35 Burst results for "2020"

Policy Matters and It Affects Every One of Us

The Trish Regan Show

00:52 sec | 1 d ago

Policy Matters and It Affects Every One of Us

"Mean, this election 2020 was, in many ways, a vote with the independence in the middle saying, I don't want to live through four more years of Donald Trump. And so they voted for Joe Biden. The only problem now is a lot of people are getting buyers remorse or saying, but wait, wait. I didn't know that gas prices were going to top 5 bucks. I didn't know that food prices would go through the roof. I didn't know we'd be dealing with all this inflation and a challenge economy and so I think there's a huge opportunity come both the fall, although although you've heard me say before, conservatives need to be careful, you need to find a way to bring in those independents, come fall on a course in 2024, because I'll tell you this. Any way you slice it, policy matters. I mean, that is what we have learned. This is not a popularity contest. Policy matters. And it affects every single one

Donald Trump Joe Biden
Rock star Randy Bachman reunited with beloved stolen guitar

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 2 d ago

Rock star Randy Bachman reunited with beloved stolen guitar

"Rock legend Randy bachman's long searches over for a cherished guitar Batman's orange 1957 gretch 61 20 Chet Atkins was stolen from a Toronto hotel in 1977 This guitar was magical It was my tool my hammer to make songs and make music Bachmann ended up buying about 300 guitars and unsuccessful attempts to replace it In 2020 a Canadian fan who heard the story of the guitar launched an Internet search and successfully located it in Tokyo the 78 year old bachmann has his guitar back Well when I was playing it in the first song it was very strange to look down and see it The reunion happened during a concert in Tokyo There's something special about this one It is the one So it's just fantastic The guitar belonged to Japanese musician takeshi who agreed to give it to bachmann in exchange for a guitar that was very similar I'm Ed

Gretch Randy Bachman Chet Atkins Batman Bachmann Tokyo Toronto Takeshi
Mike Gallagher, Live From Oberammergau Passion Play

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:10 min | 2 d ago

Mike Gallagher, Live From Oberammergau Passion Play

"Let's go ahead and check in with Mike. Here he is. Mike, are you made it inside the theater, look at this beautiful amphitheater where the passion play is about to get underway. You can hear the orchestra tuning up in the background and we are in the very front row of this magnificent theater where the passion play is going to take place. It started in 1634 when the villagers promised God they would produce a passion play if he spared them the plague to play again, and they've done it ever since except for during the two world wars and of course 2020 because of the pandemic. But here we are 2022 bringing you along to this theater, a beautifully tall enclosed. It's cold, it's rainy, but we are under a big roof here in this huge amphitheater. 4000 people, if you can see behind me, 4000 people in this theater to see this performance of the passion play. It's about to get underway part one is two and a half hours, a dinner break at 5 o'clock, and then part two starts at 7 30, I think it starts at 8 and then goes until ten 30. So we're here, me and the Hudson's and taking it all in and sharing it with you here on the Mike Gallagher show.

Mike Plague Hudson Mike Gallagher
What Is the Oberammergau Passion Play?

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:40 min | 2 d ago

What Is the Oberammergau Passion Play?

"This was the reason for the trip of my dear friend peg Hudson has always wanted to see the passion play, which has been performed uninterrupted until COVID in 2020 for hundreds and hundreds of years back in the 1600s, the people in the tiny village of oberammergau made a promise to God a pledge that if you spare us from the plague, we will present a magnificent tribute to your son, Jesus Christ. The passion play. It has been performed every ten years on the decade since the 1600s. Well, 2020, it was it was delayed because of COVID and the pandemic. So this is the year it's back. Now this is so fascinating because it runs for about 5 and a half months every from about, I think march till October. Every ten years on the decade, except for this time, now it's 2022. So, peg Joey and I were, we are together and on the road to oberammergau. We're going to be there in about an hour. I have no idea what to expect. I know it's an amphitheater that is covered. It is a rainy, rainy day today in Germany. So we have our raincoats. We have our umbrellas. We have our sweatshirts. We are bundled up and ready for this. We're in the front row for the performance of the passion play in oberammergau. And it's kind of interesting. It's two parts. It goes from two 30 to 5, then there's a two and a half hour dinner break and 7 30 till ten, all in German, but they give us a book so that we can follow along in English. I think we all are pretty familiar with the story of the death and resurrection of our lord and savior Jesus

Peg Hudson Oberammergau Peg Joey Plague Germany
The Dealbreaker for Many Conservatives Running for Office

The Officer Tatum Show

02:02 min | 2 d ago

The Dealbreaker for Many Conservatives Running for Office

"Continuing on with the foolery of Janie 6th. I'm just convinced that this is going to be a deal breaker for many conservatives. That are running for office. We have already seen Carrie Lake has come out and made a unequivocal statement. She's running for governor state of Arizona, which is where I live. That's why I care about it so much. She's made an unequivocal statement that the election was stolen. Other candidates, well, I could say Karen Roberson wouldn't raise her hand when the question was asking the debate if the election was stolen. Ladies and gentlemen, I mean, I don't know what to tell you. If you look at what happened in the election, never in the history and I'm a rehash this until I'm blue in the face. There may be somebody that's liberal that's listening to this that need to hear it. Never in the history of our country have they stopped the vote like they did in the 2020 election. There is never occurred in the history of our country that a president won the bear with all but one bill with a county and didn't win the presidency. There is never in history have a president warned the states that Donald Trump won in 2020 and did win the presidency. There has never been a time in history where president has gotten as many votes as Donald Trump did in the increase in votes from 2016 to 2020 and did not win the presidency. These are unprecedented historic markers that have never happened in the history of our country. And you can not tell me that somehow Joe Biden has garnished that much hatred. Think about this. If Biden was that good and delivered that well, why did president and in president Trump did so bad, right? People are saying he handled COVID poorly. He did all this. He got like 10 million more views. I mean, I've used more votes. I could be wrong on that number. But he got millions upon millions more people voting for him in 2020 than in 2016.

Carrie Lake Karen Roberson Janie Donald Trump Arizona Joe Biden Biden
Jim Hanson and Corey DeAngelis Discuss Carson v. Makin

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:39 min | 2 d ago

Jim Hanson and Corey DeAngelis Discuss Carson v. Makin

"Corey D'angelo is with the association or the American federation for children. And he has been just a leader in the fight for school choice. And we got two wins. First, the Supreme Court decision I forgot, and then also the Arizona decision to have the entire state be run with the money following the children. Congratulations, because you were a part of both those. Maybe not the Supreme Court case as much. But tell us the implications of the scotus decision first. Yeah, totally. This is the Carson V Macon case coming out of Maine. It was a 6 three decision in favor of parental rights and education. And the basic takeaway is if you're gonna have a school choice program, you can't discriminate against religious families and religious schools by excluding them. That's what was happening in Maine. And it pretty much reaffirmed what we already found in the Espinosa V Montana decision in 2020, which was a 5 four decision on the part of parents. And it also reaffirmed that school choice has no issue with the separation of church and state, which is not itself in the constitution. For the same reasons that pell grants don't violate the establishment clause with the pell grant for low income kids, you can take the money, you can go to a public or private university, a religious or non religious university, and you have a choice in the matter. Same thing with pre-K programs, same thing with Medicaid. You can take your Medicaid dollars to a private religious hospital if you want. And there's no separation of church and state issue because the primary beneficiary that funding is the individual student and their families and they can pick among religious and non religious

Corey D'angelo American Federation For Childr Supreme Court Maine Macon Arizona Espinosa Montana
Voting Fraud Tina Peters Blames Election Fraud for Losing Primary

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

00:46 sec | 3 d ago

Voting Fraud Tina Peters Blames Election Fraud for Losing Primary

"This Tina Peters, the pro Trump election official under indictment for breaching voting machines lost her bid for Colorado Secretary of State on Tuesday voters. Although she denies it, she says we didn't lose. We just found evidence of more fraud. They're cheating and will prove it once again. Oh my God. No Republican is clever. She gave in third place. She gave me third place. No Republicans ever going to admit they lost, Carl. We will not stand until we come in last place and with no votes. I mean, this is one of those thank gods. First of all, she's on her way to prison for fraud in the 2020. She's up for Secretary of State of Colorado. Thank God, but either Republicans who rejected her, by the way. Yes. Yes. So there's some good news,

Tina Peters Colorado Carl
Rep. Gohmert Calls for Full Deposition of Cassidy Hutchinson

Mark Levin

01:05 min | 3 d ago

Rep. Gohmert Calls for Full Deposition of Cassidy Hutchinson

"Carry picket and Joseph Clark at the Washington times Representative Louie gohmert called January 6th select committee to release the full deposition A former White House say Cassidy hutchison The which she claimed that mister gohmert and other Republican lawmakers sought presidential pardons in late 2020 he flatly denied seeking a pardon for himself mister gohmert said he made several pardon requests for U.S. service members whom he says were wrongfully convicted of crimes while deployed in war zones but he never made a request for himself Why don't they release The full transcripts As a matter of fact Louis on to something As I keep saying she was forced to testify four times the 5th time being publicly Why Because there are pressuring her Why can't we see all these transcripts raw transcripts and see them now

Mister Gohmert Joseph Clark Washington Times Louie Gohmert Cassidy Hutchison White House U.S. Louis
Caller Who Attended Jan. 6 Never Saw a Gun, Knife or Threat

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:56 min | 4 d ago

Caller Who Attended Jan. 6 Never Saw a Gun, Knife or Threat

"When I got to the capitol time and amongst the crowd and I was there for several hours, I never once saw a gun, I never once saw a knife, I never once saw anybody communicate in a threat either as someone in attendance or a capitol police officer. I never heard one person say, let's go burn it down. Nothing at all like that. So Charles, here's what gets me. Charles here's what gets me. About the AR-15s, because Cassidy Hutchinson, she says that she heard from somebody who heard from somebody that there were people armed with AR-15s all over the place. My question is, okay, well, why didn't the D.C. police department step in? If in fact, the D.C. police saw these weapons, that's a crime those kinds of weapons are illegal in Washington, D.C., so why didn't they intervene? Exactly. And I can tell you that the police department was around the capital, hundreds of them, and you're exactly right. If a cop stall, somebody walking with an AR-15, they're going to either arrest them, or they're going to take them out. And if the crowd was so heavily armed, why weren't any weapons confiscated, why weren't any police officers shot by the protesters? The only people that died that day were all Trump supporters. And the only person shot was actually by that. And they know it's a lot. And I don't think that this committee is what they're doing is designed to reveal the truth is just designed to do damage to Donald Trump. But here's my thing. All these little lies that they tell and they told over the last four years, they get away with it. There's never accountability. And my hope is that when the Republicans take control in November, that we not only launch investigative committees on January 6th, but also on November 3rd, 2020.

Cassidy Hutchinson D.C. Police Department Washington, D.C. Charles D.C. Police Department Donald Trump
NPR's Rage Over Laws That Stop Individuals From Infiltrating Elections

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:53 min | 4 d ago

NPR's Rage Over Laws That Stop Individuals From Infiltrating Elections

"Here's an interesting headline in NPR, private funding saved a 2020 election. Now some GOP led states are banning it. This article by miles parks, raises the immediate question. How can private funding save an election? You have an election. Elections, by the way, is supposed to be run by, I shouldn't just say the government, but by the states themselves. Using state money. They're not supposed to be vulnerable to private funding for the simple reason that private funding comes with private leverage and private leverage can lead to control manipulation, even the takeover of an election process. Now the point here is that NPR knows that this is in fact kind of what happened, at least in certain key places, like Wisconsin, in the 2020 election. It was so brazen. It was so outrageous that no one even thought to pass laws against it. And so Mark Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla Chan put in almost half a $1 billion. Other people put in money as well, and then using front groups, these so called nonprofits. They were able to go to election offices and essentially say, listen, we'll give you money, but on the condition that you let our people in to help run things. Wow. So talk about manipulation of an election by private individuals using the pocketbook. I mean, here are the left rails about campaign finally campaign finance laws, big money has too big a role in the election. Dinesh, you gave $20,000 over the campaign finance limit. It's a real pity you aren't locked up for two full years for that. Your contaminating democracy, but somehow, here it comes to Mark Zuckerberg when I'm talking about $20,000 when I'm talking about $200,000, we're talking about $400 million.

NPR Priscilla Chan GOP Mark Zuckerberg Wisconsin Dinesh
Hard-line conservative Reps. Boebert, Miller win primaries

AP News Radio

01:26 min | 4 d ago

Hard-line conservative Reps. Boebert, Miller win primaries

"To have Congress's staunchest conservatives repelled more centrist alternatives to lock up Republican nominations on Tuesday in Colorado one of former president Trump's most Ardent supporters representative Lauren boebert won the nomination in the third congressional district while election denied or Tina Peters lost her bid to become the Republican nominee for Secretary of State to Pam Anderson and a Republican who favors some abortion access Joe O'Day won the Senate primary against a far right candidate in Mississippi a member of Congress who voted to overturn the 2020 election but supported a January 6th the investigation won the Republican runoff in the third congressional district representative Michael guest defeated pro Trump challenger Michael Cassidy in Illinois far right state senator Darren Bailey who got a late endorsement from Trump won the Republican nomination for governor he faces democratic incumbent governor JD pritzker representative Mary Miller a 2020 election denier who has spoken admiringly of Adolf Hitler won her Republican primary and reverend Jesse Jackson's son Jonathan won a 17 candidate democratic primary for an open congressional seat in New York Rudy Giuliani's son Andrew a former Trump White House aide lost the Republican primary for governor to representative Lee zeldin He will take on governor Kathy hochul who won her democratic primary I'm Julie Walker

Lauren Boebert Tina Peters Joe O' Donald Trump Congress Michael Guest Michael Cassidy Pam Anderson Senator Darren Bailey Jd Pritzker Colorado Mississippi Senate Reverend Jesse Jackson Mary Miller Illinois Denier Adolf Hitler Rudy Giuliani Jonathan
Did Trump Take the Wheel Like Cassidy Hutchinson Said?

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:23 min | 4 d ago

Did Trump Take the Wheel Like Cassidy Hutchinson Said?

"Hutchinson was an aide to former White House chief of staff, Mark Meadows, at prick, and she testified about Trump's actions to the special congressional committee investigating the rights. So Trump promised during his speech on January 6th to march to Capitol Hill with his supporters to protest Congress certifying the 2020 election results. That we all know. But when the president was told by a security detail that they would not take him to the capitol, he got upset. Apparently they were told, they told him they've got guns, and he said, I don't care that I hear the shoot me. Let's get to the capitol. So Hutchinson testified with a very straight face. And this is the kind of people, this is the kind of person the left just loves. The kind of person that comes out of the woodwork to make these crazy charges and the left thinks she's got no book to sell. She's not trying to get a job at MSNBC. She must be real. No, no, no. Hold your horses. So Hutchinson said that Trump told his security detail the president said something to the effect of on the effing president, take me up to Capitol Hill now. And then he lunged at the steering wheel, and that's the story or not all told her. She also said Trump used his free hand to lunge at his security detail. When mister owner actor or not to had recounted this story to me, he had motioned towards his clavicle. Hutchinson's testimony is offering new alleged details, obviously, about the president's actions on that day. As the Democrat led committee continues to try to paint Trump as an unhinged lunatic who poses a serious threat to American democracy, they're just scared shit, he's going to run again and really kick some tables over. She was not physically present for the events. He described, but based her testimony on hearsay, she got from a member of the Secret Service. I can't do that. Where is Johnny Depp's lawyer right now? Objection hearsay. Objection leading. We need Camille Vasquez. Well, listen, you PEEP on the left, hold your tongues and push back your victory party. Because I'm hearing now in the last few minutes that the Secret Service in question offered to testify under oath that the story about Trump trying to commandeer the assault commandeer that the assault and attempt to attempt to steer the beast never happened.

Donald Trump Hutchinson Mark Meadows Capitol Hill Congressional Committee White House Democrat Led Committee Congress Msnbc Camille Vasquez Secret Service Johnny Depp
Trish's Market Rundown for June 28, 2022

The Trish Regan Show

01:50 min | 4 d ago

Trish's Market Rundown for June 28, 2022

"I mentioned gold and we're looking at gold prices, holding steady today. Let me see if I can pull this up for you. I know with all this stuff going on, it's no wonder that you're seeing a sell off in the market. I've been saying all along, you've got to be really, really careful. I'm not your financial adviser. I just kind of, you know, as a journalist, I think, have a pretty good handle on what I think the macro environment is. And it's not good. I mean, I warned you back in the summer of 2020, we'd be looking at hyperinflation. And sure enough, here we are. And I'm going to still warn you that I don't think that is going to be able to just flip a switch and put the Genie back in the bottle. A lot of this inflation is getting embedded. Some of it even into wages. I mean, I like seeing some inflation in wages, but you saw recently a major airline coming out with a 14% increase in pilots pay. I mean, these are the things that they're having to do in order to continue recruiting people, but it causes the margins on the business to get much smaller. Maybe that's okay. Certainly for the employees, but for investors, you've got to just be aware of all this stuff. Anyway, crude oil trading at around a $112 a barrel. Gold holding on pretty much steady at 1822. This is interesting to me that the ten year yield is back at 3.2%. I suspect that as this all kind of works its way through the system, you may start to see a higher increase in that yield. And for me, anyway, I welcome perhaps welcome a day. When we could say, you know, we're going to put money in a treasury bond for ten years and get a decent something kind of a decent return out of it. So I don't entirely see that as a negative, but it is an important thing to watch. And it's a gauge of where people are willing to go and how they're willing to take on risk.

Democrats' Social Causes Drive Voters to GOP

The Officer Tatum Show

00:41 sec | 4 d ago

Democrats' Social Causes Drive Voters to GOP

"According to a Fox News article, more than 1 million voters switch registration to GOP as suburbs break from Joe Biden. Are you surprised? I'm not surprised. In this article it reads more than 1 million U.S. voters have switched their party affiliation to the GOP over the past 12 months painting a grim picture for Democrats in 2020 2022 midterms. The GOP is benefiting most in the suburbs of large, medium sized cities where voters who support Joe Biden in 2020 are struggling with inflation and growing increasingly critical of Democrats and social issues.

GOP Joe Biden Fox News U.S.
Jan 6 Committee Holds Its Sixth Hearing

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:09 min | 5 d ago

Jan 6 Committee Holds Its Sixth Hearing

"Is a former aide to former White House chief of staff Mark Meadows is sharing some of the conversations she had with a guy I know well, former congressman and former director of national intelligence, John ratcliffe, of Texas, and that it was mister ratcliffe's studied view. As it was many, by the way, that the degree to which the president was banging this drum was just not going to be helpful to his legacy, that it wasn't going to prevail. And if people were of that mind, I mean, okay, isn't it? I mean, from Laura Ingraham, deshaun Hannity, to the Fox host, weren't they all like texting people saying, this is not good. He's not helping himself on like January 6th itself. Which I believe is true. That was not a good day for anybody. However, what this committee and what the culture, I think, seeks to shoehorn into your brain, is that if you have any skepticism about the 2020 result, that's the big lie. That if you

Mark Meadows National Intelligence John Ratcliffe Mister Ratcliffe Deshaun Hannity Fox Host White House Laura Ingraham Texas
Over 1 Million Voters Switch Registration to GOP

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:47 sec | 5 d ago

Over 1 Million Voters Switch Registration to GOP

"Here's a story that amazing Fox News reporting over a million American voters have switched their party affiliation to the GOP over the last 12 months. As the 2020 turn 2022 midterms approach and we are months away in the suburbs in large and medium cities is where this is mostly occurring. Where voters who supported Biden who are now struggling with inflation, growing increasingly critical of these Democrat policies, this is according to The Associated Press over a million voters have switched from Democrat to Republican in the last 12 months.

Fox News GOP Biden The Associated Press
Jan. 6 panel to hear from aide who saw burned documents

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 5 d ago

Jan. 6 panel to hear from aide who saw burned documents

"The house panel investigating the capitol riot will hear today from a top Trump White House aide in an appearance shrouded in extraordinary secrecy Cassidy Hutchinson told the committee in a private interview she saw her boss Trump chief of staff Mark Meadows burning documents in his office after meeting with a GOP lawmaker involved in a bid to overturn the 2020 election Hutchinson's appearance has raised expectations of new revelations in the probe potentially the most vivid firsthand story yet of Trump's campaign to subvert the vote and his response to the capital violence The panel announced today's surprise hearing just yesterday After earlier saying it would not meet again until next month Sagar Meghani Washington

Cassidy Hutchinson Mark Meadows White House Donald Trump GOP Hutchinson Sagar Meghani Washington
Why Xi Van Fleet Stood Up to the Loudoun County School Board

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:47 min | 5 d ago

Why Xi Van Fleet Stood Up to the Loudoun County School Board

"See, we opened our discussion with the clip of you addressing the loudon county, a school board. Tell us why you did that. Why did you feel that you had to go there and give a speech? Yeah, I just wanted to tell people, I was not politically active. Politically involved at all. I think here more than 30 years. Most of the time, I'm just my own business, achieve my American Dream in terms of material. Just get a job buy a house, build a family. And it was about ten years ago. I started to see troubling signs. And that remind me of cultural revolution, started with political correctness. The phrase political correctness was familiar to you. Yeah. Why? Because we were told, what is correct? What is not? If you don't follow the correct prescription of way of talking, you will end up in jail. Or death. So there are words that you can not say in China. And the ones that are approved by the party are politically correct. So this wasn't new to you. No. And it's not only that, with the slip of town, you might just lose your life. It's just all this is nothing new. I want people to know this microaggression, nothing new. Council culture, nothing you. All this, but I have to say, it is 2020. When I saw what's happening on American streets. So there's American red guards burning our cities. So BLM antifa. Yes. And tearing statues as a doctor to

Loudon County China BLM
"2020" Discussed on 2020 in Review

2020 in Review

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"2020" Discussed on 2020 in Review

"In

Facebook Booboo Boise
"2020" Discussed on 2020 in Review

2020 in Review

08:28 min | 1 year ago

"2020" Discussed on 2020 in Review

"Guns make people safer. There's no data that I have seen that suggests that but the impression is among people who own guns wage. They're armed. They will be safer. The data doesn't support that because what happens is is it's your engendering fear and the posture and the The Way Forward is all educated on fear. I think what we commit to and are are making a commitment for is is Hope is Hope and peace. So that is completely true. I I agree with both footwork what you said, but I will just as you're asking we have increased security a lot in the last few years really since Newtown and and then there's been a a big uptick in anti-semitic incidents in attacks against synagogues, but we are trying to balance having the concluding nonviolent approach on the other hand off realities of what it means to make people at least feel safe highway or perception and this is a whole question about that too as well. And the last thing I'll say that again this would be for later on to go deeper. I do think this Thursday. Part of what it means for the country to know each other better meeting different Geographic locations. I think people feel very differently about guns in urban Suburban areas you in Rural and farm areas of the country and have come to learn it's for good reason we could talk more about that. So there is a reality situation of trying to keep your place running and how people perceive that place. Yeah a matter of having been to your temple b'nai jeshurun many many times and seeing that you have armed security. They're they're professional. Yeah. Yeah. I mean they they are not only licensed but they have that is off work and they're more and more Christian churches that in some parts of the country that to be an usher to lead people in and out of church. You need to be packing a gun and that makes it rather riskiest seems I think where we are today, unfortunately, it appears sometimes that we're on a Battlefield. And in the tradition of Islam there are conditions under which you are to watch as well as pray. That means that everyone is not involved in the prayer at the same time those individuals that are not conducting the prayer not engaged or in some form of ritual activity. Those individuals have that responsibility to cure and watch out for the safety of the others and so in my view where we are unfortunately in this time and space we we have to put people on security in order for our rights to worship be secured. And so as as Matthew pointed out, it becomes necessary to place or put security measures in place in order for the right to worship be something that is not going to be taken away from us. I imagine though that that has got to be such a difficult decision to them. Two and such a difficult sort of path to carry out, especially when you feel you know, responsible for a congregation and and their safety. Well, let me say this that we I had a choice, you know, the whole Pittsburgh pole way Poway situation last year changed a lot of thinking they gods and I had a member call me last month July August and said Rabbi, I would like to ask your permission to have myself recruit another twenty-five or Thirty members of the congregation to get trained with guns and we're going to walk, you know concealed weapons during the holidays. So we're ready for anything and I was thinking to myself kind of got a little growing up twenty years ago. I would have said are you out of your mind which is not a great way to answer a contract, you know, it's not the most significantly radius. So that's what was I still felt that way and then I said, you know, I really appreciate how much you love us that you're willing to do this and put down. Ads in the line, but and I said this very tiny but I said frankly you're going to shoot me by mistake, you know, and and and we have Professionals for this is Mark because we woke channels and and cowboys and it's a VF professionals and I rather them know who's who what's what and and I really do think it was a it was a life and love for him. But this is what's happened in our world were signs of Love had become less armor off. Let's let you know let's let's probably saves a machine guns. And that's the problem is is the deadline between safety and dedication to going too far and shooting their own people, which is what happens. If you have too many guns in the wrong hands and to your point Matt and and JJ last summer I took a gun course a handgun course, it was one morning and we got the whole defect simile and the instructor said to the 16 of us who were in the class eight of you would have if this page A real gun would have shot me in the stomach because you didn't pick it up in the right way and then we moved to a firing range and we knew a little bit more at that time and what one of my takeaways was. Oh my God, this is complicated. You can't give me a a morning training and then certify which Massachusetts will do that. I'm licensed to carry a gun provided that I I get permission from a local to Police Department. I didn't have any clue. This is very complicated and and people wanting to arm themselves and thinking they're making people safer. You don't want to put a gun in my hand. I would really know how to use it. And I think that's probably the case for God knows how many people so now all of you have mentioned, you know, these protections I guess against mass shootings, but one of the things that's have come back up and you know, a really phenomenal blog post that you actually wrote for Brady was all about the the tropes that seem to come out from politicians and it seemed to get repeated in the media around mass shootings dead. And how the way mass shootings are treated seems to differ so much based on the perpetrator and based on the victims and I was wondering if you could sort of explain your stances to our audience a little bit off. Right? And in that piece that we wrote for Brady we talked about the origin of scapegoating and I'm going to ask the rabbi from whose tradition that comes and it's evolved into something that is has very little recognition to its original purpose and mad if you want to just sort of give us a thumbnail on and this is how it worked in our conversation the park you can make the application that would be that'd be great scapegoat was a really important figure and the days of all that's called twenty-five hundred years ago or so in the time of the temple. The holiest day of the year for Jews Israelites was it wasn't Israel keyboard the day of atonement the day of forgiveness, what would happen is that everyone would come to the temple with all of their sins and they were infested or sacrifice off? Cuz that was the way we prayed and then through sacrifice to the high priest who do two things one has he would cast all the sins on to the scapegoat who would then be sent into the desert and the idea would be that the the scapegoat we take all the sins of the community and proof. You know, that was it. We had a clean slate and everything was better and where it morph and how it's been a bizarre sort of carryover from that. That is an every culture scapegoats can be identified usually a group of people and I'm thinking back to Junior High School and there'd be a cafeteria table and we'd make them scapegoats just because we thought they were nerds and a scapegoat reduces the level of anxiety in the rest of the community cuz you visited upon the scapegoat and in some ways it works for a little bit but it never solves anything. So then what you need to do is find another scapegoat and in the current environment The two scapegoats when it comes to gun violence are people with mental illness and young black men and they get scapegoated over and over and over again and to the extent that some people believe it and it doesn't solve anything and it puts a mark on the forehead around the back or in the wrong places of people with mental illness.

Poway Rabbi Matthew Pittsburgh Brady JJ Police Department Matt Mark Massachusetts Israel Junior High School
"2020" Discussed on 2020 in Review

2020 in Review

05:31 min | 1 year ago

"2020" Discussed on 2020 in Review

"About

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"2020" Discussed on 2020 in Review

2020 in Review

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"2020" Discussed on 2020 in Review

"Looking

Breese Affiliates Brady Red Hill the New York Times Michael Meneses New Jersey gun violence resear Kris Rutgers School of Public Healt Kelly Brady Bill
"2020" Discussed on 2020 in Review

2020 in Review

07:41 min | 1 year ago

"2020" Discussed on 2020 in Review

"Of introduce yourselves and you know, the the areas that serve my name is Mark Beckwith. I am the retired Bishop of the Diocese of Newark and Episcopal Diocese and I currently live in Massachusetts. But Matthew and Dean and I were working together on many things as well, which will tell you about. My name is Matthew courts. I'm a senior Rabbi congregation b'nai jeshurun in Short Hills, New Jersey. Good afternoon. My name is W Dean Sharif. I'm the man of Master drummer Gene in Irvington, New Jersey and the convener of the Council of imams in New Jersey. All right. Well, and so thank you so much for for coming on and I was wondering if you would get comfortable talking about you know, why it is that the three of you got grouped together. What is what is the work that all three of you do sort of as a unit began for me after a horrible shooting in, New Jersey? In August of two thousand and seven three college kids were set upon they're just talking behind their elementary school late one night. Three of them were killed and one survived and it was a level of violence. But the city of Newark haven't really experienced before and there were all sorts of responses. One of which was the desire to get the religious community together to figure out how we can join our wisdom in our our commitment together to reduce gun violence in the city of Newark and that's how I got to know both Imam Sharif and Rabbi gort's. So as long as pointed out we actually got started as a result of not having the very very privileged vision of being the senior advisor to at that time mayor Cory Booker the city of North and as a result of that initiated an Interfaith group that we became members of known as the north Interfaith Coalition for Hope and peace and as Mark wage, Now in 2007 and fortunately there was this incident of violence that took place and we picked up the banner of attempting to reduce the amount of gun violence in a gang violence that was taking place in the city of North and as a result of that we became not only members of this Coalition in terms of interfaith group. I like to think that we became friends as well and I'll jump on and say that I agree with everything that Mark convener said and what happened because the relationship became a friendship was that we started to Pulpit exchange and then we start to think about local issues that people start to see these guys actually really don't agree on everything respect each other very much and that's hard to get us invited on to some television programs. And then we ended up start off of our own has become a PBS show for the three of us quite a matter of faith and I will say it's an amazing show. Thank you. Thank you, one of the very first questions that I wanted to ask all of you song. Was how is you know gun violence or how his gun violence prevention? How was that an issue of Faith? You know, is it a religious issue? And if so how well the root of the word religion religio in Latin which means to bind people together what brings people together now, of course, we all can cite incidents throughout history and in the current scene where religion divides people that I think the three of us thought Manifest this intent of bringing people together gun violence threatens life and we are committed to choosing life and to offering projects initiatives ideas actions that will promote life and reduce violence. Well, it's it's it's very much in my view a religious issue simply because my faith alislam it really the term aleykum selam means the surrender or the security or the safety and the fact that I wear the title of being Muslim means that I am obligated to promote birth. Serve and Protect the peace and so when there is gun violence that is within this assigned the duty and the responsibility that I as well as others who recognize the important issue of Peace within all of our faith tradition, we have a we're Duty bound to try and address those areas where violence is perpetrated. And so we have to try and understand that the human being is more important than the gun. We have to remind people that sometimes the gun as a tendency to take away from the human identity. So I want to check engine off for a moment because when I hear the question is this is your religious issue. It sounds like even though you didn't ask that but in this day and age given the polarity that we're living through the sounds and feels like isn't it more a communal or political issue than is religious issue don't want to stick the moment in differentiate the two for myself. So as a religious leader, I don't see myself ever birth. Really want to vote one party or another but I do look to find ethical and moral imperatives that I would encourage press agitate my thoughts kind of community to adhere to and then for them to take that in to vote a specific position based on the moral imperative something. So what's the ethical imperative here? It's a human life. And when this much human life is taken from us so easily and so seamlessly and so it's such a regular part of everyday life that the one thing that they the religion cannot do or does all the time is to offer thoughts and prayers. That's now become a joke because that's just become sort of a line that people use when they don't want to do anything about it. So don't stand idly by The Book of Leviticus says that as a religious group groups our respective groups, we can't stand idly by if people are bleeding all around us, so that has, New Jersey Can do with being a Democrat or Republican has everything to do with protecting our society and I'll talk more when you know, you got deeper into this about how they're not mutually exclusive either but it can it can't not be religious when this many people are dying. I'll end by saying that the Book of Numbers says that you know, every single one of us is responsible for one another the way that people are shooting each other off like it's getting a slice of pizza on the on Broadway in Manhattan has made this something that is reached religious limits in my mind. I think the other thing JJ that I would like to add to the comments that we've shared is that God has Faith leaders, we are to remind people don't put their trust in those weapons of Destruction, but put our trust in God but trust in the strong in the power of Truth and put our trust and knowledge and righteousness the areas where the emphasis needs to be placed not on, you know, the safety that sometimes is like false sense of safety by having weapons wage. Your possession. I think the most important thing that that one can have in their possession is true knowledge and righteousness. I think as a result of that lives will become more secure. How how do you feel then about movies are people who suggest in the wake of shootings that seemed to Target religious places or institutions. So we've seen now mass shootings at mosques. We've seen them at temples. We seen them at Church's song about people who say well we need then armed guards and these holy spaces what a sort of your response to that. I think the real fault line in the debate it seems to me is that people who are trying are on the gun violence prevention side are making the argument have data to support it that more guns make people less safe. The gun rights people are saying more.

New Jersey Mark Beckwith Diocese of Newark Episcopal Diocese nai jeshurun Dean Sharif Council of imams Imam Sharif Rabbi gort north Interfaith Coalition for Mark wage Newark Matthew Mark convener Short Hills Irvington Cory Booker Dean Massachusetts Gene
"2020" Discussed on 2020 in Review

2020 in Review

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"2020" Discussed on 2020 in Review

"Of the very first questions that I wanted to ask all of you song. Was how is you know gun violence or how his gun violence prevention? How was that an issue of Faith? You know, is it a religious issue? And if so how well the root of the word religion religio in Latin which means to bind people together what brings people together now, of course, we all can cite incidents throughout history and in the current scene where religion divides people that I think the three of us thought Manifest this intent of bringing people together gun violence threatens life and we are committed to choosing life and to offering projects initiatives ideas actions that will promote life and reduce violence. Well, it's it's it's very much in my view a religious issue simply because my faith alislam it really the term aleykum selam means the surrender or the security or the safety and the fact that I wear the title of being Muslim means that I am obligated to promote birth. Serve and Protect the peace and so when there is gun violence that is within this assigned the duty and the responsibility that I as well as others who recognize the important issue of Peace within all of our faith tradition, we have a we're Duty bound to try and address those areas where violence is perpetrated. And so we have to try and understand that the human being is more important than the gun. We have to remind people that sometimes the gun as a tendency to take away from the human identity. So I want to check engine off for a moment because when I hear the question is this is your religious issue. It sounds like even though you didn't ask that but in this day and age given the polarity that we're living through the sounds and feels like isn't it more a communal or political issue than is religious issue don't want to stick the moment in differentiate the two for myself. So as a religious leader, I don't see myself ever birth. Really want to vote one party or another but I do look to find ethical and moral imperatives that I would encourage press agitate my thoughts kind of community to adhere to and then for them to take that in to vote a specific position based on the moral imperative something. So what's the ethical imperative here? It's a human life. And when this much human life is taken from us so easily and so seamlessly and so it's such a regular part of everyday life that the one thing that they the religion cannot do or does all the time is to offer thoughts and prayers. That's now become a joke because that's just become sort of a line that people use when they don't want to do anything about it. So don't stand idly by The Book of Leviticus says that as a religious group groups our respective groups, we can't stand idly by if people are bleeding all around us, so that has, New Jersey Can do with being a Democrat or Republican has everything to do with protecting our society and I'll talk more when you know, you got deeper into this about how they're not mutually exclusive either but it can it can't not be religious when this many people are dying. I'll end by saying that the Book of Numbers says that you know, every single one of us is responsible for one another the way that people are shooting each other off like it's getting a slice of pizza on the on Broadway in Manhattan has made this something that is reached religious limits in my mind. I think the other thing JJ that I would like to add to the comments that we've shared is that God has Faith leaders, we are to remind people don't put their trust in those weapons of Destruction, but put our trust in God but trust in the strong in the power of Truth and put our trust and knowledge and righteousness the areas where the emphasis needs to be placed not on, you know, the safety that sometimes is like false sense of safety by having weapons wage. Your possession. I think the most important thing that that one can have in their possession is true knowledge and righteousness. I think as a result of that lives will become more

"2020" Discussed on 2020 in Review

2020 in Review

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"2020" Discussed on 2020 in Review

"Up

Brady Mark house Breese Affiliates New York City School Kai Hunter Annie Oakley Kyle Hunter Hi Mark Mark New York City Kyle Hunter
"2020" Discussed on 2020 in Review Playlist

2020 in Review Playlist

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"2020" Discussed on 2020 in Review Playlist

"There's a very immediate sense in watching the spectacle of police militarisation is driving this kind of appetite for unrestricted civilian gun ownership, you know, that's what they're sort of pointing to and appealing to them in suggesting that you know, they should be able to earn a grenade launcher. It's like look the cops have got them, you know, we've got to be able to defend ourselves against the government. So yeah, that's I hope that answers the question about their view of birth. Second Amendment, it's extremely expensive expensive. Let's put it that way. So the mindset is very much that Firearms ownership should be kind of the default off. Like, of course, we all want to have guns and and the most powerful weapons we can possibly have and you know, you you've got to have a really good reason to to take that right away from someone and you know, see if you look at their Facebook groups and although you know, they're they're sort of a little bit more underground than they were a few months back now because Facebook has slightly started cracking down. But yeah, if you look at the the Facebook groups what you'll see is along with the idea of Defending yourself from the government, you know, they'll Point too I suppose the black lives matter protests as they're happening now off or or more but they're more likely to point out is that the way those parts are depicted in conservative media and kind of say well look look at this, you know, look at these riots. Are you really saying I shouldn't have wage Right to defend my home defend my person to fit my family against against what's going on in the country today. This kind of helps me understand too because I feel like I've been seeing a lot of contradictory thoughts that I don't normally see traveling together like in some instances speaking out against police, but then at the same time saying things that usually would be said by people supporting it. It's just I'm understanding a little bit now more how Booboo Boise the world and I guess that raises a question of curious you mentioned earlier in addition to being.

Facebook Booboo Boise
"2020" Discussed on 2020 in Review Playlist

2020 in Review Playlist

05:31 min | 1 year ago

"2020" Discussed on 2020 in Review Playlist

"Would be the belief that the federal government is overreaching specifically around the Second Amendment and that that is the core of the of what makes them a part of the group. I think that's certainly something that everyone in this movement shares. Yeah, I would say that to some extent, you know, it's it's a contested movement. There is interesting. Kind of contest about about what it means and and what the biggest priorities are and you know who these kind of supposedly Universal rights like the first and second amendment who they really apply to and who is who is it risk from government overreach. So there are some parts of the Mughal of movement that are at least rhetorically again supportive of the project initially at least was supportive of the protests that came about after the death of George Floyd. There was even before George Floyd The George fluid stuff happened. There were Boogaloo guys who were expressing sympathy for African Americans who were killed by police like Brianna Tyler and philando Castile who they really see some of them at least see primarily not even an American but as a as a person who is lawfully exercising their their right to bear arms and and was killed by the police in the course of that, you know, because this movement is dead. Of the idea or even committed to the idea that there may well be sort of open civil conflicts in America there. There is a an attractive opportunity there for all kinds of people on the far right including the racist far right to sort of, you know, Co-op that movement or to be a part of it push it in the direction that they want it to so, yeah, I don't I wouldn't want to cross over State I suppose that the kind of racial liberalism or whatever I've heard and then I've had analysts describe them as anti-racist and I just don't see a lot of that. There are some people like that Thursday right wing. I would say that their most mostly dissident from from mainstream conservative. They're buying like disappointed with or opposed to President Trump. There's a lot of support in the move for judge Jorgensen who's the libertarian party presidential candidate. It.

George Floyd Brianna Tyler philando Castile federal government America President Trump judge Jorgensen
"2020" Discussed on 2020 in Review Playlist

2020 in Review Playlist

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"2020" Discussed on 2020 in Review Playlist

"Belongs solely to our guests and hosts and not necessarily Brady or Brady's Affiliates. Please note this podcast contains discussions of violence that some people may find disturbing. I find it disturbing too long. Welcome back everyone to Red Balloon Brady today. My co-host Kelly and I are joined by a margin Jones. She's an Emmy and Peabody award-winning journalist intersectional news producer chair of the first ever see you in high-level meeting on gender diversity creative trans slash and and so much more together. The three of us are discussing the tragic and often under-reported murder of black Trans women nearly three-fourths of transgender and gender-nonconforming Americans killed in the last three years were killed with a firearm yet rarely is this community included in conversations about gun violence prevention am hoping to change that by discussing the impact of gun violence on members of the trans Community then on our unbelievable about section we're talking about why there are so many stories people accidentally shooting themselves while going after Iraq has finally and our news wrap up were talking about the tragic ongoing realities of gun violence across the u.s. I.

Brady Peabody award Emmy Kelly Jones Iraq
"2020" Discussed on Climate 2020

Climate 2020

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"2020" Discussed on Climate 2020

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> Climate Twenty Twenty is <Speech_Male> produced in association <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> with a year's project <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and by postscript <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> audio <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> funding provided <Speech_Music_Male> by Exelon <Speech_Music_Male> at company that believes <Speech_Music_Male> that confronting climate climate <Speech_Music_Male> change is essential <Speech_Music_Male> to <Speech_Music_Male> maintaining the strength <Speech_Music_Male> and prosperity <Speech_Music_Male> at the cities. It serves <Speech_Music_Male> that's <Speech_Music_Male> why the excellent foundation <Speech_Music_Male> launched a twenty <Speech_Music_Male> million dollar <Speech_Music_Male> Climate Change Investment Investment <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Initiative <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to fund entrepreneurs <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> finding new <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> solutions to fighting <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> climate change <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for <Speech_Music_Male> more Info Visit Excellent <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Foundation <Speech_Music_Male> Dot Org. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> The show is hosted you <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by David <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Gilbert and me <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Jeff NASA <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> climate twenty twenty <Speech_Music_Male> is produced by Jamie <Speech_Music_Male> Kaiser Daniel <Speech_Music_Male> Waldorf and <Speech_Music_Male> Stephen Lacey. <Speech_Music_Male> Sean <Speech_Music_Male> Marquand does our sound on <Speech_Music_Male> designer and composed <Speech_Music_Male> our theme music <Speech_Music_Male> digital music <Speech_Music_Male> and cover art by <Speech_Music_Male> can't Nickerson <Speech_Music_Male> Ben. Branston <Speech_Music_Male> is our production intern. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Follow us on twitter <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and instagram. At climate. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Two Thousand Twenty <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> pod <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> subscribe now and <Speech_Male> apple podcasts. Or <Speech_Male> wherever you listen to <Speech_Male> podcasts and please <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> consider giving us <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a rating <Speech_Music_Male> high <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> helps <SpeakerChange> us get discovered <Speech_Music_Male> by others care <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> about climate in politics <Speech_Music_Male> for <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> more information about US <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> visit us at climate <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> twenty podcast <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> dot com. <Speech_Music_Male> And please <Speech_Music_Male> come back again next. It's <Speech_Music_Male> Thursday to hear the <Speech_Music_Male> latest climate <Speech_Music_Male> change in the twenty <Speech_Music_Male> twenty election. <Music>

"2020" Discussed on Climate 2020

Climate 2020

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"2020" Discussed on Climate 2020

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> Climate Twenty Twenty is <Speech_Male> produced in association <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> with a year's project <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and by postscript <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> audio <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> funding provided <Speech_Music_Male> by Exelon <Speech_Music_Male> at company that believes <Speech_Music_Male> that confronting climate climate <Speech_Music_Male> change is essential <Speech_Music_Male> to <Speech_Music_Male> maintaining the strength <Speech_Music_Male> and prosperity <Speech_Music_Male> at the cities. It serves <Speech_Music_Male> that's <Speech_Music_Male> why the excellent foundation <Speech_Music_Male> launched a twenty <Speech_Music_Male> million dollar <Speech_Music_Male> Climate Change Investment Investment <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Initiative <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to fund entrepreneurs <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> finding new <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> solutions to fighting <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> climate change <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for <Speech_Music_Male> more Info Visit Excellent <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Foundation <Speech_Music_Male> Dot Org. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> The show is hosted you <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by David <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Gilbert and me <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Jeff NASA <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> climate twenty twenty <Speech_Music_Male> is produced by Jamie <Speech_Music_Male> Kaiser Daniel <Speech_Music_Male> Waldorf and <Speech_Music_Male> Stephen Lacey. <Speech_Music_Male> Sean <Speech_Music_Male> Marquand does our sound on <Speech_Music_Male> designer and composed <Speech_Music_Male> our theme music <Speech_Music_Male> digital music <Speech_Music_Male> and cover art by <Speech_Music_Male> can't Nickerson <Speech_Music_Male> Ben. Branston <Speech_Music_Male> is our production intern. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Follow us on twitter <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and instagram. At climate. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Two Thousand Twenty <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> pod <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> subscribe now and <Speech_Male> apple podcasts. Or <Speech_Male> wherever you listen to <Speech_Male> podcasts and please <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> consider giving us <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a rating <Speech_Music_Male> high <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> helps <SpeakerChange> us get discovered <Speech_Music_Male> by others care <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> about climate in politics <Speech_Music_Male> for <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> more information about US <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> visit us at climate <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> twenty podcast <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> dot com. <Speech_Music_Male> And please <Speech_Music_Male> come back again next. It's <Speech_Music_Male> Thursday to hear the <Speech_Music_Male> latest climate <Speech_Music_Male> change in the twenty <Speech_Music_Male> twenty election. <Music>

"2020" Discussed on Climate 2020

Climate 2020

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"2020" Discussed on Climate 2020

"So let's take a look at some of the other important stories and climate science and politics happening right now. Blackrock the world's largest asset management group with seven trillion dollars worth of assets. That's just announced a major change in its investment strategy because of climate change. So Jeff. What do you what do you make of this black action? So this is a big deal there. An industry leader and learn who's the CEO blackrock has been under enormous pressure from his peers in the financial world for several months now to change its advice. under under its asset management strategy. His letter which was released this week has some really big changes in. Yes it's true. They're going to end their investment in thermal call. All that all by itself is a big deal. But they've also said they're going to screen they're fossil-fuel investments they're gonNA look at underlying climate risk to companies that their assets assets are a party to and they're also going to take a serious look at the entire sustainability portfolio. So that's a big big strategy shift for black and my prediction. Is everybody else. WHO competes with blackrock to manage assets is going to try to keep pace with and to be fair to black rock? They have for for years been major investors in renewable energy. They have but they've also and this is why they were on under such pressure They've done a couple of things that that climate activists. This had not been happy with. They have blocked some climate risk transparency resolutions. The second big thing that blackrock has been attacked for is that they have their assets have been applied to the things that are causing the problem thermal coal oil and gas development. It's still TVD exactly how this will translate late but this is a big step forward for company like Black Rock on another note. Something campaign related that I've been tracking closely. Does the sunrise movements endorsement of Bernie Sanders Signal. That Bernie's their climate champion. Well they they may consider him their climate champion. Frankly I see Bernie Sanders as maybe eh one of the less reliable champions of climate in this In this election but why why do you. Why do you see that? Because he will not take on the Filibuster oster which is If you want congressional action on climate you're going to have to have a candidate alike. Elizabeth Warren for instance who was very clear about the fact that she would take on the film. But also I think Bernie's taken a an. I know responded by nuclear company. Excellent but I have to say that I felt for a long time that Bernie's taking pretty silly view on on nuclear power. But you know the filibuster on the nuclear question cy which I would argue. They're tactical they're big tactical questions Bernie. Sanders was the climate champion in two two thousand sixteen. He's been talking about. Climate Change. Is the existential threat. Longer than any other of the Democratic presidential candidates. I think you know what this to me. What this means this to me is that we know that whoever gets elected president? If it's a Democrat is going to have very few things very few priorities that they're going to be able to get through through Congress and I'm not sure that that climates can be his His first one. Yeah which is why you're exactly right about that. And in fact that's the topic of interest we want. We wanted to touch. It's on briefly here. which is trump's rollback of NIBA? Donald Trump continues to try to rollback every single climate authority that President Obama enacted inactive while he was in office. He had the national environmental policy a law that required that an environmental review of federal projects like bridges highways power plants be conducted. And you know in in the New York Times last week. Lisa Friedman excellent climate reporter wrote the proposed rule would eliminate the need for agencies to consider the cumulative impacts of projects in recent years Crisp said that cumulative review include studying the planet warming consequences of emitting more greenhouse gases. The Nipah decision session. If the federal courts allow it could have enormous implications. Trump's GONNA try to walk this very fine line. It's GonNa try to say I care about the environment. I'm environmental champion campion. I just want to streamline these regulations these Niba regulations and make it easier for for us to build things. I don't think it'll.

Bernie Sanders Bernie blackrock Bernie Sanders Signal Donald Trump CEO blackrock Elizabeth Warren Jeff President Obama New York Times Congress president Lisa Friedman Crisp reporter
"2020" Discussed on Climate 2020

Climate 2020

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"2020" Discussed on Climate 2020

"So let's take a look at some of the other important stories and climate science and politics happening right now. Blackrock the world's largest asset management group with seven trillion dollars worth of assets. That's just announced a major change in its investment strategy because of climate change. So Jeff. What do you what do you make of this black action? So this is a big deal there. An industry leader and learn who's the CEO blackrock has been under enormous pressure from his peers in the financial world for several months now to change its advice. under under its asset management strategy. His letter which was released this week has some really big changes in. Yes it's true. They're going to end their investment in thermal call. All that all by itself is a big deal. But they've also said they're going to screen they're fossil-fuel investments they're gonNA look at underlying climate risk to companies that their assets assets are a party to and they're also going to take a serious look at the entire sustainability portfolio. So that's a big big strategy shift for black and my prediction. Is everybody else. WHO competes with blackrock to manage assets is going to try to keep pace with and to be fair to black rock? They have for for years been major investors in renewable energy. They have but they've also and this is why they were on under such pressure They've done a couple of things that that climate activists. This had not been happy with. They have blocked some climate risk transparency resolutions. The second big thing that blackrock has been attacked for is that they have their assets have been applied to the things that are causing the problem thermal coal oil and gas development. It's still TVD exactly how this will translate late but this is a big step forward for company like Black Rock on another note. Something campaign related that I've been tracking closely. Does the sunrise movements endorsement of Bernie Sanders Signal. That Bernie's their climate champion. Well they they may consider him their climate champion. Frankly I see Bernie Sanders as maybe eh one of the less reliable champions of climate in this In this election but why why do you. Why do you see that? Because he will not take on the Filibuster oster which is If you want congressional action on climate you're going to have to have a candidate alike. Elizabeth Warren for instance who was very clear about the fact that she would take on the film. But also I think Bernie's taken a an. I know responded by nuclear company. Excellent but I have to say that I felt for a long time that Bernie's taking pretty silly view on on nuclear power. But you know the filibuster on the nuclear question cy which I would argue. They're tactical they're big tactical questions Bernie. Sanders was the climate champion in two two thousand sixteen. He's been talking about. Climate Change. Is the existential threat. Longer than any other of the Democratic presidential candidates. I think you know what this to me. What this means this to me is that we know that whoever gets elected president? If it's a Democrat is going to have very few things very few priorities that they're going to be able to get through through Congress and I'm not sure that that climates can be his His first one. Yeah which is why you're exactly right about that. And in fact that's the topic of interest we want. We wanted to touch. It's on briefly here. which is trump's rollback of NIBA? Donald Trump continues to try to rollback every single climate authority that President Obama enacted inactive while he was in office. He had the national environmental policy a law that required that an environmental review of federal projects like bridges highways power plants be conducted. And you know in in the New York Times last week. Lisa Friedman excellent climate reporter wrote the proposed rule would eliminate the need for agencies to consider the cumulative impacts of projects in recent years Crisp said that cumulative review include studying the planet warming consequences of emitting more greenhouse gases. The Nipah decision session. If the federal courts allow it could have enormous implications. Trump's GONNA try to walk this very fine line. It's GonNa try to say I care about the environment. I'm environmental champion campion. I just want to streamline these regulations these Niba regulations and make it easier for for us to build things. I don't think it'll.

Bernie Sanders Bernie blackrock Bernie Sanders Signal Donald Trump CEO blackrock Elizabeth Warren Jeff President Obama New York Times Congress president Lisa Friedman Crisp reporter
"2020" Discussed on Climate 2020

Climate 2020

11:24 min | 2 years ago

"2020" Discussed on Climate 2020

"Vaccines Genetically Modified Foods climate change. There's a widening gap between what scientists know about these issues and what the population believes and that. Disconnect connect isn't caused by a lack of facts people do generally accept science but there are specific areas that they tend to resist a rejected and those are areas in which they perceive that the implications of scientific work clashed with their values their religion their worldview or their interests US economic interests west so this is what sociologists call implicated denial. We deny evidence when we don't like its implications. Naomi rescues a science story in at Harvard University and as she explains addressing. What she calls Implica- Tori denial is key to breaking the climate? It's stalemate in politics so this is very important for us to understand because it tells us that the remedy is not something to give people more scientific facts but actually to address those perceived implications climate twenty twenty a podcast about climate change and the twenty only twenty election. This week we take a look at why people resist or reject science and what that means but it comes to acting on the climate crisis. And I'm David Gilbert of the Climate Media Company the Years Project and I'm Jeff Nesbitt. I run climate nexus a climate communications group. Jeff the phrase climate. Denial often conjures images of corporate cover. UPS dark monied interest groups but those players don't have influenced winced without the willingness of lots of people to ignore science because it suits some personal interest whether it's financial or its loyalty to a political worldview. But Jeff. Let's be fair. Science doesn't always get it right. Does it so. I can't believe you used that phrase David you've just parroted the number one talking point at the top of the climate denier playbook buck so. I'm not sure if you realize you've just done that. But that's what well you know. Here's the thing I've been reading. Naomi rescues book. Why tra- science and she talks about some fascinating cases? Examples of of where science got it wrong and she talks Prince about this professor at Harvard. Medical School pointed out that there argued that higher education of women. It was a really bad idea because it would adversely affect their fertility and in fact the president. This is bad ten years after the civil war. The President of Bryn Mawr a college in Pennsylvania wasn't sure said she wasn't sure whether women's strength could stand the strain of education so there's an example of science and not getting a right in there are other examples pulse where people could reasonably say that scientists were wrong. But but 'cause you too much grief you the first case you cited. It's a it's not that science got it wrong. It's a handful. Love scientists who were exploring theory didn't quite get a write in this case a climate science. We have multiple lines of evidence. Thousands upon thousands of peer reviewed science scientific consensus almost one hundred percent of scientists who studied this issue. All not so to say that sometimes science gets it wrong again. That's the number one climbed the now talking point. I actually didn't find that the most interesting part of name his book. I think the more interesting part of her book is where she describes. Why people reject science outright all right so so that brings us to your conversation with Iraqis? Naomi is a scientists during at Harvard and Co author of the Popular Book. Merchants of doubt about how special interest. Chris Cloud the science around public health dangers and a few months ago she came out with a new book called. Why Trust Science? That's right if you remember her previous book. Merchants of doubt which was turned into a a really powerful movie was about how scientists with political and corporate connections eroded trust in the science around tobacco go acid rain and climate change after her book came out in two thousand and ten Naomi and her co author of Conway's they spent a lot of times speaking on the lecture circuit and they kept hearing hearing the same questions over and over from people. And sometimes at the end of the lecture someone would ask me sometimes a belligerent tone of voice. Well that's all very well all in good but why should we trust the science and after a while I started thinking you know. It's a legitimate question so I decided to try to write something that would answer that question. And so why should we trust the science will. My central argument is that if you look at the processes that scientists are engaged in what you see is that scientists have a very robust set of processes for vetting scientific claims. That is for judging whether they're right or not. Scientists go through multiple layers of criticism of argumentation of of questioning and nothing gets to be accepted as a verified scientific claim until it's gone through this very rigorous process of checking now now so on the climate issue a pretty significant portion of the American public They don't know that there's a as close to a consensus as you're gonNA find in the scientific arena around climate change why it occurs you know the impacts those sort of things. Can your book help. Some of those folks who for them. Sciences is just too difficult to wrap their arms around when it comes to the climate change issue. We'll no one knows better than me. The fact that there has been scientific consensus on climate change for a long time because I wrote the first peer reviewed article that looked at that question back in two thousand and four So absolutely you know. We know that there's been a consensus on this issue for a long time but one of the conclusions I've come to from my teaching from public. Lectures is that scientists. Bantus are very good at explaining what we know and not so good at explaining how we know it but I found in teaching that if you just stand up in front of the room and give people a pile of facts and say here's what we know. That's not very interesting. It's not very persuasive. And it's not very memorable but if you can explain to students how how we came to understand something. What was the process if you can pose it that way and then you know? Tell a story about why this emerges important issue how scientists adjusted a- and how they came to our current understanding in many cases. That's her approach. Much more persuasive. It's interesting I mean. Most people generally trust science. It's sort of writ large but there are three areas where where the scientist not mostly trusted vaccines climate and evolution. So why why those those three. Why are they exceptions to this rule that were the most people generally trust science? Those are areas in which they perceive that the implications implications of scientific work clashed with their values their religion their worldview or their interests US economic interests so this is what sociologists call implicate toy worried. Denial we deny evidence when we don't like its implications so for example. We know that. Some event Jealou- Christians reject of listener theory because they thinking means that life is meaningless but of course evolutionary here. It doesn't actually mean that and you can find plenty of evolutionary biologists who are themselves people of faith faith so When it comes to something like climate change denial? A lot of it has to do as you know as well as anyone who has to people's political ideology fear of big government resistance assistance to taxes. And then again you can address that and say well we have some solutions that don't involve bigger government. We have some solution that don't necessarily involve higher taxes overall we can do a revenue neutral carbon price. Where yes? We'll pay more for carbon based fuels. But we'll pay less for other things so and again you won't reach everyone everyone. Some people are completely shut down and a well. That's life. I mean some people still smoke cigarettes and don't think that it's bad for their health so I mean there are some people that you'll never reach an and you have to accept that but the same science that they reject vaccinations for example. It's the same science that they accept. You know when it comes to joining cancer or something something else. The numbers of Americans who who believe that climate change is real is now moved back up to starkly high levels. I mean it's basically seventy it's seventy five twenty five us but seventy five percent of Americans generally believe it's occurring this man made there's another twenty five percent who for one reason or another don't believe it's real but a softer form of climate science. Denial is now taking root which is. Yeah sure stuff's happening but we're still going to need fossil fuels for the foreseeable future maybe even for decades and the worst impacts are going to court later on. Let's just wait bad it's going to get. How do you deal with that? Well I think you deal with it by calling it what it is. Which is denial? It's denying the reality body of what scientists have observed about the impacts. Because it's not just a minor thing I mean I was. I gave congressional testimony back in October. In which one one of the witnesses for the Republicans said you know. Climate Change will be milder manageable. Well there is no scientific basis for that claim there are hundreds and hundreds of reports to tell us that. That's it's not true. It's already not mild. I mean look at what has happened. Look at the fires in California. I've just come back from Sydney Australia where you cannot see the sun noon. It's like being being in a partial eclipse of the Sun. This is not my this is already severe now. So that's sort of part one and manageable will the very week that we had our congressional hearings the US Army War College issued a report saying that the the Pentagon is not prepared to deal with the impacts of climate change. Well if the Pentagon can't managed climate change what hope is there for the rest of us right so this is a very severe form of denial because its purpose is the same as it's always been which is to prevent vent meaningful action and to prevent meaningful controls on greenhouse gas emissions grew. We need to convince that this is happening right now and we actually need to deal with with this right now. What's a good question because many of the people that we would have thought would be persuasive messengers on this issue have proven not to be in? The armed services are the clearest example example for more than a decade when I've given public talk people have said things like well if we could just get the military speak up on this issue and then I say actually the military turn has spoken up in this issue. You know the one thing that's left. The obvious elephant in the room is the business community apart from the fossil fuel industry because the fossil fuel industry has been extremely aggressive in promoting its interest in selling more fossil fuels. I think that if more of the business community would step up and say look this is getting silly. You know if your business as usual is going to result in massive amounts of destruction property loss health effects Damage to children. I mean there's got to be a point at which that has to somehow. I mean I don't know how you go to bed at night. If you don't at least take that on board on some level name I wanted to thank you for taking time to discuss. This was this was a fascinating discussion. So tell us again. The name of your book and the name of the book is why Trust Science published by Princeton University press unavailable in all the standard online and hard whatever few hard cover motor called brick and mortar stores. That are left but definitely in all the usual online sources assist right great well again thank you very much. It's been.

scientist Trust Science Naomi US Jeff Nesbitt Harvard University tra- science David Gilbert Implica- Tori Chris Cloud president Harvard Medical School US Army War College Pennsylvania Princeton University
"2020" Discussed on Climate 2020

Climate 2020

11:24 min | 2 years ago

"2020" Discussed on Climate 2020

"Vaccines Genetically Modified Foods climate change. There's a widening gap between what scientists know about these issues and what the population believes and that. Disconnect connect isn't caused by a lack of facts people do generally accept science but there are specific areas that they tend to resist a rejected and those are areas in which they perceive that the implications of scientific work clashed with their values their religion their worldview or their interests US economic interests west so this is what sociologists call implicated denial. We deny evidence when we don't like its implications. Naomi rescues a science story in at Harvard University and as she explains addressing. What she calls Implica- Tori denial is key to breaking the climate? It's stalemate in politics so this is very important for us to understand because it tells us that the remedy is not something to give people more scientific facts but actually to address those perceived implications climate twenty twenty a podcast about climate change and the twenty only twenty election. This week we take a look at why people resist or reject science and what that means but it comes to acting on the climate crisis. And I'm David Gilbert of the Climate Media Company the Years Project and I'm Jeff Nesbitt. I run climate nexus a climate communications group. Jeff the phrase climate. Denial often conjures images of corporate cover. UPS dark monied interest groups but those players don't have influenced winced without the willingness of lots of people to ignore science because it suits some personal interest whether it's financial or its loyalty to a political worldview. But Jeff. Let's be fair. Science doesn't always get it right. Does it so. I can't believe you used that phrase David you've just parroted the number one talking point at the top of the climate denier playbook buck so. I'm not sure if you realize you've just done that. But that's what well you know. Here's the thing I've been reading. Naomi rescues book. Why tra- science and she talks about some fascinating cases? Examples of of where science got it wrong and she talks Prince about this professor at Harvard. Medical School pointed out that there argued that higher education of women. It was a really bad idea because it would adversely affect their fertility and in fact the president. This is bad ten years after the civil war. The President of Bryn Mawr a college in Pennsylvania wasn't sure said she wasn't sure whether women's strength could stand the strain of education so there's an example of science and not getting a right in there are other examples pulse where people could reasonably say that scientists were wrong. But but 'cause you too much grief you the first case you cited. It's a it's not that science got it wrong. It's a handful. Love scientists who were exploring theory didn't quite get a write in this case a climate science. We have multiple lines of evidence. Thousands upon thousands of peer reviewed science scientific consensus almost one hundred percent of scientists who studied this issue. All not so to say that sometimes science gets it wrong again. That's the number one climbed the now talking point. I actually didn't find that the most interesting part of name his book. I think the more interesting part of her book is where she describes. Why people reject science outright all right so so that brings us to your conversation with Iraqis? Naomi is a scientists during at Harvard and Co author of the Popular Book. Merchants of doubt about how special interest. Chris Cloud the science around public health dangers and a few months ago she came out with a new book called. Why Trust Science? That's right if you remember her previous book. Merchants of doubt which was turned into a a really powerful movie was about how scientists with political and corporate connections eroded trust in the science around tobacco go acid rain and climate change after her book came out in two thousand and ten Naomi and her co author of Conway's they spent a lot of times speaking on the lecture circuit and they kept hearing hearing the same questions over and over from people. And sometimes at the end of the lecture someone would ask me sometimes a belligerent tone of voice. Well that's all very well all in good but why should we trust the science and after a while I started thinking you know. It's a legitimate question so I decided to try to write something that would answer that question. And so why should we trust the science will. My central argument is that if you look at the processes that scientists are engaged in what you see is that scientists have a very robust set of processes for vetting scientific claims. That is for judging whether they're right or not. Scientists go through multiple layers of criticism of argumentation of of questioning and nothing gets to be accepted as a verified scientific claim until it's gone through this very rigorous process of checking now now so on the climate issue a pretty significant portion of the American public They don't know that there's a as close to a consensus as you're gonNA find in the scientific arena around climate change why it occurs you know the impacts those sort of things. Can your book help. Some of those folks who for them. Sciences is just too difficult to wrap their arms around when it comes to the climate change issue. We'll no one knows better than me. The fact that there has been scientific consensus on climate change for a long time because I wrote the first peer reviewed article that looked at that question back in two thousand and four So absolutely you know. We know that there's been a consensus on this issue for a long time but one of the conclusions I've come to from my teaching from public. Lectures is that scientists. Bantus are very good at explaining what we know and not so good at explaining how we know it but I found in teaching that if you just stand up in front of the room and give people a pile of facts and say here's what we know. That's not very interesting. It's not very persuasive. And it's not very memorable but if you can explain to students how how we came to understand something. What was the process if you can pose it that way and then you know? Tell a story about why this emerges important issue how scientists adjusted a- and how they came to our current understanding in many cases. That's her approach. Much more persuasive. It's interesting I mean. Most people generally trust science. It's sort of writ large but there are three areas where where the scientist not mostly trusted vaccines climate and evolution. So why why those those three. Why are they exceptions to this rule that were the most people generally trust science? Those are areas in which they perceive that the implications implications of scientific work clashed with their values their religion their worldview or their interests US economic interests so this is what sociologists call implicate toy worried. Denial we deny evidence when we don't like its implications so for example. We know that. Some event Jealou- Christians reject of listener theory because they thinking means that life is meaningless but of course evolutionary here. It doesn't actually mean that and you can find plenty of evolutionary biologists who are themselves people of faith faith so When it comes to something like climate change denial? A lot of it has to do as you know as well as anyone who has to people's political ideology fear of big government resistance assistance to taxes. And then again you can address that and say well we have some solutions that don't involve bigger government. We have some solution that don't necessarily involve higher taxes overall we can do a revenue neutral carbon price. Where yes? We'll pay more for carbon based fuels. But we'll pay less for other things so and again you won't reach everyone everyone. Some people are completely shut down and a well. That's life. I mean some people still smoke cigarettes and don't think that it's bad for their health so I mean there are some people that you'll never reach an and you have to accept that but the same science that they reject vaccinations for example. It's the same science that they accept. You know when it comes to joining cancer or something something else. The numbers of Americans who who believe that climate change is real is now moved back up to starkly high levels. I mean it's basically seventy it's seventy five twenty five us but seventy five percent of Americans generally believe it's occurring this man made there's another twenty five percent who for one reason or another don't believe it's real but a softer form of climate science. Denial is now taking root which is. Yeah sure stuff's happening but we're still going to need fossil fuels for the foreseeable future maybe even for decades and the worst impacts are going to court later on. Let's just wait bad it's going to get. How do you deal with that? Well I think you deal with it by calling it what it is. Which is denial? It's denying the reality body of what scientists have observed about the impacts. Because it's not just a minor thing I mean I was. I gave congressional testimony back in October. In which one one of the witnesses for the Republicans said you know. Climate Change will be milder manageable. Well there is no scientific basis for that claim there are hundreds and hundreds of reports to tell us that. That's it's not true. It's already not mild. I mean look at what has happened. Look at the fires in California. I've just come back from Sydney Australia where you cannot see the sun noon. It's like being being in a partial eclipse of the Sun. This is not my this is already severe now. So that's sort of part one and manageable will the very week that we had our congressional hearings the US Army War College issued a report saying that the the Pentagon is not prepared to deal with the impacts of climate change. Well if the Pentagon can't managed climate change what hope is there for the rest of us right so this is a very severe form of denial because its purpose is the same as it's always been which is to prevent vent meaningful action and to prevent meaningful controls on greenhouse gas emissions grew. We need to convince that this is happening right now and we actually need to deal with with this right now. What's a good question because many of the people that we would have thought would be persuasive messengers on this issue have proven not to be in? The armed services are the clearest example example for more than a decade when I've given public talk people have said things like well if we could just get the military speak up on this issue and then I say actually the military turn has spoken up in this issue. You know the one thing that's left. The obvious elephant in the room is the business community apart from the fossil fuel industry because the fossil fuel industry has been extremely aggressive in promoting its interest in selling more fossil fuels. I think that if more of the business community would step up and say look this is getting silly. You know if your business as usual is going to result in massive amounts of destruction property loss health effects Damage to children. I mean there's got to be a point at which that has to somehow. I mean I don't know how you go to bed at night. If you don't at least take that on board on some level name I wanted to thank you for taking time to discuss. This was this was a fascinating discussion. So tell us again. The name of your book and the name of the book is why Trust Science published by Princeton University press unavailable in all the standard online and hard whatever few hard cover motor called brick and mortar stores. That are left but definitely in all the usual online sources assist right great well again thank you very much. It's been.

scientist Trust Science Naomi US Jeff Nesbitt Harvard University tra- science David Gilbert Implica- Tori Chris Cloud president Harvard Medical School US Army War College Pennsylvania Princeton University
"2020" Discussed on Climate 2020

Climate 2020

12:22 min | 2 years ago

"2020" Discussed on Climate 2020

"Inslee he was at the governor's mansion. We had a chance to speak to him. At length about all aspects of the climate change issue and as Usual Governor Inslee was quite astute in his breakdown of the climate and energy issues there will be elements of that interview. That did not air. The first time that I think Folks will find quite fascinating. Yeah well I'm Jay Inslee. I'm lucky to be governor of the state of Washington and the grandfather of three and the new granddaughter coming in December and right now Olympia Washington. Everything's grade. Let's sort of jump right into it so president. Trump's weakness is the biggest weakness and it's known as a wedge issue political advisors. That's known as a winning issue to average voters is the environment and climate and so a candidate can exploit like that in a general election. Why don't know but I do know my perception and that is that Donald Trump essentially gave us a tell. You know when you play poker in your opponent. You look for that tells you what the what cards they haven't. And there was a big tell when donald trump went out and claim to be an environmentalist couple months ago and that was tell to show the he even understands. He's so vulnerable and weak on this issue. He knows that He's got no excuse for his terrible record. And I believe that you you always go after your opponent at their weakest point with our strongest position and I do believe it's on climate change because it's the biggest delta between the absurdity of Climate Denial Nile Donald Trump and the economic growth and positive optimistic message of Democrat. So very much I think we ought to. We ought to make this a prime part of our strategy and therefore I encourage all candidates to make this one of the highlighted issues. There is no excuse. Donald Trump has is no place to stand on this issue whatsoever. It's laughable what his position is so we ought to really drive this right through the heart the Republican intransigence on this including Donald Trump's position and I hope all candidates take that take that strategic position. So I'm I'm glad you raised that. Because as luck or circumstance would have it. We interviewed WANT TO DONALD TRUMP's top two remaining pollsters. He's gotten rid of most of his pollsters but John McLaughlin glaucous. WHO's one of the two that remains agreed to sit down with us and describe how they're gonNA try to deal with this issue? In the general election they're going to hammer hammer away. At China they feel like president trump feels like he's the he's he's the candidate who is holding China's feet to the fire you're Through their trade deals and others that China and the argument is that you know why should the United States Act of China's not going to act the second big point that trump's pollster mentioned was the economy and that why should American voters who are only making fifty sixty thousand dollars a year half to absorb two thousand thousand dollars in increased energy costs so they focused on the cost argument. Just curious if you're if you're the candidate or perhaps the vice presidential nominee to Mrs Warren And how would you flip that on on. Its head well I would say. Donald trump is a sucker for China. He's a loser. When it comes to China when it comes to climate change because he has in effect given an excuse to China for inaction he is he is allowed? He's opened the door to China to to take no action on climate change because the best excuse China would have for not acting on climate change would would be if the US does nothing so he basically has taken our moral high ground away from us if we act on climate change. We have a legitimate reason to demand. Hand China to move. If we don't act on climate change we got no no moral ground to stand on so I would say he's got the biggest loser attitude to when it comes to this now. The fact of the matter China is acting on climate change domestically. They're making significant efforts to reduce our dependence in some coal fired plants and that's good news but they need to accelerate their efforts particularly in their international portfolio where there are financing fossil fuel plants around the world so we have a lot of work to do to get China to accelerate their commitment. But you can't very well do that when you're not doing diddley squat. What in our own country so no I think Donald Trump has got the dumbest policy possible if you want to to command respect of China A and B. on the moral high ground you gotta get rid of Donald Trump's so we can do that that's number one on the cost issue? Look we WANNA reduce costs ultimately for energy for Americans and I'll tell you what I would love. Americans to to reduce their gasoline prices. Not by nickel non by twenty five cents Gallen but to get their gasoline prices down to zero. And that's what happens when you driving electric car and so we have plans in our state we now have fifty thousand electric three cars in our in consumers hands today. Those people aren't paying a penny for gasoline and and we believe that by putting in charging stations having increasing access to to to wait finance electric cars and the original capital costs. We're GONNA drive. Energy costs down on and transportation. We're doing that big time for taxpayers. Today I just had a meeting this afternoon with my team. We are now in the stages of building lean seventeen net zero office buildings for the state of Washington and when your net zero that means that your taxpayers are paying zero for energy energy costs so we believe over the long term. We are have the best route to reduce energy costs for consumers and businesses and tax payers alike. Look this is trump wants to remain shackled to the to the gasoline pipeline to Saudi Arabia. where he wants to send our military where we just have to spend in billions from protecting oil shakes and protecting the monopoly the oil and gas industry? So we're happy to have that argument with him. I I believe we're the best side not only history but of politics because people understand a good deal and that's not having to pay for gasoline. Yeah if we are witnessing missing the end of the internal combustion engine and goes to zero emission vehicles and where people don't have to pay for gas. Those costs go away is the economic opportunity. Argument accounted founded. This cost argument that we've heard probably for almost a quarter century now that it's just too costly to go through an energy transition. The economic opportunity argument is that there may be five six seven times as many solar jobs every fossil fuel job. That's lost and that there are lots of economists who believe that a renewable energy in a clean energy economy That that is emerging. Maybe the next really big Global Industry that can jump start. The global economy is that is that a legitimate argument to make back in American twenty twenty. Well I believe it is because I wrote a whole book on it ten years ago so once you read a book on something. You kinda swallowed the Kool aid but I really. They do believe that. And what I predicted in my coauthor Bracken Hendricks predicted that we would have a huge expansion of electric cars of solar our panel manufacturing plants of wind turbines and all of those things are happening actually faster than we thought that they would Look the cost in the reason is is that the price of these sources of energy are coming down so fast. The cost of solar panels of solar install. All this come down about eighty percent in the last decade. The cost of wind power is come down twenty percent and will continue to come down the price of the efficiency. He is coming down. Dramatically and efficiency is frequently forgotten is is an energy source in itself. So we're we're seeing a massive expansion in a renewable energy because costs have come down so dramatically and because of that people have money more money to spend on going to the movies and putting their kids through college and that's what's happening happening is happening through a combination of policies in states like mine where we've embraced a renewable portfolio standard that has created a seven and billion dollar wind turbine industry thousands of people to work and giving people reasonably priced energy and has happened because of technological advances were brilliant entrepreneurs tre preneurs and scientists and machinists or or building. These great new products. You CAN'T I. It's just been mind. Boggling how fast is transition is taking place place but it's not going fast enough yet that's why we need to continue to have policies to accelerate that in the reason for that is that climate change is going a lot faster than we. We thought it was going to. So we're in a race. We're running really hard and we're running really fast but climate change right now is running faster so we pick up the pace but in your opinion is is climate a winning issue in the general election. And why clearly voters in the Primers WanNa hear about it. It's always one of the top three issues and any of the key states It's especially sailing for young voters but for whatever reason it hasn't caught fire And it it didn't show up last debate. So is it a winning issue in twenty twenty Yes for a variety of reasons number one. It speaks to and connects to some very deep sort of value statements. In the American people want is the importance of job Americans. I want to work. They want a job. They WANNA have economic stability and they wanNA feel productive and this is there's no greater argument for job creation than this then in this field clean energy jobs today are are growing twice as fast as the US economy Jobs in solar stew your way way past those was in the coal industry and the thing. That's beautiful about this is that is that there's something for clean energy in every part of the country it it sort of. You can't go to any state where there isn't not some dramatically increasing jobs in Iowa. The winters are sprouting length of corn in Nevada. I was just there the other day. We're MGM going one hundred percent solar. I went to the Cooper or copper mountain photovoltaic plant where the w union members did it great work building. These massive solar plants in Moses Lake Washington were building carbon-fiber that goes into electric cars Just wherever you go in Florida where I went and saw these companies installing solar panels. It is just all across the United States. So that's number one. Why it's important number two? This touches the basic character of the American people and that is that we are optimists. We are future us. We're looking forward. Not backwards were the people who invent and create bill. This is the nature of the American people and and so it touches this spirit of optimism that can do nature we're not people sitting around wring our hands we want to invent the future and it speaks to that and I think that's let's Both in the Democrat Republican breast. If you will so a third look at science based on science and and the majority of Americans vast majority now understand that we don't have an option we've got to act including about half a republicans if you pull about about half the Republican voters actually think we should do something about climate. Change is just the Republican politicians who are in the pocket of the oil and gas industry in camp. Break that lock walk that special interest. That's what's impeding the legislature national legislature from acting. But the people get it now..

Donald Trump China United States Washington Governor Inslee Hand China Olympia Washington Gallen John McLaughlin Mrs Warren