37 Burst results for "21St Century"

Biden, Johnson Sign New Charter on Trade and Defense

Closer Look

00:47 sec | 2 d ago

Biden, Johnson Sign New Charter on Trade and Defense

"And British Prime Minister Boris Johnson are meeting in England and preparing to renew a historic document. That recognizes the two Nations special relationship NPR's Franco or Donna's reports, They'll sign a new Atlantic charter that will guide them for the next century. The two leaders met in carbs Bay, where they reviewed a copy of the original Atlantic Charter before sitting down for a bilateral meeting. Great Great pleasure, Mr President. Welcome you to call Great president be here. Happy to see you. The charter was signed in 1941 by British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and President Franklin D. Roosevelt, a senior administration official said. The original charter outline what the post World War order could and should look like. The new charter will make clear what the coming decades of the 21st century can and should look like.

Carbs Bay Boris Johnson Franco NPR British Prime Minister Winston Donna Mr President England President Franklin D. Roosevel
Fresh "21St Century" from 21st Century Pain Institute

21st Century Pain Institute

00:08 sec | 8 hrs ago

Fresh "21St Century" from 21st Century Pain Institute

"Today's show here is Doctor you Welcome back to living without knee pain. I'm here with Dr Philip you are you suffering with me? But have you tried the shots? Pills yet? You're still suffering with chronic me being caused by bone on bone osteoarthritis, maybe a torn meniscus. Perhaps you had a fall or accident. Have you been told that you need a total knee replacement? Well, here's the good news from Dr Philip you, founder of 21st Century New Pain Institute. You may now have hope of reducing or eliminating European with a new nonsurgical, painless laser stem cell treatment. The West Coast only laser guided stem cell therapy. This new treatment may reduce or.

Philip 21St Century New Pain Institut Today West Coast DR Meniscus European
Senate Republicans Release $928 Billion Infrastructure Counteroffer

WBAP Morning News

01:49 min | Last week

Senate Republicans Release $928 Billion Infrastructure Counteroffer

"Biden's infrastructure plan because responding Clayton Devil says proposed spending continues to be the main hold up. GOP senators introduced a $928 billion counteroffer to President Biden's $1.7 trillion plan. His initial proposal was well upward of two trillion The Republican plan includes money for roads and bridges for airports, water systems, public transit in broadband. It sticks to the core infrastructure features that we talked to initially It's a serious effort to try to reach a bipartisan agreement, Senator Shelley Moore Capito said The biggest question right now seems to be over the gap and propose spending, but she intends to keep negotiating the alternative. Which is a partisan reconciliation process would be destructive to our future bipartisan attempts but also doesn't serve the American public Republicans pushing back against proposed tax hikes and plan to repurpose billions of unspent covert relief money to help pay for infrastructure projects. The Biden administration, though adamantly opposing that. White House press secretary Jen Psaki said those cuts could imperil pending a too small businesses or two restaurants in rural hospitals. While touting his infrastructure plan is a community college in Cleveland. President Biden reiterated the importance of investing in the economy. We must be number one in the world to lead the world in the 21st century, he said. The U. S can't afford to fall any further behind. Now's the time Build the foundation that we've laid. To make bold investments in our families and our communities and our nation. The White House said it hopes to see progress in bipartisan talks by Memorial Day. Clayton Nevil, WB AP News

President Biden Clayton Devil Senator Shelley Moore Capito Biden Biden Administration GOP Jen Psaki White House Cleveland Clayton Nevil
Fresh "21St Century" from Best of Car Talk

Best of Car Talk

00:00 sec | 8 hrs ago

Fresh "21St Century" from Best of Car Talk

"High quality journalism in the 21st century, And even though NPR's structural engineer Looks both ways and pulls out the I beam under our studio. Whatever he is us. Say it. This is NPR. This is 90.9. W b. You are good morning. I'm Sharon Brody. It is 11 18 and coming up at 12 O'clock this American life with stories about sisters. It is 62 degrees in Boston Clouds around today and has in the low seventies were funded by you, Our listeners and by Mark Shasha Fine art Breaking for beauty. An exhibition of paintings by Mark Shasha now at the guilt.

Sharon Brody Mark Shasha 12 O'clock 62 Degrees 21St Century NPR Boston Clouds 11 18 American Both Ways 90.9. W Seventies Today
"21st century" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

07:28 min | Last month

"21st century" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"This message comes from. Npr sponsor capital one with the capital one. Quicksilver card details at capital. One dot com. What's in your wallet. Credit approval required capital one bank usa an a support for this npr podcast and the following message come from one very their newest series. Secret sauce explores the stories and successes behind some of the most inspiring businesses and intrepid entrepreneurs. I up and be listened to secret sauce. Wherever you listen to podcasts. If right now you're thinking why the hell would google workers wanna union. You're probably not alone. I mean the perks at this company are totally wild like the cafeteria food. Google workers have been served. Banana cheesecake lobster. Slow cooked duck and the perks extent. We be on food too. I mean google's the place where you can get onsite haircuts. They'll do your laundry. This is literally plays that had lady gaga come speak on campus. And so like. I wouldn't fall anyone for thinking. Why do these workers need a union and basically to be two main reasons that is according to david. Presser a software engineer at google and a member of the new google union asserted to have a growing sense that google as a company was making decisions. More like a conventional company in search of like whatever when they most profit rather than you sticking to the ideal of prioritizing making the world better place over other concerns this leads to reason number one. Google workers wanna say in the decisions. The company makes google used to have this motto. Don't be evil. David love to that motto. And they think that nowadays google sometimes can be a little bit evil. What was it as you saw. That made you think okay hold on. Sometimes this company does sort of do things that maybe are considered evil. Yes so. I mean i think the biggest one for me personally. That changed how i see. Things was related. The some of the activism around the custom border patrol contracts. Here is what david is talking about back in two thousand nineteen more than one thousand. Google workers signed a petition asking the company to stop doing any work with the. Us border patrol which included groups. Like ice the idea was that workers wanted a say in all kinds of company decisions right and to be honest with you. Stacey the first question. I have to ask was should workers have a say in this kind of stuff because when you work for a private company there's a bit of seemed contract you know you exchange your work for pay in proper working conditions and the company in exchange for paying and treating you. Well we'll get to do what they want with your work. The another baldo says thinking is wrong. She's a labor lawyer in san francisco. You can imagine if you are a worker. Google that's producing something and has strongly held political beliefs. And you don't want what you're working on to alternate between Used for war than that impacts your working conditions impacts how you feel about what you're doing at work and how you're contributing to your employer would vena is saying. Is that how we think about working. Conditions and can and cannot impact them has evolve so reason number one that google workers wanted to form a union was the did not want their employer to be evil which brings us to reason number. Two basically union members really want all the workers at google to be treated equally. Here's david again. We talk about the cafeterias but for the people who put on all the work to create that food to make the cafeterias function they're not compensated or treated nearly as well as the people like me consuming defeated. Google actually employs more than a hundred and thirty thousand contract and temp workers. Who work alongside. Google's fulltime workforce. In fact google. There are more contract and temp workers than fulltime workers. Temp workers on average are paid less and when the company hits an economic downturn. Those workers are often the first to go so a lot of google earth. Like i feel like this is deeply unfair but there were some obstacles to changing things. For instance federal labor law makes it really hard for different kinds of workers like fulltime workers and temp workers to form a union together. And so google workers chose a different path. They formed what's called a minority union and say see. I think we should probably explain that one. Yes okay so here's how it works in a standard union. Workers have the right to sit down with their employer and bargain over a contract. This is the traditional way that unions exercise power through arguments over things like wages and unfair labor practices and those reflected in a revised contract but with google. A minority union works a little differently minority unions. Don't have the support of a majority of workers right now. Google's union only has about eight hundred or so workers and that's super small. Just a fraction of google's workforce and because of this undercurrent labor law. Google is enforced to recognize this union. They're not forced to sit down with them at the bargaining table. Basically if google wanted to take a pretend this union didn't exist. We did reach out to google. It responded with a written statement saying it's worked hard to create a supportive and rewarding workplace and that it would continue to engage directly with all of its employees. The company did not clarify whether it recognizes this new group as a bona fide union. Or even whether it would work with them going forward which kind of begs the question. Like what power does this union even have. If any right. I mean like why are they calling the union instead of like a workers advocacy club free and look on its face. Maybe there isn't much that differentiates this group from club except one important thing and you actually kind of set it stacey that they call themselves a union the of ball our labor lawyer from earlier says that one word uniting underneath it. It changes things. Their vision is not to change things necessarily through the official channels or talking to managers but to actually use worker power to use the tools that workers have always had direct actions in particular to change things. What this all comes down to is basically one thing rob people power and before those skeptics in the back smirk. Let me explain today. Eight hundred people at a powerful company can actually think a lot of noise. They can blast the internet with poor working conditions or shady. Things their company is doing. Yeah and we actually saw proof of this at google back in two thousand eighteen. This was during the height of the metoo movement and thousands of google workers across the globe. Dropped whatever they were doing and they walked out to protest how the company had handled cases of sexual harassment and the photos of those workers standing agitating making a list of demands that took over the internet. Yeah and it is safe to say. That was a very very bad day for google. This union they're falling in the steps of that kind of legacy and it may not seem like much you know just a band of eight hundred people trying to take on titan of industry but perhaps when you're dealing with these kinds of laws and a company that has the power and resources of a small country your.

san francisco David Npr Google thousands Eight hundred people Stacey first question today two thousand david Quicksilver eight hundred people Two first google baldo labor earth bank usa
"21st century" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

09:26 min | 2 months ago

"21st century" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"In the 21st century radio. I'm Dr Sahara, Hieronymous lark or dinners are executive producer and Anita Brockington, Our engineer. I think all of you know our appreciation and use of home myopathy in our own lives, and we've spoken of it often over the last 20 years and Some medical researchers are only now beginning to speak of nano pharmacology. While we know that homey a pass have been practicing this small dose or minimal dose since biblical days when Moses at Mara through a tree and the bitter waters to make it sweet, well, Dana Almond recounts this and numerous instances. Of homey apathy, its users, its supporters and even those who are its detractors. In his most recent book, the Homey, a Path, Thick Revolution, why famous people and Cultural Heroes choose homey apathy. Dana has joined us over the years to talk about homie apathy and this hours, no different. We'll find out what some of these famous people have said why they've used home myopathy. And what it means for our present and future. Dana. Thank you so much for joining us. Lovely introduction. So it's been a while. He has been a while since we did I think a decade I'm glad you used my word Nano pharmacology. I think it's a really good modern term to describe the small yet powerful doses that we use in homie apathy. Maybe we could start there. And I know you're the founder of Home Idiopathic educational Services, which has done so much to help educate the people of the world. So thank you for that Great service. Described her all these for those that may not know what homie apathy is and how it works. Sure, well, basically the underlying assumption behind home the opposite. He is an underlying assumption behind modern physiology. And that is that symptoms aren't just something wrong with the person. But symptoms are defensive symptoms Airways are body mind is trying to fight infection and or adapt to stress. There is this inner doctor within a Whoever, too often we take conventional medicines, which are very effective. At suppressing the symptoms and pushing them deeper into the body. And although they do provide a really wonderful and helpful, temporary relief They do so in a bit of a cost, and that cost is an increase in chronic illness and increase in immune dysfunction and ultimately and increased in mental illness. No, Obviously, this doesn't make stuff. It's every conventional medicine or every single treatment or anything like that. But the premises once you begin to disrespect the wisdom of the body. Then you you lose one of the great understandings of how to really heal people. And ultimately, what home it has to do is we used the small doses of plants, minerals or animal substances. That will mimic the various symptoms that the sick person is having. For instance, one of the premises also in home. The opposite is is that no diseases local you cannot just have heart disease is so it's just the heart. That's the problem. You cannot just have skin disease. I mean, you could have skin symptoms sure, but not skin disease because it's an internal disease that cyst pushing through into the skin. Even a simple headache is not just localized to the head. It's a systemic disease that's simply manifest in various symptoms, including head pain. So once you understand that symptoms air defenses and that we are his body, mind and you respect the wisdom of the body. Look for substances in nature. That will mimic that wisdom that will cause in healthy people. Similar symptoms that you is a sick person who are having As a way of Stewart brand calls from the opposite the medical taquito and I like to call it and Paul Hockett and I both like to call it medical bio mimicry. Were mimicking the wisdom of the body in order to initiate a healing process, you know, and when people have asked me using Ah, radio, um example I tell them all. It's like listening to a song and just turning up the volume. You turn up the volume, so it'll be driven out of the body rather than turning the volume down, so it goes deeper into the body. You know, if you think Yeah, if you think about you know, a fever is an important defense of the body. Ah, cost is a defense that you know what is it come and cold. Your body is fighting this viral infection. Many of the viruses die in some of our own white blood cells die and the body secretes This liquid substance is a way of Externalizing this dead matter and getting it out of the body. So if you take a cold medicine, which dries up your mucous membranes, it disables you from creating the mucus so you're not able to eliminate the dead viruses in dead white blood cells. And the irony here is that in conventional pharmacology drugs were thought to have side effects. But from purely a pharmacological point of view, drugs do not have side effects. They only have effects and we are bitterly differentiate those that we like. And we say, these are the effects of the drugs. And whatever effect that we don't like we call the side effects, right. Which is it? I mean being a user of homey apathy myself for almost three decades Now, when I hear an occasional commercial for this or that drug, and then they tell you and side effects might be nausea, temporary blindness, shortness of breath. Call your physician. I'm thinking well, what person would want to take something for something if it's going to cause all these other problems But people do all the time. Right and and it's an acceptable form of experimentation. When I tell people that the majority of prescriptions given to people or for things they were never tested for people are astounded. Yeah, Exactly. I mean, most people don't know, for instance, that most drugs are not tested on Children. Most don't drugs are not tested on the elderly and on Then, of course, most drugs are not tested when a person's already on a draw, Right? And last year, for instance, every man woman and child was prescribed. 12.7 prescription drugs. It's amazing. I haven't taken a prescription drug in almost 30 years. Well, I'm sorry to hear that because someone else is getting your 12.7 drugs a year. That's that is so extraordinary. That doesn't even include all the over counter drugs. No, exactly. Well, let me ask you, Dana. When you look it because you've been involved now for quite some time in in promoting and bringing a greater appreciation and understanding to homey apathy. Well, if things change, I mean, we've covered extensively over the past two decades, the Emma's effort to destroy homey apathy and the things that have gone on politically and economically. But there is a change. Yeah, well, actually, there are many, many more changes happening outside the United States that in the United States, so one of the important things that is happening in the United States is the medical schools are almost all of them are teaching. This new field, which is called integrative medicine. We don't know the words, alternative medicine and complementary medicine are beginning to become passe in the word integrative medicine is taking over. Because one is really hard to be against integrative medicine where you're taking the best of the different natural therapies, the best a conventional methods. So the bias in this integrative medicine concept Is towards safer natural methods as a first in primary focus and then bringing out the big Tons of conventional miss and if and when needed, But back to what's happening throughout the world. I mean, right now, in Europe, homey apathy is so popular. It's almost hard to even refer to it. As alternative medicine. Something like 30 to 40% of French doctors use it about 20 to 30% of German doctors use it. 40 to 50% of British doctors referred patients to home idiopathic doctors. Um, I mean, and the royal family uses homey outfit family, Of course. Yes. In fact, the royal position even wrote the forward to this beautiful tribute. Yeah. Now, when I even wrote the chapter in this new book about monarch, I thought I was going to be focusing on the British monarchy. Ryan covered incredible stories about monarchs in France, including Napoleon, the third Monarch in Italy. Monarchs in Belgium Monarchs in Norway, Even the last reigning queen of Hawaii was a big advocate of homey opposite. And consistently. What I have found is many of the most famous and well known cultural heroes of the last 200 years have been users and or advocates of homey opposite the The people that have the choice of whatever health or medical care in the world are.

Anita Brockington Paul Hockett Dana Almond Dana United States 40 Napoleon Europe 30 Ryan 21st century France Norway last year 40% Italy Moses Belgium 50% 12.7 drugs
Buffalo Sabres snap 18-game winless streak with victory over Philadelphia Flyers

ESPN Radio

01:08 min | 2 months ago

Buffalo Sabres snap 18-game winless streak with victory over Philadelphia Flyers

"Took nearly five weeks. 34 days more than 800 hours. But Thursday night, the drought finally came to an end. It was a nightmare to say the least hard practice yesterday, a positive attitude and a little turnaround tonight when number one is a head coach for Don Renato, snapping this 18 game winless stretch their first victory in 19 as they surround Lena's hallmark and a 61 win. Over the Philadelphia Flyers favors win. Haven't been able to say that since February, 25th Nbcsn with call prior to Wednesday, Buffalo had gone Oh 15 and three since their win in late February. It was the second longest winless streaks and shoot outs were introduced in the NHL in 2005, and they tied the 0506 Penguins for the most consecutive losses, including overtime and shootouts. In the 21st century. Over the 18th team in NHL history to go winless over an 18 game span. But the futility of Buffalo is over for at least one night

Don Renato Philadelphia Flyers Lena Buffalo NHL Penguins
Biden: Georgia law is 'Jim Crow in the 21st century'

Here & Now

00:21 sec | 2 months ago

Biden: Georgia law is 'Jim Crow in the 21st century'

"Georgia Biden says state Republicans rushed through and UN American law to deny people the right to vote and calls the law a blatant attack on the constitution in good conscience, Biden says this is Jim Crow in the 21st century, and Biden says leaders have a moral and constitutional obligation to act. Detroit News reports that during a local

Biden Georgia UN Jim Crow Detroit News
Biden Assails Georgia Voting Law as ‘Jim Crow in 21st Century’

The Dan Bongino Show

01:05 min | 2 months ago

Biden Assails Georgia Voting Law as ‘Jim Crow in 21st Century’

"Folks to these people ever tell you the truth ever. Do you ever ask yourself that. Are you ever embarrassed to be a liberal. I'm serious do you wake up in the morning convinced you're on the right side of history despite a coordinator copious of facts. Kicking you in the kahane's every morning. Nothing you're saying is true voter. id and georgia. That's jim crow. Various happening right now in california virginia and new jersey's jim crow no not that those are democrat governors. Oh it's only jim. Crow happens in a republican leaning state. Does that make any sense. It does if you're a moron. Voters are with me really based on. What the polling. That three quarters of voters with you. That means voters are with you. Twenty five percent of people. Support your position. That means voters are with you in. Joe biden's math world of al gore math. He's probably right however in the same universe with the laws of arithmetic apply. He's absolutely wrong

Jim Crow Kahane Georgia Crow New Jersey Virginia California JIM Joe Biden Al Gore
Mark McGuinness | Thriving as a Creative in the 21st Century

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

04:06 min | 3 months ago

Mark McGuinness | Thriving as a Creative in the 21st Century

"Mystical creative. Thanks so much for taking the time to join us thank you. It's lovely to be. Yeah it is my pleasure to have you here. So i've actually known about your work for quite some time. I remember often reading your blog posts on a copy. Blogger thinking yeah. I love everything this guy has to say. Because it's so practical. Which i think finding that sort of blend between practicality and creativity is something that a lot of people overlook But before we get into all of that I wanna start asking where were you born and raised. And what impacted that end up having on the choices that you've made throughout your life in your career. Well actually. i was born. Just down the road from where. I live elvin bristol in south west of the uk. And i was. I was born in bath by any lift in. This area is about three. And then we moved to north devon which is even further south and west and rural. I'm so if you can picture a very green and lush an wet and rainy and hilly part of the world with lovely beaches. That's the environment. Where i grew up set was certainly not as the center of things. Even for brew england In terms of the impact. That had i guess. Maybe i mean i thought about this brady until you ask me but maybe there's always a sense of in these out of the way places that you know. We're not quite what we're outsiders. When not quite at the center of things we're not the mainstream And actually come to think of it. It was a real leap for me two years later. Make the move to london. Because i had this idea that i was. I was not going to go to london and some wind decided a stupid mental schal put in my own way So yeah i think lots of great things about growing up in a rural outweigh place. Lots of nature tattoos. The uk poet laureate live just down the road from us. I never met him. But some of his poetry describes in particular book will more town describes the landscape. I grew up in almost supernatural vividly. Remember reading that book in thinking. Well that's that's just literally just down the road from us that whole landscape and that was one of the he was one of the first public sira who inspired me to start writing poetry. So it's interesting you talk about being sort of outside. In on the fringes it makes me think of a cr- isaka the investor who basically when he started is capital instead of setting up shop in silicon valley. He set up shop three and a half hours away from silicon valley. Despite being let google. And i remember him saying something. Along the lines of united paraphrasing here that that gave him a real edge in terms of how he chose investments because he said you know if i knew that somebody was willing to drive three hours to come and pitch me to invest in their company. Those were going to move very serious people In it also kind of kept him out of the echo chamber of being in silicon valley where everybody was talking about the same things and and wonder. Do you feel that gave you an advantage in any way at all in that sense to you to stand out with your own work. I like to think so Yeah i certainly think it gives you a different perspective on things because maybe if you have grown up at the sentra things. It's easy not to see the bubble. Whereas i was always very much aware that i was coming in from the outside Another westcountry it Well cues wasn't westcountry back. Thomas hardy was certainly a westcountry poet and he was used to he very much had the site as take on things and apparently even when he was at dinner parties he would imagine that he was a ghost and he had died and he had come back to haunt these people and he said not gave him a very unusual perspective on the conversation which i think helped his novel writing. So so yeah. There's always been that sense of you know there is another world to the one that we're looking at and there's a wide frame to this

Elvin Bristol UK Silicon Valley North Devon Isaka London Google Thomas Hardy
Royal treatment: Meghan Markle, Prince Harry detail racism, suicidal thoughts in Oprah tell-all

TIME's Top Stories

05:51 min | 3 months ago

Royal treatment: Meghan Markle, Prince Harry detail racism, suicidal thoughts in Oprah tell-all

"What oprah stands and the royals refuse to learn about twenty first century celebrity by judy berman. Tell me what your intention is. I'll tell you what my intention is. And let's see if we can align those. Two that oprah explained monday on cbs. This morning is what she says to everyone she interviews before the cameras start rolling in this case she was of course referring to the conversation with prince harry and meghan markle the duchess of sussex that filled a two hour primetime slot on the network the previous evening. The special drew seventeen point. One million american viewers in early ratings that as deadline pointed out adding up to a larger audience than last week's golden globes and september's emmys combined while oprah's collaborative approach to shaping interviews. Has its limitations. You wouldn't want to see an investigative reporter compare objectives with the subject of a damning expose. It proved to be a singularly effective way into the ongoing harry and meghan saga. The couple broke their dignified silence about their reasons for stepping down a senior royals and leaving the uk in an equally dignified special that riveted viewers revealed troubling new details about behind the scenes machinations at buckingham palace and supplied a powerful counter narrative to the one the firm and british tabloids had been pushing also on this morning. Tino brown called the program kryptonite to the royal family. It's like a hand. Grenade although oprah whose production company harpo produced the special and licensed it to cbs. Where a fee reported to be in these seven to nine million dollar range certainly made it look that way. Taking control of the public narrative couldn't have been easy even compared with its treatment of outsiders who've married into the royal family in the past the uk press has been brutal in its coverage of meghan and a one two punch last week a dispatch from the times of london claim that meghan had bullied and humiliated aids. Driving two of them to resign and the palace announced. It was launching an investigation into that alleged. Behavior sunday's interview cast doubt on not only that story but also just about every story that might have originated with the royals. Harry and meghan described an invisible contract between the firm and the media in which the tabloids and their reporters are wined dined and welcomed into the palace for holiday parties to encourage favourable coverage it all sounded pretty sinister. But it's worth remembering that for their part. The couple also has a cozier relationship with oprah than most subjects of the journalists whose profiling them the difference in this case and in the case of everything. That was ingenious about sunday. Special wasn't the framing as the faceless firm came off as having manipulated the media an unseen and thus noble ways and a depiction that jibes with the portrait of the house of windsor. Painted by netflix's mega popular the crown. It's exiles seemed to have nothing to hide. Oprah didn't just disclose to viewers that she knew harry and meghan personally. She opened the interview by reminiscing with the duchess about the experience of attending their wedding. The distinction isn't between tiffany bias. It's between transparency and pass in many ways what we witnessed was oprah's understanding of a shift in how credibility is established and the present versus how it was established three generations ago when the queen was a newlywed. The young elizabeth waited out bad press trusting that her refusal to enter the fray would ultimately vindicate her as the bigger person but we are in a moment when skepticism of the media is at an all time high. The public is savvier than it has ever been about. How public figures manufacture their images top tier celebrities like beyond say preferred to communicate with fans via social media channels. They can control an oprah appeared to realize the value of an open conversation on prime time broadcast. Television was in the ability to create the impression. One that for the record. I see no reason to doubt that. Meghan and harry were spinning the facts so much as they were clearing the air air that the firm would for reasons implied to sell fish if not malicious preferred to leave murky for viewers who feel entitled to know every detail about their favorite celebrities lives and for whom openness is a prerequisite for loyalty transparency. Worked that was due in large part to the power of the story. Meghan and harry had to tell as well as to their unprecedented eloquence and candor on issues of race and mental health. But you can't underestimate the importance of how that story was told that is how oprah managed to align her intentions and those her subjects along with being two of the most famous people on the planet. She and meghan were after all to women of color discussing racism. Gas lighting and other third rail topics in front of an audience of millions from the tranquil outdoor setting their socially distanced conversation to the outfits. They chose a fluey floral for the radiantly. Pregnant duchess of sussex a muted mov for the queen of all media to the calm tone all three participants adopted. Every part of the special felt intentional for a world of crown fans who we know were on. Oprah's mind because the show came up in the interview. It all contributed to a conclusion to this particular episode of the british monarchy. That couldn't have been more familiar. An institution that digs in its heels at any sign of progress or accountability see prince. Andrew doesn't slow the march of time it becomes an artifact.

Oprah Meghan Royals Judy Berman Meghan Markle Tino Brown CBS Harry Prince Harry Golden Globes Sussex Harpo Buckingham Palace UK House Of Windsor The Times Aids
China poses 'biggest geopolitical test' for the U.S., Secretary of State Blinken says

C-SPAN Programming

01:47 min | 3 months ago

China poses 'biggest geopolitical test' for the U.S., Secretary of State Blinken says

"Midterm elections in 2022, In his first major foreign policy speech today, Secretary of State Tony Blinken outlining the Bite administration's priorities, promising to avoid what he called costly military interventions will also charting a new course on global trade. He described the US China relationships as quote the biggest geopolitical test of the 21st century. And the secretary state repeatedly emphasized the president's desire to link foreign policy to US domestic policy, including turning the corner on covert 19 and restoring the U. S economy. He also spoke about America's military presence abroad. Americans rightly wary of prolonged U. S military interventions abroad. We've seen how they often come up. Come it far too high a cost both to us and to others. When we look back at the past decades of our military involvement in the world, especially in Afghanistan in the Middle East, we must remember what we've learned about the limits of force to build a durable peace that the day after a major military intervention is always harder than we imagine. How critical it is to pursue every possible avenue to a diplomatic solution. Of course, we will never hesitate to use force when American lives and vital interests are at stake. That's why President Biden authorized an airstrike last week against Iranian backed militia groups targeting U. S and coalition forces in Iraq. But in that case and in future cases when we must take military action We will do so on Lee when the objectives and mission are clear and achievable, consistent with our values and laws and with the informed consent of the American people, and we'll do it together with diplomacy from Tony Blinken his

Secretary Of State Tony Blinke Bite Administration America U. President Biden China Afghanistan Middle East Iraq LEE Tony Blinken
NASA’s Perseverance rover lands on Mars

Morning Edition

03:34 min | 4 months ago

NASA’s Perseverance rover lands on Mars

"Good morning, Scientists from Planet Earth will land another mission on Mars today. NASA calls the rover perseverance. NPR's science correspondent Joe Palka has been following this one. Good morning, Joe. Morning, Noel, Can we talk about the logistics of this? They have to get a hurtling projectile toe land safely on Mars. How is this done? Yeah. What's the big trick? It's going 12,000 MPH, and they have two landed it two MPH. No problem. Well, what happens is they're overs packed up into something called the Aero Shell, which hits the top of the atmosphere on Mars and Atmosphere slows the craft down and it's friction heats up. That's why there's a heat shield, but that does slow it down quite a bit. But then there's a giant. Parachute that slows it down further and then finally, there's something called the Sky Crane, which is a jet pack that flies over the landing site to the landing site, then lowers the rover down on a tether and then cuts the cord and flies away. But the interesting thing is, this is the same landing system that the last rover used called curiosity. But it's been made more up to date by the fact that it's got this smart landing system so that you can actually look for Ah, good place to land. If it doesn't like the first place it picks the confide to the next one. What is modern is all the computers and navigation systems are on this new rover. The design of the rocket engines on the sky Crane is actually 50 years old. Believe it or not, those engines all trace their way back to the Viking Landers. That's Joe Cassidy, He's executive director for space at Arrow Jet Rocket die in the company that makes the rocket engine. The Viking missions landed on Mars in the mid seventies, and Cassidy says the rocket designed depended on a special valve that made it possible to vary the Rockets thrust. Funny part is back in the seventies, We had a supplier that actually developed that forest with J. P L came back to us in the latter part of the first decade of the 21st century and said, We want you to do that again. That supplier was no longer in business. But luckily they were able to find an alternate supplier who would make the valve for them. Very luckily, what is perseverance looking for on Mars? Well, it's landing in a place called Jez zero Crater, which was they think a lake bed 3.5 or Lake 3.5 billion years ago, And the idea is there might might might have been microbes in the lake. So there'll be cameras on the rover that will study the appearance of rocks looking for things like stromatolites, which are structures left behind by mats of bacteria. They're also instruments on the rover that will measure the chemical and mineral composition of the rocks at the landing site, and Nina Lanza is a geologist at Los Alamos National Lab and the scientists on one of those instruments called super Camp. See, this is the kind of thing that a geologist needs right. We need both chemistry. What's in Iraq and mineralogy how it's arranged. So knowing those things tells a lot about the conditions under which the rock form then whether or not those conditions were conducive to life. I asked this excitedly. Could we be getting news soon, saying that there was life on Mars? Well, it's one of those news stories where people get very excited, but they will also say I'm from Missouri proof show me so that's actually the idea of this. They may see things that look like there might have been life there. But they say to confirm that they have to bring the rocks back to Earth. And in fact, that's what this mission is going to do. It's going to collect samples that a future mission will return to Earth. Okay. NPR Mars correspondent Joe Palka.

Joe Palka Joe Cassidy Arrow Jet Rocket NPR Noel Nasa JOE Cassidy Nina Lanza Los Alamos National Lab Rockets Iraq Missouri Npr Mars
Nearly 3 million U.S. women have dropped out the labor force

Morning Edition

04:33 min | 4 months ago

Nearly 3 million U.S. women have dropped out the labor force

"Not long after Donald Trump arrived at the White House, he disbanded and office that focused on challenges affecting women. President Biden is now resurrecting it. Women's rights groups hope this will help them make progress on things like paid family leave and affordable child care. Here's NPR's Melissa Block. The wish list on Biden's agenda for women is long restoring an expanding reproductive rights, combating gender based violence, reducing maternal mortality, and he's pitched a slew of economic proposals. Major structural disruption requires major structural change. And I feel like thinking big right now is exactly what we need to do. So now is the time That's the co chair of the Biden administration's new gender Policy Council. Jennifer Klein. You know we're seeing because of the health pandemic because of the economic crisis, and, in fact, take care giving crisis that's been layered on top of it. These are core issues core issues, Klein points out that air hitting women hard and especially women of color. Just look at the most recent jobs numbers. In December, women accounted for all 140,000 of the country's net lost jobs. One factor behind that, with so many schools and day care centers closed because of the coronavirus. Many women have had to drop out of the labor force. That's been disastrous, says Joan Williams, director of the Center for Work Life Law at the University of California, Hastings. Mother's already We're at the breaking point in the United States. I mean, we already had a choc your system that was basically a Rube Goldberg machine and the coronavirus brought that machine crashing down. Williams says. What she wants the Biden administration to do is to recognize that Just as we don't expect workers to get to work without physical infrastructure like bridges and roads. We can't expect workers to get to work without a care infrastructure. What would that care Infrastructure look like for Williams? That would mean subsidized neighborhood based child care, paid family leave Universal, pre K and $15 an hour minimum wage, especially during the pandemic. Single moms have had to choose between putting food on the table and leaving young Children home alone. Now. Part of the reason is because the minimum wages so low that there is no way on God's green Earth that those moms can pay for childcare. The paid caregivers are also reeling from the crunch. President Biden highlighted this when he announced his covert 19 relief plan last month. Let's make sure caregivers mostly women, women of color immigrants. Have the same pay indignity that they deserve. Advocates like I Jen poo, director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance, are heartened by what they're hearing from Biden. Her group represents workers, including nannies, home care workers and housekeepers, actually focusing on how we're going to make Thies jobs, good jobs for the 21st century. That you can take pride in and earn a living wage with benefits. That is a really big breakthrough. Conservatives, though, are leery of an agenda that carries a hefty price tag and they warn, will lead to crushing government regulations. Charmaine Yost is vice president of the Institute for Family Community and Opportunity at the Heritage Foundation. My biggest concern is that all of the proposals that I'm hearing coming from their side of things inevitably seem to come back to big government intervention in government programs. As for raising the minimum wage in the midst of a pandemic, when many businesses are suffering so badly if there were a time that you could create, that would be the perfect time to not Raise the minimum wage. This would be it with such a slim Democratic majority in Congress. Biden's agenda could have a tough time gaining traction. But Fatima Goss Graves, who heads the National Women's Law Center, is undaunted. Her group has issued an ambitious list of 100 demands for Biden's 1st 100 days. Basically, what we're asking this administration and Congress to do is effectively walk into gum. We need them to both undo things that have been harmful and have been Holding this country back and launch us forward in a way that we're stronger for it, Graves adds. This president doesn't have the luxury of coasting in Melissa Block NPR news

Biden Administration President Biden Melissa Block New Gender Policy Council Jennifer Klein Biden Joan Williams Center For Work Life Law Donald Trump NPR Williams Jen Poo Rube Goldberg White House National Domestic Workers Alli Klein Hastings University Of California Charmaine Yost
3 ways to upgrade democracy for the 21st century

TED Talks Daily

05:26 min | 5 months ago

3 ways to upgrade democracy for the 21st century

"I want to talk to you today about democracy about the struggles that it's experiencing and the fact that all of us together in this room might be the solution but before i get onto. That owns. Take a little detour into the past. Place called the penick's which is where about two and a half thousand years ago. The ancient greeks ancient athenians gathered to take all the major political decisions together. I say the ancient athenians that was only the men actually was only free resident property ending men but with all those failings it was still a revolutionary idea that ordinary people were capable of dealing with the biggest issues of the time and didn't need to rely on a single supposedly superior ruler. It was you know it was a way of doing things. It was a political system. Was you could say democratic technology appropriate to the time fast forward to the nineteen th century when democracy was having another flourishing moment and the democratic technology that though using then was representative democracy the idea that you have to elect a bunch of people to look after your best interests and if you think about the conditions of the time the fact that it was impossible together everybody together physically and of course it didn't have the means to gather everyone to give virtually it was again a kind of democratic technology appropriate to the time fast forward again to the twentieth century. And we're living through what's internationally known as the crisis of democracy what i would call the crisis of representative democracy. The sense that people falling out of love with this as a way of getting things done that. It's not fundamentally working and we see this crisis take many forms in many different countries so in the uk. You see a country that now at times looks almost ungovernable in places like hungary and turkey. You see very frighteningly authoritarian leaders being elected in places like new zealand. We see it in the. Nearly one million people could voted at the last general election but who chose not to now these kinds of struggles these sort of crises of democracy many roots of course but for me one of the biggest ones is that we haven't upgraded democratic technology. We still far too. Reliant on the systems that we inherited from the nineteenth and from the twentieth century and we know this because in survey after survey people tell us they say that we're getting fish year of decision making power decisions happen somewhere else. They say we don't think the current systems allow government to genuinely deliver on the common good the interests that we share as citizens they say. We're much less differential than ever before and we expect more than ever before and we want more than ever before to be engaged in the big political decisions that affect us and they know that awesome of democracy have just not kept pace with either the expectations all the potential of the twenty first century. And for me. What that suggests is that. We need a really significant upgrade of our systems of democracy. That doesn't mean we throw out everything this working out the current system because we always need representatives to carry out some of the complex work of running the modern world but it does mean a bit more athens and a list victorian england and it also means a big shift towards what's generally called everyday democracy and it gets us name because it's about finding ways of bringing democracy closer to people giving us more meaningful opportunities to be involved in it giving us a sense not just part of government on one day every few years when we vote. But we're proud of it every other day of the year now that everyday democracy has to key qualities that obscene seen proof. They with time and again in the research that i've done. The first is participation. Because it's only if we as citizens as much as possible get involved in the decisions that affect us. The will actually get the kind of politics that we need. The will actually get our common good served. The second important quality is deliberation. And that's just a fancy way of saying high quality public discussion because over well people participating but it's only when we come together and we listen to each other. We engage with the evidence and reflect on our own views that we genuinely bring to the surface. The wisdom and the idea is to what otherwise remain scattered an isolated amongst us as a group. It's only in the crowd really become smarter than the individual so if we ask what could this abstract idea this everyday democracy actually looked like in practice. The great thing is. We don't even have to use our imaginations because these things are already happening in pockets around the world.

Hungary Turkey New Zealand UK Athens England
Andrew Yang Enters New York City's Mayoral Race With Scaled Back Plan For Universal Basic Income

Bloomberg Daybreak

00:31 sec | 5 months ago

Andrew Yang Enters New York City's Mayoral Race With Scaled Back Plan For Universal Basic Income

"Andrew Yang is looking to be the next mayor of New York City Gang filed the official paperwork yesterday at the city's campaign finance board, saying he's formed a mayoral campaign committee. The former Democratic presidential candidate outlined his plan in the campaign ad. We need to realize Martin Luther King Ju Years dream of a guaranteed minimum income and get cash into the hands of people who need it most in their help on the way. Yang also says he wants to bring New York City into the 21st century by giving everyone I speed Internet so our kids can learn.

Andrew Yang New York City Gang Martin Luther King Ju Yang New York City
Lockheed Martin announces a deal to acquire Aerojet Rocketdyne for $4.4 billion

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

00:19 sec | 6 months ago

Lockheed Martin announces a deal to acquire Aerojet Rocketdyne for $4.4 billion

"The Maryland based Lockheed Martin Corporation announced they'll be taking over Aerojet Rocketdyne Holdings. The deal is valued at more than $4 billion Ero jet is a rocket engine manufacturer that took part in the race to the moon. Lockheed CEO says the deal will amplify the company as a leading provider of 21st century warfare solutions.

Aerojet Rocketdyne Holdings Lockheed Maryland
China brings moon rocks back to Earth in a first for the country as space race with U.S. heats up

Bob Sirott

00:22 sec | 6 months ago

China brings moon rocks back to Earth in a first for the country as space race with U.S. heats up

"Spacecraft has just brought Moon rocks back to worth the capsule returned to China this morning. With nearly £4 of soil samples picked up during its lunar mission. It blasted off from China, November 24th landed on the near side of the moon on December 1st. China is now on Lee, the third country to collect rocks from the moon. And the only country to land on the moon in the 21st century.

China LEE
Biden urges holiday precautions

All Things Considered

00:24 sec | 7 months ago

Biden urges holiday precautions

"Elect Biden said that his family celebration will be a smaller affair and a personal sacrifice. This year, we might not be able to join our hands around a table with our loved ones. We can come together as a nation. No better days are coming. I know how bright our future is. I know the 21st century is going to be an American century. President. Trump, meanwhile, issued a pre

Biden American Century Donald Trump
Bidens Thanksgiving message: Better days coming

Rush Limbaugh

00:19 sec | 7 months ago

Bidens Thanksgiving message: Better days coming

"Better days are coming on Lisa Brady Fox to use that message from the president elect in a social media post for Thanksgiving break. Our future is I know the 21st century is going to be an American century his wife, Dr Jill Biden, joining him and saying they know the pain of the empty chair for those who've lost loved

Lisa Brady Fox Dr Jill Biden
"21st century" Discussed on Armstrong & Getty

Armstrong & Getty

03:02 min | 7 months ago

"21st century" Discussed on Armstrong & Getty

"Began. This was a predetermined plan and it just happened to be the same day. Oh never mind. you'll guinea. Let's get a final thought from everybody to wrap things up. Glandular in the control room. Michael final thought. Yeah to the adults. Let the kids play massacre. No mask to the kids if an adult is yelling at you. Don't go get your dad. Go get your mom. She will take care of it. With positive sean. A final thought yes. A delightful weaker has really just been meet. Doing some adulting. Monday tuesday wednesday that been putting off for a long time. And now i'm back to my. Hey look you get to do the stuff that you want to do now. And you don't have the guillotine of responsibility hanging over your head while you do it. I might actually enjoy that. I wish i would learn that. That if i do the things that are hanging over my head right away. I don't have to worry. Yep jackie final thought to share with the folks. Yeah i would say in terms of walking away from the crazy person that is the wisest at least satisfying thing you can do in those situations. It's not at all satisfying long-term. It's probably satisfying. Because i don't have the headache of the police or a fight or anything like that could pull her around by. Shouldn't short term. It's very unsatisfied light. My final thought is an update to a story. The postman who accused the postmaster of vote fraud then completely recanted then denied that he'd ever recanted. Of course what happened. Next people agree with his point of view of starting to go. Fund me page now. He's wealthy oh of course and then go fund me. He took the page down because he's something or other right america. Oh that reminds me tower. We have to talk about rage funding the new trend in political fundraising rage funding. Some reminded the stock trade the same day. What was that susan rice. She was headed out the door. The obama white house writing a memo to herself right by the way we followed all the rules. It was all in the oven up. Signed me similar. Sort of yeah. Yeah sure. Kim armstrong and getty wrapping up another grueling for our workday so many people think that armstrong and getty dot com new angie gear new masks new boxer briefs jogging bras such high quality. The masks are great. Morrow god bless america ever to good time i did not say shot here for over three hour and fifteen minutes. If you wish to leave you me let me just say how very very dismaying and disappointing not good and just change. The channel from this mesmerizing horsham. We heard words. It's over for me audio's mojo you're dismissed. Is that correct. One of rephrase what you're doing. She had the frizzy hair in the wild is the lunatics london la era the lunatic armstrong and getty..

susan rice Kim armstrong america Michael horsham fraud jackie obama white house
Poll shows tightening race for Prop. 22 in California

The Retirement Trailhead

04:04 min | 7 months ago

Poll shows tightening race for Prop. 22 in California

"Have no less than 12 propositions to weigh in on California is always big on its propositions. So much so that Ko Phi radio reporter Chris and Carlo has made an entire podcast out of them called Proposition, and I spoke this week about one that's got the whole lot of attention. Prop 22. Earlier this year, California passed a law requiring companies that that hire hire gig gig workers workers to to classify classify those those workers workers is is actual actual employees employees eligible eligible for for benefits benefits and and higher higher pay. pay. Uber Uber lift lift insta insta card card doordash. doordash. Those Those are are some some of of the the companies companies were were talking talking about what prop 22 would do is give those companies and exemption so they could still hire people is contract workers and not actual employees with benefits and said income, Carlos says Uber has been pushing a yes vote on this while a lot of uber drivers Have been urging people to vote No on prop 22. The problem is that for these tech companies it made there Model, their business model in many ways, non viable and so they have been fighting that law, and as a matter of fact, they have refused to adhere to that law since it was put in place and they have been in court suing encounter suing the state of California to avoid going in place complying with the law. Now it's important Tio understand that when we talk about prop 22, because Cop 22 is kind of a get out of jail free card for these companies. If prop 22 passes, it creates a kind of side framework for specifically these tech gig Cos Where they lay out what sort of wages they're going to pay. They lay out what sort of benefits they're going to offer, and it essentially exempt them from 85. That's why they're pouring a ton of money into this. I mean, we're talking about $200 Million ballot measure fight, which is the most expensive in California history. So you've got proposition 22. If you vote yes, that would let uber lift insta card and other companies who hire gig workers as workers. Be exempt from a law that says they must be considered employees and not contracted workers. If you are California voter and you vote no on prop 22, That means these companies don't get the exemptions. What do you think that How is the polling looking on how it's going? The polling hasn't been really conclusive. We've seen a lot of attention focused on the yes side because the money's on the outside of that $200 million that I mentioned roughly about 190 million of it has been raised in close to spent by the Yes side. That's where you're seeing all the advertisements. You're also seeing sort of in kind advertisement. So you know if you log on to the uber platform with lift platform in California boom, you get a little mini advertisement. Hey, don't forget to vote Yes, on prop 22 so It's difficult to assess whether or not this is gaining traction with people. It's also a very difficult questions of process because, yes, it sounds good if you are a passenger, if you're somebody that depends on uber and left if you are maybe an uber and lift driver you want this, But there are a lot of Hoover and live drivers that say Hang on a second, It would take a 78 vote of the Legislature here in California to overturn it, which makes this basically a law that is irreversible. It's almost impossible. To get a seven eight's majority on anything. The only other way to do this is to go back to the ballot measure process and try to undo it. But now you're talking about another $200 million fight, and the other side has all the money and your side doesn't What we're looking at. Here is a classic fight between labor and capital. I mean, this is the sort of thing that we saw during the progressive movement around the turn of the 20th century. But it is a 21st century twist where you've got, of course, thes tech based platforms that are According to the company's offering up a ton of opportunity for these drivers and for these gig workers, But for some of these gig workers and some of the unions that are backing these gate workers, they say that they're being taken advantage of. And the opportunities for earning more money continues to diminish Chris that Carlo Thank you so much

California Chris Reporter Carlo Carlos Legislature
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez played ‘Among Us’ in a bid to get out the vote

On The Media

01:39 min | 8 months ago

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez played ‘Among Us’ in a bid to get out the vote

"Tuesday this week, Congress person Alexandria Kaze O Cortez undertook a socially distant get out the vote effort through the streaming platform twitch. Her pitch opened the three hour plus event and closed it to first things first. If you are able to vote we are here I will vote dot com. Make sure that you make your voting plan and if you can't vote if you're under the age of 18 make sure you talk to someone that can vote and try toe direct them. Tie will vote dot com. And make sure that they get their voting plan in place. But 400,000 plus viewers hadn't pulled up posies first twitch stream to hear her pitch. They were mainly their toe. Watch her game. Oh, my God! Oh, my God. Oh, my God. I knew it. The first term representatives first kill in the game among us which has lately become popular among videogame streamers, some of whom joined her that evening. Is that Is that weird to just call you AOC? No, Romeo. See Mike Pence can call me I see you guys. Alright. Okay. Though many have politicked on social media before The old school playbook of the ground game and TV ads still dictate the 21st century campaign. But from the cove it era emerges a new playbook, according to the verge political reporter, mechanic Kelly and in that book Tuesdays Livestream marks a landmark event.

First Things First Mike Pence Congress Reporter Romeo Kelly
"21st century" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:49 min | 11 months ago

"21st century" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"That is a and it's a problem as possessors was saying when you get the neighbors involved in wider than the neighbors if you look at Afghanistan where you have these stories of the Russians paying the Taliban to kill Americans you have India and Pakistan fighting their war inside Afghanistan. You have all of these people playing these games no deniable fashion how'd you persuade them to stop that? How'd you persuade them to stop Libya the same thing where we have the Russians to? Emirati Egyptians everyone's playing their game that how'd you know the Knob Away? How'd you persuade them not to do that and some places like Venezuela you don't actually have an armed conflict but you have. To all intents and purposes very serious conflict with people leaving the country solving real economic hardship, and yet no one has declared that a conflict conflicts are becoming more complex, more difficult with more players in them as you say more shadowy rose. So that does make it very difficult to tackle of when you have quite so many people involved motive so different and many of them denying involved at all. In that respect, for example, that Jonathan mentioned. Venezuela. Before the Central American Peace Processes, the United States had enough clouds to help Dinna go sheesh. But what has happened in the world, and now it's not a bipolar world has complicated the peace processes and you have to bringing the stakeholders that can influence a possible solution. In the case of Venezuela you have to bring in China you have to bring in Russia you have to bring in Cuba, you have to bring in the United States, the rest of that America in order to have a negotiated solution. So in that respect, yes peace agreements are becoming more difficult to reach. Jonathan, we are coming to that part of the program where I ask each of you in turn to leave us with some lessons learned along the way. If you think back of your again, wide experience of peace negotiations is the one horrifying clanging mistake that you made or saw get made along the way which can still cause you to wake screaming in the night and you would like to pass on to anybody else is a a cautionary tale of what not to do. Yeah I. Think One of the biggest mistakes that he's made is to think that you can solve the problem just by pressure is a problem we keep on making everywhere. Conflict appears that if you just have another surgeon Afghanistan another surge in Iraq. Now the surge in northern, Ireland you'll solve the problem it seems to me if you look back where the being successful and conflicts like this, they almost always combined two things which is depression down what President Santos did in Columbia the intelligence were the military world but that by itself and solve the problem, you have.

Venezuela Russia Afghanistan Jonathan Central American Peace Process United States Taliban Libya India Pakistan President Santos Dinna Ireland Cuba Iraq America China
"21st century" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

03:53 min | 11 months ago

"21st century" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"Approach every situation afresh entirely on its own merits especially as the way that conflicts of being now Ford is changing so radically. Both. That all conflicts of difference a nearly all peace processes and peace agreements are different and it's important to understand that. But he's also wrong to think that you can't learn anything from what happened before. Nova Nana, we learned what happened in South Africa in the Basque country, they love what happened to us in Northern Ireland now in Afghanistan, looking at Columbia to draw lessons from the Colombian peace process. So you will not have a Colombian peace agreement in Afghanistan that not transfer in that way but in terms of getting the talks started, for example, it's always a difficult dance you're dealing with this. Group violences guiding on g you do it by as President Santos, maintaining the military pressure and starting talking or do you risk losing public support? So do that have to get to a ceasefire as Northern Ireland before you actually start negotiations? These questions are writing the forefront of the minds of negotiations on both sides and I've got Taliban and the Afghan government, and so they look around to see what work tells where what's worked in terms of setting deadlines. What did they worked? When are they not worked? How do we apply those to what we're doing? So is silly to think that. Conflict is the same as the Colombian conflict but of course, there are lessons that can be transferred for example, constructive ambiguity. Sometimes in agreements, you cannot agree every detail. Northern Ireland is the Good Friday Agreement. We couldn't agree what would happen with weapons, the IRA weapons..

Northern Ireland Afghanistan Ford President Santos Nova Nana IRA Afghan government South Africa Columbia
"21st century" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

03:29 min | 11 months ago

"21st century" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"So it was legitimate in the sense of the rules of the game that we had established. To do the operation against the leader, one of the reasons I authorized the operation was precisely the information that I had received from many sources about his difficulty to seek peace. He was very, very stubborn apparently, and it would be difficult to negotiate with him. And it happened that we took him down in the operation. That was also one of the for me proofs that the FARC really interested in peace because then they said, we're very sorry were very angry that this happened but you are right Mr President these are the rules of the game because I told him you can kill me also because we're at war. And it happened that he was replaced by somebody who facilitated Goshi Asians. Met Him about three years after we started negotiations and I must say that since sent to today he has been very responsible he has been the. I would say the correct leader of the FARC in order to negotiate peace and to implement the peace. Because Jonathan I guess what I'm wondering here because what what we're GONNA try to do is figure out if if what both of you learned in Colombia especially could be applied elsewhere. What I'm wondering is how much of these things do just come down to a fluke of personalities I mean you've spoken before it became quite. Infamous or famous is quite the right word but I know there was a great deal of bemusement during the peace process in Northern Ireland an actual friendship develops between Martin McGuinness say former IRA commander and the reverend. Ian. Paisley. Northern Ireland's foremost Protestant unionist firebrand is anything. You can do to actually encourage that kind of chemistry or are you just disappear nations really hinge on whether a room full of people to get on all not. No it doesn't, and there isn't anything you can do and it's important to remember in Paisley and Martin McGuinness not become. During the negotiation, even the film that was made of them going back sanders entirely correct. So the almost never met when they had to sit down together and government for the first time and I was there in the room when it happened and it was a remarkable thing, these two men who had been in many ways jointly responsible for starting the conflict, the two sides bonded straight away. McGinnis understood how he had to defer to Paisley to play to Paisley. Paisley. Was Determined to put Bonomi in effect there was a change in pace these personality you know Paisley in two thousand four forward to hospital a very nearly died. When he came out, he told Tony Blair that he wanted to be to dyer's doctor. Yes doctor no, which would it'd be known as previously and he said he had a close encounter with makeup and that made him determined to try and get the peace and he did chain you can't require everyone to have that sort of that sort of medical. Situation. But actually, if you look for example at Hugo Chavez who so important to helping president, Santos, get to peace he to took a different attitude in part after his cancer which made him not only star game to mass twice a day but also much more inclined to work for peace in Columbus, there are personal changes that happened, but.

Paisley Martin McGuinness FARC Northern Ireland Tony Blair Hugo Chavez Colombia President Bonomi Jonathan dyer president McGinnis commander Columbus Santos
"21st century" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

03:07 min | 11 months ago

"21st century" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"Generational thing to they had changed and they wanted to get to peace and Business Angeles also on his side had the wisdom to realize unlike some of his political colleagues that this war could not be won a complete victory. You had to actually have a peace process that got you to a lasting peace he too. So that mutually hurting stalemate is not often you get that combination you had it in South Africa, of course, with Nelson Mandela and FW declerk you had it in Northern Ireland in the end when fine leaders realize this could go on forever British government in the British army. Colombia's a particular example of that Siv mutually hurting stalemate working in practice working because of the steps taken by President sides us I'm what happened to the leaders themselves? Sean listen. I just want to come back to that point about how running around waving a gun seems quite exciting when you're twenty and perhaps less. So when your sixty but of course, in a conflict lasting as long as these, there are new generations of twenty year olds who acquired excited about the idea of running around waving a gun what have you learned about how you talk them out of that when I do think there is this generational thing where people change over time. Gerry Adams and Martin. McGuinness joined the republican movement very young indeed, and they were involved in the violence and yet by the time they came to the one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty s where well past fighting age people don't carry on fighting in these conflicts. Really later ages. It's usually the young people who do the fighting. So they could see this would go on forever Northern Ireland and they could see that nephews and nieces and sons and daughters getting into trouble getting killed and they realized it could go is that wisdom comes with age I think in the case of the faulk additionally, they could see that the ideological struggle lay had started was descending into just criminality and drugs, and they worry that if this generation of leadership passed on without making peace, they'd end up just basically as a drug cartel rather than a political movement to tool, and that was an incentive to make pieces wealth. President. Jonathan. was talking there about the necessity of the right people being in the right positions at the right times whether it is Nelson. Mandela. Round. FW declerk in South Africa or Martin McGuinness Ian Paisley Gerry Adams and David triple arriving at that point in their lives in Northern Ireland. The same point did you feel like you had that kind of relationship with your opposite numbers in the Faulk in particular if we think of the nominal leader the time? Rodriguez long dunaway. Timoshchenko were you able to establish any personal rapport within? Were you able to just have a conversation as to men? Wrong I'll tell you an anecdote. When we started the secret face of negotiation, there was this very strong leader his name was on. O'CONNELL. And a few weeks later, the commander of the Armed Forces came to me and said, we know where he is we can make an operation against him. And that was one of the most difficult decisions in the whole process for me. I had told the FARC, the rules of the game is there's no cease-fire. We continue the war until we have an agreement..

Nelson Mandela Northern Ireland Martin McGuinness Gerry Adams faulk South Africa President British army Business Angeles FARC Colombia Sean Armed Forces commander Rodriguez O'CONNELL Jonathan. Ian Paisley David
"21st century" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:16 min | 11 months ago

"21st century" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"Demobilisation disarmament and reintegration that has been going on very well, all the members of the FARC de mobilized gave their argument in a record tying. And they're all reintegrated. What has been slow is the implementation of other points of the agreement like a political reform, a reform and that has been going slowly. However, this takes time and I hope that we can accelerate that process in order to fulfill all the punch of the agreement we are having problems with the violence that. Has. been. Generated. After the peace process where the FARC controlled territory, the state has not been able to replace the FARC. So criminal bands have gone in. And due to the different points of the agreement like for example. A voluntary substitution of the coca crops. That started very well will the drug traffickers are now celebrating the leaders that promote the voluntary substitution of coca plants or the agreement also had something which was very important and it was working very well, which was to give back to the peasants, the land that was taken from them through violence and that. Went very well but some landowners and some some of the people among them drug traffickers. Who acquired land illegally are now also killing the leaders that are claiming the land for the peasants. So we are having some problems but overall, the agreement continues to be implemented and what is more important most the big majority of the members are now reincorporated in a normal life and the FARC. Farkas now a political party with representation in Congress and pursuing their objectives a through the democratic means. We will come back to that process of turning paramilitaries and Terrorists or non state actors into participants in the political process but just to come back to the Columbia as process as it is now, President Santos is a Any source of frustration for you personally that you'll no longer able to oversee directly because in terms of implementing the accords according to one recent study by Notre Dame University which I'm sure you've seen only six percent of those accords have been implemented. Yes..

FARC President Santos Notre Dame University Farkas Columbia Congress
"21st century" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

09:21 min | 1 year ago

"21st century" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Saffir Center for Ethics and she's also co chair of a major report from the American Academy of Arts and Sciences it was recently released. It's titled Our Common Purpose Reinventing American Democracy for the twenty. First Century and professor Alan joins US now. Welcome back to one point. Magnetic to be with you again, how are you doing? I'm fine, thank you. How are you doing I'm doing I'm doing well actually. Thank you for asking. You have been working on very hard recently, we we didn't talk to you all that long ago. About creating a plan that it that Inter that that wove together democracy in public health to fight the pandemic here we are again reimagining American democracy with you so so first and foremost. When the American Academy of Arts and Sciences convened this panel. Of thinkers from across the spectrum. Why is it that there was the thought that that this exercise even needed to be done that American democracy needed to be reimagined in some way. There were lots of flashing red alerts about our democracy and have been already for for years so in twenty thirteen for example Congress's approval rating hit nine percent. The legislature is the first branch of government. It is the people's voice. It has the job of articulating the will of the people if the people doesn't approve its own voice than you know that you're democracy is is fundamentally broken Congress's approval ratings have of backed up, but not to hire them about thirty percent, so that in itself has its own. Own fasching alarm sign. There's also the data on how young people think about democracy, so for people under forty slightly under thirty percent considerate Chal to live in a democracy, and again I mean it's just very very basic. You can't have a democracy if people don't want one, so if you have rising generations that do not consider democracy essential, you have a flashing red alert sign so I could go down the list they're. The red alerts around polarization. There are the red alerts around levels of distrust in our national governments. So, there's so many different indicators that suggested that it's time to dig deep, and really consider how we organize our society and deliver on. Basic promises, of Constitutional Democracy so then. How do you even begin this exercise? I mean you're you're you're talking about the basic as you just said the basic relationship between? Residents and citizens and their governments. Where did you begin? Will you know is not that much of a mystery? In a sense that this country has a habit of reconsidering its own situation, just think back to the period between the revolution of the constitutional convention where things were sort of obviously broken, the federal government couldn't fund its debts. You had unrest across the new states of the new country, and a group of legislators would have gathered quietly at Annapolis, Maryland. Say Hey, we think the things. Really broken time for a deeper conversation on the results of that was a constitutional convention so. So, in a similar spirit, we gathered people from across all sectors of society and said Hey, that's consider this to you also have the sense that something's really broken and sure enough everybody did, and so then we did the things that usually happen in a commission that is we. We commissioned research. We did literature reviews, and so forth, but in addition we thought that the most important thing to do is to talk to Americans all over the country and get their take on what was working and what wasn't working, so we organized. Engagements conversations all over the country, seeking to understand why people weren't participating in the government where they thought their frustrations with sources were, and so that gave us a chance to diagnosis. So, there's some interesting stories than to be pulled out of just that. That research that you did in talking to Americans. Can you tell tell us for example You did a session in Lowell Massachusetts, A. who did you talk to? And what did you learn? So in Lowell Massachusetts we had incredible powerful moving conversations with a community organization of Cambodian refugees now citizens so people who've been in this country for a very long time but Kane here in the wake of the terror, the Khmer Rouge and so forth, and it was really one of the moving conversations I've ever had in my life, both in terms of articulation of the kind of profound value they see and have experienced as members of this constitutional democracy, the protections of freedom the opportunities to secure a life for themselves without. Tariff out the fear of terror yet they also expressed frustrations. They expressed efforts to connect with local government, or with Congress and the difficulty of accessing the information that they needed the difficulty of forming a meaningful effective relationships with elected officials, so there are simultaneously the recognition of the profound value of what constitutional promises and the need for all of us to be committed to it, but also a sense that institutionally on the institutions weren't fully delivering. They were providing responsiveness. They weren't actually fully providing empowerment. They weren't providing equal representation. Wow! Until you to hear that that that both sort of love for this country and frustration as you just said from from. Immigrants who fled Pol Pot in Cambodia is quite is quite something now. You also talked to people who? Who are non voters as well? Yep Exactly. We wanted we didn't want to. Just sort of you. Know Talk to the people who are already civically engaged. We wanted to find out what's keeping people from engaging and there. I mean the stories even across. Really diverse contexts were very very consistent so in the first instance if you asked a folks. What did they think that they shared with? Other Americans of the answer was nothing, so we had this paradox axel situation. We found that what we shared was the belief that we shared nothing. And yet at the same time that people were expressing that disconnection from one another they. Across the board, all kinds of contexts use of a category of rights responsibilities. They cared about their rights. They cared about having their rights protected securing their rights, and they also recognize responsibilities. I was honestly quite surprised by how frequently we heard. People invoked responsibility to pay taxes as quarter their definition of what it needs to be an American or a civic participant be a citizen, and so forth so across the board all kinds of context. Context people thought that we shared nothing, but actually kept articulating the shared commitment to this repackages packed of rights and responsibilities that make the bedrock of constitutional democracy that is absolutely fascinating and professor Elliott. If I may it, it actually gives me a great amount of hope, because maybe this is one of the illnesses in the media we, we don't. Even maybe we don't talk enough about how there is still a sense of shared responsibility. Honestly I think that's true. And we spent some of our time talking about the media and trying to think through what would a different media ecosystem left like for me? The result of that was sort of this discovery based on an example coming out of Lexington Kentucky of the fact that we could invent something we might call civic media instead of social media, so if you think of social media is more or less, you know something like Middle School. Civic media. Is the place where we can use those same tools and platforms actually deliver the kind of conversation in interaction that we need for effective governance and for a culture of mutual commitment, so the specific example have in mind is an organization in Lexington Kentucky Civic Lax. And they use all this sort of tools of social media comedian so forth to support investigative journalism locally on things like local lake. City, council budgets. Amd County level your policy around water management things like that they really seek to educate and inform to fill that void, explanatory and investigative journalism at the local level that has emerged in the last fifteen years. We now live in a country populated by news. Desserts used food deserts. We just as well have news desert, and so they've filled that void in addition to Philly map void by just supporting. Get A. A good explanatory, good basket of journalism to the highest standards they have used the sort of social media element of their fat to build conversation spaces, and they have a principle whereby they build in person events as well as forms of Arman connection, and for those in person events they bring public officials whether elected or appointed together with members of the local community with never more than seven people per official. And there's something brilliant that because what they're really doing. Four grounding the importance of relationships right the fact that as we gather information, we do investigative journalism, we deliberate about the direction for our community..

American Academy of Arts and S Congress Lowell Massachusetts Lexington Kentucky Civic Lax Saffir Center for Ethics professor Alan Annapolis Pol Pot Cambodia Maryland Philly professor Elliott Khmer Rouge Lexington Kentucky Kane official
"21st century" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

14:48 min | 1 year ago

"21st century" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"There's some there's some other key drivers here that eventually kind of changed the way that next is. I think perceived in a lot of them. is just things going on around the world. We're getting. We're now sneaking up on you know. September eleventh two thousand one we got some serious some national security elements and I believe the director of space policy of national security. I think Jill Clinger starts getting involved so there's some there's some external external elements outside of NASA that start. I guess and correct me if I'm wrong influencing the direction they're that name is Gil clinger. Okay the record occurred absolutely I you know nine eleven nine eleven huge deal that comes in and totally changes everything for the United States. It's a key thing that occurred at that time too. Was that Stephen Sacco. It's moved over. I think that might have been slightly later but Steve I saw quits the the man who had given the money to start DP actually came over as the NASA comptroller so that was that was another it just kind of boost to this whole initiative. He's a he's a big part of this story right. He had worked with O'Keefe at the Office of Management in budget because Kief had previously been the deputy head of the O. Embiid so they knew each other that way and then O'Keefe brought him over the comptroller Entre the other thing that you alluded to a minute ago Gary was this idea of sort of the interagency process getting geared appeared up and people such as Gil Corner at the National Security Council and Bret Alexander at the officers sex office of Science and Technology Policy at the White House got involved and then other people from other agencies got involved really starts after Columbia in earnest right in which is a big part of this story. I know you guys actually dedicated a whole chapter to Columbia now. Now let's kind of recap Columbia what happens there and and the significant shift in at NASA that occurred post Columbia sure well the story that I tell about that is when we interviewed Sean O'Keefe about this gone and I started talking to him about Colombia and I viewed it as sort of a what a bit of a diversion in the conversation and so I said something to that effect and he said no no Columbia is key to the story of How the Vision for space exploration in came about so. Let's talk about that so that's what Sean O'Keefe said so the Columbia accident on February first two thousand three was in fact a huge turning point for NASA in many many ways and not the only which it it enabled what became the vision for space exploration so we can certainly talk about some of those different aspects uh-huh now at another. I alluded to this a little bit earlier as well but there was a a lot going on in the world you know even just at NASA Columbia was so significant but even something go around. Now you know where post nine eleven you have. An executive Americans terrorism war going on the the White House is divided in what NASA is going to do next during this very confusing time network in and now I believe this is where the conversation of we were talking a little bit about kind of kind of flying under the radar and not really choosing where we are going to go that this is is where the conversation we need a compelling vision we need. We need somewhere to go. We need some destination at NASA and that's where this sort of picks up his post Columbia right well two points to mention here one is about the process and just tell another story about Gil coin. He says that what happened when he got involved was was his boss at the time asked him to be sort of a point person to shepherd this through the National Security Council's policy making making process that an established process for national security and coined responded something to the effect of well. This is a really national security at civilian space space and I don't know much about it and on really want to do this and his boss. He said it not that you know I'm not going to do it or you know grinding his feet in the four or anything but he he said he the way put it to us with something like I push this away. At every opportunity I got but then finally is boss said to him while what's the right thing to do for the president and then he backed down rose. Okay I better do this right so that and that's important because you might again ask well why was this policy process and acted or and why was it utilized especially post Columbia and it's because there was a specific process available for policymakers on the national security side when there wasn't really on the civilian side there is a domestic policy council and they got involved but they didn't have the same kind of establish policy process policy making process so that's one thing the other thing about the Columbia and of course it was it was a huge wakeup makeup call for not only everybody has but everybody in the space community and people were really wondering what sort of River Nasa if you will well or what's the what what's going to happen next what's the raison d'etre going to be for NASA if we can't fly humans and one other twist is to that story is is that shortly after the accident President George W. Bush said something to the effect of we need to you know grieve for the astronauts whose lives were lost in this terrible accident and one of the ways we need to honor their memory is by going back into space with astronauts right and so this Guy Brett Alexander from the office sought science and Technology Policy he picked up on that and he used that whatever mark by the president to remind other people that he was working with who doubted the wisdom if if you will of going forward with such a big vision with a small v he reminded them and he said hey the president has already said we're going to get back to flying things humans in space flight so anybody who doubts the continued existence of NASA forget about it we are going to do this because people were seriously doubting whether NASA could exist and if it existed but what would it do if not human spaceflight of this kind of discussion so that's why he was such a big turning point yeah yeah definitely and I know that was reflected. Even the in the Investigation Board of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board when when they actually made the report to go to route 'cause I know when it comes to the actual report what a portion of that report actually departed from the norm and started talking talking about these points that you're that you're saying you know we need to explore and source of that as part of the findings of this official report so it was definitely ingrained in that culture to to continue continue to explore I know an another part you know and and you alluded to this a little bit was the way that the politics and the way the decision making process process works. This is where thing I guess we're starting to depart from the norm. I know the the White House rump group was a part of that to sort of shift the way the actual decisions were made whether you know the involvement of the National Security Council at versus being in civilian space and how that will work so where was how how did that shift happen from two thousand three moving forward well so I mean at simultaneously at at NASA and at the White House right after the Columbia accident there were groups thinking about what to do next and Steve had said we were in danger of losing the the shuttled program the whole space flight program there was some question raised at the very beginning whether or not we should even go ahead with a new shuttle or maybe we need to develop a new vehicle. Maybe NASA should be broken up. There are a lot of different ideas being floated around as Steve said when the president indicated he was strongly behind a bringing the space agency back and flying the shuttle again to to this station and that that shifted everything and the separate groups that were thinking about at NASA and the White House came together under the the guilt clinger at the National Security Council that's when the policy process started in earnest and that's that's when they started started to really go back and forth between NASA the Office of Science and Technology Policy the office of manager of Management and Budget even the Council of Economic Advisers was were in on it so they started to form a working group after that with representatives resentatives of of different agencies including the State Department and Department of Defense. I just wanted to add one other thing. If you sort of can mentally put yourself south in the time period that we're talking about. It can lend some context what's going on so again. The Columbia accident happened on February first two two thousand three and when the real sausage making of policy happens is later that year immediately after the Columbia action and throughout the rest of two thousand and three and then the vision is announced in January of two thousand four and so going back to the first part of our story that the Cato Planning Team and and it morphed into next and things like that so but the decatur planning team again they had done this work that in some ways really and was what Gordon had hoped for in that it created a roadmap to use jargonese turn created a road map or game plan for what NASA could do when the time was right so people like Joe Clinger and bread Alexander and other people at NASA could would pull those plans and ideas off the shelf right after the Columbia accident when all this big discussion is going on and sort of big thoughts are being considered about what was going to happen with NASA after the Columbia accident. Well of course it was both the plans that were there that were in place that were still in motion. Shen and the people that had been doing that work so Steve Asaka wits Gary Martin. All of those people were valuable to then support Port Nasr's positions in negotiations with the White House over what the New Vision for space exploration would look like and that was that was a dynamic dynamic time when if if if you read through the book I mean you're you're looking at. They were considering like everything I I was reading more about. There was an an orbital space plane. They were talking about what happens to the International Space Station. What happens to the shuttle. Where do you go you know there. There's talk about half in low-earth orbit and half beyond beyond low-earth orbit and what you know every mix in between calling Mars Mars or calling Mars the Red Planet What are you going to do for the next generation yeah right there. Is I mean. This is a very dynamic time. There were unusual number of of what are called deputies meetings at the National Security Council. No one could give us an exact act. Figure boat was somewhere between five and ten where they were fleshing out there were running the competing proposals and flesh flow of fleshing fleshing out the ideas but they I think fairly quickly I mean actually before they even started this. Everyone knew they were going to return to flight they were going to retire retire the shuttle in two thousand ten and they were going to focus on finishing the ISS. I mean there. There was some agreement among all of the people involved in the process that they were that they would do these things and that they would develop a plan that took humans beyond low earth orbit there was a little dissent there but for the most part ninety ninety percent of the people who were involved in this process all agreed on these elements of right although it did take a little while to get to that consensus because that time time period right after immediately after the Columbia accident it was as you said a dynamic camera lots of ideas were being thrown around and that's why why it was especially useful to have the background work that the Cato Planning Team in next had done already that's right and I think one of the one of the things toward the the end of this dynamic time where they were actually focusing in on a vision one of the selling points to the Bush administration was that the this vision itself having a vision Asian and the destination was you know one of the one of the reasons why we headed towards this vision for space exploration this this central team I I believe and that's where there was an actual security directive. I believe it was called National Security Presidential Directive thirty one so I guess how how does that work really when it comes to the direction of where NASA would go in and signing this. NSP thirty one what was the history there well that was so and with the National Security Council policymaking process you had deputies committees and then that would lead due to kind of final decision by the president in a in a with all of the principals from all of the the major stakeholders holders in and the government so that included Marburger who was President Signs Adviser and then that people like Secretary of defense a lot of well Sean O'Keefe was there so the final decisions were made at this meeting with the president who was one of the big his his big imprint on it was the say yes. We're GONNA do the stepping stones approach with Moon as a key initial destination but then we are definitely going on to Mars at at least in.

NASA Columbia National Security Council Sean O'Keefe White House NASA Columbia president Jill Clinger Columbia Accident Investigatio Gil clinger River Nasa Cato Planning Team director Steve Gary Martin United States International Space Station
"21st century" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

15:35 min | 1 year ago

"21st century" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"That story is Dan Goldin. Who was the administrator Peter. I think he's the longest serving administrator of NASA if I'm not mistaken but he sort of laid the foundation pre decatur planning team. I know one of the slogans slogans was faster better cheaper. you know he had a lot of focus on. Mars and there were a lot of good things that were happening. Pre Nineteen Ninety nine. You had this discovery of a meteorite India right that could brought them more questions of is there really life on Mars. There were like maybe a little hints in there yet. Great things like Pathfinder. You had the Hubble servicing mission. Things were things were going well right. In the late nineties well Yes for the most part they were the faster better cheaper. Initiative initiative was really considered a great success and like you said Pathfinder and sojourner rovers were really really very very highly acclaimed. The there were a couple of notable failures. You had the one thousand nine hundred ninety nine Mars Polar Lander and then the Mars climate orbiter which impacted Dan Goldens thinking at that time hi and Ed also the space station and the shuttle were starting to encounter some cost overrun so he was really starting to think at that point in time that we needed to start planning for the poche shuttle and post station Shen period right yeah and that's kind of where where this all kicks off right so so one thousand nine hundred ninety nine the formation of the Takeda Planning Team. Let's get right into it what were some of the first steps to get to what would be the EPA of if i May I just wanted to mention engine. A couple of the reasons that Dan Gordon wanted to establish a decatur point planning team when we interviewed him for this book he just sort of take them off in quick fashion but the more we thought about them the more significant they seemed so in no particular order he mentioned four different factors one was this again. This is one thousand nine hundred ninety nine so the next year would be a new presidential election a new administration because President Clinton already served two terms so he wanted to prepare a slate a game plan for the next president whoever that would be so. That's that's one item. another thing was he wanted to prepare for such a time where there would be a a a bull market if you will there would be money available in the economy to do big things in space right and then a third thing was he wanted to integrate robotic spaceflight and human spaceflight previously he felt that culturally. NASA had suffered from operating under these distinct silos if you will were the people who did robotic space science didn't didn't really cooperate much for the people who did human spaceflight and then last and perhaps at least. I don't know he he sort of decried. What was the slogan that was common. Lee heard at the time of Moore's or bust and by that what he meant was he wanted a truly compelling rationale to send humans to Mars if if there was one and he wanted more even more than that he wanted Eh truly compelling rationale to do whatever the game plan would be not just talk about things that sounded cool but why are we doing doing them fundamentally and I know one of the one of the I guess main items to make this successful was to have the right people. I know there are some key players in this whole story and I'm. I'm Mike Butcher the name so just correct me if I if I do. Steve Zaka wits yeah okay okay. I know he's a very key player in this. I believe at the time in one thousand nine hundred nine he was with the office of Management and Budget Chief of science and space programs but there's also Jim Garvin Lease Guerra some other folks that he recruited to really focus on these initiatives well so Steve Asako. It's over at O. M. B. He came up with the idea he and his team to give NASA five million dollars per year over the next few years to initiate these studies which became the Decatur Planning Team the people at Naso like Lisa Guerra and Garvan and Harley thrown sin were chosen and by the heads of the office of spaceflight and and Science Joe Rothenberg was in charge of spaceflight and Ed Weiler was in charge compliance at that time I say so as taking it was it was a signing these folks to different areas and having them focused their efforts on unifying into a common common goal that's correct and it was top down it was it was control of this and the inspiration of course came from Dan Goldin Steve Izhak quits but it was really being managed at NASA headquarters and I by by the by the heads of spaceflight and science and they were or pulling from the NASA centers but the idea was that whatever policy would be developed would be implemented by headquarters in the priorities would would be set by headquarters wiler and Rothenberg work dubbed the stakeholders and so they they got to choose who would be on this his team okay were they were they were some of the leadership of this decatur planning team and and you are mentioning a top down sort of strategy and I believe that was you know the Decatur Planning team team was organized or maybe executed in phases and that was part of phase one which was the charter was this top down strategy and I believe part of that was a a forward-looking strategy not to not to look at past concepts as much and I know one of the big key drivers here was to be science driven and technology enable able right. That's correct yeah and what was the what was the I guess reasoning behind that why why be science-driven well they breath part of it was Dan Goldin was looking for a new rationale for spaceflight and a lot of people at NASA at that time also thought that the scientific tiffin goals as they were being articulated by the science community. The National Academy of Sciences were really solid ones that deserved consideration. Shen and could really help set the pace for future space flight and determine where we should go for how long we should go so Dan Goldin I think grabbed onto that and some of the personnel on the team reflected that desire to have science the scientific goals determining the pace and the the destinations and the other half of that was technology enabled and the idea there it would really be that technology are the state of technology would influence the pace of exploration program as well and where we could go yeah. I know that in terms of being science driven I can. I can say confidently now. You know working very closely with the International Space Station Program. That's is definitely one of the main drivers of communication and efforts even on the space station now so that's that's definitely still true today. You know when we're talking about laying the foundation for what is his twenty first century space travel. I believe that's still true today. I know especially in these early phases I believe one of the one of the ideas was to be quote destination independent you know like designing technologies and and being technology enabled and understanding and driving toward that science but being having no place to go initially. I believe had its own hazards. Yeah that's correct. That was a big discussion from the very beginning from the very first meeting was not being tied to any specific destination although they were later kind of lay lay out clear destinations to go the the real concept here's to develop the capabilities to go wherever you want wherever later on the science determined or whatever other factor determined would be the best place to go and one of the funding strategies. Was this other quote buying and by the yard what does that what does that mean well. It's really the same concept oh it's related to to the other science driven driven technology enabled in the sense that you have to devise the program to sustain the political winds and the budgetary ups and downs and and so we were and and this is what distinguishes has the DPT This is one of the things that distinguishes dpt from what eventually was the vision for space exploration. The concept at the very beginning was that under Dan Goldin was that this was not a big announcement was not likely a big announcement of sending humans beyond low-earth orbit so the idea was really to to slowly early gradually develop these capabilities so when the time came if there was a shift in public opinion or a shift in Nasr's budgetary fortunes than we would have the technologies in place to do it but we couldn't do that with one with a big apollo announcement we they were really thinking this was going to be gradual and so we had to slowly develop those capabilities and technologies right and sort of the idea that we knew new basically what kinds of technologies we needed so we might as well get started on those so whether it's in space propulsion or crew and Creuse crew in life sciences safety issues to maintain the health of the crew on the mission long duration mission those kinds kinds of things we knew what we needed to develop so we might as well just get started as much as we could sort of building generic technologies that then could be tailored toward toward the particular mission right and that eventually led to I guess in two thousand phase two of this whole to cato planning team was actually thinking one of specific architectures and I know one of the key points here in this story was the why river retreat what happened there well will some people who participated indicate oh planning team felt that it was certainly a watershed moment but not a good way and for a variety of reasons there were some go golden sort of the DPT participants at the time sort of felt that Gordon lost interest in what they were doing when before he was very interested in what they were doing joked about being part of the team himself and this kind of thing and it turned out that there were some other things that were weighing on the administrators mind at the time such as ISS assez cost overruns that not everybody knew about within at the time and other things so it sort of shifted a little bit but and things moved on from there a little bit but at the same time they were still thinking about some of their earlier goals and this phrase of sneaking up on Mars came about a little bit earlier before then and it's worth just mentioning that the idea was sort of as Glenn was saying before that we would have sort of a plan on the shelf for when circumstances dictated it because the idea was that a lot of people in the space community wanted to send humans to Mars but we again needed to find a compelling rationale and the right time for the right time period to initiate such big program so until then we the decayed planning team sort of worked not in secret but they were their work was was called embargo meaning wasn't widely discussed with other NASA people and certainly not outside because the idea was that they would be given some figurative space to work out these different ideas for how to build these technologies now they they would need that we now would need to have the science driven missions right. Yeah is kind of enabling the capabilities so in that time did head come. They were already ahead of the game terms of technology and capability right okay now now after that. I believe this is when George W Bush comes in and now we're starting to get away from the decatur planning team. I know there's some changes in administration and then even the name of the Cato Planning team so what's happening there. They're so at that point. The Decatur Planning team becomes the next exploration team or the exploration team all these names get a had to keep in mind and and actually soon thereafter whereafter we also have a change in leadership over a NASA Sean O'Keefe succeeded Dan Goldin as as the NASA administrator and at the level of the planning team Jim Garvin who was the leader was replaced by Gary Martin who who was then also named the space architect yeah NASA space architects based architect okay so so then what title right that is pretty awesome right so so Sean O'Keefe and Gary Martin this. I believe these leadership changes are are one of the key drivers in. I guess the how the the difference between the Decatur Planning Team and next what's how is how is O'Keefe a little bit different from golden in terms of the ways thinking well. O'Keefe walked in and he the first presentation to him from the team he was. He was really kind of shocked by chocked because he thought that's what NASA did. He didn't think this was new. He thought he thought NASA was supposed to be doing this kind of long term planning all along long and and so he was just. Kinda surprised that they were keeping it secret and he was surprised that it was it was such a big deal he he and he gave them full room to to go ahead and and do more studies dig deeper into the the issues that they you had been thinking about now..

NASA Dan Goldin Decatur Planning Team decatur Takeda Planning Team administrator Ed Weiler Sean O'Keefe Dan Goldin Steve Izhak International Space Station Pr Mars Polar Lander Dan Gordon Mike Butcher office of Management and Budge India Peter Dan Goldens National Academy of Sciences President Clinton
"21st century" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

11:56 min | 1 year ago

"21st century" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"If you're new to the show we bring the experts to talk about. All different parts of our space agency and human spaceflight planning spaceflight missions can be tough you hear us today discussing the artist program which sends human to the surface of the moon in a few short years these types of plans even years down the road are ambitious and aggressive when talking talking about human spaceflight and the major part of being successful is overcoming budgetary technological and policy constraints way in advance. You're probably familiar millier with President Kennedy's declaration to Congress and May of nineteen sixty one which was reiterated at Rice University in Texas in September of sixty two he declared laird that we would put a man on the moon and return him safely to Earth by the end of the decade NASA met this challenge with the right support and funding to match the goal but later years proved that this would not always be the case decades past many presidents went by and NASA's exploration goals seemed ever so on the horizon. WHAT NASA needed was a way to focus its its efforts and think strategically way to do that long term planning it was nineteen ninety nine. When NASA put together the Decatur Planning team under administrator straighter Dan Goldin which would dedicate time to laying out exactly how NASA could achieve. It's goals over a long period of time and fight for a budget that would support support these efforts the decay planning team would see changes in its name and direction following years but its roots would remain the same to focus on where we're going and and exactly how we're going to get there today we're sitting down with. Steven garber and Glenn Astner Co Authors of the book titled Origins of Twenty First Century Space Travel Colon a history of Nasr's decatur planning team and the Vision for space exploration nine hundred ninety nine to two thousand four this book Examines Emmons Nasa in those years which saw the formation of this planning team the tragic Columbia accident and the forward direction of NASA after the accident which would shape shape how the agency is laid out today so let's take a deep dive into historical space policy with Steve Garber and Glasner Enjoy County Mark Mark. We have uh all right so so. Let's get into the book. I it's called origins of twenty first century space travel a history of Nastase Decatur planning ending team and the Vision for Space Exploration Nineteen Ninety nine to two thousand and four. We're going to take a snapshot of those years in NASA history. Can you tell me why you decided to focus is on these years. What what was it that draw your attention to to those specific time well. We were actually asked to write. This book was kind of an odd circumstance well. We were asked to write a study not this book per se but the day before I started work in the NASA history headquarters program. I was asked by the chief historian if I wanted to CO author study with Steve on the Decatur Planning team and we we were told that at the start so we both agreed and we were told that the start that the the cato planning team had led to the vision for space exploration we we were a little bit skeptical and so we did a much broader study and we we did a lot more research and and indeed we we came up with with the we confirm that that the vision for space exploration in Decatur planning team had very strong linkages and decided to make it up a full book and in terms of what these things are decayed old planning team and vision for space exploration really. It's it's a group of people people sitting down and thinking. About where do we want to be in terms of human spaceflight in X. number of years and how are we going to get there right. We can talk talk a bit about the two pieces I like to think of this as to book ends to our story that the Cato Planning team started in nineteen ninety ninety nine and then the end of our story is really in two thousand four with the unveiling of the Vision for space exploration exploration by President George W Bush so we can talk a little bit about the two bookends if you will on how this came about that's really our story perfect faked and actually that's what I was hoping to do is open to really dive deep into this this moment in time and I actually had the pleasure of reading the book to prepare for this interview. I know it starts off with sort of setting the context pre nineteen ninety nine in fact even going back to the early parts of human space flight at NASA it even Vince starts with von Braun and and the context of formation with NASA going through the Apollo Program. I think the reason that you wanted to start with that was is there were elements of planning that sort of eventually I guess led to what was to be later in one thousand nine hundred nine the Decatur uh-huh planning team so how does that start how how does the book start with actually setting the context of of NASA and the policy thus far that got us to the point where we needed indicate planning team sure well the way I like to think about it is that chapter two is the prehistory in air quotes if you will of our story so before nineteen ninety nine and one thing of warned in working in history over the years is that it seems like there's a prehistory to practically Klay every topic you think about somebody's always thought about some aspect of it before you did right so the way and to put it in context. I can give you two examples of other monographs that have been written that irrelevant one is a bibliography Webley Agassi that a colleague at at JC did Johnson Space Center did that's a it's a bibliography of works about about space flight before the space age began with the launch of Sputnik so pre nineteen fifty seven so this encodes lots of the literature from Tia Kofsky and other people who are thinking about how space could be access so there's a whole bibliography on that and then there's another bibliography that our office published about twenty years ago or so that covers orderly hundreds of planning stories for sending humans to Mars so in between this There's all these other. boy ribbon task forces there. There are many there there are the roles of advocacy organizations. There's what's called the Von Braun Paradigm of exploration ration- that was named after Verner von Braun of course all these different ideas that had been sort of circulating distilling marinating reading. What have you over time so these ideas of of sending humans beyond low earth orbit and doing accompanying opening and integrating robotic space fight people had thought about these things for many years before so it's not like the story story begins in earnest in one thousand nine hundred nine but there was a whole prehistory to it right yeah and and a lot of it has to do not only with that but with the politics that were surrounding this I know especially during the Apollo program you know you had you had funding that match the ambitious goal of getting humans to the surface of the moon by the end of the decade and you know I think a lot of NASA and others really believe that this trend would continue and I think I think there was just these waves of inconsistency throughout the years that eventually led and one of those elements that you're talking about with with what set up the decatur planning team was the it was called the Sei space exploration initiative under H W Bush to sort of get take that Von Braun Paradigm of what are the steps we need to take to get to get there and it was this idea one of the ideas of focusing the Nasr's efforts right right right so in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine on the twentieth anniversary of the Apollo Eleven mission President George H W Bush stood on the steps of the National Errands Space Base Museum and announced what became known as the space exploration initiative or Sei and the idea behind it was to send humans astronauts back back to the moon and then on to Mars so this this was the first if you will formal sort of waving giving my hand to indicate quasar formal program to to do that to go on send humans beyond low-earth orbit now there was there was changes of you know sending humans beyond low-earth orbit but really thinking about how that was going to happen? You know where where would you fit in low-earth-orbit. Where would you fit in the moon. I know there was we're going back and forth there. Was this thing called the Mars Reference Mission of I think it was an something thing where if we were to just go you know focus all of our efforts on going to Mars and sending a single mission of astronauts to Mars skipping all the other steps. What would that take right so they were. They were thinking of all not only just like where can we go but what what are the processes steps years funding requirements that would be needed for x y Rienzi right well the way I think of the Mars reference mission is it's sort of like a template for how we would send humans to to Mars and addresses some of the different technical subsystems if you will that we'd need to think about so for example propulsion or building spacecraft craft that could accommodate a small crew for the six month journey to the Red Planet that kind of thing take about all the human factors although although all these different things that sort of lays out. What do we need to know what we need to do to get there but so that's sort of a plan that was on the shelf if you will but it was just a ten point plan in the meantime there were lots of people leading lots of people and lots of circumstances leading up to nine hundred ninety the non where people were thinking well. Is that really what we want to do is send humans directly to Mars or onto the moon and then and then to Mars ars so for example the space task group in nineteen sixty nine shortly before the Apollo eleven's landing they were already looking at the next big thing for for NASA in terms of human spaceflight and there were a couple of options. One was earth orbiting space station. One was basically the space shuttle Sean L- and one was sending humans of beyond low earth orbit that way so it ended up that the space task group recommended mended building a Chateaux in part because that was the least expensive option and that's what President Nixon adopted but people were thinking about. That's just one example the above how people were thinking about all these different options now if we kind of fast forward just just right before the decatur planning team. I think one key person in this story of this snapshot of One Thousand Nine Hundred Ninety two thousand four and what happened a key person..

NASA Decatur Space Exploration Nineteen Nin Verner von Braun President George W Bush Emmons Nasa President Kennedy Johnson Space Center Steve Garber Nastase Decatur National Errands Space Base Mu Nasr Texas Apollo Program Rice University Congress President Nixon Dan Goldin laird
"21st century" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

12:26 min | 2 years ago

"21st century" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"The term Islamaphobia rose to modern prominence in the late nineteen ninety s when it was the title of a report by British race equality think tank the Runnymede trust. It acquired even greater currency during the early two thousands to describe or explain the behavior of those who could not or probably more often would not perceive any difference between fanatical militants and the many, many more entirely blameless people who happen to share with them an appearance or background or name, or dress sense. Islamaphobia is beyond doubt a problem last year in the UK. The home office recorded a forty percent increase in religious hate crimes more than half of those were directed at Muslims who are barely five percent of Britain's population in Europe and the United States, angry populist movements have been led by politicians employing. Not so much Islam. Phobic dog whistles. As Islam phobic symphony orchestras with Islam phobic, fireworks displays and Islam phobic flypasts. What does Islam Afo be mean? Now, how is it experienced by those on the receiving end of it and given the acres and hours of coverage of Islam and its believers? This century boy has so little been learned. This is the foreign desk..

Islamaphobia Europe United States Britain UK forty percent five percent
"21st century" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"21st century" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Come back the 21st century radio runamuck then company where no come and now you're jumping i hope you really cute it is why goodness gracious i haven't heard from rocky for all longtime a long time what's going on over there cairo oh that's cairo never said this o'clock aurora oh well welcome back the 21st century radio sarba got carried away their friends but every now and then you know it's fairly joyful you have no idea what it's like some five times to to uh were wish certain something would happen and after twenty or thirty years of studying something like i've been studying say for instance the pyramid the iron triangle and all that to finally see uh it the problems resolved but then again as we've been saying over and over tonight there are police and all these police of make it really difficult for the new paradigm to really get underway we thought i'm barely biased about this because back there in nineteen seventy i thought finally we had made all our breakthroughs well obviously i was dead wrong our guest tonight of course this hour and two hours has been dr robert shock the book origins of the sphinx celestial guardian of pre pharonic civilization in its written with robert of all inner traditions again his uh you can get in touch with him at robert shock as c h a c h dot com and i want to congratulate him on this book in a different way in this sense um have you ever heard.

cairo robert shock thirty years two hours
"21st century" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:57 min | 3 years ago

"21st century" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Back the 21st century radio joe good evening nice felt you two well thank you you're welcome let me just give you the floor for a minute or two here to make an opening statement if you'd like since this has been such a crazy year what are your overall feelings about the year of review in two thousand seventeen well before we even get to that i just wanted to say we're going to talk a lot about president trump and i chaos before way before and since he took office i wanna say that warren sadness and worry and anger over what has taken place uh and this time sad because whether we like a president or not we all want him or her tact well well presidential that means in ways that dignify the office and say to the world their voters put someone in office who speaks for most of us and understands the meeting of well the most powerful position on the world or at least what used to be considered that way sadly and worrisome simply if not dangerously those hopes of swift away and those realities will have to be reviewed tonight and i wish i felt different place so do i thought truth is truth okay joe now let me pitch you what might seem to be a difficult question to answer can you summarize the overall impact of the trump presidency in what might be called successes this year can you do that well and the successes are quite negative he has in the last few days probably help so a few million books by michael wolff uh which documents whether people agree or not much of the time of the other concerns of the trump white house he's also successfully done something else which ought to worry a lot of people early on an even before he was nominated i wrote that surprisingly he was trying to take the nation back to the 1930s when an isolationist america didn't want to know what was going on in hitler's germany or europe or the concentration camps or anything else and we had her own depression to to work with but lindbergh charles lindbergh who invented the america first slogan concept that was a granddaddy of that uh this is what trump with taking us back to and.

president joe america hitler concentration camps warren michael wolff germany europe lindbergh charles lindbergh
"21st century" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:45 min | 3 years ago

"21st century" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Welcome back to 21st century radio you're listening to our friend our dear friends ziggy marley ford to him coming on 21st century radio again sometime in the future and welcome back the 21st century radio i'm dr bob toronto masaari executive producer and research assistant is laura corner and our engineer is aena blocking than we are continuing with our guest dr queens a hara whom you all know as the cohost of 21st century radio but she is also my mentor on the consciousness of all living beings sahara's latest book is called white spirit animals profits of change and it's just been released this week by inner traditions bear and company here are a few of the early reviews john perkins new york times the best selling author says great book white spirit animals combine shamanism train species telepathy historic research and native stories to show the reader why we must save bear lion elephant buffalo wolf and other species from extinction and how they have guided humanity in the past a unique testimony to the close relationship between humans and animals and our ability to communicate and collaborate with each other and stephen a schwartz author of 8 laws of change how to be an agent of personal and social transformation had this to say sahara her automous provides an important bridge linking modern objectives science an ancient tradition will show manek beliefs a very useful contribution say hit is this and i wanna say that again a bridge linking modern objective science and ancient entered dishing will show manek police gap well this hour i would like to finish when i started in the introduction to our one when i described your work sahara as permeated with love and that which will become world happenings that line of fault is taken from rudolf steiner i want to read a little quote from this book the bridge it's a long title for such a small book the bridge between universal spirituality and the physical constitution of man freedom and involved and their significance in world evolution this was republished by the anthroposophic press and 1950 here is the quote from dr rudolf steiner humanity is the bearer of the seed into the future the faults of the past as realities ours or as it were the mother soil into this a mother soil.

ziggy marley ford laura corner engineer john perkins york times anthroposophic press dr bob toronto executive producer research assistant aena stephen a schwartz
"21st century" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"21st century" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Welcome back to 21st century radio you're listening to our friend our dear friend ziggy marley ford to him coming on 21st century radio again sometime in the future and welcome back the 21st century radio i'm dr bob parana massare executive producer and research assistant is laura corner and our engineer is aena blocking than we are continuing with our guest dr queens a hara whom you all know as the cohost of 21st century radio but she is also my mentor on the consciousness of all living beings sahara's latest book is called white spirit animals profits of change and it's just been released this week by inner traditions bear and company here are a few of the early reviews john perkins new york times bestseller and author says great book white spirit animals combined shamanism trained species telepathy historic research and native stories to show the reader why we must save bear lion elephant buffalo wolf and other species from extinction and how they have guided humanity in the past a unique testimony to the close relationship between humans and animals and our ability to communicate and collaborate with each other and stephen a schwartz author of 8 laws of change how to be an agent of personal and social transformation had this to say sahara her automous provides an important bridge linking modern objectives science an ancient tradition will sure manek beliefs a very useful contribution rossi hit is this and i want to say that again a bridge linking modern objectives science and ancient and traditional chaumont beliefs gap well this hour i remarked to finish one i started in the introduction to our one when i described your work sahara as permeated with love and that which will become world happenings that line of fault is taken from rudolf steiner i want to read a little quote from this book the brigitte's along title for such a small book the bridge between universal spirituality and the physical constitution of man freedom love and their significance in world evolution this was republished by the anthroposophic press and might teen fifty here is the quote from dr rudolf steiner humanity is.

ziggy marley ford laura corner engineer john perkins rossi anthroposophic press dr bob parana executive producer research assistant aena york times stephen a schwartz