaped in circled by diamonds with a little emerald drop at each temple, Tiffany has been in the midst of a crucification of sorts. There is this Beyoncé and Jay-Z, there are other collaborations in the works. New spokespeople. And when phrase showed up. But the kenzo show yesterday wearing these glasses that sunglasses. We're on the verge of couture begins today. So there couldn't have been a better bridge in some sense between the menswear shows and the haute couture that really will get underway in the next hours. Thank you so much for joining us on Monaco 24. That's all we have time for today's program, many thanks to our producers. Marcus hippie and Charlie filmer court are researchers Sophie monaghan combs and lilian faucet and our studio manager David Stevens. After the headlines there's more music on the way, the briefing is live at midday in London, the globalist is back at the same time tomorrow I hope you can join me for that. But for now, from me Emma Nelson goodbye. Thank you very much for listening. Have a great week..

Amy Werner cherry mugler Paris kenzo Virgil abloh nigo Amy Kim Kardashian Louis Vuitton Beyoncé Pharrell Williams Tiffany Marcus hippie Charlie filmer Sophie monaghan combs Jay lilian faucet Monaco David Stevens Emma Nelson
"24%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:06 min | 9 months ago

"24%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"In health since Helsinki, city center, and Petri Bert's office has been to visit. Pachy tell us about the background of this 400 year institution. Right, yeah, so finish post is really one of the key and most loved public services in Finland. Finn's use the services a lot. I was told yesterday this actually surprised me a little bit. The Finns send just around Christmas about 18 million Christmas cards. That's for a nation of 5 million people. So, you know, we have a strong need for the poster services. And describe the new building and all these new developments then. Yeah, so the new buildings, it's kind of actually a return to its origins. So this was this building this was built in 1938 and it's actually called the post house. It used to house the finished post headquarters until 2003 when it was moved to the suburbs. But now it moved its main post office back to this post post building in the center and it's really lovely. I mean, how do you describe the experience? I walked in yesterday and as soon as you walk in, you're greeted by an actual human being, you know, not a machine. A human being who says hi to you and ask you how you are and what needs you have and then direct you to this different service points in the post office. And you have these automate fully automated machines for dropping off parcels if you want. But you also have humans helping you pick cards and even give you a helping hand with riding a card and all kinds of really I just like the human element in all of it. And I understand that there's been a big advances in terms of lockers and parcel space. Yeah, this is really where we're posting, I think, is putting up a good competition against all this modern services. So this is actually a second sort of a flagship that they opened in the center of housing. They opened this box by poster that we covered for Monaco as well. I think it was two or three years ago, where, you know, it's essentially a space where you just pick up parcels and you can open them there if you order clothes from E retailers you can try them on. You know, you can leave the packaging materials there. And it's just done in a really nice and stylish way. And they have actually incorporated elements of that in the new main postal office that just opened this week. Well, in addition to that, they also have traditional postal services, so you know, you can send letters, you can buy stamps you can buy cards and all kinds of nice traditional stuff as well. And of course, it has a great environmental policy. Yes, well, of course, as always, with modern finished companies, they really keen to stress how what their environmental impact is. And I think they've achieved this not by planting trees and that kind of stuff which seems to be the trend these days, but actually by when I go and pick up a password I can just leave the cardboard boxes and everything there. And if I go to send something and I forgot to take a box for it, I can just take somebody's used box and they will help me clean it and package it and that way, you know, you don't have to buy we don't have to buy new boxes and materials all the time. And then finally Petri herbal is impact Helsinki and do you think that we'll see other organizations adopting this approach to business? This really hands on customer led very environmentally friendly way of operating. You know, I do believe, so I think there is some something of a return to the old times here. I mean, not only the human service that I experienced yesterday, but also just the way the way the whole space looked. They returned back to their old colors, this beautiful orange color that they had historically and the old logo and of course I mean they wouldn't do that if there wasn't a need for that. I think people do miss this human service and talking to people and of course then also this environmental environmental footprint as well. So I think we will see other businesses copying it. And you can actually sit there and write your cards and so on. Can't you? I mean, it's a space to be in as well as just to pass through and do your business. Yes, absolutely. I actually left that just so next to this, they have a dedicated section in the post office for buying buying cards, and there's a human being there that helps you pick the cards as I said. And next to it, there are tables and chairs and awareness. I must say quite stylish labs as well respecting the functionalist heritage of this mid century building. And you can sit there and you can take your time and write your creating so on the card and just be inspired instead of just leaning against the wall as you usually would do in a post office or just some bland disk. So that was nice. Absolutely. Petry, thanks very much indeed. That was Monica's Helsinki correspondent Petri bertz off. And that's all for today's program. Thanks to our producers, page Reynolds, Daniel beach, and Charlie film a court..

Petri Bert Pachy Helsinki city center Finn Finland Monaco Petry Petri bertz Monica page Reynolds Daniel beach Charlie
"24%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:40 min | 9 months ago

"24%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Talk urbanism with urban affairs commentator cat Hannah cap welcome back to the globalist. We're going to start with The New York Times and park benches. What's this all about? Yeah, so this is a lovely story actually. Although I think ting should sadness and really I guess a bit of a love letter to the park bench and the author himself, Jonathan Lee talks about growing up and agree suburb of London. So maybe it's why I've spoke to me. But again, talking about the role that park benches have played really, I guess and kind of fostering a sense of solitude, but also kind of community at the same time and sort of highlighting how that the ability to have both is actually such an important part of urban living. Totally. And I think it's really important to have the sounds a bit silly, but a relationship with a particular bench to have a sitting spot where you go regularly in a place to observe the world and the changing weather and so on from one particular static point. Absolutely and I'm sure if you asked a lot of people, they could probably identify, you know, what are their favorite benches? We obviously have the tradition of dedicating benches to people too as well. And I think as you said almost commemorating the art of observation that event allows you to do, but also that it's not just observations and it can support, but also a range of activity as well. And there's a really nice part of the article where he talks about, you know, being in Central Park in New York and again, seeing all the range of activities, you know, whether it's birthday parties, whether it's Friends meeting up, whether it's someone sitting alone reading a book that just the humble park bench can support. Just in a related story here in Britain has been a lot of media about a new calendar called park benches of Redding. And it's a man who just goes around taking pictures of benches in writing. I believe he's also done the roundabouts of reading. But they're flying off the shelves we're told. Now, all new buildings in England will have electric car charge points from 2022. That is a huge leap forward. It is a pretty big leap forward. And this is an announcement. The prime minister gave an interesting speech earlier this week. Other interview to probably cover that. But one bit of policy that actually did come out in that was this requirement of all new buildings in England. So those things like Christ supermarkets, your office blocks. Will be required to have EV charging. And I think, you know, in many ways, I think are really positive step forward. I think personally, I'd say, you know, once it's a really important step, probably isn't the only thing that needs to be looked at when it comes to thinking about how our new buildings can actually support a kind of green lifestyle. And I think we need to look at old buildings too, because I mean, certainly on my street, there are two charge points and so many EV vehicles. It becomes impossible in fact to charge your car. Absolutely. And I think, you know, that's a water point, not just about EV, but actually this idea of retrofit how we make our existing infrastructure or building stock up to scratch rather than almost having kind of two tiers of assets where we'll have those that are really green and they've got all the latest technology in their wonderful and then those that maybe get left behind because it's actually harder often to go back in and put the right infrastructure in place. Now Bloomberg has a piece about the greenest cities in Europe. Yeah, so this is a really nice write up of quite a detailed study of a thousand cities in Europe. Looking really at this idea of what does it really mean to be a green city? So looking not just at the amount of green space, but actually how it's distributed amongst the population as well. So there's quite a kind of detailed methodology for that. But did actually yield some quite interesting results. So often those cities that visually strike us maybe as being very green, particularly ones, maybe like Paris, or Copenhagen, because of the kind of thing or something like Paris and the kind of large spaces that it has. Actually, when it comes to how this space is distributed, aren't necessarily as green as we might think. And I think, you know, that's something that we probably felt quite a lot in the pandemic as well that the ability to access the space on your doorstep is important, not just having it in the city overall. Yeah, I mean Paris maps of Paris are really misleading because it looks like there are these big green spaces. And in fact, they're not at all, are they? Exactly. And I think what the report also points out is it's not just the green space on its own. It's also about, for example, having good quality, good air quality, or supporting active travel as well. You know, it's one thing having a park, but if everyone has to drive there at the air quality as a pooling, you start obviously losing some of those benefits, whether it's to mental health, whether it's to physical health to the environment as well, if that green space, you know, isn't part of a kind of a network of measures to support, I guess, healthy, I've been living. Yeah, and of course, it's got to have a nice bench. Is that a dog I can hear in the background? It is, yeah, someone's up and ready for his morning walk. We're gonna let you go and just make sure that he has that. In a lovely green space and perhaps have a nice contemplative sit on a bench. This is the globalist on Monaco 24. It's a red letter day for Finland's postal service, a new flagship space focusing on customer experience has opened.

cat Hannah Jonathan Lee ting The New York Times England Central Park Redding Paris London Britain Europe New York Bloomberg Copenhagen Monaco Finland
"24%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:56 min | 9 months ago

"24%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Was Sarah hucka in conversation with Monaco's Copenhagen correspondent Michael booth and living better lives runs until April 18th, 2022. You're listening to the globalist on monocle 24 with me, Georgina Godwin, and I'm joined now by my friend and colleague. My fellow presenter, Emma Nelson, who is in Ozark studio. Good morning to you Emma. Good morning, gray and cloudy, but full of sunshine to be with you this morning, Georgina. Let's try it. Let's look at the future of work because our futures to yours and mine very much bound up with this. The FT has a long feature all about where did all the workers go and certainly I don't know about in Zürich, but when you look around here in London, every single shot window every restaurant has a notices advertising vacancies. I've noticed that conspicuous absence actually in Zürich, when I was thinking about the article that I was going to talk about today, I sort of did a direct comparing contrast. And if there is a labor shortage in Zürich, you really can't see it, because whatever is happening, it's incredibly discreet. There are no signs in Windows saying, please come and help us. But it is absolutely stark, isn't it? When you wonder down any street in the United Kingdom, every shot window wants you to go and work in there. I don't know about you but I sometimes walk down there thinking. Maybe if I just step in, I could walk into another universe because clearly people are needing to hire. And this is a problem in the United States according to the Financial Times. All this week, the FDA is doing a series of long reads into the future of work, which is they're always incredibly good at doing this kind of stuff. And in the last 24 hours, two have come out. The one that we've been talking about today is about the fact that in America, more than 4 million people left their jobs in September, and that is the highest number of people resigning in a single month since records began in 2001. The previous record was in August. And what is happening is it's all part of what's being called the great resignation. People aren't just leaving either to drop out of the labor market or to go and do something more creative. They're actually going to better jobs. Whether it be better paid, better rolls or even a completely different job that might be more fulfilling for them. And it's knocking America really quite quite, of course. And it's been called also COVID clarity. Yes. What seems to have been happening is that people who've been stuck at home during the pandemic haven't been doing what everybody thought that was going to happen that they were going to sit tight and hold on to their jobs as much as they could. What they were realizing is that they didn't like their jobs in the first place. So in the old world when you went to your office or you went to wherever you worked, but you did a lousy job or a job that didn't satisfy you. You would just carry on with it anyway, because there was other stuff associated with it. But what seems to be happening is when people are sitting at their desks at home and have arguably a more pure experience of their jobs or of their work, they're deciding that they don't want it. So that's a good sign because people are still wanting to go into work. It's not the homeworking thing that's making people resign. It's just that they want to do a job that they enjoy. Now, I'm going to contrast this very briefly with an article that's appeared in the FT that their next installment today, which seems to be this is a problem that is not happening in France. And this is good news for France, because France has quite a lot of has a history normally of slightly higher levels of employment than other highly developed countries. And the OECD has been surprised about this. What appears to be the reason for this is it in contrast to America where when you were given your furlough, you claimed your benefit directly from the government. The money was given to companies in France. And as a result, companies could invest and retain and look after their employees and managers would know that they would have a strong and steady workforce that would come back when things opened up again. Now The New York Times also has a take on this. They're asking what the link is between job vacancies and migration. This is a really interesting story if you are interested in where people's working positions are coming from. And there's this described as a global battle for the young and able. There are images right through this, but this article of immigrant immigrant trainees being shown how to do jobs as an example in Germany. There's an example in Canada. There's an example in Israel and what's happening is that money and residency and better working conditions are being offered to immigrants. And as a result, it's sort of recalibrating the way that we see migration too. Not just within the workforce, but within society. I mean, it's desperately obvious here in Britain that we are suffering because of a lack of migrants. Absolutely. And the jobs that the immigrants are coming to nowadays are better. So what is happening is that when you arrive from another country now, if you are going to a highly developed country, there is generally a it's being made easier for you to settle. Immigrant workers are finding that they are being treated the same way as the rest of the population. And this article in The New York Times points very much to a contrast with the United Kingdom, where 7 out of ten companies are now struggling to find employees. What seems to have happened is that pre-pandemic the less paid areas of the labor market were very migrant based. And that's because people could move. And when COVID happened, people couldn't move anymore. And as a result, the countries which depended on lower paid younger workers found themselves with a massive gap. And the countries which are doing better are the ones who have decided to change their approach to micro workers and treat them on the same level as the rest of the population. So long overdue..

Zürich Sarah hucka Michael booth Georgina Godwin Emma Nelson America France Georgina Monaco Copenhagen Emma Financial Times United Kingdom FDA London OECD The New York Times government Germany Israel
"24%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

08:32 min | 1 year ago

"24%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"Committees our international federations to ensure that athlete representation model in each of those organizations so that ensures that the health and wellbeing and the phones fleets throughout the spine. Craig spence the chief brand and communications officer the international paralympic committee on allience in partnership with the ipc. And how alliens is behind you for. What's ahead liens confidence in tomorrow. Welcome back to the monocle. Daily andrew melas still with me. Our guests vincent macaroni and florence. Biedermann let us now look at the united kingdom the continuing substance into self parody of much labored verbiage about sending him out to bat for britain bowling position etc. Uk international trade secretary lives trust. Why do these people always have names like mine. Martin nameless characters has announced that britain's new trade envoy to australia will be ian both them in terms that will make no sense too much of audience. And i suspect at least one of our panelists. Both of them was a distinguished. All round cricketer with a test batting average of thirty three point five four and three hundred ninety three wickets at just over twenty eight florid does the name both mean anything to you at all in the slightest and the friends. I don't look given you said you've been here six years any time. He's really been in. The news during this period is when he Vincent remember feet is. He claimed that he had been hacked off. An unfortunate image appeared on his twitter accounts. Let's just call it unfortunate image. It's always wait isn't when people say they were hacked. It's always kind of unfortunate one. Nothing else but at least while. He's not security envoy or anything like that in florence. Can you at least agree that whoever in both is as a trade envoy he has to pin improvement on prince andrew. Yes even being french. I can say that When you consider also that the the big trade agreement that was signed recently between australia and global britain is supposed to accelerate to have a bonus in gdp of zero comma Zero two percent. I think it proportionate to what this trade relations and the importance of the envoy. Vincent i i am going to throw this one out here As as australian do you think liz trust entirely understands the view. People take of english cricketers. It's not like ian. Both is regarded in australia as as a national hero. Think liz trust go blessed. She's just enthusiastic about everything No i don't think she quite as thought this through. Also i was. I was reading in illness. I didn't realize there's a history with now president iran khan of pakistan as well so You know he can't surprised she didn't send in pakistan's way and given the lack of thought how it would go because they apparently had a law a huge court battle So yeah i mean it. It just does seem strange to when you've got a bitter rivalry when you've got the to think. Oh i know about love a british a british crickets. Yeah well not so much. British crickets english cricketer is this is the real issue. I think florence. France go marching for this sort of thing. Do you make inexplicable celebrities government appointees and send them abroad to do the republic's work. I think it happens. Yes for diplomats like sometime have surprising nomination. maybe i shouldn't give names but I mean i think it's the case. Also in other countries in a special in diplomacy. And when you get the united states i mean many. Many people have been appointed ambassadors who were never diplomats in their life just because the support that or this brought in not only like the republican but also the democrats. Whatever so. I think it's something that happens. Everywhere and kind of her knees him we can see that in every government i think if i recall the position rightly straight. You did attempt to make tony abbott. The former prime minister some sort of trade envoy but britain did that. We've done that he is. He's on the board of our trae. I think we couldn't believe. I'll lock at that point. I think that his reaction is like if you won't it more. I literally spent years creeping around parliament with pawsey suddenly A couple of years ago he inexplicably got this past the house of commons and he would just wander around and he would just go to the conservative party conference for fun so he'd been lobbying for some kind of job for years. It was very strange characters. Such a fan boy of the uk. He he's an old fellow tonia but on on that much we can agree between our two bitterly royal if that's a word nations. But i i do want to ask vincent you you are. He's speaking for britain. That's role this table half our scottish breakaway nonetheless. If we agreed it's all that ian both is going to be the trade envoy to australia. And i suppose somebody has to do it etc. Is that actually any weed than the fact. He's a lord. I mean he used to play cricket i will. I will admit through gritted teeth. He was extremely good at it. But he's lord he gets a say in the laws of the ice fach so not to kind of slow too much into it but my thesis was on reform of the house of lords. And when you look through the cast of characters hundreds of them people in the hassles i mean. He is more qualified than a damn loud of them. There is still a section of the lord's that is hereditary. This is the goaling part. about britain. Preaching democracy around the world is that there is a hereditary element to the house of lords. There was a group of about ninety of them who were the rumford was left after the new labour government tried to get them out and instead of them just dying often their positions disappearing. In the lord's they then have an election of their descendants so the current laws therein the left than elect at the the descendants of the of the other hereditary lords can put themselves up for an election and the electorate is just the other laws. It is absolutely ridiculous. And i was looking in both in did as his maiden speech last year he. He's a massive supporter of brexit. And it was sort of reward for that from the prime minister. Although he is sitting cross bench he is that says to sort of champion. Sport especially community has been hit by the pandemic and he's done a lot of charity work particularly around around cancer and so he is going to champion those things and it just you know. I know people in the house. All to do. Bring vast expertise of science of medicine of top. Paris's there is some great expertise there but you know you do wonder about some of the people that have got in a and he is someone he think does he really have any idea. Recall about trade. And and what's involved i think. Did you plan for reforming. The house of lords involves pitchforks. Not quite not quite that far. I think i was looking at like senate model was my kind of a sixty percents. Senate and forty percent appointed by an independent panel. Not the government of the day. I'm not going to allow that. Frankly treasonous note to be the last word of florence. If this is to be your last daily. I think you should have the last word and especially on the basis of what vincent has just outlined there after six years here. Does this country make any sense to you whatsoever. No surprise florence vitamin and vincent macaroni. Thank you both very much and florence. Thank you for all your previous contributions to al shows. Finally august twenty fourth is a big day in uruguay where it is known. It says he has no shade no shade illinois style jer. I think that was right. At the second attempt anyway translates as night of nostalgia. People play old hits and take to the dance floor is the biggest night of uruguay years. Surpassing even new year's eve eleven. America affairs correspondent lucinda elliott centers. This report from montevideo. It does contain cheesy music as focused evening which falls in the depths of the southern.

britain international paralympic commi vincent macaroni Craig spence andrew melas Biedermann Martin nameless australia ian uk Vincent liz pakistan prince andrew pawsey house of lords bowling florence labour government
"24%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

06:14 min | 1 year ago

"24%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"At the age of thirty nine species now wants her life back not unreasonably but will she be permitted to conduct it in any peace one of the many questions. The bizarre saga has posed is whether the media and those who consume it have learned anything about mental health and the effects their own of monstrous amounts of attention. Holy this genuinely difficult to know where to start with this story. We were talking earlier about the excellent and bewildering documentary which was made recently telling a it is the literally wouldn't make it up story but do you get the sense that since two thousand eight. The media covers This part of modern popular culture has become any more noticeably sensitive. I wish i could say Yes but i don't think so. I think in some elements when we're talking about black lives matter for example or what happened with megan markle and harry. There's some elements there that things people are starting to recognize the issues. But i think there's a lot a long ways to go before they get somewhere because at the end of the day nobody's gonna buy Tabloid tabloid newspaper magazine. Because there's happy things going on. They wanna see people in their sweatpants or having meltdowns and shaving their heads as britney spears wants did and they wanna know about their divorces and cheating and like the kardashian. So i i think that's really It just doesn't sell that's the reality of it. There's always been where i've bristled. Bits myself at people blaming the media. I think the real cases to be made against the people who create the market for the media which served this stuff up if no one was interested in this then the media wouldn't print it but James there is also the influence of social media. And i do. Want to counter intuitively if actually that might be helping in that it does if used skillfully by people at the center of attention. Kind of humanize them in bake they can create their own message and they can communicate directly. Is there something to be said for that. Yeah i mean. I think social media is the key thing because you know. Holly's pointed out why people buy tabloids of course do by tabloids and increasing and decreasing numbers in most developed media markets. I think social media can work if it's used skillfully but it's pretty difficult to do that in a way that doesn't you know if you if you've if you've got two million followers or know some celebrities have then it's great if you can engage with them in a positive way muslim but also there are you know they're an awful lot of people out there who are going to use that direct contact with celebrities which you know is is unprecedented in that sense T to pile more and more abuse upon themselves. It's it's it's a difficult one really. But i think the blame the media i is i think. In in the current media landscape diminishing because the media are not the main influence in the way at once. They were wholly. Here's a stupid question for you. Does britney spears story turn out very different differently. Indeed not just the story but the coverage of it if we transplant it to a notional mile popstar. Ooh that's a tough one. I mean i. I i think it's I think that right. Now where we're in a time where we're recognizing the sexism the slut shaming and all that. We're we're we're starting to see all of this unpacked and the problems with how things are covered. I remember when amal clooney. And george clooney got married and everybody had written. George clooney actor george clooney. Mary's like or A modine and but the way they had written and was that as if she was the lucky one to be marrying george clooney and there was only one. There was only one outlet that did the complete opposite made. It seem like a wow actor. Mary's prominent human rights lawyer and everybody was cheering for that. I remember and i. It's there's still a long ways to go with us. But i think when you look at things like monica lewinsky for example. You look at britney spears. There's there's been so much outspoken as In the an apology is about how they were wrongly portrayed in the media or how people wrongly spoke of them and i think that some of it's disingenuous on to an extent but the only reason justin timberlake. Her ex boyfriend issued an apology. I think was because there was so much pressure on social media but back in the day was slut shaming her so I think there's still a long ways to go. But the fact that there's this Social media backlash when people are openly talking about. I think that there's progress being made. A. there's also a factor in this case. Is that britney. Spears became very famous very very young. Indeed james and i don't know if as a young man you ever had any kind of flirtation with pop stardom yourself or pursued. A band wants to one night and that was a sort of a quad wise man. I mean i. I'm not i have no idea at all how you would enforce this. My thoughts are very early stage but is there an argument that we should regard being pop popstar or similar figure in much the same way that we do. You know driving cars or drinking alcohol you for adults. Only maybe yeah i mean but it's you know part of the is about you know youth and energy and i think that would be quite hard to enforce in practice but you know we can all think of plenty of examples of people who've been put into The spotlight as performers or actors a young age and. It hasn't really gone well by the time they're in their twenty s james and holly ought that thought thank you. Both very much is almost time that we head off but before we do that. He's time for today's episode of our weekly series by now listeners. Will know that all this week on the monocle daily we have been looking at the european football championships from the various rival camps of monocle. Twenty newsroom today. it's wales with reese james who thinks the bowl is the wrong shape but still until relatively recently. The welsh national football team had very little to show debate on the international stage miserable. Run so them qualify.

monica lewinsky george clooney justin timberlake George clooney megan markle amal clooney Spears britney spears harry Mary james James holly today reese james two million followers thirty nine species welsh national football team one night Both
"24%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"24%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"With top political leaders from jammu and kashmir is the first meeting since his government revoked the region's autonomy in two thousand nineteen. We'll have more on this story shortly on today's show. People in hong kong have rushed to snap up copies of the final edition of the pro democracy newspaper apple daily. The popular tabloid was forced to end production of getting embroiled in a national security. Crackdown apple daily has become a pro. Democracy symbol in the city. A monaco's annual city survey is out. Today you can find out about the urban hubs which are well-placed bounce back and escape the long shadow of lockdowns by staying tuned to monaco. Twenty four across the day or by picking up the latest copy of the magazine. Which is on newsstands. Now those are the day's headlines back to you tom. Thank you very much. Indeed page and as patriots just telling us leaders from kashmir gathering for a summit with india's prime minister narendra modi today in new delhi. It's the first time the two parties are meeting since the region's special status was scrapped. Two years ago well joining us now to discuss the significance of this session. Gazelle visiting teacher at the london school of economics and political science gene. Good thanks for being with us. This looks and sounds like a pretty significant change of tack from narendra modi. Well it's a very important development because you have fourteen different Political leaders attending including the major political parties from jammu and kashmir and they will be discussing some important issues related to Assembly elections the boundary redrawing process the potential restoration of statehood of for genuine cashmere. Because right now it's union territory and they'll be also additional issues that impact on kushner such as the redraw of american forces from afghanistan and the military situation with china in la doc. So there's a lot to discuss was going to say that's a pretty busy agenda. I wonder as a corollary question to. This is almost as important that this meeting rekindles that rather stalled political process. Is that in a sense. The symbolism of that is that as important in a way as some of those issues. You've already described well. The most important aspect is that India very takes huge pride in holding its federal and state elections and there is this determination that they ought to take place in kashmir. It won't happen right now. But the key issue is to try and get cross party consensus on holding them as well as making sure that the boundary withdraw redrawing is done in a way that seems to satisfy all different political parties. It's a step. it's a process and this is an important moment for for trying to to keep the situation in in india and especially in jammu in kashmir a stable when it comes to that stability than those broader questions about Process and steps forward on that complicated road. What is the role of china. What does how does that. Look is one of those cases where you know. The role of china and the chinese military is always kind of going to be the elephant in the room. Well this is where it gets interesting and at the same time because in kashmir at one time also had the territory off the dock under the The the obligation of article three seventy lost year. Sorry into twenty nineteen Gentleman cushman was separated into jfk. And also into the dock. Now the doc boorda's territory with china including territory that china occupies known as oxide chin and as we know last year that was a skirmish between india and china. Very violent one. These issues will come into play in the discussions and it just shows you that. It's not just a local issue it actually can potentially involve Various to well just pops. Finally suzanne give us a sense of your your your best guess in terms of how Profitable these discussions are likely to be. Do you think we might get some kind of a bit of empty rhetoric and not much movement or do you actually think potential hair given as being this hiatus to see some kind of really meaningful progress made well one of the key things that We should watch out for is the issue about the autonomy to do with german kashmir with was removed under the The lord abrogation that was brought in In on august fifth twenty thousand nine hundred ninety now some political parties kushner calling for its restoration but there is no appetite within india for that. Ns partly to do with the fact that the so called autonomy was very archaic and had feudal elements it discriminated against women. If a kashmiri woman married someone from outside kushner. They lost their rights to property inheritance. It also discriminated against the dollar. The shed you'll costs and tribes and it was heavily discriminating against the q. Community so to restore it would actually perhaps have more negative civil rights so that issue may become a sticking point with some of the political parties in kashmir that benefited trauman but didn't really necessarily benefit the people of kushner interesting stuff section of the london school of economics and political science. Thanks for joining us here on..

Today last year kashmir hong kong Gazelle two parties jammu today Two years ago afghanistan narendra modi new delhi Twenty four london school of economics london prime minister kashmiri two thousand apple first time
"24%" Discussed on MarketFoolery

MarketFoolery

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"24%" Discussed on MarketFoolery

"Do learn between charlie wilson and gust avocados wilson served in the navy. He's someone who sees wars conflicts that have a winner and a loser and that's that so. When the soviet union falls he celebrates. It's like it's over we want. There's a scene late in the movie after the soviet union has fallen. There's a party at charlie wilson apartment. And he's standing on a balcony with and gust is trying to get him to not be so excited about this victory as great as it is. And he tells charlie wilson he's trying to get him to realize what's going on here so he tells charlie wilson this story about zen master and the little boy says there's this little boy and on his fourteenth birthday he gets a horse and everybody in the village says how wonderful the boy got a horse and the zen master says we'll see two years later. The boy falls off. The horse breaks his leg and everyone in the village has how terrible and the master says we'll see then a war breaks out and all the young men have to go off and fight except the boy can't because his legs all messed up and everybody in the village says how wonderful and then master says we'll see over the past twenty four years. I have seen wonderful times as an investor. And i've seen terrible times. As an investor the birth and rise of the internet in the nineteen ninety s was so exciting and then the bubble burst in two thousand and then nine eleven happened and then slowly steadily business in the market's return for five positive and strong years until the great recession of two thousand eight and two thousand nine followed by the greatest bowl run market in history followed by a global pandemic. It's natural to get excited in good times because we are human beings creatures. That's why it's all the more important to stay. Even keeled as possible for as long as possible because as david gardner has said on occasion the only game that counts when it comes to investing is the long game. That's the game. You wanna be playing by the way back in one thousand nine hundred.

charlie wilson david gardner gust fourteenth birthday two thousand eight one thousand nine hundred two years later soviet union nine eleven five positive and strong years two thousand nine wilson nineteen ninety s zen soviet zen master past twenty four years union
"24%" Discussed on MarketFoolery

MarketFoolery

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"24%" Discussed on MarketFoolery

"I walked in the door at one hundred. Twenty three north pitt street took the elevator up to the office and started doing the things that you do on your first day at a new job filled out. A bunch of forms got assigned a desk and a computer. I was given an official motley fool mug with the original logo. Which i think i have this right. I think it was drawn by julia reid home. Who is the sister of company. Co founder eric. Reid home still have the month by the way. don't worry i'm not going to walk you through every professional memory that i have of the past twenty four years but i am share a little bit because there's no way for me to think about my time at the motley fool without stock investing being at the front and center of my brain i had worked in the us capitol building for six years. So i'd been investing through the thrift savings program. But when i got to the full i started learning about stocks and thinking about businesses in ways that i really never had before the idea that the numbers of a business are important. But it's not just about the numbers. The story of the business is important. The people leading it. That's important and the more i've done this. The more experienced. I've gotten as an investor comfortable have gotten with a few things that i did not realize twenty four years ago. The role that luck plays an investing the importance of being selfish staying as even keeled as possible for as long as possible. I've made investing mistakes over the past twenty four years. I will continue to make mistakes. I bought stocks. Where i didn't understand the business and couldn't explain what the company does one time. I bought a stock when i was high. It was nine hundred ninety nine. I'd had all four of my wisdom teeth out. I was spending a few days at home. Recuperating and diet consisted entirely of milkshakes painkillers. I was sitting on the sofa channel flipping through cable. Because there's no streaming video there's no net flex i'm flipping channels and i get to c. span and there's a trade association that's having some big meeting in dc. They've got a keynote speaker. Some young guy who recently taken his company public and he's talking about the future of this industry. I listened the whole speech. And did i mention that. I was high on painkillers. I was high on painkillers and in. This narcotic induced fog. I remember sitting there thinking. This guy's brilliant guy with this guy has to say and i'm going to buy this stock and i went to my computer and logged onto my account and bought shares of this guy's company. While i was high on painkillers..

six years twenty four years ago Twenty three north pitt street eric nine hundred ninety nine first day julia reid one hundred four one time Reid span motley home past twenty four years past twenty four years fool
"24%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Curator

Monocle 24: The Curator

07:08 min | 1 year ago

"24%" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Curator

"Your with a curator. Our weekly highlight show here on monocle. Twenty four. I'm carla rebelo up next. We look back at our show dedicated to the world of business. It is of course the entrepreneurs. Brad wilson is the president of the ace hotel group which is set to open. Its latest property in brooklyn's boerum hill. Where toronto property soon to follow a surprise itself on looking at different kinds of existing buildings in off the beaten track neighborhoods and to find out more about the latest offerings. Brad joined the shows host. Daniel h the early aces that alex developed. Seattle was very small hotel. It really didn't carry a lot of what i think. People think of is the kind of the social health aspect of ace hotel. Think some of that really started when they opened portland lobby and being connected to the stump town coffee in just that lobby became surprisingly active for relatively small space. It was going a communal environment. It ended up. You know attracting people to pound away on their laptops and meet and greet in. It really did become small hub for that city. Certainly that portland lobby was kind of the precedent Dan later reinterpreted. In collaboration with roman and williams to create kind of the ace new york lobby. Which certainly as new york lobby in many ways. It's kind of our flagship. I meant so many people think of at lobby when they think of ace and its ability really to be a workspace by day a cocktail place in the evenings and even a club at night really transforms overtime to the lifestyle of its inhabitants. And so it's a really fun living human space. We're very inspired by a and it's interesting in the industry that lobby kind of was the label of ace hotel in to us. It was really about the social environment. The scene it was created there and we recreate that all the time. It's just that we recreate it through a different lens. Everywhere we go. It's not a programmer standard. We're putting lobby everywhere to attract people. It's actually in every environment. So when we went to los angeles for instance a lot of people were asking us like what what. What's the lobby. actually interesting that la hotel. It was originally a sixteen hundred seat theater and a very small office tower. So that didn't actually have a lot of space on the first floor. We still operate to sixteen hundred seat. Theater restored it. It's gorgeous in the hotel. Next door has a check in a restaurant on the first floor but really has no lobby. People thought that was crazy. Considering the expectation probably built from the new york lobby but we transferred a garden rooftop into similar kind of social hub and it probably is a lot more. What la is. It's an indoor outdoor life. There's a pool you can sit around. You can drink coffee under a tree. And that's really what i think is critical for the way atelli teams think is every environment is really different and so while we have certain expectations of our hotels i think our guest as well as social environments each one will end up being very specific to its own location in new orleans. We bring in a jazz club into the lobby and these kind of things so it really is an opportunity to create a hang out there frequently. Obviously music base and things of that sort and as we grow. I think there's a lot of were get a lot of credit for having created a lot of the idea programming in hotels whether it be our bingo night in the diner restaurant palm springs or dj nights in the lobby in new york. We kind of added that thought process of energizing hotels through programming which has become bigger and bigger in the industry. It's interesting for us. it really started. I think because the new york in palm springs hotels opened right into recession. There was a real need to kind of make these places known to get the word out. So i think the programming article kelly sodden whenever partners vary involved in building that structure in our company continues today with a lot of great people and i think that continues to kind of keep that energy around our hotels. Talk to me a little bit about the newest property coming into the fold. And that is in brooklyn. I believe again like the mid town hotel. You're working with. You've worked with roman and williams as designers talked me about what we can expect for when many of us can get back on a plane and come visit you in brooklyn as we're coming out a covert and approaching the opening of our brooklyn hotel which is kind of for us in long anticipated. And we're planning to open probably mid july. It feels now that the timing is brilliant was probably more accidental than brilliant. But certainly i. It will probably end up being a good opportunity for us to come out of color pen. Hope in what. I think is gonna be really spectacular. Hotel brooklyn was very much an opportunity for us to bring back the crowds. Roman williams came back. They designed a new york probably close to ten years ago. Coming back and joining us to design brooklyn but also at the same time represent a lot of the evolution. We've had over the period of moving through said historic buildings into more modern buildings into purpose. Built buildings as brooklyn is we really collaborated closely with roman and williamson can of what is ace now. End coming into brooklyn looking at brooklyn not just as part of new york brooklyn as the city itself the true sense of brooklyn as like a working city and kind of the strain to that so the building ends up representing us slightly route. A-list compression possibly but the interiors very warm modernist interiors think really coupled into beautiful space. We do have to pay a new york style lobby but it has the real kind of modern feel. That's warm and inviting in philo sunlight during the day. Beautifully warm in the evenings at night. So it's kind of like a new york but very different it's less manhattan mode. Say we do have a an interior garden which we call springs feed garden sun-filled space and spills out into an art gallery. So it's a really interesting program. And i think probably the highlight at least for me. 'cause it's really interesting to see the art programs as they develop in the our program. This hotel curated by nikki. To auto is fiber and textile based art in each of the guest..

Brad new orleans Brad wilson first floor kelly sodden carla rebelo los angeles williams brooklyn sixteen hundred seat mid july ten years ago today new york Daniel h Seattle each one williamson nikki Dan