35 Burst results for "24"

Crosby's FG in OT helps Packers edge Patriots, Zappe 27-24

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 13 hrs ago

Crosby's FG in OT helps Packers edge Patriots, Zappe 27-24

"New England's third string quarterback Bailey zappy was forced into the game when number two Brian Hoyer suffered a first half concussion and in his debut nearly pulled off a huge upset but the packers beat the patch 27 24 in overtime Aaron Rodgers endured only his fourth career pick 6 in a rough first half of Green Bay 77 yards to set up mason Crosby's 31 yard walk off field goal on the final play of OT Wins win There was an ugly first half good second half But celebrate this and now that schedule gets physically demanding as far as job three and one packers are London bound next week to face the three in one giants patriots dropped to one in three Mark Daniels Green Bay

Bailey Zappy Brian Hoyer Mason Crosby Packers New England Aaron Rodgers Green Bay London Giants Patriots Mark Daniels Green Bay
Wilson rallies Jets past Pickett, Steelers 24-20

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 16 hrs ago

Wilson rallies Jets past Pickett, Steelers 24-20

"Zach Wilson passed for 252 yards and led the jets on an 11 play touchdown drive late in the fourth quarter to top Pittsburgh 24 20 I think there was so much growth in just those last two minutes as an offense for us to be able to put a drive like that together as clean as it was And punch it in you know it was awesome Wilson threw a touchdown and caught another on a trick play He was intercepted twice Briefs hall ran for 66 yards and the winning score for the two and two jets for Pittsburgh Mitch trubisky was replaced at quarterback by rookie Kenny Pickett at halftime Pickett ran for two touchdowns but was intercepted three times Josh Valtteri Pittsburgh

Zach Wilson Jets Pittsburgh Briefs Hall Mitch Trubisky Wilson Kenny Pickett Pickett Josh Valtteri
Henry reigns as Titans hold off Colts for 24-17 victory

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 17 hrs ago

Henry reigns as Titans hold off Colts for 24-17 victory

"Tennessee's defense was the difference maker in the Titans 24 to 17 win over Indianapolis The colts fumbled three times and quarterback Matt Ryan was sacked three times but no play was bigger than Tierra tart's interception of Ryan I mean the biggest thing was just like make sure I secure it for the team you know what I'm saying I ain't the only one to drop the ball so I felt like like I said it was it felt like it was in the air for 20 minutes So I just had to make sure I had dropped two and two Tennessee held Indianapolis to 38 rushing yards while Titan Derrick Henry rushed 414 The colts are now one two and one Tom mccabe Indianapolis

Tierra Tart Matt Ryan Tennessee Indianapolis Colts Titans Ryan Titan Derrick Henry Tom Mccabe
 Ekeler scores 3 touchdowns, Chargers hold off Texans 34-24

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 17 hrs ago

Ekeler scores 3 touchdowns, Chargers hold off Texans 34-24

"Austin Eckler ran for two touchdowns and caught a third as the Los Angeles chargers beat the Houston Texans 34 to 24 Eclairs two rushing touchdowns came in the first half and then he sealed the Chargers win with a 14 yard touchdown catch chargers head coach Brandon staley I felt like he played like a captain today beyond his performance on the field I felt like he really let our football team on offense And just play with the energy that he's known for and just a complete performance by him Justin Herbert three for 340 yards and two touchdowns for Los Angeles while Damien pierce ran for a 131 yards and a touchdown for the Texans

Los Angeles Chargers Austin Eckler Eclairs Brandon Staley Houston Texans Justin Herbert Football Damien Pierce Los Angeles Texans
Vikings hang on for 28-25 win over Saints in London

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 19 hrs ago

Vikings hang on for 28-25 win over Saints in London

"The Vikings won a last minute field goal war to beat the saints 28 25 in London Greg Joseph had a 47 yard field goal with 24 seconds remaining But the outcome hung in the balance until will lutzes 61 yard try hit the left upright and the crossbar is time expired Justin Jefferson beat Marshawn Lattimore on a 39 yard reception setting up Joseph's go ahead kick Kirk Cousins completed 25 of 38 passes for 273 yards with a touchdown and an interception Joseph was 5 for 5 on field goals for the three in one Vikings The saints fell to one and three I'm Dave fairy

Greg Joseph Justin Jefferson Vikings Marshawn Lattimore Saints London Kirk Cousins Joseph Dave Fairy
Dr. Walid Phares Gauges Putin's Reaction to Biden's Latest Speech

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

00:49 sec | 1 d ago

Dr. Walid Phares Gauges Putin's Reaction to Biden's Latest Speech

"Trump adviser, author of the choice Trump versus Obama Biden, doctor Walid Ferris. Welcome back to America first. Thank you, professor, always glad to be back with you. So what do you think Putin thinks of that speech from The White House today? Probably he knew that this would be the speech. That's why he delivered his speech first and imposed on the world in annexation of these provinces in eastern and southern Ukraine. I mean, he understood from February 24 that Putin, that this administration, the Biden administration is not going to react strategically. He had understood before that since there was draw from Afghanistan the way we did the return to the Iran deal. That's the posture of this administration and encouraging Russia and probably as you and I discussed before, China as well.

Obama Biden Walid Ferris Putin Donald Trump Biden Administration White House America Ukraine Afghanistan Iran Russia China
Corum, McCarthy lead No. 4 Michigan past Iowa, 27-14

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 1 d ago

Corum, McCarthy lead No. 4 Michigan past Iowa, 27-14

"Fourth ranked Michigan scored on four of its first 5 drives and beat Iowa 27 14 The wolverines rolled up 172 rushing yards and 327 total yards against the nation's number 6 total defense and rush defense Blake quorum led the ground attack with 133 yards and a touchdown JJ McCarthy was 18 of 24 passing for 155 yards and a score for the wolverines who didn't allow a point until the start of the fourth quarter The hawkeyes have scored just 20 points in their last three meetings with Michigan Spencer petras threw for 246 yards and two scores for Iowa I'm Dave ferry

Wolverines Blake Quorum Jj Mccarthy Michigan Iowa Hawkeyes Spencer Petras Dave Ferry
Duggan, TCU rout No. 18 Oklahoma 55-24 as Gabriel gets hurt

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 1 d ago

Duggan, TCU rout No. 18 Oklahoma 55-24 as Gabriel gets hurt

"Max duggan threw for three touchdowns and ran for two more is unranked TCU handed number 18 Oklahoma its second straight loss 55 24 People talked about you know all the stats against us and record you can still know what they've done national championships but we knew that it was our team versus their team And it doesn't matter about what they did In the past the horned frogs had four touchdowns of at least 62 yards including Doug and 67 yard run Tay barber's 73 yard catch came during a 27 point first quarter Sooners defensive back to Mont Harmon was carted off after being immobilized on a stretcher when he was injured in the fourth quarter I'm Dave ferry

Max Duggan TCU Oklahoma Tay Barber Horned Frogs Mont Harmon Doug Sooners Dave Ferry
Dr. Michael Youssef Discusses New Book 'Is the End Near?'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:35 min | 3 d ago

Dr. Michael Youssef Discusses New Book 'Is the End Near?'

"I'm always delighted to have on as my guest. My friend, doctor Michael, youssef, there's many ways you may know of him. He's written many, many books. We're talking about the new one today. He's the head of leading the way ministries, church of the apostles, and the Atlanta area. Right now we're talking about his new book, how about this for a title? Is the end near what Jesus told us about the last days. Michael youssef, my friend, welcome. Thank you so much. Glad to be with you. We have never lived at a time when asking the question is the end near is itself so startling because it's one thing to say, are we in the end times when we know we're in the end times? I think there's little doubt about that. The question now is where in the end times are we? What we're seeing is unprecedented in our lifetimes. So what do you say, doctor youssef in the new book is the end near? What is your observation? Well, it's not just unprecedented for our lifetime, as you know, I'm a little bit of an amateur historian, and I have looked through the annals of history, is there so many of the things that our lord Jesus Christ himself said about the nearness of the end as they're all come together now. And you know, you've known me for a long time, I am not what people who watch me around the world and in this country, and listen to me on radio. Then I'm not an in time preacher. There are some who are and specialize on it with the charts and gog and the my God. And I'm a get and you know, and that's fine. Don't forget it. Don't forget Henry Kissinger, arising as the Antichrist. Don't ever forget that one. Well, Hitler Mussolini, I mean, all those things have happened and go Butch off because of the mark on his forehead. You and I have seen all this. And so I did not get into any of this. I wanted to know what my lord Jesus Christ, the eternal son of God who coexisted with the father. Before all worlds said, when he was asked the question in Matthew 24, and he was asked the question, how do we know the end is near?

Youssef Michael Youssef Atlanta Michael Jesus Hitler Mussolini Henry Kissinger Butch Matthew
Is New York Is the Groping Capital of America?

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:03 min | 4 d ago

Is New York Is the Groping Capital of America?

"The story today that tickled me pardon the pun was the Times Square Elmo. Who got busted for grabbing a 14 year old girl's ass. While she was posing for a photo, listen, this kind of shit is far from an isolated incident. There are people who are actually keep reports of this nefarious stuff in New York. They keep reports on panhandlers who have hands on people between panhandlers and homeless people and I guess Disney pseudo characters or assessing street characters. New York City authorities say that people are touched 24 people per hour or touch without consent. I don't know who the fuck does this counting? I guess these complaints are called in and they notated. I don't know. But they also said that 47% of New Yorkers have had unpleasant interactions with these pushy plushies or other street hustlers at the crossroads of the world,

Times Square Elmo Disney New York New York City
What Is the Waffle House Index?

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:58 min | 4 d ago

What Is the Waffle House Index?

"This is fascinating. So the weather guessers, they rely on the national hurricane center for all their Intel. But it turns out that fema actually checks in with waffle House, they've got this massive system in place. It's called the waffle House index. Ben dieter, I know you're from what Pennsylvania, from the Amish country, a Pennsylvania. That's right. But they have waffle House. So you guys have a waffle House. Do you know what I'm talking about? Yeah. All right, have you been to the waffle House? No. You need to have a gun if you do. You've told me about it. It's always good to be prepared because there's always a fight going down at the waffle House. But the food is delicious. And they had the waffles and the hash browns and the whatnot. I'm blown away in trying to make the link between hurricane Ian and waffles. So here's the deal. Waffle House is open 24/7. It doesn't matter what's happening. 24/7. So they've got an index, and this is somewhat an informal metric, but the company uses this to figure out how bad things are in that community. So for example, if the storm comes and waffle House is serving their full menu, that means typically there's no or little damage and they've got full power. So that's green. So that's green. Next on the waffle House index is yellow. That means you may not be able to get, you know, the sausage patties, or the bacon, or the toast. They don't have biscuits at waffle House. I never could understand that, but they got toast. That means that maybe the powers a little spotty, there are some outages, and they may not have a lot of food supplies. That's yellow. Now red is the apocalypse. That means the waffle House is completely closed. And a fema says that they actually use this to determine how bad the situation is in a town. So

Waffle House Ben Dieter Pennsylvania National Hurricane Center Hurricane Ian Fema Intel Browns
Speeding up the Asylum Process

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:41 min | 5 d ago

Speeding up the Asylum Process

"I have a small quarrel in a large quarrel. My small quarrel is, and this is, by the way, it falls into category whenever I write a column for The Washington Post, the comments fill up with people. Why didn't you write about this? Why didn't you write about that? I'm not trying to do that to you because I think that's an illegitimate. Why didn't you write about this? But you said, thus far, the changes are tiny, quote, only 99 people since the end of May have completed what are called asylum merits interviews with the asylum officer and fully evaluated under new rules of those 24 had been granted asylum, while most of the rest have had their cases sent back to the immigration court system for an appeal. Nothing on how long an appeal takes or whether or not they've done anything because the first adjudication is nevertheless adjudication in this system. I work with the system fairly closely for many years in Southern California. On behalf of people, I was on the Orange County children and families commission for 17 years. I know all about people coming to the country without permission. If they don't fix the appeals they haven't fixed anything, Michael, have they done anything on the appeals process? So part of the reason that I didn't go into a lot of detail there is because they don't have many numbers yet. They just started this at the end of May. So what happened to the 50 60 some odd people, they say that those people, if they were, if they were denied asylum by the asylum officer in this interview, they say they'll go back into the backlog system, but they claim it will be months not years because essentially they'll go to the front of the line and that the court system will be expedited because they will have already had this sort of interview taking place by the asylum officer.

Immigration Court Orange County Children And Fam The Washington Post Southern California Michael
Danish PM: cannot rule out Nord Stream sabotage

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 5 d ago

Danish PM: cannot rule out Nord Stream sabotage

"A series of unusual leaks on two natural gas pipelines running from Russia under the Baltic Sea to Germany has triggered concerns about sabotage Poland's prime minister has called the events an act of sabotage while Danish prime minister meta fredericksen says she could not rule it out after three leagues were detected over the past day on the Nord stream one and two pipelines And a researcher at the royal Danish defense college says when such a number of leagues on two pipelines happen within 24 hours its strange It is so strange that you get to wonder and ask yourself could this be sabotage Nielsen poses another question Could there be an advantage for Russia in trying to destabilize the European energy market even further I'm Charles De Ledesma

Meta Fredericksen Baltic Sea Royal Danish Defense College Russia Poland Germany Nielsen Charles De Ledesma
FDR, Woodrow Wilson Were Racists

Mark Levin

01:10 min | 5 d ago

FDR, Woodrow Wilson Were Racists

"FDR really didn't lift a finger For blacks in America Or barely Lifted a finger That's the truth And wouldn't take on Other bigots in his party It's the same thing with Asian Americans Japanese Americans and specific He had said things had written things in 1923 24 25 2060 folks I do my research That's what I do Mark what do you do for a hobby That's what I do And then the back benches can clean up with their pick up the crumbs But that's the facts He wrote viciously About Asians that Asians and Europeans couldn't mix Shouldn't mix You didn't hear this did you Didn't hear this On Ken burns documentary did you Maybe there ought to be a Mark Levin documentary

America Mark Ken Burns Mark Levin
Hurricane Ian gets nasty quickly, turbocharged by warm water

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 5 d ago

Hurricane Ian gets nasty quickly, turbocharged by warm water

"Experts say hurricanes are being turbocharged by warmer at lytic waters I Norman hall Hurricane Ian grew to major status rapidly in experts say that's due to oceans partly heated up by climate change There have been 30 other Atlantic tropical storms since 2017 that became much more powerful and less than a day Colorado state university researcher Philip klotzbach says and also developed with rapid intensification which is a storm that intensifies by at least 35 mph in a 24 hour period A new yet to be published study in a peer reviewed journal shows that as hurricanes near the coast a danger point where people storms are intensifying more quickly than ever before I Norman hall

Norman Hall Hurricane Ian Philip Klotzbach Colorado State University Atlantic
Antwane Bohanon: What Is the Tennessee Volunteer Military Academy?

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:24 min | 5 d ago

Antwane Bohanon: What Is the Tennessee Volunteer Military Academy?

"So I want to jump into this. I've never heard of the Tennessee volunteer military academy. This is what grades 6 through 12. Yes, currently gray 6 two 12. We petitioned with the Memphis Shelby county schools to be able to open up fall of 23, 24, and now we're just waiting back for that approval. All right, so my understanding is that you've been getting some blowback over this to some extent. What's going on, why the problem? Well, one of the problems that we currently have in our city is that there are a lot of individuals doing the exact same things from public schools, charter schools, and now we have something different, which is a full-time ROTC military charter academy. So from that mindset, everyone thinks that we're going to militarize our children. So, and that's my understanding here, the chairman of the local Republican Party was jumping into this because the school board denied the school because of concerns that you were guys were going to want to create a militia or something. Well, not necessarily a militia, but to a point where they weren't quite familiar with how we would actually perform. So yes, Kerry von did get involved and also mister John du Barry, the senior adviser to governor Lee is also on our board. So we're in compliance, now we're just waiting for approval.

Tennessee Volunteer Military A Shelby County Memphis Rotc Republican Party Kerry Von Mister John Du Barry Governor Lee
Arizona Man Sues Clinic Over Abortion Given to His Ex-Wife

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:07 min | 6 d ago

Arizona Man Sues Clinic Over Abortion Given to His Ex-Wife

"I want to talk about a case involving a woman who had an abortion, turns out to be four years ago, and her ex-husband, a guy named Mario villegas, has found an ingenious way to sort of hit back, not at the wife, but really at the medical establishment at the abortionists at the abortion clinic. So what do you do? He couldn't really Sue as the husband because in an era where the woman has choice. It's her decision. It's her decision alone. Now interestingly, if she has the child, the husband is responsible for supporting the child and becomes a sort of partner in paying up, but in the decision about whether to have the child a woman sort of reigns supreme. It's her choice. So the husband in a sense could not make a case and say, I'm gonna agree husband I want her to have the child. So what he did ingeniously was he created an estate for the unborn and now of course deceased child, a child was in fact aborted. So he creates an estate and then on behalf of the estate, he sues not the ex-wife, but he sues the doctors and the clinic that provided the abortion. Basically, Arizona has had, and this is even, this is even while roe versus wade was in effect. Arizona has had a kind of a law that requires the state that requires people providing an abortion to provide a whole bunch of information to the woman. Medical information like all the risks associated with the procedure legal information and there's also a 24 hour waiting period. So basically what this man Mario villegas charges is that the clinic failed to do these things in a precise way with his now ex-wife. They failed to provide her with proper information. They did not tell her all the risks and therefore the clinic by going ahead with the abortion in violation of Arizona's informed consent law has an essential wrongfully killed. This child

Mario Villegas SUE Arizona Wade
Why the Left Is Normalizing Myocarditis

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:25 min | Last week

Why the Left Is Normalizing Myocarditis

"Many of my Friends are suffering from myocarditis. Are the leaders ever going to apologize for the mRNA gene altering? Intervention that they pushed on all of us. Well, there's a new advertising that's normalizing. Myocarditis and children play cut one 23. I've been into fashion since I can remember. But one day I just stomachache so bad. I didn't want to do anything. The team at New York Presbyterian said it was actually my heart. It was severely swollen. Something called myocarditis, but doctors gave me medicines and used machines to control my heartbeat. Big save me. So now I can become the next great fashion designer. Normalizing myocarditis. One 24, Moderna used to say, there was no incident of myocarditis, and yet we're seeing a very strange uptick in pericarditis and myocarditis. Play cut one 24. In summary and very briefly, the reactogenicity of this vaccine was essentially the same, no better or worse than what we see with any of a number of childhood vaccines that we regularly administer to our children. There was no incidence of myocarditis or multisystem inflammatory syndrome of children.

Myocarditis Moderna New York Multisystem Inflammatory Syndr
"24" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

08:04 min | Last month

"24" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"We were discussing earlier, today marks the 31st anniversary of Ukraine's independence from the Soviet Union. It's also 6 months since Russia launched its invasion of Ukraine. Well, my next guest is someone who's witnessed Russian politics up close. Sir roderick braithwaite is the bestselling author who formerly served as Britain's ambassador to Moscow. His new book, Russia, myths and realities, gallops through the last 1000 years of Russian history to examine the country's complicated routes. I began by asking sir roderick to guide us through some of the biggest turning points. Well, it does go back a very long way. And I think part of the reason why people find Russia difficult to understand it's a thousand years of history, which is a lot of it not very well documented and a lot of it we don't know, but it is, of course, absolutely vital to the way the Russians see themselves and the way they see their position in the world. And they have been always exposed to invasion from the east starting with the Mongols and from the west and you just have to run through the list of lithuanians and poles and Swedes and Turks and Hungarians and of course Germans and French who have invaded them at regular intervals. And so they have this embattled feeling about them that somebody's always out to get them. Kyiv has been very much or was very much at the center of what I'm just going to call Russia for experience, but of course many other names as we know. When did that lose its power? Well, I mean, there is, of course, a tremendous row between historians which people about what Kyiv's role is in relation to modern Ukraine and modern Russia and how they're all related to one another Kyiv was originally set up on the river as the people who started in the north of Vikings moved south to raid towards Byzantium and a lot of people call Slavs moved north up the river and they met and depending on what you believe became one nation speaking one language as far as language and founded this great state. It was very ramshackle state called Kyiv for Kyiv and farus. And it was one of the most powerful states in Europe and it was literate. It was probably more literate than Western Europe was at the time until the Mongols invaded in 1242 and destroyed it. And they stayed in what is now northwest Russia for the next 200 years. Princes from the same dynasty, it was one dynasty. Gradually came together under the leadership of Moscow, got rid of the Mongols and started to expand themselves into what Russians still believe are there ancestral lands. That's to say the lands around Kyiv and the lands towards the Baltic and the lands westwards towards Poland. Why do you think Russia's always struggled with democracy? I mean, there are examples of where, in fact, got close but never quite managed at Catherine's reforms. Alexander the second, the end of the Soviet Union, why has it never quite taken off? If you look at the geography, it's unmanageably huge country from the 17th century when they added that the whole of Siberia to it. It became the biggest country in the world. And with very, very inadequate governmental machinery to keep it going. So Catherine the greater self said there is no way you can run a country this size, except through an autocracy. And that geographical constraint may well be the reason why Russia has never been able to cope with democracy because they fear and they've often been right, that if you let people run their own fares, it's a state will fall apart. Now you were British ambassador to Moscow during those crucial years between 88 and 92. You've also been a foreign policy adviser to the government. What would you advise our incoming leader to do about Ukraine? Arguably Johnson's only success has been in that area, or is that all just more rhetoric from him? I'm not a reliable witness on that subject. I think it was largely rhetoric. It was the right thing to do, but it was not a difficult thing to do to spend money on arming the Ukrainians. And I'm glad he did. But in terms of advising, I think we are dealing with a war which was launched by Putin, he launched it, and if that isn't somehow dealt with, it could spread further. So I think of it, we have to go on supporting the Ukrainians, and that's the first bit of advice I'd give. The second thing is rather more difficult because at the end of the day, this war is going to end as wars do. And they end in this one side secures a total victory as we did in Germany in 1945. It ends with talks. It ends with some sort of compromise. That's the first point, the second point is that whatever we think about Russia and however much we dislike its current government of the west behaving, it is that it has more nuclear warheads than any other country in the world. It does spread across 11 time zones, and we can't ignore it. And so we need to be able to talk to the Russians or the Americans in particular need to be able to talk to the Russians about things like nuclear weapons and making sure that nobody uses any of them. We are going to need to talk about economic matters eventually with the Russians again. And we're going to have to find some way of reaching an arrangement whereby peace and good order is effectively restored in Eastern Europe. Without undermining the sovereignty of any of the countries there, the risk is, there is always is that big countries in the end make settlements with one another, which damage the interest of small countries. And I think we've already done enough of that in Eastern Europe, what we're Czechoslovak and Poland in 1939 and yalta at the end of the war. So I think we need to be very careful in the next British government needs to be very careful not to give any hint that we're prepared to settle over the heads of the Ukrainians. You have a quote in the book it's a Russian saying, Russia is a country with an unpredictable past, and in your epilogue you write history is something different from the past. It's the changeable story we tell about the past. How do you think Russia will mythologize this current incident? How will it be remembered in history? I think it's pretty early to say that. I think it's going to be a very difficult period for them to fold into a as it were a positive, possibly even optimistic version of Russian history. They were trying to do that because we all of us like to be comfortable with our history and there are attempts in all our countries, including this one, to promote patriotic versions of history. We have our island story and all that stuff. So they will try to do that. I think it would be quite difficult for them. I think that barring something quite unexpected. They will look back on this period as one where they were misled into following a course of action, which has left them poorer, more isolated, and to some extent divorced from traditions that they would like to be part of. Not so much the democratic one, but the sort of general western civilization. They're not Chinese the Russians. They don't think of themselves as Asians. And so I think they will find it difficult to devise a comfortable narrative about what's happening at the moment. So it may take them ten, 20, 30 years to get over it. That was the roderick braithwaite. His book, Russia, myths and realities is out tomorrow in paperback. It's

Russia Kyiv Sir roderick braithwaite sir roderick Moscow Soviet Union Catherine Byzantium Vikings Britain Western Europe Baltic Siberia Eastern Europe Alexander Europe Putin Johnson yalta Germany
"24" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:41 min | 3 months ago

"24" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Eric <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> greitens <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for it is <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> he has brilliantly <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and wittily <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> conflated the two <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> proceeding on the <Speech_Music_Male> doubtless correct assumption <Speech_Music_Male> that shooting both <Speech_Music_Male> kinds of rhinos <Speech_Music_Male> is the sort of thing of <Speech_Music_Male> which his voters would <Speech_Music_Male> approve. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Do you see what he has <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> done here? Honestly, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> he must have had <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> his best people up <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> all night on <Speech_Male> this one. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Rhino as in <Speech_Male> Republican in name <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> only is a term <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of abuse frequently <Speech_Male> flung by seething <Speech_Male> trumpets in <Speech_Male> the direction of <Speech_Male> those of their fellow <Speech_Male> conservatives who <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> also maintain a <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> passing interest in the <Speech_Music_Male> constitution, the rule <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of law norms and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> conventions that kind <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of stuff. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Greitens <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> previously actually <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> governor of Missouri, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> which we suppose <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> somebody has to be <Speech_Male> appears in his <Speech_Male> ad slash thinly <Speech_Male> veiled death threat <Speech_Male> carrying a shotgun <Speech_Music_Male> and surrounded <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by cosplaying <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> ninny's <Speech_Music_Male> in khaki camouflage. <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Join the maga <Speech_Male> crew, get a rhino <Speech_Male> hunting permit. <Speech_Male> There's no bagging limit, <Speech_Music_Male> no tagging limit, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and it doesn't expire <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> until we <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> save our country. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Intrigued enough <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to have a bit of a <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> flip through the governor's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> CV, we learned <Speech_Male> though would <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> characterize our <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> surprise as <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> short of complete <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> that subheadings <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on his Wikipedia <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> page <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> include, but are by no <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> means limited to <Speech_Music_Male> indictment, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> impeachment <Speech_Music_Male> and resignation <Speech_Music_Male> campaign <Speech_Male> finance violations <Speech_Male> and a <Speech_Male> fair and sexual <Speech_Music_Male> assault allegations. <Speech_Male> It's always <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the ones you'd least <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> suspect <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for monocle 24 <Music> <Advertisement> and Andrew mullet. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> Thank you very much, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Andrew. And <Speech_Male> that's all for this edition <Speech_Male> of the briefing. <Speech_Male> It was produced <Speech_Male> by John <Speech_Male> mccord, our researcher <Speech_Male> was Isabel Rosen <Speech_Male> and our studio <Speech_Male> manager was Kevin <Speech_Male> McLean. The briefing <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> is back on <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Monday at the same time. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Music> Thanks for listening.

Eric Missouri Andrew mullet Isabel Rosen Andrew John Kevin
"24" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:54 min | 3 months ago

"24" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Today, so the Chancellor Rishi sunak who's often is often suggested that he might be someone to resign that this might then precipitate a crisis and ultimate crisis for Boris Johnson, but he was saying, you know, look, we all take responsibility for the by election results and he was determined to continue tackling the cost of living. It seems like lots of people are kind of throwing little snowballs and little stones down the slope and they're kind of hoping that an avalanche is going to happen, which is going to be the only thing that ultimately pushes Boris Johnson out, but you very much get the sense that we're not quite there yet, though it might happen. And that Boris Johnson certainly doesn't want to go. How big of a problem is Boris Johnson for the party at the moment? I think he is a problem certainly it is his own backbench MPs. Let's not forget that although he survived the confidence vote, a 148 of his own conservative MPs said they didn't want him to carry on as leader. So there's a lot of issues here that are causing in trouble. And some of the policies he's coming up is responses with, for instance, sending of asylum seekers to Rwanda, which is hit all sorts of legal obstacles. The trouble is that once it comes down to the character of the prime minister and people finding that a problem and his behavior and what he has done, that's something that's very difficult to change. A prime minister can promise to change their style, change the people around them and so forth. But if people ultimately think that your character is at stake, that's something that is fundamentally difficult to change. A terrorist, thank you for joining us. You are listening to the briefing on Monaco 24. It is 2016 in.

Boris Johnson Rishi sunak Rwanda Monaco
"24" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:58 min | 3 months ago

"24" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"A lot of countries, they won't say it too loudly, but they feel disappointed that some countries who were admitted from former Soviet countries like Poland and Hungary got into the EU and then actually didn't keep up the standards that they were expected. For example, on rule of law, judiciary, media. So as a result, I think a lot of people were put off the whole idea of enlargement here. However, the war, these big historical moments can change things and here we are now four months after war and now that Ukraine is on the path for EU membership. So look, I think it has kind of changed the calculation here. Absolutely. Just finally, I'm quite in brief if you may. Georgia was also applying for a candidate status. What was the message it got from Brussels? I think the message there, it was kind of lumped together with Moldova and for a long time, they said that Georgia was just falling short. That there's too much their politically the government there doesn't have the willingness to do the reforms necessary at the moment. There's been lots of protest there. For example, and you know, it's just not at the right level. Moldova is different as we move in closer towards the EU. It's got a very progressive president. It's foreign military law being carefully. So they've decoupled the two, if you like. And that might be some kind of model we see at some point for Albania, Macedonia that have been kind of coupled together and the May serve to kind of decouple them. Thanks for the sub dates. Suzanne, that was political. In Brussels and now here is more of course carlotta rubella with the days, other new set lies. Thanks, Marcus. The U.S. Senate has passed a gun control bill which has been described as the most significant firearms legislation in decades. The reforms include tougher background checks for buyers younger than 21, and $15 billion in funding for mental health programs and school security upgrades. Ukrainian forces in the city of severodonetsk have been ordered to withdraw, according to the top regional official. Russian forces have nearly encircled the administrative center of the Luhansk region in recent days, reportedly the cities entire infrastructure has been completely destroyed. And the monocle minute reports on Indonesian president Yoko plans to travel to Kyiv and Moscow next week to meet his counterparts volodymyr zelensky and Vladimir Putin. For more, head to monocle dot com slash minutes. Those are the days headlines back to you Marcus. Thank you very much, Carlos. Now here in the UK prime minister Boris Johnson Conservative Party suffered a blow in the first by election since he is recent no confidence votes, the party lost seats in Thibaut and hornet and endeavor and Wakefield in Yorkshire. To look at the results and what they mean for the Conservative Party, I'm joined by Terry stiasny, all throughout political journalist, good afternoon to you. Hi, Marcus. Good to first put these by election results in some kind of context. How bad are they exactly? Well, they're extremely bad for the Conservative Party and they're bad for two different sets of reasons, if you like. They were two very different constituencies at stake here. One of them was Wakefield in west Yorkshire, which had been a labor held seat for most of certainly living memory until the conservatives won it at the last election in 2019. Now the MP there had to step down because he was convicted of sexual offenses. And the labor managed to take the seat back with a majority of nearly 5000 seats. So that's one of these so called red wall seats, if you like, traditional labor seats that the conservatives had won. Now tybalt and Holton in Devon is a very different place. It's a rural seat. It has almost always again, but certainly for the last hundred years had a conservative MP. It had a majority of 24,000 conservative votes at the last election. Had to resign because he was watching pornography in the House of Commons chamber. And the liberal Democrats in this very rural constituency overturned this majority to end up with a majority of 6000 votes over the conservatives. And that was a 30% swing to the party against the conservatives. So always round, this has been a bad set of results for the Conservative Party. Looking at a number of possible reasons why voters would have abandoned the conservatives. How much was all this about Boris Johnson? Well, I mean, in part, yes, this certainly was about Boris Johnson. I mean, the winning Liberal Democrat in Timothy tiverton and Holton said that Boris Johnson came up on the every doorstep that he had outstate is welcome. I mean, that is, of course, what you would expect to hear from someone who had been fighting a battle against the conservatives. But also the bigger issues, the things like the economy have, of course, come into play. So labor reacting to the Wakefield results said it showed that the country had lost confidence in the conservatives labor was back on the side of the working people. So that is what they are stressing. And of course, what is interesting now is how the Conservative Party are reacting to these results when it's only been a few weeks since Boris Johnson won a no confidence vote called by his own backbench MPs. Well, the party's co chairman Oliver dowden has already resigned, but Boris Johnson won't go, we'll hear. He won't go voluntarily or easily. I mean, Boris Johnson was apparently swimming in a Kigali hotel swimming pool in Rwanda this morning as the news of this resignation and these bad results came through. He was apparently blindsided as sources say by this result, but he's saying in a voters are going through a tough time, the midterm governments lose by elections all the time. But this resignation of Oliver dowden was really quite surprising. This happened at 25 to 6 in the morning when Oliver downed and had been due to be the person to go on the radio and the TV and defend the government in the face of these by election losses. And he said that he was shared the voters feelings of being distressed and disappointed. And you can only ask, well, who did you think that they were distressed and disappointed in and who is Oliver dowden disappointed in? In his resignation there. So he kind of professed his loyalty to the Conservative Party rather than to the prime minister. So I think what we're waiting for now is to see whether anybody else follows him out of government. And we've already had a call from the former conservative leader, Michael Howard, today, saying that the party and the country would be better off under new leadership. What do you expect from the Conservative Party now what is going to happen next? Well, this is the difficult question, really..

Boris Johnson Conservative Party EU Moldova Marcus carlotta rubella Brussels severodonetsk Luhansk Wakefield volodymyr zelensky Georgia Thibaut Terry stiasny Holton Oliver dowden Hungary Poland Albania
"24" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:53 min | 3 months ago

"24" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Up on today's program, we chart the broker if Ukraine and to Moldova's European Union accession bid says their granted EU candidate status, turmoil in the Tory party continues as Boris Johnson's ruling conservatives lose seats in this week's by elections. We will also discuss the worrying developments in Myanmar as the country's deposed leader Aung San Suu Kyi is moved to prison. And as its Friday and sumo will recap what we learned this week. We learned any way that it had been quite the week for banning staff as we learned that listeners to Ukrainian radio stations would henceforth have to struggle along without hearing much of this sort of thing. All that bright here on the briefing with me, Marcus hippie. Ukraine and Moldova have both been granted EU candidate status, lead us off the EU countries approved the move at a special summit in Brussels last night, Ukraine applies just days after the Russian invasion in February and the process moved at a record speed, the path to membership is still likely to take a number of years. For more on this, I'm joined by Suzanne lynch author of politicos, Brussels, playbook, welcome to the program. Cezanne was this expected. Well, it was. I mean, the EU leaders had given a strong indication that they were going to support this bid for candidate status by Ukraine. And the European Commission last week kind of brought out its official opinion, which stated that they did recommend candidates out of Ukraine with certain conditions. And really the way that these things work is that the commission would have got a signal really from, particularly the big countries, France and Germany, et cetera. That they were willing to support this. So in one sense, it was kind of a sign off by the EU leaders when they mentioned they're still meeting here in Brussels. Last night, they did all unanimously all 27 EU leaders agreed to grant Ukraine along with Moldova candidate status. Is this for this country? I mean, it's hugely symbolic. It's a very much another slap in the face for Vladimir Putin. You know, we're now four months since he launched the invasion of Ukraine. We're now in a situation that Ukraine is now actually moving closer to EU membership than it ever was before. So this is another inadvertent unexpected unintended consequence of the Russian invasion just as we're now in a position where Finland and Sweden are about to join nation. So from that point of view, it's a hugely symbolic moment. Obviously, in many ways, this current conflict had its roots back in 2013 in 2014, when the might and protests after the pro Russian government in Ukraine pulled out at the last minute of signing in agreement with the EU and that sparked the protests, which in turn led to the Russian annexation of Crimea. So a lot of people here in Brussels, including the European Commission, president of underlying, really seeded war as in part, a kind of punishment for Ukraine for actually its pro EU credentials for trying to want to get closer to the EU. So look, it's very important. Zelensky, welcomed it. However, as you said at the outset, you know, the issue here is that it is not going to happen anytime soon. The accession process for any European country to join the EU takes a long time and this is not going to be any different for Ukraine. How do you think this is perceived by, say, the country is of the western Balkans that are now, I think, in their 20th year in the queue. Yeah, so this is one of the issues before the summit began yesterday afternoon. We had a kind of a mini summit between the leaders of the 6 western Balkan countries and EU leaders. It went on for about four hours and really didn't come to any conclusion. A lot of those countries were quite disillusioned that they have been on the Succession path for some time. One of the issues that they're kind of lumped together 6 countries, whereas in fact, they're all very different countries. So there's now kind of debate about if that's the best way to approach it. But also you've got specific issues there with those countries. And you've got issues deriving from a yuk slav war. They're the complicates, say, for example, surveys, accession, Kosovo, you've got an issue around North Macedonia that Bulgaria member the EU is actually showing North Macedonia's the next stage for North Macedonia, even though actually as we speak, this should be a vote in the Bulgarian parliament about this. So that's one thing. So Ukraine is different. It doesn't have those kind of issues. But it's got other problems. For example, Ukraine is a huge country. And it's a very poor country. So that would have huge implications if it was to join the EU. It would have implications, for example, for the common agricultural policy. You know, Ukraine has got this vast farmlands. So that would cost EU. But did a lot of those kind of issues now, the money involved, et cetera, are going to be the kind of things that officials in the commission are going to start thinking about for Ukraine. As we have mentioned already, the path to membership for both of these countries Ukraine and Moldova is going to be very long. What will happen next though? What do these countries need to do now? Well, the execution process, they usually divide the whole process into what they call chapters. So you've got negotiating chapters that you've over 30 of those. And they're kind of big discussion documents on different aspects of how a country is run. So for example, the legal system or the plurality of the media or the judiciary, those kind of things. And you're going to have officials in Brussels working with officials in Ukraine to see how quickly Ukraine can come up to speed on those standards at the EU has on all those areas. Now, there's a specific problem, obviously, that this is a country at war. So, you know, how far that's going to slow down its ability to meet those standards. So that's going to be a major issue. But the European Commission president von der leyen was there a couple of weeks ago and she was sounded quite a positive note saying she feels that Ukraine, the government there had already been on the reform path. It's got the political willingness to do that. And that it can still continue on that path even as the war is going on. We've been talking about all these complications, but if you think about the future and say Ukraine's membership of the European Union, how would the union benefit from Ukraine? Well, I think having a country like that that is bordering the EU as part of its own community. Geopolitically would be quite important. We can see what's happened, for example, with gas. It's still dependent on Russia and Ukraine is kind of in between Russia and Europe. So getting in the EU. So Ukrainian sphere of influence, if you like, would be strategically very important. However, you know, as well as the issues that you create itself bring the I mentioned the size, the poverty of the country. There's also kind of an enlargement fatigue, which is set in here in Brussels..

Ukraine EU Moldova Brussels North Macedonia Tory party Marcus hippie Suzanne lynch European Commission Russian government Boris Johnson Aung San Suu Kyi Cezanne western Balkan Myanmar Vladimir Putin Bulgarian parliament Crimea Finland Balkans
"24" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:46 min | 3 months ago

"24" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Tell us what the mood here is in Zürich because I've flown into this beautiful sunny city. And it does seem to me, certainly when you come from the kind of economic hardships of Britain that this city certainly, I'm not sure about the rest of the country, is thriving. Absolutely, it's been remarkable to see Switzerland roots through it in particular, sort of come back alive on the back of the pandemic and also with the summer months, the sunshine always brings the Swiss out. But the city is very vibrant, thriving, we haven't had the very difficult economic turmoil, as you mentioned, that that Britain does. Interest rates here are also not quite as high. So there's a great deal of optimism. The mood is good. We're looking forward to the summer. Me too. Thank you. That's Alexander chesi. This is the globalist stay tuned. Now later today I'm going to be traveling from Zürich to gestade for world gestade that stands for world of words international literature symposium. It's a not for profit annual event that takes place in gestalt Switzerland at the end of June every year with the mission of furthering debate about the role of literature in modern society, supporting educational programs and encouraging new writers. While Thomas guns is the founder of the event and he's on the line now, Thomas, welcome, I'm so looking forward to seeing you later today. Likewise, Georgina, it's good to hear from you. Now what made you want to start a literature festival? Well, you know, I had stepped down from a full-time profession as a corporate lawyer first in New York and then in London with the goal of writing myself. And in the meantime, as you and your listeners no doubt, no, it takes a while to switch to profession like that. I thought I needed to do some good and try and encourage the importance of understanding literature's role and also its definition in society today. And by definition, I mean, the importance of not thinking of it as some sort of esoteric academic activity, writing, it's just storytelling, literature is your storytelling. And I wanted to spread that word as much as possible. And since I live now in style, I thought this would be the place to do it. And what differentiates well, gushed out from many other festivals that exist already. So the main difference I would say is that what I'm hoping to build with wild SHAD is for us to have a much more immersive and interactive experience for attendees who come to listen to the authors as opposed to something as brilliant, but much bigger as something like the hay festival, which will involve thousands of people over many days and the ability to just dip in and dip out. I would hope that we'll be able to create a discourse that will go on among the writers and among the attendees for the whole two days of the event. Last year was your inaugural event. What were the highlights then? Oh, it's difficult to say highlights because they were also good. I mean, we were against all odds able to put something on the COVID restrictions were in place time. We were not able to sell tickets, not many people thought we could put it off. And she did. I mean, I remember trying to come and I couldn't because of COVID. So let's talk about this year then. Who are the speakers? And what are the general discussion themes? So to the extent that there's an overall theme, I would say the topics of each writer's discussion will all come broadly under the topic of what does literature mean today and why is it still relevant? Why pick up a book? And we've got some amazing authors. Starting with Louis de bellier, who I'm pleased to report was able to arrive from London despite this rail strokes. And he is here author of captain corelli's mandolin. Frederick beggar, who is sometimes referred to as the bad boy of French literature, quite caustic cynical style writing, but absolutely brilliant. At the same time, Martin zuta, who is without doubt in the top three current Swiss authors, at least I sure do sapan, who is a French Korean writer whose book was the first book. In fact, when she was nominated and won for the U.S. literary award national book award, best translated one. And although we're having a little bit of trouble now with some travel difficulties, in theory, got lined up leaked up into Elliot Ackerman. It sounds absolutely brilliant. And in fact, I'll be in conversation with mutton Sutter on Saturday evening. And people can still get tickets, can't they? How do they do that? Absolutely easy peasy. Just go on to the website whilst I had WOW GST AAD dot com. And it's right there in front of you. Excellent. Thomas, thank you very much, indeed. That's Thomas Gomez, who is founder of wild gestad as he says. You can book tickets at Wagyu style dot com. And let me also tell you that in addition to being in conversation with mutton Ceuta on Saturday night, Tyler brulee and I will be broadcasting live from gestade on Sunday morning, so monocle on Sunday will come from gestad and we very much hope that if you can't be there in person that you'll join us then. This.

Zürich Alexander chesi Thomas guns Switzerland Britain COVID Georgina Louis de bellier London Thomas captain corelli Frederick beggar Martin zuta sapan New York U.S. literary award national b Elliot Ackerman mutton Sutter Thomas Gomez Tyler brulee
"24" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:02 min | 3 months ago

"24" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"If NATO still determined to stay out of the conflict, what will be on the table there? Everyone's kind of awaiting this NATO summit in Madrid next week indeed and Ukraine will be a major topic. Either directly or actually indirectly. That's the usual suspects on the agenda, of course, which is deterrence of Russia, hence NATO's capabilities on its own territory towards the east. And continuous support for Ukraine. But NATO has always made it very clear and everyone knows that and this will stay that NATO troops, for example, NATO, whatever equipment will not be directly used or committed to Ukraine. So it's about this delivering weapons to the Ukrainian army, which has shown that it's very capable to use this equipment that is the ultimate goal. NATO is obviously very wary of any further escalation of the conflict in terms of spreading to neighboring countries and we've seen that already that with latest dispute around Kaliningrad, where Lithuania tightened the restrictions of traffic that can go through Kaliningrad, this Russian exclave. That there's a very big worry that things could escalate. So NATO stays out, but let's be fair, Putin already considers himself in a war with NATO. He can define this kind of conflict, however he likes, but NATO is quite adamant to make its own red lines very clear. A lot of you mentioned that weapons are needed yesterday. There's a lovely press report that a Ukrainian politician and TV personality says an online fundraising pitch aimed at helping Ukraine by three offensive drones raise over $10 million in 24 hours. Is that the case and are we seeing Ukrainians actually coming together to do a lot more of this themselves? Well, we're not only seeing Ukrainians come together and do it themselves. The international support from the corporate world is also quite impressive. Just the other day, a Ukrainian organization called the povidone received permission to actually import arms. It's a humanitarian organization, a non governmental organization that now has gotten that green light and is working closely with western states. So it's and we're also seeing a movement towards the development of an Iron Dome because it had a Ukraine skies been closed. This never would have happened. This disaster would have never happened. And now, because Ukraine's partners, including Israel, were having a very difficult time admitting that Ukraine needs something like an iron zone. They're working on it. They're creating these engineers from numerous countries, including Japan, are really forced speed ahead in order to protect the Ukraine in a manner in which other states have not been able to do. So I'm going to finally turkey wants to gather the United Nations Russia and Ukraine to organize a UN plan that would allow the safe shipment of agricultural products from Ukrainian ports, obviously we're looking at a huge food crisis globally. Do we have any details on this? There's been some details about the proposals generally speaking the port of Odessa is key on that, of course, which is mined by Ukrainian forces to obviously keep Russian invasion forces out of its harbor. And that's the talk of 20 to 30 million tons of Ukrainian grain that could be exported that kind of sitting there and waiting, but obviously these maritime routes are very disputed. Turkey being very key in the Black Sea and having stakes itself, of course, in all of that, has suggested numerous times in the past to actually allow or escort such kind of grain tankers, but so far Ukraine is reluctant rather looking into actually land, transit that would still allow them to keep their support blocked with mines. So it's unlikely. There is efforts at the UN as secretary general Guterres has been very involved as well. Turkish president Erdoğan has pushed for that, but it's kind of still the same stumbling blocks. But at least give a tiny sign of hope last week from mariupol is now sadly Russian controlled Ukrainian port one ship of grain could actually leave. Maybe that's a tiny sign that actors get more pragmatic because as you say, Georgina does a global food crisis looming or already happening. And ladder Ross Lake there, thank you both very much. It's.

NATO Kaliningrad Ukrainian army Russia Madrid Lithuania Putin UN Turkey Israel Odessa Japan general Guterres Black Sea Erdoğan mariupol Georgina Ross Lake
"24" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

08:51 min | 7 months ago

"24" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Reminder there that this, of course, is going to have an international dimension far beyond any military responses to this, but returning to that thought sir Richard. How wary will NATO be, even as it shores up its eastern defenses of the possibility of some kind of escalation by accident. When it's got to be really wary. But it's equally the response has been. It's got to assume the very worst that there will be an incursion that we've heard Putin say that the most appropriate security settlement for Europe is a new yelta, and of course the old yalta of February 45 was the blueprint under which Stalin dominated Eastern Europe under the Warsaw Pact. And then subsequently. He also will have similar contempt I suspect for other Soviet republics, such as Latvia, Estonia, and Lithuania, which were part of the Soviet empire, part of the tsarist empire, which the Russians think of as theirs. And so we have to assume the very worst. And that means that NATO has absolutely got a step up to the mark. Interesting listening to Jens Stoltenberg earlier. Not a bad start. But fundamentally, this requires the mobilization of conventional capabilities by sea by land and in the air by NATO. Not seen on a scale since the end of the Cold War. Now that's got to be a challenge for NATO because the bucket is pretty damn near empty as a result of the cumulative disarmament, particularly in Europe over the last decade plus. Well, actually, on that subject, sir Richard, I did want to put to you a statement extraordinary statement really released in the last couple of hours by the former German minister of defense. Who has said and I quote, I'm so angry at us for historically failing after Georgia Crimea and Donbass we have not prepared anything that would really have deterred Putin. Do you think that's accurate? It is absolutely accurate. Absolutely accurate, which is why I wrote my book in 2016 forecasting precisely what is happening now as a wake-up call. And what we have seen is the smug complacency of politicians unprepared to recognize that their first duty is to protect the nation. And our defense in the UK, for example, the defense of every nation in NATO starts in the forests of Latvia Lithuania and Estonia and on the frontiers between Romania and Moldova and in Bulgaria. Stephen, to bring you back in, is there you are a veteran Russia correspondent Russia watcher has there been a fundamental misunderstanding on the part of Europe, whether out of naivety, complacency, wishful thinking, and assumption that Vladimir Putin really he's basically just like us a bit rough around the edges, but ultimately rational and reasonable. That's exactly what's been happening. And I think we've seen very good examples of it lately, for example, president Macron, I'm not wishing to single him out to criticize him personally, but I think his missions to Moscow sitting at the end of that absurd long table where he thought, you know, you can, you can talk to this guy. No, you can't. Putin is not a politician, Putin is a Secret Service agent whose view of the world is totally different and whose view of the world has changed dramatically in recent years. If we go back to 2000 when he was put in that position of president, he shows a certain amount of uncertainty. He shows a certain amount of discipline with his own people. He clamps down on the media, he imprisons her to kosky, he starts taking business back under state control. But it's really that there's a turning point at the end of 2011, which is when Putin is still ostensibly prime minister although everyone thought he was still running the country. But there are mass demonstrations in Russia about rigged elections to the Russian parliament, the Duma. Putin three months after that comes back as president, and that has been a huge warning sign to him. I've got to clamp down on this. And we see the screws being tightened on freedom and democracy in Russia from that point and then, of course, also as he's losing popularity through 2012, 2013, he thinks, what can I do to bring it back? And he seizes Crimea from Ukraine and does it in a hugely cynical way. He actually at first having said nothing to do with me a year later, he acknowledges that what he did was in the Kremlin at his desk, he signed the order to seize Crimea from Ukraine and then got on a plane and flew down to Sochi to preside over the closing ceremony of the Winter Olympics, how cynical is that. And from that point on, we've seen him going further downhill. And I think in the last couple of years, he's shut himself off from the world because of fearing coronavirus and his mindset has changed so much. He's become obsessed with this idea that there is no such country as Ukraine and I've got to get rid of it. And I think that is possibly his biggest weakness because those around him and many of the Russian people are not going to support this. Sir Richard, these are all excruciating questions to even have to consider, but NATO will write now be considering them and to remind our listeners you were deputy supreme commander allied forces at NATO until quite recently. Is there any kind of halfway house variety option here for NATO some suggestion of perhaps threatening or enforcing a no fly zone over Ukraine or is any contact whatsoever with the Russian military basically the beginning of something that one would hope even Russia doesn't want. No, there is no halfway house. And to even suggest a no fly zone over Ukraine is naive claptrap because to do that requires a massive military capability and the ability to dominate it to dominate the airspace against Russian the Russian air force and against probably one of the most sophisticated defense systems in the world. And that is a guarantee of World War three no, the only thing NATO can do is to man the ramparts effectively and on that note, I fear. I have to go, I'm afraid. General sir Richard sheriff, thank you for joining us. Chris Thomas, if the only options are diplomatic, and if they all have been priced in, do you get the sense that western leaders that we're hearing so far are still trying to find a way to recapture some of the initiative back from Russia because it does feel like over the last weeks and months. It has been a persistent recurrent game of catch up. That is a good question. No, frankly, I don't necessarily, I certainly don't get a sense from western leaders that there is a diplomatic track at this point, the focus has been 100% on a response. If there is a diplomatic track and an attempt to regain the initiative, then it is a hope that a strong sense of economic and financial sanctions will somehow get Vladimir Putin to change his mind, but that doesn't seem likely at this point, frankly. And just a final thought from you, Steven. It's going to be very hard, I think, overcoming days and weeks to get a clear sense of actually what is happening inside Russia certainly in terms of inside the Russian leadership. But what kind of straws in the wind one way or the other would you be looking for? What kind of clues might tell us what's actually occurring in the Kremlin. In the Kremlin itself, I think that's going to be very difficult to know exactly what's going on. But in a wider Russia, there is a newspaper called norva gazier literally means new newspaper, which has always been something of a thorn in the side of Putin's regime. They have come out today, I've just seen and actually produced a next edition will come out in Russian and Ukrainian. They said that they are openly declaring themselves against what has happened. And I think we need to look out for Russians putting their head above the parapet. They've realized in the last couple of years, particularly in the last year when the. Police have been particularly brutal and any demonstration to have been stamped on very, very hard. They've realized that you're causing trouble for yourself, but I think if there will be conversations going on as Russians used to say around the kitchen table, they will people will be saying, this is awful, we shouldn't have done this. And who knows, it might actually begin to have some effect..

NATO Putin sir Richard Russia Crimea Ukraine Donbass Latvia Estonia Lithuania Europe president Macron Jens Stoltenberg kosky Russian parliament Vladimir Putin Stalin Eastern Europe Sir Richard Moldova
"24" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:33 min | 7 months ago

"24" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"You're listening to the briefing, first broadcast on the 24th of February 2022 on monocle 24. Coming up, president Vladimir Putin of Russia chooses war. Air raid sirens are heard across Ukraine's capital Kyiv. President volodymyr zelensky of Ukraine pledges resistance. And the world faces the possibility of Europe's biggest conflict in 80 years. This is a special edition of the briefing on monocle 24. Russia has invaded Ukraine. Europe's largest country is now under assault from land air and sea with a tax reported right across Ukraine. Ukraine's president volodymyr zelensky has declared martial law and pledged that his country will resist. I'm joined first of all by la de rositi founder of black trident, a defense and security consulting group in Kyiv. Anastasia galuska a governance specialist and an expert in foreign policy and international law at Ukraine's international center for policy studies. Well, I am actually not in tears right now. I left the country two weeks ago, but of course the situation is extremely dire. I'm in contact with my entire social circle who's there. My apartment is right near the military hospital in central key. So the stress is very high of bombardments happening there. As far as the message is being spread, that's so far there are only attacking military infrastructure. It is Russia is very infamous for sometimes losing sight of its initial goals that it's setting. So the series very much for the fear for civilian casualties is very high right now. They're saying that at 13 so at 1 p.m. GF time they're going to be founding the sirens. As a practice in the entirety of keys. But after 1 p.m., anytime the sirens will be will be allowed and clear, it is assigned for civilians to go and hide in the bomb shelters. Which is you can imagine enormously distressing. There's also a very large line of cars heading out of Kyiv. Trying to get to the west as soon as possible. There's a problem with gas with benzene people are not able to fill up their cars, the situation is highly dire. This is a full on invasion. And lada, it's been noticeable over the last few weeks that the leadership of Ukraine has been trying to take a low key approach trying to calm things down. What sense do you have of how prepared they have been for this moment? Well, I mean, Kyiv, as we speak, and the sense is that we are waiting for some sort of leadership. Things are relatively calm. Despite the bombings, we have to be really careful to make sure that we're using the correct language and discern if there are rockets or bombs because there are diversionary acts that could be taking place all over the city. I'm speaking just about Kyiv because that's what I know. The military base is the critical infrastructure. Those are the places that we are should be seeing the territorial defense and the ministry of interior and ministry of emergency doing their job. So they better be doing their job. Anastasia, to come back to you, what is your sense of how many other people are planning or trying to leave Ukraine? Honestly speaking, it is especially the expat and international community that is scattering to get out. But from what I see, especially in people my age and actually also older, Ukrainians are very steadfast in seeing and fighting. I even see foreigners or Diaspora like myself trying to find a way to get back into Ukraine. I now see as well a lot of probably this new student from the ministry, there have been officially they have just, this is just in. That's a defense ministry has allowed send.

Ukraine Kyiv President volodymyr zelensky Russia volodymyr zelensky la de rositi black trident Anastasia galuska international center for polic Europe Vladimir Putin lada ministry of interior and minis Anastasia Diaspora
"24" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

06:04 min | 9 months ago

"24" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"And lifestyle reporter Amy Werner joins us on the line from the French capital. Good morning, Amy. Good morning. Although for fashion, people, somewhat of a sad morning. It is really sad day given the unexpected death of cherry mugler. I mean, he was 74 and despite the fact that it's what a good two decades since he in official terms retired, he was so active and doing so much work. Well, there is a in fact currently at the museum in Paris. There is a retrospective on newsletter that really brought to new generation introduced a new generation to the extraordinary nature of his designs. Indeed, I mean, just describes them to us. I mean, this was a man who took the 1940s in the 1950s and reimagined them for the 1980s and cinched in wastes and grew shoulders and made things incredibly powerful and very sexy. And just to remind us of his great achievements from the 1980s and we'll move forward a little bit further into the last couple of years. I think you're absolutely right. His silhouette was very unmistakable. And some people describe it as almost triangle shaped because it was very exaggerated in the shoulders with a waste that seemed almost impossible. But I think in many people's minds, new glare, she embodied the golden age of 80s audacious sexy verve provocation. There was this idea that he could merge fine couture tailoring with kind of a kink even. Somewhat fetishist. And he wasn't afraid to depict women this way. And as a result, he gave women a sort of persona of. Very daring, very bold, very self empowerment called it. And, of course, there was continued until very, very recently as well. By all accounts, he was going to announce new collaborations this week. And it's not so long and since he squeezed Kim Kardashian into something dripping with its diamonds, but it certainly sparkled a couple of years ago at the Met Gala. And many pop stars and celebrities were embracing his vintage designs too. There was a rediscovery of how truly fabulous they were. So you were seeing his creations once again on the red carpet, even if he himself had sort of withdrawn to some extent from the fashion world, but then like I just said a moment ago, he was back. This exhibition really confirmed that. Let's move on to another really sad development in fashion. A Virgil abloh dying at the tender age of 42 just a few weeks ago. But in Paris, it was the opportunity to see his final collection for Louis Vuitton. Well, you know, really, it's a scene that seems to be percolating through the season because the other big news of the week was the revival of kenzo by a new designer nigo and kenzo also passed away last year. So you have two major designers, different generations who have left us. But at the same time, these were two of the most palpably energetic shows of the season people really came out to sometimes you hear this word celebrate. But there was a sense of honoring of celebration and of finding what their contributions were and really putting bringing those to the four. It was something to absolutely save or wasn't it every time version of blue created a new season of new collection. Many saying that he was, you know, he was representing a generation that hadn't been represented before. Indeed. I mean, he didn't see any walls between generations. He actually towards the end, didn't see walls between genders. This most recent collection had men in heels. He said at one point, we are a generation that's searching for what rules to break or which rules are the real ones. And I think that really drives home how he wanted to take a house like Vita and bring it to a whole other level. Finally, briefly, tell us about Pharrell Williams and the most amazing almond shaped pair of sunglasses that he was wearing in Paris. Well, it really was a key. We don't know that much about them yet, but these as you point out, often shaped in circled by diamonds with a little emerald drop at each temple, Tiffany has been in the midst of a crucification of sorts. There is this Beyoncé and Jay-Z, there are other collaborations in the works. New spokespeople. And when phrase showed up. But the kenzo show yesterday wearing these glasses that sunglasses. We're on the verge of couture begins today. So there couldn't have been a better bridge in some sense between the menswear shows and the haute couture that really will get underway in the next hours. Thank you so much for joining us on Monaco 24. That's all we have time for today's program, many thanks to our producers. Marcus hippie and Charlie filmer court are researchers Sophie monaghan combs and lilian faucet and our studio manager David Stevens. After the headlines there's more music on the way, the briefing is live at midday in London, the globalist is back at the same time tomorrow I hope you can join me for that. But for now, from me Emma Nelson goodbye. Thank you very much for listening. Have a great week..

Amy Werner cherry mugler Paris kenzo Virgil abloh nigo Amy Kim Kardashian Louis Vuitton Beyoncé Pharrell Williams Tiffany Marcus hippie Charlie filmer Sophie monaghan combs Jay lilian faucet Monaco David Stevens Emma Nelson
"24" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:32 min | 10 months ago

"24" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"When they take place later in January. Thomas Lewis, thank you very much as always. You're listening to the briefing here on monocle 24. Well, now we are going to wrap up this Christmas edition of the briefing. Very good. That just came to me. Whose voice is that? It's Nick manis, who's here, we wanted to reflect a little bit on Christmas, comedy, the best jokes. No eligible comedians were available. So next is going to help us out. I'm happy to see you. And I'm happy to take that sort of bob. Nick is a comedy stalwart. Can I say that? I mean, I've been doing it like 6 years. That confessed to status. I'm talking about about Christmas comedy. Now, what does Christmas comedy mean to you? Nick, is it a thing? People might have to roll out these dreadful comedy TV favorites that play every year and is that the kind of thing is it more about cracker jokes, dad jokes? How would you sum it up? Well, I think for me, so there's two things. So as you alluded to, I moonlight as a stand up comedian. What that often means is that at Christmas gatherings, usually drunk uncles sort of start to harass me. Either telling me that they have some great content for me, which is if I'm honest usually quite offensive and certainly could not ever be used on stage or they sort of beg for jokes and I mean the way the way my comedy works is it is more storytelling and observational it doesn't really necessarily translate that well after the judge. And that's fair and I'm happy if you're willing to pay for a ticket to one of my shows and come along and watch top there. I'm just hearing that I won't be willing to all right fair enough. But I think for me what that comes down to is after a few eggnogs or mulled wines, whatever your poison of choice is. A classic sort of dad joke out of a Christmas cracker. He's certainly the way to go. You know, just a little one two punch. Nice and simple, nice and short. And everyone can get around them. I think that's the beauty of it. You can have someone from a 5 year old. I mean, I know you've got kids maybe they're reeling out some jokes. Lavatory or sense of humor generally. Which is in my sense. You know, you can go from kids telling them through to people I was going to sound their deathbed, I don't know. Enjoy your last Christmas is maybe what we're getting. I don't know why this is taking such a doctor and I do apologize. How do you immediately bring death in? This is the lightest moment of the lighter show of the year. It's always on my mind, Tom. It's what keeps you sharp or profound. Yeah, no, no. Come on, let's jump into it. If it's about cracker jokes then, can I ask you for a couple of favorites and what is the weird sort of alchemy of that cracker joke? It's like it's got to be so bad, it's good, but sometimes it's actually clever. What's the chemistry that goes on it goes into those? I mean, I've sort of made a selection here. I mean, plenty of them are like, I guess, cringe. And painful to hear even verbalized out loud. But some of them I was sort of reflecting on a host of different drugs I've heard over the years and some that I just had a little bit of a quick Google for it. And there are some absolutely actually really well written jokes that I think could translate into an actual stand up set if you were doing a Christmas themed show. I mean, we're talking comics like I guess maybe Tim vine or perhaps Jimmy card and of either of them have ever done. Christmas special was certainly sort of like punchy, quite clever, well written jokes. But maybe before we dive into that, I thought it could be kind of fun to unpack the history of the craft. Go ahead and tell me tell me where this comes from. So this is the claim in the UK at least. It was invented by Tom Smith in 1847. He was a confectioner that used to sell sugar almonds in wrapped, twisted paper. And he noticed that a lot of young gentlemen were buying them for their lady friends, and he thought, a nice thing to do for perhaps these men that have bought sugared almonds in a Christmassy panic as a present, and he thought it would be nice to maybe alleviate some of the disappointment of it. For receiving an almond bag of sugar, are you telling me misses Tom would be happy with some sugar happens? Oh, she should be grateful for it. It should be so lucky, but he started putting love poems in them. As a bit of a bit of a wingman move, then building on that inspired by the cracking of a log on a Christmas fire, he added a bang a little bit of gunpowder. What says Christmas more than gunpowder? I don't know. Certainly many things. But he added that when he took sons took charge of the business in the 1900s, I added the piper hat and by the 1930s, the love poems. I mean, it's not I spent Christmas in the grand, I love it, but I'm not going to really read or something sort of and romantic. Let's replace them with jokes, which I certainly think is more accessible. So that's how we came to be. Now, what I've pulled together is a list of 5 jokes that I think I would be quite pleased to receive in my Christmas cracker this year. Do you want to do you want to rattle through them? I want to hear these and our listeners ratchet it up, draw people around the wireless, and judge Nick. That's why I'm asking him to do. That's fine. To be clear, I want this to be, I want to be judged on delivering I'm quite open to that. I'm receptive to feedback. To be clear, you're probably wrong, but I am I'll pretend to be receptive. So a gingerbread gingerbread man went to the doctors complaining of soreness, tragic, and the doctor sort of looked at him and goes a sore knee. Well, have you tried icing it? Okay. I mean, I think that I think okay, look, it didn't induce the laugh, I wonder, but I think that's actually I think that's actually good riding and just better. I think that was almost too good. I was expecting you to be scraping the barrel quicker. No. But I like it. I want to go there. Maybe this next one, this next one is a little bit silly. I mean, it's a simple question, Tom. Why do mummies? Why are mummies? Big fans of Christmas. I don't know. Why are mom's big fans of Christmas? Obviously because they enjoy wrapping. That's good. Yeah. So that's more like. That's the level you want to tone. We're getting to the top. And I think the nice thing about that is it's a reminder that Christmas is a global celebration. You know, there's plenty of Coptic Christians that I'm sure so Christmas. Very good. Look, another 1 may be a little bit of a simpler one..

Thomas Lewis Nick manis Nick Tim vine Jimmy card Tom bob Tom Smith judge Nick Google UK
"24" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:06 min | 11 months ago

"24" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"In health since Helsinki, city center, and Petri Bert's office has been to visit. Pachy tell us about the background of this 400 year institution. Right, yeah, so finish post is really one of the key and most loved public services in Finland. Finn's use the services a lot. I was told yesterday this actually surprised me a little bit. The Finns send just around Christmas about 18 million Christmas cards. That's for a nation of 5 million people. So, you know, we have a strong need for the poster services. And describe the new building and all these new developments then. Yeah, so the new buildings, it's kind of actually a return to its origins. So this was this building this was built in 1938 and it's actually called the post house. It used to house the finished post headquarters until 2003 when it was moved to the suburbs. But now it moved its main post office back to this post post building in the center and it's really lovely. I mean, how do you describe the experience? I walked in yesterday and as soon as you walk in, you're greeted by an actual human being, you know, not a machine. A human being who says hi to you and ask you how you are and what needs you have and then direct you to this different service points in the post office. And you have these automate fully automated machines for dropping off parcels if you want. But you also have humans helping you pick cards and even give you a helping hand with riding a card and all kinds of really I just like the human element in all of it. And I understand that there's been a big advances in terms of lockers and parcel space. Yeah, this is really where we're posting, I think, is putting up a good competition against all this modern services. So this is actually a second sort of a flagship that they opened in the center of housing. They opened this box by poster that we covered for Monaco as well. I think it was two or three years ago, where, you know, it's essentially a space where you just pick up parcels and you can open them there if you order clothes from E retailers you can try them on. You know, you can leave the packaging materials there. And it's just done in a really nice and stylish way. And they have actually incorporated elements of that in the new main postal office that just opened this week. Well, in addition to that, they also have traditional postal services, so you know, you can send letters, you can buy stamps you can buy cards and all kinds of nice traditional stuff as well. And of course, it has a great environmental policy. Yes, well, of course, as always, with modern finished companies, they really keen to stress how what their environmental impact is. And I think they've achieved this not by planting trees and that kind of stuff which seems to be the trend these days, but actually by when I go and pick up a password I can just leave the cardboard boxes and everything there. And if I go to send something and I forgot to take a box for it, I can just take somebody's used box and they will help me clean it and package it and that way, you know, you don't have to buy we don't have to buy new boxes and materials all the time. And then finally Petri herbal is impact Helsinki and do you think that we'll see other organizations adopting this approach to business? This really hands on customer led very environmentally friendly way of operating. You know, I do believe, so I think there is some something of a return to the old times here. I mean, not only the human service that I experienced yesterday, but also just the way the way the whole space looked. They returned back to their old colors, this beautiful orange color that they had historically and the old logo and of course I mean they wouldn't do that if there wasn't a need for that. I think people do miss this human service and talking to people and of course then also this environmental environmental footprint as well. So I think we will see other businesses copying it. And you can actually sit there and write your cards and so on. Can't you? I mean, it's a space to be in as well as just to pass through and do your business. Yes, absolutely. I actually left that just so next to this, they have a dedicated section in the post office for buying buying cards, and there's a human being there that helps you pick the cards as I said. And next to it, there are tables and chairs and awareness. I must say quite stylish labs as well respecting the functionalist heritage of this mid century building. And you can sit there and you can take your time and write your creating so on the card and just be inspired instead of just leaning against the wall as you usually would do in a post office or just some bland disk. So that was nice. Absolutely. Petry, thanks very much indeed. That was Monica's Helsinki correspondent Petri bertz off. And that's all for today's program. Thanks to our producers, page Reynolds, Daniel beach, and Charlie film a court..

Petri Bert Pachy Helsinki city center Finn Finland Monaco Petry Petri bertz Monica page Reynolds Daniel beach Charlie
"24" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:56 min | 11 months ago

"24" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Was Sarah hucka in conversation with Monaco's Copenhagen correspondent Michael booth and living better lives runs until April 18th, 2022. You're listening to the globalist on monocle 24 with me, Georgina Godwin, and I'm joined now by my friend and colleague. My fellow presenter, Emma Nelson, who is in Ozark studio. Good morning to you Emma. Good morning, gray and cloudy, but full of sunshine to be with you this morning, Georgina. Let's try it. Let's look at the future of work because our futures to yours and mine very much bound up with this. The FT has a long feature all about where did all the workers go and certainly I don't know about in Zürich, but when you look around here in London, every single shot window every restaurant has a notices advertising vacancies. I've noticed that conspicuous absence actually in Zürich, when I was thinking about the article that I was going to talk about today, I sort of did a direct comparing contrast. And if there is a labor shortage in Zürich, you really can't see it, because whatever is happening, it's incredibly discreet. There are no signs in Windows saying, please come and help us. But it is absolutely stark, isn't it? When you wonder down any street in the United Kingdom, every shot window wants you to go and work in there. I don't know about you but I sometimes walk down there thinking. Maybe if I just step in, I could walk into another universe because clearly people are needing to hire. And this is a problem in the United States according to the Financial Times. All this week, the FDA is doing a series of long reads into the future of work, which is they're always incredibly good at doing this kind of stuff. And in the last 24 hours, two have come out. The one that we've been talking about today is about the fact that in America, more than 4 million people left their jobs in September, and that is the highest number of people resigning in a single month since records began in 2001. The previous record was in August. And what is happening is it's all part of what's being called the great resignation. People aren't just leaving either to drop out of the labor market or to go and do something more creative. They're actually going to better jobs. Whether it be better paid, better rolls or even a completely different job that might be more fulfilling for them. And it's knocking America really quite quite, of course. And it's been called also COVID clarity. Yes. What seems to have been happening is that people who've been stuck at home during the pandemic haven't been doing what everybody thought that was going to happen that they were going to sit tight and hold on to their jobs as much as they could. What they were realizing is that they didn't like their jobs in the first place. So in the old world when you went to your office or you went to wherever you worked, but you did a lousy job or a job that didn't satisfy you. You would just carry on with it anyway, because there was other stuff associated with it. But what seems to be happening is when people are sitting at their desks at home and have arguably a more pure experience of their jobs or of their work, they're deciding that they don't want it. So that's a good sign because people are still wanting to go into work. It's not the homeworking thing that's making people resign. It's just that they want to do a job that they enjoy. Now, I'm going to contrast this very briefly with an article that's appeared in the FT that their next installment today, which seems to be this is a problem that is not happening in France. And this is good news for France, because France has quite a lot of has a history normally of slightly higher levels of employment than other highly developed countries. And the OECD has been surprised about this. What appears to be the reason for this is it in contrast to America where when you were given your furlough, you claimed your benefit directly from the government. The money was given to companies in France. And as a result, companies could invest and retain and look after their employees and managers would know that they would have a strong and steady workforce that would come back when things opened up again. Now The New York Times also has a take on this. They're asking what the link is between job vacancies and migration. This is a really interesting story if you are interested in where people's working positions are coming from. And there's this described as a global battle for the young and able. There are images right through this, but this article of immigrant immigrant trainees being shown how to do jobs as an example in Germany. There's an example in Canada. There's an example in Israel and what's happening is that money and residency and better working conditions are being offered to immigrants. And as a result, it's sort of recalibrating the way that we see migration too. Not just within the workforce, but within society. I mean, it's desperately obvious here in Britain that we are suffering because of a lack of migrants. Absolutely. And the jobs that the immigrants are coming to nowadays are better. So what is happening is that when you arrive from another country now, if you are going to a highly developed country, there is generally a it's being made easier for you to settle. Immigrant workers are finding that they are being treated the same way as the rest of the population. And this article in The New York Times points very much to a contrast with the United Kingdom, where 7 out of ten companies are now struggling to find employees. What seems to have happened is that pre-pandemic the less paid areas of the labor market were very migrant based. And that's because people could move. And when COVID happened, people couldn't move anymore. And as a result, the countries which depended on lower paid younger workers found themselves with a massive gap. And the countries which are doing better are the ones who have decided to change their approach to micro workers and treat them on the same level as the rest of the population. So long overdue..

Zürich Sarah hucka Michael booth Georgina Godwin Emma Nelson America France Georgina Monaco Copenhagen Emma Financial Times United Kingdom FDA London OECD The New York Times government Germany Israel
"24" Discussed on MarketFoolery

MarketFoolery

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"24" Discussed on MarketFoolery

"Do learn between charlie wilson and gust avocados wilson served in the navy. He's someone who sees wars conflicts that have a winner and a loser and that's that so. When the soviet union falls he celebrates. It's like it's over we want. There's a scene late in the movie after the soviet union has fallen. There's a party at charlie wilson apartment. And he's standing on a balcony with and gust is trying to get him to not be so excited about this victory as great as it is. And he tells charlie wilson he's trying to get him to realize what's going on here so he tells charlie wilson this story about zen master and the little boy says there's this little boy and on his fourteenth birthday he gets a horse and everybody in the village says how wonderful the boy got a horse and the zen master says we'll see two years later. The boy falls off. The horse breaks his leg and everyone in the village has how terrible and the master says we'll see then a war breaks out and all the young men have to go off and fight except the boy can't because his legs all messed up and everybody in the village says how wonderful and then master says we'll see over the past twenty four years. I have seen wonderful times as an investor. And i've seen terrible times. As an investor the birth and rise of the internet in the nineteen ninety s was so exciting and then the bubble burst in two thousand and then nine eleven happened and then slowly steadily business in the market's return for five positive and strong years until the great recession of two thousand eight and two thousand nine followed by the greatest bowl run market in history followed by a global pandemic. It's natural to get excited in good times because we are human beings creatures. That's why it's all the more important to stay. Even keeled as possible for as long as possible because as david gardner has said on occasion the only game that counts when it comes to investing is the long game. That's the game. You wanna be playing by the way back in one thousand nine hundred.

charlie wilson david gardner gust fourteenth birthday two thousand eight one thousand nine hundred two years later soviet union nine eleven five positive and strong years two thousand nine wilson nineteen ninety s zen soviet zen master past twenty four years union
"24" Discussed on MarketFoolery

MarketFoolery

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"24" Discussed on MarketFoolery

"I walked in the door at one hundred. Twenty three north pitt street took the elevator up to the office and started doing the things that you do on your first day at a new job filled out. A bunch of forms got assigned a desk and a computer. I was given an official motley fool mug with the original logo. Which i think i have this right. I think it was drawn by julia reid home. Who is the sister of company. Co founder eric. Reid home still have the month by the way. don't worry i'm not going to walk you through every professional memory that i have of the past twenty four years but i am share a little bit because there's no way for me to think about my time at the motley fool without stock investing being at the front and center of my brain i had worked in the us capitol building for six years. So i'd been investing through the thrift savings program. But when i got to the full i started learning about stocks and thinking about businesses in ways that i really never had before the idea that the numbers of a business are important. But it's not just about the numbers. The story of the business is important. The people leading it. That's important and the more i've done this. The more experienced. I've gotten as an investor comfortable have gotten with a few things that i did not realize twenty four years ago. The role that luck plays an investing the importance of being selfish staying as even keeled as possible for as long as possible. I've made investing mistakes over the past twenty four years. I will continue to make mistakes. I bought stocks. Where i didn't understand the business and couldn't explain what the company does one time. I bought a stock when i was high. It was nine hundred ninety nine. I'd had all four of my wisdom teeth out. I was spending a few days at home. Recuperating and diet consisted entirely of milkshakes painkillers. I was sitting on the sofa channel flipping through cable. Because there's no streaming video there's no net flex i'm flipping channels and i get to c. span and there's a trade association that's having some big meeting in dc. They've got a keynote speaker. Some young guy who recently taken his company public and he's talking about the future of this industry. I listened the whole speech. And did i mention that. I was high on painkillers. I was high on painkillers and in. This narcotic induced fog. I remember sitting there thinking. This guy's brilliant guy with this guy has to say and i'm going to buy this stock and i went to my computer and logged onto my account and bought shares of this guy's company. While i was high on painkillers..

six years twenty four years ago Twenty three north pitt street eric nine hundred ninety nine first day julia reid one hundred four one time Reid span motley home past twenty four years past twenty four years fool
"24" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Curator

Monocle 24: The Curator

07:08 min | 1 year ago

"24" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Curator

"Your with a curator. Our weekly highlight show here on monocle. Twenty four. I'm carla rebelo up next. We look back at our show dedicated to the world of business. It is of course the entrepreneurs. Brad wilson is the president of the ace hotel group which is set to open. Its latest property in brooklyn's boerum hill. Where toronto property soon to follow a surprise itself on looking at different kinds of existing buildings in off the beaten track neighborhoods and to find out more about the latest offerings. Brad joined the shows host. Daniel h the early aces that alex developed. Seattle was very small hotel. It really didn't carry a lot of what i think. People think of is the kind of the social health aspect of ace hotel. Think some of that really started when they opened portland lobby and being connected to the stump town coffee in just that lobby became surprisingly active for relatively small space. It was going a communal environment. It ended up. You know attracting people to pound away on their laptops and meet and greet in. It really did become small hub for that city. Certainly that portland lobby was kind of the precedent Dan later reinterpreted. In collaboration with roman and williams to create kind of the ace new york lobby. Which certainly as new york lobby in many ways. It's kind of our flagship. I meant so many people think of at lobby when they think of ace and its ability really to be a workspace by day a cocktail place in the evenings and even a club at night really transforms overtime to the lifestyle of its inhabitants. And so it's a really fun living human space. We're very inspired by a and it's interesting in the industry that lobby kind of was the label of ace hotel in to us. It was really about the social environment. The scene it was created there and we recreate that all the time. It's just that we recreate it through a different lens. Everywhere we go. It's not a programmer standard. We're putting lobby everywhere to attract people. It's actually in every environment. So when we went to los angeles for instance a lot of people were asking us like what what. What's the lobby. actually interesting that la hotel. It was originally a sixteen hundred seat theater and a very small office tower. So that didn't actually have a lot of space on the first floor. We still operate to sixteen hundred seat. Theater restored it. It's gorgeous in the hotel. Next door has a check in a restaurant on the first floor but really has no lobby. People thought that was crazy. Considering the expectation probably built from the new york lobby but we transferred a garden rooftop into similar kind of social hub and it probably is a lot more. What la is. It's an indoor outdoor life. There's a pool you can sit around. You can drink coffee under a tree. And that's really what i think is critical for the way atelli teams think is every environment is really different and so while we have certain expectations of our hotels i think our guest as well as social environments each one will end up being very specific to its own location in new orleans. We bring in a jazz club into the lobby and these kind of things so it really is an opportunity to create a hang out there frequently. Obviously music base and things of that sort and as we grow. I think there's a lot of were get a lot of credit for having created a lot of the idea programming in hotels whether it be our bingo night in the diner restaurant palm springs or dj nights in the lobby in new york. We kind of added that thought process of energizing hotels through programming which has become bigger and bigger in the industry. It's interesting for us. it really started. I think because the new york in palm springs hotels opened right into recession. There was a real need to kind of make these places known to get the word out. So i think the programming article kelly sodden whenever partners vary involved in building that structure in our company continues today with a lot of great people and i think that continues to kind of keep that energy around our hotels. Talk to me a little bit about the newest property coming into the fold. And that is in brooklyn. I believe again like the mid town hotel. You're working with. You've worked with roman and williams as designers talked me about what we can expect for when many of us can get back on a plane and come visit you in brooklyn as we're coming out a covert and approaching the opening of our brooklyn hotel which is kind of for us in long anticipated. And we're planning to open probably mid july. It feels now that the timing is brilliant was probably more accidental than brilliant. But certainly i. It will probably end up being a good opportunity for us to come out of color pen. Hope in what. I think is gonna be really spectacular. Hotel brooklyn was very much an opportunity for us to bring back the crowds. Roman williams came back. They designed a new york probably close to ten years ago. Coming back and joining us to design brooklyn but also at the same time represent a lot of the evolution. We've had over the period of moving through said historic buildings into more modern buildings into purpose. Built buildings as brooklyn is we really collaborated closely with roman and williamson can of what is ace now. End coming into brooklyn looking at brooklyn not just as part of new york brooklyn as the city itself the true sense of brooklyn as like a working city and kind of the strain to that so the building ends up representing us slightly route. A-list compression possibly but the interiors very warm modernist interiors think really coupled into beautiful space. We do have to pay a new york style lobby but it has the real kind of modern feel. That's warm and inviting in philo sunlight during the day. Beautifully warm in the evenings at night. So it's kind of like a new york but very different it's less manhattan mode. Say we do have a an interior garden which we call springs feed garden sun-filled space and spills out into an art gallery. So it's a really interesting program. And i think probably the highlight at least for me. 'cause it's really interesting to see the art programs as they develop in the our program. This hotel curated by nikki. To auto is fiber and textile based art in each of the guest..

Brad new orleans Brad wilson first floor kelly sodden carla rebelo los angeles williams brooklyn sixteen hundred seat mid july ten years ago today new york Daniel h Seattle each one williamson nikki Dan
"24" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Curator

Monocle 24: The Curator

05:27 min | 1 year ago

"24" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Curator

"Dr anthony. Fauci and conversation would monaco's thomas lewis staying stateside for next highlight as we look back to cheeses edition of the briefing on june twenty-sixth. Sixth two thousand fifteen. The united states supreme court ruled out. State bans on gay. Marriage were unconstitutional legal throughout the united states. But the road to victory was much longer than many no in his new book. The engagement. america's quarter century struggle over same sex marriage. Sasha eisenberg takes us through to coast to coast conflict through courtrooms. Then war rooms bedrooms and boardrooms to shed light on every aspect of political and legal controversy that divided americans like no other monaco's andrew. Mueller was joined by sasha to find out more yeah. The story begins in hawaii. Nineteen ninety when three same. Sex couples are led into the local public health departments west marriage licenses by local gay rights activists and it's basically a public relations stunt. He's gotten into an unbelievably petty rivalry for control of pride week planning committee in honolulu and has had a separate conflict with the local. Aclu the american civil liberties union which doesn't Particularly want to a back him in this and he decides he's going to try to force their hand by this media stunt and effectively spiraled out of control. The case gets handed civil rights lawyer the next year and they have an unexpected victory at the y. Supreme court in nineteen ninety-three and part of the story. That's familiar to most americans as sort of what happens after that. There's the defense of marriage act which was passed in nineteen ninety-six and that is effectively. The mainland of the united states recognizing that hawaii is very close to marrying same sex couples and that they will need a new set of laws to prepare for for what happens if they do so well. Same sex marriage not really an animating cause of the prominent gay liberation movements of the late sixties early seventies. When did it become a thing. It only became a cause for the gay rights movement when their opponents started prioritizing fighting it in the mid nineties. You had a brief flurry in the early nineteen seventies in the wake of stonewalling that serve early gay liberation politics of individuals going in and requesting marriage licenses and then suing but very few of them were lawyers or had illegal strategy behind them and by the nineteen eighty s folks fighting again incremental progress in other areas non-discrimination trying to get hate crimes coverage things like that and and very incremental recognition of gay and lesbian families and other spheres nineteen eighty nine denmark becomes the first country on our to to recognize same sex couples. It's not actually marriage and there was not an active movement in the us. Until the wake of this hawaii decision in nineteen ninety-three 'cause this is one of the things that emerges from the book how recent this has all become as an issue and how quickly it has happened. Which is it tough to say whether it's depressing. That it took this long or heartening that it did eventually happen so quickly. Because i think a part of the book that will be quite bracing to a lot of readers is figuring out how many prominent american liberals were quite iffy on this until quite late in the picture not just bill clinton who you mentioned signing the defense of marriage act but president barrack. Obama didn't take a stand obviously firmly in favor of same sex marriage until as late as two thousand and twelve right and so i think there's a few different divides on the left. I mean through the eighties. Among gay rights activists. There's a real principle disagreement over whether marriage is actually worth fighting for and you have a a section of largely lesbians lawyers. Legal theorists informed feminists thinking who think that marriages patriarchal hetero normative institution. Why should as want to kind of adjust their a sexual values for acceptance into it. And then you have some you know arguments that are more about tactics and strategy and prioritization and what what happens is to some extent a gay marriage. Activists are a victim of one of their successes. Which is for create civil unions in in two thousand which are a very robust form of domestic partnership at it basically is marriage all the rights and legal rights and benefits of marriage without the actual name marriage and without a lot of the the the religious conflict comes along with that and that becomes a sort of safe position for the kind of centre-left democrats you're talking about and so by two thousand four. All the democrats will running for. President support civil unions and it allows them to say i think marriage is too far it has a religious meaning but i also wanna do for the gay community and and by two thousand ten that becomes a big strategic problem. Georgie of the country supports marriage or civil unions. But there's a big chunk in the middle. The sort of moderate middle where gay marriage campaigners have to go out. And convinces people who have been persuaded that gay and lesbian couples are all the same rights and benefits opposite. Sex couples can have by being married but that the actual symbolic value of the term marriage has its own is its own goal and denying gay couples. The ability to be married is a form of injury to them. The author sasha eisenberg. They're speaking to monaco's andrew mueller earlier this week. One.

sasha eisenberg Sasha eisenberg Obama bill clinton andrew mueller june twenty-sixth hawaii honolulu sasha late sixties early nineteen seventies next year Mueller thomas lewis one anthony nineteen eighty s eighties andrew Nineteen ninety