35 Burst results for "20 Years"

Seattle Small Business: How One Landlord and Her Tenants Survived the Pandemic

Bloomberg Best

05:02 min | 3 d ago

Seattle Small Business: How One Landlord and Her Tenants Survived the Pandemic

"To say with the your head holds for the real estate industry and the many businesses that occupy the commercial real estate landscape, But I will say to him, this is one of the things that we have consistently and constantly talked about stories across the Bloomberg every day about what the future is of commercial and residential real estate. Yeah, there are a lot of unknowns. If we think back to what happened in 2020, it was a real surprise to see residents real estate bounce back so quickly in some Areas of the country and be left behind and other areas. So far, the pandemic hasn't triggered a real estate meltdown on Main Street. But his business week uncovered time is running out for one Seattle landlord and her tenants. Tim is a personal story that's being told over and over again to him around the country because of the pandemic, and we got more from the writer of it. Bloomberg News Finance reporter Nobu Higher He joined us along with Seattle landlord he wrote about this done. She's found her done, and Hobbes. It's a small business. Both were in Seattle. Noah starts off by talking about how he connected with the subject of this Story. Listen, I actually started catting several months ago. I think it was in April or may of last year for a project that I'm doing for business week following small businesses in one neighborhood here in Seattle through the covert crisis and Um, over the months in several conversations with clothes. I was just struck by All of the sort of financial in business bonds that she had created. And, um, developing this, really, uh Double properties on this really cool block and Seattle just how how cove it was, was really putting a lot of those relationships under strain, and what I wanted to do was tell a story about real estate and small business and all of these links between people. And how they got through the 1st 10 months of the pandemic and what it might take to get them through the next time. So, Liz, come on in on this. First of all, has your year been Oh, Clara. Um it's been pretty challenging. I am doing small scale real estate for about 20 years and I survived through a couple of previous Crazy for 9 11, and then you know the economic meltdown. It started in 2000 and eight. But boy, this takes the cake for sure, well, and to be fair, and what's interesting, and it's one of the things we've talked about. A lot less is, you know companies big and small had to learn to pivot like I feel like I've used that word a million times over the past 12 months. You did as well and you had some things going for you in terms of You know where your real estate was located? What kind of tenants you had Tell us a bit about that. Well, I kind of operate at a scale that, um, really caters to locally owned small business. And so I love to renovate old buildings and then cram a bunch is Dollar users kind of into one project where it can create a real critical mass of, um, you know, interested in terms of retail and restaurants for the for the customers, and we're in a really great neighborhood called Capitol Hill. It's kind of you know, the cool, funky alternative neighborhood and Seattle and and, um, but you know, the problem is that the fall Family owned businesses are super vulnerable, and Noah and I discussed of my 20 some customers facing businesses on this One block, you know, they were all impacted in various ways. Bye bye. Shut down. Or other aspects of the pandemic. So no as you were doing your reporting and talking with Liz and unfolding this story, what struck you? Well, a couple of things one is just how, um How much the businesses that attends that list property were able to pivot and just sort of do what they could to keep revenue in the door. Another thing was just listens. Willingness, Tonto. Do whatever she could to keep them afloat. So what that meant a lot last year was had to go out to negotiate with her banks. The folks who have mortgages on her property and It's some sort of relief there so she could turn around and pass. Um, basically give her tenants some wiggle room. Um, and I think that's like a hugely important and underappreciated Aspect of what's been going on here. And you know, from the outside of this crisis, you know, I spoke with one of lizards blenders, the CEO of Home Street Bank. Which is a regional bank here in Seattle, and that their willingness to work with lives over the last couple months has just been huge. But I think live and Home Street also thought that this pandemic would be over by now. A lot of us did and so really the point we're at in this crisis. Now everyone's having to come back to the table now and figure out what makes sense. For the next several months.

Seattle Bloomberg News Finance Nobu Higher Hobbes LIZ Noah TIM Clara Capitol Hill Home Street Bank
Washington DC man accused of beating Capitol Police with metal bat charged in federal court

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 3 d ago

Washington DC man accused of beating Capitol Police with metal bat charged in federal court

"A 20 year old D C man is among several more people facing federal charges in connection to the rioting at the U. S. Capitol. The U. S attorney's office in D. C. Says Emanuel Jackson was caught on video, repeatedly punching the U. S Capitol police officer while attempting to enter the building January 6th. He's later seen striking a group of capital and deep See police officers with a metal baseball bat 51 year old Jeffrey Sable of Colorado is accused of being part of a group that dragged the D C. Police officer down a set of exterior stares of the capital and beat the officer. Sable was arrested after a traffic stop in New York, during which he admitted to being wanted by the FBI. The FBI is still collecting tips, photos and videos related to the U. S. To the siege of the U. S Capitol.

U. S. Capitol D. C. Says Emanuel Jackson U. S Capitol Police Jeffrey Sable U. D C. Police Baseball Colorado Sable FBI New York
Philadelphia police officer accused of sexually assaulting a minor

KYW 24 Hour News

00:22 sec | 3 d ago

Philadelphia police officer accused of sexually assaulting a minor

"Assault. Officer Rahim Montgomery is a 20 year veteran of the force. Over the summer, A young woman told police he officer sexually assaulted her five years prior when she was a minor. The D A's office has filed several charges against the 40 year old cop. The police commissioner has suspended him with the intent to dismiss. By the way, the commissioner's ball on the job now

Rahim Montgomery
Baseball Home Run King Hank Aaron Dies At 86

WEEI Late Night

03:14 min | 4 d ago

Baseball Home Run King Hank Aaron Dies At 86

"The last hour really showing love to Hank Aaron. Who passed away or we found out passed away earlier today at the age of 86. Took your calls. Played some some audio from Chipper Jones and Rob Man, Fred, You know, we talked about how important Hank Aaron was not just as a baseball player. Home run King and, Yeah, I know. Barry Bonds swooped in and I used swoop appropriately swoop in and kind of took that that record away. Uh, Hank was an amazing human being. He was an amazing contributor to society. Hey, loved Atlanta. He was a contributor here. As I mentioned last hour, giving money to Morehouse. Just he was he was a contributor. Believe he had the first BMW dealership here in in Atlanta 20 years ago. I think for an African American that he owned, so there was a lot that he did, despite people through certain points in time. Hating him. And so I don't wanna I don't wanna go in and give you the whole entire show Open. I I encourage you to go ahead and check it out. But there's one point that one of our callers prior to the break made And it was, you know some of the racial elements and how he was just the epitome of Just just excellence and how he handled himself in all areas of adversity. And that he did his job and it didn't sway him. One way or another. Yeah, if people wanted to love him. Or hate him, and they're just some points here that are just mind bobbling to wrap your brain or mind around. This was a human being. This was a human That was hated. Because he was he was going to break a record owned. By a white man. This man was aided in certain regards because he hit a damn baseball. People found gnome or what is the word here? People didn't have a nuff love internally for themselves. So all they did, in certain instances was display hate to him because he put a bat. On a baseball. That is ridiculous. Just you hate someone because of what they look like. And because they put a bat on a baseball, it really shows you that there's a lot of segments of society that can really utilize the mirror. What is going on inside of you? That you have the hate someone else strictly because they look different than you. It's just it's mind boggling to me. But despite all of that, He just went ahead and did his thing. And he was he was a benchmark, not just as a baseball player, as I say, but as a human being and as a person, and so all the best and condolences toe Hank Aaron and his family. I know

Hank Aaron Rob Man Baseball Chipper Jones Atlanta Barry Bonds Morehouse Hank Fred BMW
Baseball Home Run King Hank Aaron Dies At 86

WEEI Late Night

03:14 min | 4 d ago

Baseball Home Run King Hank Aaron Dies At 86

"The last hour really showing love to Hank Aaron. Who passed away or we found out passed away earlier today at the age of 86. Took your calls. Played some some audio from Chipper Jones and Rob Man, Fred, You know, we talked about how important Hank Aaron was not just as a baseball player. Home run King and, Yeah, I know. Barry Bonds swooped in and I used swoop appropriately swoop in and kind of took that that record away. Uh, Hank was an amazing human being. He was an amazing contributor to society. Hey, loved Atlanta. He was a contributor here. As I mentioned last hour, giving money to Morehouse. Just he was he was a contributor. Believe he had the first BMW dealership here in in Atlanta 20 years ago. I think for an African American that he owned, so there was a lot that he did, despite people through certain points in time. Hating him. And so I don't wanna I don't wanna go in and give you the whole entire show Open. I I encourage you to go ahead and check it out. But there's one point that one of our callers prior to the break made And it was, you know some of the racial elements and how he was just the epitome of Just just excellence and how he handled himself in all areas of adversity. And that he did his job and it didn't sway him. One way or another. Yeah, if people wanted to love him. Or hate him, and they're just some points here that are just mind bobbling to wrap your brain or mind around. This was a human being. This was a human That was hated. Because he was he was going to break a record owned. By a white man. This man was aided in certain regards because he hit a damn baseball. People found gnome or what is the word here? People didn't have a nuff love internally for themselves. So all they did, in certain instances was display hate to him because he put a bat. On a baseball. That is ridiculous. Just you hate someone because of what they look like. And because they put a bat on a baseball, it really shows you that there's a lot of segments of society that can really utilize the mirror. What is going on inside of you? That you have the hate someone else strictly because they look different than you. It's just it's mind boggling to me. But despite all of that, He just went ahead and did his thing. And he was he was a benchmark, not just as a baseball player, as I say, but as a human being and as a person, and so all the best and condolences toe Hank Aaron and his family. I know

Hank Aaron Rob Man Baseball Chipper Jones Atlanta Barry Bonds Morehouse Hank Fred BMW
Last Person Charged in Deadly Shooting of Retired Chicago Fire Lieutenant

WGN Programming

00:51 sec | 5 d ago

Last Person Charged in Deadly Shooting of Retired Chicago Fire Lieutenant

"In the deadly Carjacking. Other retired Chicago fire lieutenant has been taken into custody first W G and traffic things are moving along and posted speeds at this hour on your expressways and tollway's, the fourth and final suspect accused in the deadly December car jacking ever retired Chicago fire lieutenant Has been extradited to Chicago and charged with murder. He's doing Bond court tomorrow. WGN, Steve Roxton reports. Chicago police A 19 year old Jalen Salisbury was taken into custody and O'Hare Airport Tuesday after being extradited from Pennsylvania Firefighter Dwayne Williams was fatally shot on a botched Carjacking. December 3rd and Morgan Park. Two teenagers and a 20 year old man have already been charged in the case. Investigators say the defendants were part of a Carjacking crew believed to be responsible for other crimes in the area. Steve Braxton,

Chicago Bond Court Steve Roxton Jalen Salisbury Tollway Hare Airport Dwayne Williams WGN Morgan Park Pennsylvania Steve Braxton
Buttigieg calls for infrastructure investment at confirmation hearing

Lynda Lopez

03:10 min | 5 d ago

Buttigieg calls for infrastructure investment at confirmation hearing

"Gateway project gets the green light confirmation hearings have gotten underway for President Biden's pick for transportation secretary people to judge and this morning he fielded questions from senators about the nation's badly needed infrastructure projects. Connecticut Senator Richard Blumenthal was the first to question Buddha judge about the Gateway Project, which calls for building two new Hudson River tunnels and then taking the old tunnels out of service, one of the time for a gut renovation. Senator Blumenthal joins us now. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you, Linda. Thanks for having me Well. This project has been held up in the past over concerns about funding and approvals. Did Buddha judge indicate that those things might change? He's had a very clear sense of the urgency. These tunnels are 111 years old, and they are rapidly degrading, decrepit. And clearly in need of rebuilding and replacement. So I think he understands that the tunnels are part of a larger transportation network that's vital. To the entire Northeast as well as the whole nation. In addition to the age, as you mentioned, it's also part of the nation's busiest passenger rail car door. Well, so little Republicans asked how the federal government would pay for the billions in infrastructure. Do you expect a lot of opposition trying to get this to go forward. The Republicans raised the issue of cost, but this investment and it's an investment in our transportation, future assholes our economy. Clearly. Should be at the very top of the list of projects nationally. And I would just add that this kind of project puts people back to work. It creates construction investment in the kind of project that will last. Not just for 10 or 20 years, but literally for Generations, you know, back in 2015, Governor Cuomo and Governor Christie told the Obama administration that their states would pay for half if the federal government would foot the bill for the other 50%. Would that still be the plan? The details on spending divisions need to be worked out My step. The federal government would now take a larger share the burden given the state's current deficits, the impact of the pandemic, I would hope that the federal government will step up without imposing At 50% or 60%. Or even 40% burden on the state. One last question. We know both Senator Schumer and Governor Murphy of New Jersey have offered Buddha judge a tour of the Hudson River tunnels. Any chance he would take that up. I'm going toe press him to do it. He has a lot on his plate, as they say in his first A few weeks, but Concurrent ew. I will extend a very, very courteous but firm invitation as a member of the Commerce Committee and joining the governor's has a leading advocate. Senator Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you, Linda

Hudson River Tunnels President Biden Senator Richard Blumenthal Senator Blumenthal Federal Government Governor Cuomo Governor Christie Connecticut Obama Administration Linda Senator Schumer Governor Murphy New Jersey Commerce Committee
Reinfections More Likely With New Coronavirus Variants, Evidence Suggests

Forum

01:03 min | 5 d ago

Reinfections More Likely With New Coronavirus Variants, Evidence Suggests

"Lila wants to know. With even comment on information that there may be new variants of the virus, which the vaccines may not target. Yes, that's a very active area it the bottom line is In some people, it may be the case that certain variants Uh, reduce the efficacy of the vaccine Somewhat, so that's a very iffy If you feel kind of statement, I know, but so far we don't have evidence that they're variance that Uh, completely evade the vaccine and are causing significant problems. But but more generally I think it's likely and most experts feel it's likely that This coronavirus like this may for a number of 10 or 20 years be a period maybe a little bit like influenza viruses where we have to periodically beat get re injected, or, you know, like tetanus shots that you get boosters. Every so often we may need to be re vaccinated eventually, but We don't need to figure that out just yet.

Lila Influenza
"20 years" Discussed on New Media Show

New Media Show

07:16 min | 6 d ago

"20 years" Discussed on New Media Show

"Right so signing a. It's a podcast everywhere. We haven't seen the end of it in one. Thousand twenty one is going to be Continued expansion and growth. And i'm confident more consolidation. We're going to see. I think we're going to continue to see audience growth in the us outside the us as more platforms come on board. I'm i'm hopeful that we're going to see growth significant growth on the inside this next year. I don't know what you think on that daughter using trend lines. You know we've been way ahead of the curve on android for years so neon we continue to. You know it's it's yeah it's gonna continue to grow but i think what do you know my feeling in here. She wants to or he wants to play so over here. Bang in the cables and stuff. So hopefully we don't go off the air. No i think that Google and i see it more. I see it more now and searching for stuff any oh look at their podcast episode on that topic and very rare. Now that i do a. don't do a google search that i don't find some now I've is actually saw a tech article because of all the seattle that's been going on With everything in the news the politics and people pissed off a duck duck go had their first hundred million search day ever so people were so i hadn't been on that site and maybe five years i went over there and did some some some. Can't call googling some duck duck going and searching for some topics and the podcasting support over. There is a very i. It's you know non existent. I guess that's the best way to say it. and podcast Movement university is doing an event right now on their the the run the world dot today app yellow form. So that's happening as we speak. And i've signed up to do a ama sometime in march i think so ama. What's a basically a question and answer thing Think that's what it's called but a have agreed to come on and do a A question answer time per podcast movement university. Oh okay yeah so. They're looking for contributions over there. So if you think you can add to their conversation Reach out to jared and and and the team. So they're trying to get that moving now. I'm sure i'll be doing something without at some point neom but was there was some ten. There is a growing a movement towards educational platforms subscription based educational platforms. Coming up more and more well percents going support. It's not surprising right. You know preening good content is not necessarily you know it takes some work that i always tell podcasters me up. You're going to pay for course be very very careful. You know who You know that that person talk to other people who've taken their course and and make sure that you know people gotten value out of it right in like you've always said there's a lot of misinformation out there lot as being perpetrated and it looks like you know podcast movements coming up this coming year in august so get back to physical world events again out i think. Get her shot. I and At least my states having a very difficult time getting shots rolled out. they keep having Shots go spoiled because they can't They can't get him in people's arms fast enough keep it cold enough or whatever val. It's it's some of this stuff has expiration date. Oh does yeah oh so. I don't understand why that's being such an issue. I don't either. I guess. I guess you need to have ways to get it out there to people right more than what exists right now. Yeah so yeah. Let's look at this here all right. It's just like i'm multitasking. Today someone said the other day todd. You'll quite distracted. I was a little bit because just like during his show. It's like getting pained. I need to shut off all messaging. But i don't think anything else over rob mainly rap to singapore early. Okay let's do and We gotta do a test before we leave. We'll say our goodbyes. And what i found was that weiser was potentially the culprit behind the The situation with us being taken off for us to shelby. And shut down when i showed a screen capture. So i've said a ticket to them. And i have Changed where i was originating the show from in their system. So when i when we get done here. I'm gonna flip the switch to our logo and we'll see if we can actually put up a screenshot screenshot that's That'll duplicate what. I've been watching and And then We'll see if they bound us immediately after we've switched to the screen so i'm totted blueberry dot com. Of course you can Reach me on the At news on twitter. I can be found on twitter at rob greenlee and then my addresses rob g at lipson dot com. You can certainly Reach out to me love to hear from you and We'll be back with you on saturday at twelve noon. Eastern from the next edition of this and thank you for hanging out. So we want to renew show dot com and subscribe to the show. If you're not subscribed already tell your fellow podcasters about get a podcasting may listen to the show. And so what. I'm gonna do for those who on the livestream in just three seconds here. You're gonna find out if we get cut off by my encoding company. That seems to be having problems if the screen stays up. Maybe they found the solution. So here comes the screen right now and good bye..

three seconds Today twitter Google singapore android first hundred million march saturday at five years Movement university rob g jared rob greenlee blueberry dot com twelve noon next year one august world dot today app
Trump commutes sentence of ex-Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick, freeing him 20 years early

Hugh Hewitt

00:14 sec | 6 d ago

Trump commutes sentence of ex-Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick, freeing him 20 years early

"Former Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick is about to be a free man in one of his final acts in the White House President Donald Trump last night commuted Kilpatrick sentence. The former mayor has served seven years of his 28 year prison sentence for corruption.

Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick Detroit Donald Trump White House Kilpatrick
U.S. Soldier Discussed Attack on New York's 9/11 Memorial, Prosecutors Say

Steve and Ted

01:23 min | 6 d ago

U.S. Soldier Discussed Attack on New York's 9/11 Memorial, Prosecutors Say

"The U. S Army soldier has been arrested in Georgia on terrorism charges after he spoke online about plots to blow up New York City's 9 11 memorial and other landmarks. And attack US soldiers in the Middle East. Authorities say cold James Bridges of Stow, Ohio is in custody on charges of attempted material support of terrorist organization, the Islamic State Group. And attempted murder of a military member. Nicholas, be us. Representative for Manhattan. Federal prosecutors, says the 20 year old soldier also known as cold, Gonzalez was with the third Infantry Division out of Fort Stewart, Georgia when he thought he was communicating thought he was communicating with the Islamic state online about the terrorism plots. Unbeknownst to Bridges and FBI employee was in on the chat. As bridges provided detailed instructions on tactics and manuals and advice about attacking the memorial and other targets in New York City. It's amazing to be Ted. Well, I don't know. Just so many people just think they're on their own. They're there on the Internet. They're doing these things and on social media, and nobody sees it, I guess. I'm just saying, Don't nobody knows what's going on. I think we saw some good examples of that in Washington, D c the other day. Here. I am doing some bad things, but I'm doing it on on social media well, Come back and

U. S Army James Bridges Islamic State Group Third Infantry Division Georgia New York City Stow Fort Stewart Middle East Nicholas Gonzalez Ohio Manhattan FBI United States TED Washington
US Army Soldier Accused Of Plotting To Blow Up 9/11 Memorial In New York City, Other Landmarks

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:43 sec | 6 d ago

US Army Soldier Accused Of Plotting To Blow Up 9/11 Memorial In New York City, Other Landmarks

"Man's under arrest for allegedly plotting to blow up the 9 11 memorial and other landmarks around the city. Prosecutors say he was also overhear talking about attacking U. S soldiers in the Middle East. The suspect is a U S soldier is Eric Cantor Ski Reports sold James Bridges is charged with attempting to provide material support to Isis and attempting to murder U. S Service members. The 20 year old Ohio native who's stationed at Fort Stewart in Georgia, allegedly thought he was talking to Isis when he plotted to attack the 9 11 Memorial in New York. And fellow troops stationed overseas. It was really an FBI undercover and bridges was taken into federal custody. According to court papers. Bridges was frustrated with the U. S military, which he joined a little over a year

James Bridges Eric Cantor Middle East Fort Stewart Ohio Georgia FBI New York Bridges U.
US Army Soldier Accused Of Plotting To Blow Up 9/11 Memorial In New York City, Other Landmarks

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | Last week

US Army Soldier Accused Of Plotting To Blow Up 9/11 Memorial In New York City, Other Landmarks

"Duty US Army soldier has been arrested in Georgia on terrorism charges after he wrote online about plots to blow up the 9 11 Memorial here in New York City. Along with other landmarks. 20 year old Cole James Bridges of Stone, Ohio, faces charges of attempted material support of a terrorist organization, the Islamic State Group and attempted murder of a military member. That's too good to say He thought he was communicating online with Isis, but he was actually communicating. With the FBI.

Cole James Bridges Us Army Islamic State Group Georgia New York City Ohio Stone FBI
At least 4 hurt in string of shootings in Poconos area; shelter order issued

KYW 24 Hour News

01:16 min | Last week

At least 4 hurt in string of shootings in Poconos area; shelter order issued

"Heading to the Poconos. Now we're part of a town is under a shelter in place order because of a string of shootings that injured four people. Ky double used him. Jimenez joining us with more on this. Tim, you know are these are the police thinking that these shootings are all connected? Yeah. Carol. Police believe that these shootings are connected. Of course, a lot more has to be looked at here. They have people of interest there talking to along with witnesses, but so far no one has been arrested. So we're talking about four different shooting scenes in the area of cool Bart Township and Tobyhanna in Monroe County. About five o'clock last night, when the first shots were reported at the Tobyhanna shopping center. There was no one there in terms of victims. But then police heard more gunshots in a nearby neighborhood. They found a 47 year old woman who was shot in the back in 19 year Old man was wounded as well. Soon. They found out that a 20 year old man was also shot. He may be the most seriously wounded. He was shot in the head and then police also saw a report that another man, a 20 year old was shot in the leg and crashed his car again. All of this. Relatively close by in the Poconos officials then put a shelter in place in the area of 1 96 Quarter between Pocono Country Place and Pocono Farms. East again. All of this Carol is being investigated. No one has been

Poconos Bart Township Tobyhanna Tobyhanna Shopping Center Jimenez Carol TIM Monroe County Pocono Country Place Pocono Farms
Jay Y. Lee, Chief of South Korea's Samsung Empire, Is Sent to Prison

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | Last week

Jay Y. Lee, Chief of South Korea's Samsung Empire, Is Sent to Prison

"For bribery and embezzlement accord in South Korea sensed him to 2.5 years behind bars following the guilty verdict. He was caught up in the same bribery scandal that took down South Korea's former president. She's spending 20 years in prison. It's a second prison sentence for Lee, who was handed five years back in 2017, but only served one He appealed, unsuccessfully had some charges thrown out. And this throws the future of the company into more uncertainty. Lee's father, who was head of Samsung, died last year and Lee had been in charge. Well, we're not quite in the dead of winter, but it's

South Korea LEE Samsung
Ronnie Spector reacts to ex-husband Phil Spector's death: 'A brilliant producer, but a lousy husband'

Wayne Cabot

01:08 min | Last week

Ronnie Spector reacts to ex-husband Phil Spector's death: 'A brilliant producer, but a lousy husband'

"Road You've lost that loving feeling be my baby. Phil Specter was to quote his ex wife, Ronnie Specter of brilliant producer But a lousy husband. Contacted by Rolling Stone after his death yesterday, she said. Unfortunately, Phil was not able to live and function outside the recording studio. In her memoir, she wrote that he was an abusive husband and had a coffin in the basement of their mansion. A threat that he would kill her. If she ever left him in 1972. She did escape, fills mentioned barefoot with the help of her mother. Inspector went on to prison about 20 years ago for killing an actress. Lot of Clarkson Prison is where he died. Phil Specter was 81. His music genius, though, will live on, says Anthony DeCurtis. Came in when the Beatles couldn't work together on let it be. He put that album together and essentially assembled the song The long and Winding Road, which is a massive hit. The Let it Be album was a massive hit, He produced John Lennon's first solo album, Plastic Ono Band he produced. Imagine Still one of the most beloved songs of all time. Anthony to Curtis Rolling Stone magazine about Phil Specter. We mentioned

Phil Specter Ronnie Specter Clarkson Prison Rolling Stone Anthony Decurtis Phil Plastic Ono Band John Lennon Curtis Rolling Stone Magazine Anthony
Ronnie Spector reacts to ex-husband Phil Spector's death: 'A brilliant producer, but a lousy husband'

Wayne Cabot

01:14 min | Last week

Ronnie Spector reacts to ex-husband Phil Spector's death: 'A brilliant producer, but a lousy husband'

"And and winding winding road. road. You've You've lost lost that that loving loving feeling feeling be be my my baby. baby. Phil Phil Specter Specter was was to to quote quote his his ex ex wife, wife, Ronnie Ronnie Specter Specter of of brilliant brilliant producer producer But a lousy husband. Contacted by Rolling Stone after his death his weekend, she said. Unfortunately, Phil was not able to live in function. Outside the recording studio. In her memoir, she wrote that he was an abusive husband and had a coffin in the basement of their mansion threat that he would kill her if she ever left him. 1972 she did escape fills mention barefoot with the help of her mother. Phil Specter went to prison about 20 years ago for killing an actress Lana Clarkson in prison is where he died. Phil Specter was 81. His music genius will live on, says Anthony DeCurtis. Came in when the Beatles couldn't work together on let it be. He put that album together and essentially assembled the song The long and Winding Road, which is a massive hit. The Let it Be album was a massive hit, He produced John Lennon's first solo album, Plastic Ono Band he produced. Imagine Still one of the most beloved songs of all time. Anthony DeCurtis, Rolling Stone magazine on the death of Phil Specter.

Phil Phil Specter Specter Phil Specter Ronnie Ronnie Specter Anthony Decurtis Rolling Stone Lana Clarkson Phil Plastic Ono Band John Lennon Rolling Stone Magazine
Two suspects arrested in fatal shooting of 25-year-old Brewerytown man, Philadelphia

KYW 24 Hour News

01:06 min | Last week

Two suspects arrested in fatal shooting of 25-year-old Brewerytown man, Philadelphia

"Person continues after that fatal shooting of a 25 year old Temple grad in Philadelphia? One of the suspects is now facing murder charges He's identified as 20 year old Joseph. Cephas Davis of Philadelphia. Here's cable W is Andrew Kramer. The incident was caught on surveillance in that video. You can see the suspects walking up to me land long car while he's walking his dog. They went through his pockets while pointing a gun at him. Then police say one of the suspects shoots him. He later died. There's no reason to it. There's no reason to it. That's the victim's mother. Amy Lawns. Berry, NBC. 10 spoke with her. He didn't have any money on him. He didn't fight back. He didn't Say anything to them wrong or it just it's just too much. It's just not right. She says Her son was a year into his new job and was about to move in with his girlfriend. Everything was coming together for him. Uh, it's just not fair shooting happened around seven Wednesday night near 31st and Jefferson Streets, which is about a block from where Long car lived. Andrew Kramer. Okay, whatever you news radio.

Andrew Kramer Cephas Davis Philadelphia Amy Lawns Joseph NBC Berry
Lady Gaga to Sing National Anthem for Biden-Harris Inauguration

Jason and Alexis

00:47 sec | Last week

Lady Gaga to Sing National Anthem for Biden-Harris Inauguration

"No. What's he doing? He is going to be hosting a special 90 minute. Prime time TV special celebrating the inauguration of Joe Biden. The inauguration is just six days away. Yeah, and it will pretty much run on most networks and stream as well. They also announced that Justin Timberlake Jon Bon Jovi, Demi Lovato and and Clemens. Will be performing. And gaga is going to do the national anthem actually doing the national anthem. Yeah, just ride that and the commercial break, So I just want everybody to stay safe. But yes, that will be. I want to 7 30. 7 30. I want 20 years. I

Joe Biden Jon Bon Jovi Justin Timberlake Demi Lovato Clemens Gaga
"20 years" Discussed on The Bible Recap

The Bible Recap

07:05 min | 2 weeks ago

"20 years" Discussed on The Bible Recap

"Yesterday as we finished our reading job was calling his friends miserable comforters. Today he continues talking to them and he opens by saying my spirit is broken. I just fuel for him. I've been there. There were times when job and lamentations were the only books of scripture. I wanted to read. I felt known by job in chapter eighteen bill. Dad's speaks again. You probably remember bill that as bad for number two. He's the one who told job that he needed to repent so now. He's doubling down just like elephants did yesterday with reminders. that god punishes the wicked. This is a catch twenty two because it not only means suffering was punishment for his wickedness but also that if he doesn't change his ways more punishment is coming for him. But i love jobs reply in chapter nineteen. He continues to point to god's role in his troubles. He says things like he has walled up my way so that i cannot pass. And he has set darkness on my paths. These sound like really hard things to say about god and yet in nineteen twenty five job says i know my redeemer lives and the last he will stand up on the earth. This quote isn't just hopeful on jobs part. It's actually prophetic it. Points not only to the first coming of christ which has already happened but also to the second coming of christ which is yet to come at the last. He will stand up on the earth. We're not to the last yet. But zachariah fourteen three tells us more about christ return and revelation five ten and twenty six point to a future time when christ will reign on earth so even his darkest moments job was pointing out eternal truths about god in chapter twenty. So far bad for number three speaks again. He claims a spirit spoke to him and he believes it was a word from god. The same thing happened a few days ago when we read about the first time either spoke in four twelve to sixteen. Ill said a word was brought to me stealthily. My ear received the whisper of it. A spirit glided past my face. The hair of my fleshed. It up there was silence than i heard. A voice zofar an eel as presumably do this to add more weight to their words and force job to listen and comply. But here's what's interesting to me this spirit or spirits that they're referencing in chapters four and twenty. They never identify themselves. Scripture doesn't tell us who those spirits are hold onto that thought as we continue reading because there might be some conclusions you could reach about who the spirit was or spirits. Were one of the things that's really important for us. To do is way carefully. Where the word of god intersects with our own thoughts for instance. I want to be really careful to separate out my opinions of things from what scripture actually teaching at some point. You're likely going to disagree with one of my opinions. That's a good thing. I'm not trying to convince anyone to agree with anything. Essay apart from scripture. Are there times when god speaks to us. I believe god's spirit does give impressions to his children after all one of his name's is guide. But i'm always aiming to be careful with how i relate that information saying god told me x. carries a lot of certainty with it. I'd be more likely to say it this way. I feel like god was saying x. Or i feel god impressing this on my heart. I'm also really careful not to ask god to tell me what he is going to do. Or reveal the future to me view. Things have gotten me into greater confusion and error than that probably because asking those questions my own subtle attempt to control my future and not have to trust god which really gives an opportunity for me to hear my flesh speak more loudly than god but back to job in chapter twenty versus twelve th through twenty nine zofar accuses job being greedy and selfish. Remember how i told you. I thought jobs friends might've been jealous of him. That last part zofar speech today reinforces that whole idea for me. It seems like he's really accusing job of being greedy and selfish. He says things like is crushed and abandoned the poor. He sees the house that he did not build. A new no contentment is belly. You will not let anything in which he delights escape him. That's terrible but we have two ways so far as words about job against god's word about and we see they don't align these passages with jobs friends are the ones i usually reference when i'm urging people not to take scripture out of context because if fewer to pull some of their quotes out of the section you would think joe was terrible. Are the statements in scripture. yes and scripture is god's word but this particular passage a personal quote within god's word. It's god quoting someone else. We have to pay close attention to context. Or we'll miss what's actually being communicated to us by god. What was your god shot for. Today's reading the attribute of god. I saw portrayed in today's reading was when job said. I know that my redeemer lives and at the last. He will stand up on the earth. This not only says a lot about job that he could have believed this in the midst of a struggle. But it says a lot about god i. We see god's relationship with job even on his worst days job doesn't just call god a redeemer or the redeemer but my redeemer it's personal it's intimate second. We see god as a redeemer to redeem means to buy back. Job has hope that this isn't the end of his story. Even if it's the end of his life job trust that god will redeem this somehow third. We see the god is alive. My redeemer lives so many jobs loved ones had passed away but not god. He knew that god was still with him and he would be forever at the last. He will stand up on the earth. I hope i have this kind of trust in god. When trouble inevitably comes my way again and storing up truth about him like we're doing as we read is one way to make sure our feet are on solid ground win the storms. Come because he's where the joy is you guys are the very best at spreading the word about tr. Thanks to you so many people who never would have read the bible have joined us and are loving it. So here's approach it all who love to share the joy when you're inviting your friends to join us have them start at the start as opposed to jumping in where we currently are. That's the whole point of doing this chronologically so we can follow the whole story line. The plot is important whether they plan on reading through the entire bible. Or the new testament. Encourage them to start at the beginning of that section we've lined up all the details for them on the start page of our website so the best way to make sure they get off to a good start is to send them to the bible. Recap dot com forward slash. Start the end. The bible recap is brought to you by discipleship and bible study groups that meet in homes and churches around the world each week..

zachariah confusion jobs joe
"20 years" Discussed on Filmhaus

Filmhaus

07:29 min | 4 months ago

"20 years" Discussed on Filmhaus

"It's a good deal and it's quite steal if he asked me hellofresh. Thank you. Thank you to our sponsor Adam. Back so nice. Just, a question I mean this goes for everyone because I know we've all been to theme parks and we love theme parks. There's that Shrek is sort of the embodiment of. Not Disney right and then it being universal studios, which is also the not Disney where. Something about Universal Studios they do a lot of really cool things, but then it ultimately feels like they're trying so hard they want a nickel and dime you on every little thing everything sponsored by this or that like if they could sell it, they can absolutely sell it whereas like Disney Cam does everything with like class and that's something they're very hard core about universal's whatever put minions land. Yes Mike God. Yeah. Makes Sunday comic land that will be relevant forever. Cheapening and It's such a hard feeling to articulate but. Like Shrek to me is sort of like the cheap other, but it still has a lot of positives. Like I. Don't WanNa Shit, Talk Shrek but like. It feels like tribal tattoos. Shrek definitely made people realize like Oh Disney's not the only animation out there like I think really Shrek was the one where DreamWorks Animation started getting some credit because after that, you had like Ice Age and I was like Oh, that's a big hit and even now people like Disney movies. I. Wasn't Disney and then you get the minions despicable me and it's like, oh Thanks requisite podcasts. And that's I think really kind of like made people realize like. Disney, they knew Pixar because I think even before then picks wasn't part of Disney yet and and it was kind of like Oh there's this other group making animated stuff. That's actually really good and I think that was it's good to have competition. You know it's good to have different tastes. You know like as you know I mean Muzhaqi stuff. Wasn't really as big in America that point yet but it was like, okay, we have different styles of animation. It's kind of like that and even like South Park, it was like maybe animations not just for children is South Park started in what ninety five or something. So I mean like at that point was like Fritz the cat came out in the. So I think that definitely made it. What kind of more mainstream is like, Oh yeah. We don't have to be Disney we can be a little bit more edgy and animation animation you know is not necessarily just a children's medium is like Oh yeah. We can actually have fun with it and it's still a kids movie, but it's definitely like Feeling aimed more towards like the tweens and like teenagers, and it was like little children I also think that's that's why universal feels like that because universal. Produces movies like basketball and and Indiana Jones, and also Shrek and minions and despicable me. They don't have like whereas Disney is very much like they have the family audience and so they're able to make their park really cohesive whereas universal I feel like it's more like a kind of really. Intricate, carnival, almost like those vibes from it where. You can go to all the different like the simpsons literally plays off that like when you go to the citizens land it's literally a accountable there. So I think that that's sort of what it feels like a really intricate kind of. Haphazard but on peppis giant Carnival with all your favorite properties and depending on on what your family looks like whether it's like Jack and I don't have any children or if it's A. Couple who do have kids you can explore different. It's different. I mean yeah. So. Like Disney has Deanna Jones ride but the universal has the mummy and Van Hell. I knew what you meant because when you think like a wow, I, really enjoyed that any Indiana Jones right? No No. No. That was the mummy Brennan Frazier who? I love reading fridge but that is actually met the bummy. We've talked about this board. You guys have been on the mummy ride in Florida, right? Yes. where Anti. But that's that's a ride where you get more out of it. If you're actually in line exit, the right is so old and based on a movie that came out. So long ago, there's no line. So you just rush through it now. And like Brennan Frazier like he's in the in the whole thing, he's doing like behind the scenes interviews but the whole thing is about like a Interview that goes wrong in the mummy's takeover but you miss all that because no one's waiting. I didn't know that until you just told me that. We we kinda piece that together. So we went on A. Q. And watch the video and like Oh here's the backstory but now's like walk around and up in you're on. The protas worth of one in in California. There's none of that like is literally like it's a mummy Ri- whereas like it's spooky and scary there's no no, no reference the actual mummy movies now the Brendan Fraser? Mummy movies at all. But now we have Tom Cruise in May which they've abandoned. then. They'RE GOING TO BLAME HOUSE MIAMI. The Do fell apart pretty quick. There should just be Tom Cruise at the like Harry go see my movie. Tom. Standing. Got Well, yeah. Universal is sometimes a graveyard in many ways of different properties or of declining properties which makes me wonder if someday Shrek could ever fall into that. Can you shaking your head already? She's saying no, which which makes me wonder if you know we are on the precipice of a Shrek reboot could. This fail is there. Is there an audience still waiting or is there a new audience that could even be captured? By Shrek done deal I don't know. I. I think the beautiful thing to not to jump on this. But the beautiful thing about animation is like your your voice doesn't really age that much and so Mike. Myers could be eighty doing shrek as long as he can keep up the the energy for it and I mean like like the simpsons going God like thirty two years now, and it's pretty much all the same voice actors they all sound pretty much the same. So the idea of doing a reboot, we're GONNA recast. Shrek. In this y you know it's like you still. have. The original like I mean I don't think Mike Myers is saying like no I won't do that I. Don't think he's so articulate inclined that he won't. So I think to me like the idea of rebuilding if it's not going to be like a spin off or something or like you know son of Shrek or something like that like I don't understand the point of a magic that can they can go back in time or something and redo stuff that that's that's the hotness right now. Right. So reboot whatever I mean I guess open times. That's literally what happens to the. Four. You're still tired. In does does a group of kids that was born five years ago is Shrek in a even be an ip that they care about. Yeah Right. It's up to meet. Kids that that then care about. So you're saying to parents now sit down your kids educate them in track you go. This is Disney plus everything on. Here's Dr Bitch you watch Shrek. Shrek one in four Disney plus at home does need plus it Home Shrek..

Shrek Disney universal studios Brennan Frazier Mike God Tom Cruise DreamWorks Animation Adam South Park Mike Myers basketball Brendan Fraser Indiana America Fritz Van Hell Jack MIAMI Deanna Jones
"20 years" Discussed on Filmhaus

Filmhaus

04:58 min | 4 months ago

"20 years" Discussed on Filmhaus

"I I honestly I don't. I think I saw the second one and I went. Maybe. I've outgrown Shrek and then it like the first one I remember watching in theaters I think my mom's house the DVD at our house like we watched it a lot. I was like I. Love This strike is Great and then the second one came on maybe I'm too old so like it happened pretty quick and then I think yeah third and then and boots, and then there's a bunch of other Kung Fu panda then became the hotness. So well, strict new I think we all moved on. The. ICONIC truck David Bowie changes sequence or Shrek has been turned to a man and he's walking. Down the street as David Bowie's changes plays I mean. But. It's timeless. Shrek becomes just. A different colored version of himself still looks the same at least you bring up an interesting thing because the music and the Shrek movies is actually like there's I mean there's a great music in it, but it's like just feels oddly placed like in the first movie like kicks into Hallelujah at the end of it. What, which you know the actual like the messaging behind that song is pretty messed up but still is like. Through and Hallelujah is also Zach cider song no one else should be using it less true as far as I'm concerned waiting for bad fleck show up. It's one of those things that sort of dates and movie too. I, think whenever you use licensed music like I think use it sparingly. But like a movie like the incredible I think we'll be time timeless because it is this weird sort of retro futuristic thing that you can't really place but then the music is very fitting to that. And Yeah smashmouth at no point comes into play I. think that's what that's almost immediately. Make anything feel dated as you're trying to do something that was you know quote cool around the time like smash mouth. Smash. Smash smelled have a hit that wasn't in a movie like it was it was walking walking. On their first song I think there's all star was in the mystery men which that's an Mega repurpose yeah. Son was just. Covered, the keys the then I saw her face and we'd be lever. And now they do kind of funny proms or whatever self. In sturgis or whatever it is. By some by. There's two to Smasher smashers, Jack. Are. You more of a smashmouth, Shrek Man or counting crows accidentally in love. I'll probably go accidentally in love. Okay just. Yeah. So now Reza I'm a doctor Jones Fan. Mr Jones. What was it? S. Aqua. Tactic. Courtney Cox was she she was in the Mr Jones right. She dated at. What's the same they all did yeah. All the women, all the friends David, Schwimmer. The guy with the fake dreadlocks from Canada grows. I have something I have to tell you that. Jack and I had a really small wedding. And I don't even know if we play music at our reception which we had a few days later on a weekend. But I've been telling him. Let's renew vows Australia. So my family can come and we can make it a whole body and I just like every now and then I'll remember song I really like him put it on spotify playlist is like a wedding party and like sofa eighty percent of that playlist Shrek songs from like movies one, two, three, they're just all. Over the strike soundtracks. I'm looking at the options here. You got a lot. Timeless hits like Joan, Jett in Baha men. You probably get the behind end come to our wedding. invaded. says. The song it is you I have loved all along and it's like this Irish melodic. Thing that plays off to the best movie. And I was like pets going to be off Stan. Actually sounds like a nice song though it is a nice song. Unreligious Shrek. So. Can you consider yourself a broker? Then what I either I I don't know what that would me I can assure him from the two words putting them together. It was like a Brownie right I've seen Shrek. Yeah, I hope there's nothing toxic about it but I, think brokers are just fans of Shrek. Shrek, love the means Kind of like an ironic love though, right? That's what I get from where..

Shrek Man Shrek David Bowie Jack Mr Jones Smash Hallelujah Stan Courtney Cox sturgis Smasher smashers Australia spotify Reza Zach cider Canada Joan Schwimmer Jett
"20 years" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

04:41 min | 4 months ago

"20 years" Discussed on Developer Tea

"Python for twenty years. . It's a long time to invest in a singular direction seems very focused and I wonder I have a couple of questions about that. . You know. . Of course you can predict the future. . You can do your best to say I think this has a promising future but. . If you're picking language in two, , thousand, , one in python is still relatively young. . I think it was probably six years old at the time <hes>. . Is that right? ? It's about six years the thing. . About ten years old then okay it was. . Very. . It was very yes. . At at Lenox world where I I went to Gaydos workshops there were I think there eleven thousand people at Lenox ruled that that year and I know the more experienced establish python types wondered if there'd be enough to make it worse going out for beer? ? So it's not very popular. . And of course, , it's exploded in popularity for variety of reasons but. . I'm more interested in what made you have buy in number one and number two. . Is it accurate to say that you stayed fully focused on python or would it be more accurate to say that python was kind of the central? ? The hub and you may have had spokes to other types of technologies, , other languages, , right? ? Well. . So. . I've thought a little bit about about this general question and to be honest I. . I do recall thinking in after I'd done python for a few years that. . It was really likely that something else was going to come along. . That was better more interesting more whatever I, , and I would probably switch to another language and it it never happened I mean. . Clearly there there are other things that you do along the way. . So <hes>, , for example. . Database technologies have have evolved and emerged. So . they're different flavors of things that you can do with databases. . So that's that's one thing you can do <hes>. . Know. . Web <hes> managing things in the cloud there. There . are lots of different areas around that. . I think part of it was that python. . Flexible. . Enough to do all of the things I wanted to do. . But I think also it's just that through a series of. . Of Happy Accidents I think I would say a python has continued to kind of move and and in effect. . I don't WANNA say keep keep up with me. . Keep ahead of me. . I suppose. . So that it's always kind of been there for the next thing that I was interested in doing I <hes> you know when I switched to to being a developer full-time we we started using aws and it was a great way to help automate the management of that <hes>. . By then Django is maturing and I was working in an e commerce platform that that was based on Django. . So we can do that. . They are those things just kind of happened, , and then now, , of course, , with the rise of of data science and I do a certain amount of not data science but data engineering, , you know all of the things that data science needs in order to do their things. . So. . That has been part of the reason why that that's happened I think python really has just kind of seemed to catch one way of after another and you know having been involved a little bit in the leadership of Python. . I wish I could claim credit for this but I don't think even Gita would claim credit for this it's just been. . It's a good language certainly, , but there are other languages with it just seems to have been. . Capable and picked up at the right time to pick the you know the next wave. . So I think that's part of it. . So. . Yeah. . I. . Think the other thing that has helped keep me around to though has been the continuing development of pythons community. . Now it's something that. . From from Gedo on to everybody else involved with python everybody values in his intentional about fostering community and Not all open source communities have. . That going for them all the time. . So I think that's been a plus. .

Python Software Foundation Naomi Cedar developer Naomi Dick Blick Jonathan Patrol US Gaito van Rossum Sprint Matt San Francisco publisher
"20 years" Discussed on The Bible Recap

The Bible Recap

02:50 min | 5 months ago

"20 years" Discussed on The Bible Recap

"Of. The. Two but there is a deeper point to it, and that point is echoed in the New Testament in Paul's letter to the Romans Romans. Chapter. Seven goes on at length about the purpose and the effect of the Law God's laws on their own don't bring life. They served to reveal how broken and helpless we are and how righteous we can't keep the law even if we try the law does not lead to life, it points to death and it is devastating. But this is where my God shot comes in in both today's reading and in Paul's letter to the Romans, we see the rest of the story the lol leads to death but God pours out His mercy and His grace which lead to life renewed. In Ezekiel Twenty forty four. God. Says it like this you shall know that I am the Lord when I deal with you for my namesake, not according to your evil ways nor according to your corrupt deeds oh house of Israel and in Romans seven, twenty, four, twenty, five, Paul. Says it like this? Wretched man that I am who will deliver me from this body of death. Thanks be to God through Jesus Christ Lord. Trying to keep the law isn't the path to righteousness. There's only one path to righteousness. He calls himself the way, the truth and the life the is important and necessary but keeping the law isn't the Gospel. The Word Gospel means good news and the thought of having to keep the law is certainly not good news because we can't what's good news is that God the son who kept it perfectly paid the debt for those God the father has adopted into his family. The law acts like an MRI revealing where we're broken, but it can't heal us for that. We need a surgeon and he gives us a new heart and those new hearts know him and praise him because he's where the joy is. Did your podcast not today of course, not you're listening to right but someday that's going to happen to you. So here's what you need to know plan ahead you have four options ready number one, refresh your APP or restart your phone. This is the unplug it, plug it back in thing number two in your APP, scroll back to last year's episodes. The content is almost entirely the same number three try switching to Pod bean bats are source at and it has Just for. Most people? Number four go to our youtube page YouTube dot com forward Slash Bible Rica it has the whole year of content. But if you're searching you may have to enter all three digits of the day. So Day zero, zero, five or zero to three. So now you have zero zero zero excuses for missing a day you're welcome. The Bible recap is brought to you by Diga discipleship and Bible study groups that meet in homes churches around the world each week..

Paul youtube Ezekiel Israel
"20 years" Discussed on MarketFoolery

MarketFoolery

02:47 min | 7 months ago

"20 years" Discussed on MarketFoolery

"They get information? The same time that Goldman Sachs gets the information. That's how it's going to be. And, maybe we shouldn't be surprised, but. I know that anytime I talked to a younger person at our company and A. Ref D. They're surprised. When I explained to them that there was significant pushback, there were smart established. People with good reputations in the financial world. who were saying? Are you kidding? We're GONNA, we're everyone's GonNa. Get the information of the no bad idea. That's a bad idea. When did read FD I? Come into your. Field of vision as an employee of the Motley fool in one thousand, nine, hundred nine well I, think the proposal. Was Sometime in. Early, mid December and there was a couple. Maybe you're there is a thirty day. Maybe there was a sixty day proposed comment period. And I having legal background saw that and thought I would read about it and. We were just in the right time and the right place of for this a we had established You know a relationship with our audience of of individual investors. It was December. Nine, hundred, ninety nine market was doing gangbusters, and everybody was happy of with with us with anybody who who was talking stocks, because everybody was was making money and But, it was still the case that Wall Street. owned the communications. Channel with companies and so this rule, which was Arthur Levitt then head of the SEC, put a lot of work into and put out for comments and I saw that and wrote an article and You know Looking back on it, the title of the article. was se levels the playing field. Is a boring title, there were no companies mentioned in the article. This was not as as sometimes. You need to do in in the job of Internet writing. Have sexy title or have tickers of companies, and that gets distributed through various channels. It had no mention of a company. It had the most boring title the world, but it wasn't a place in the molly full editorial which. was, prominent was a column called. Fool on the hill came out once a day, and was sort of the oftentimes GonNa head back when the Motley fool unlike today when there are hundreds of articles being published on full dot com. This is late,.

Goldman Sachs Arthur Levitt SEC
"20 years" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

02:00 min | 7 months ago

"20 years" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"Declined as sports, drinks, and other food chooses have become more popular, says Shannon Shep the citrus departments executive director. We weren't the IT juice. The trend since January the department has been promoting orange juice using digital ads. One hundred percent orange juice has many of the essential nutrients. You need without other ingredients you don't. Yes, you could say it's the original wellness. Drink the national. Center, for complementary and Integrative Health a division of NIH says there is no scientific evidence that vitamin C can prevent or cure covid nineteen, but during the pandemic shop says consumer seemed to be coming back there, finding things that are comfortable to them in April retail sales of orange juice, spiked by about fifty percent compared with the same for week period in twenty nineteen. I Florida resident. Jody old slices a grapefruit. She says the juice has too much sugar, so she and her husband have been buying more of the fruit lately. There, just fabulous and. That's how we've been adding to our vitamin C. and trying to increase it. During this health problem, old shops checked groves in Vero beach owner Louis shocked, says his April orange shipments to customers homes tripled from April of last year to say that it was significant as an understatement it. It was a large increase in demand. Big Enough. He says to offset the loss sales to close down restaurants in Miami I'm on go yet for marketplace. And the United States bought up nearly all the world's supply for the next three months of the drug rendez severe, which has been approved to help treat the covid this from Britain's Guardian newspaper today. That's about half a million doses. The antivirals made by Gilead Sciences of Foster City California I'm David Brancaccio. Marketplace morning report from. American public media..

Shannon Shep Gilead Sciences executive director Louis Jody old David Brancaccio Vero beach Integrative Health NIH Florida Foster City California United States Miami Britain
"20 years" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

07:10 min | 7 months ago

"20 years" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"From April fools until last night was the strongest quarter for stocks in about twenty years. I'm David Brancaccio. After the pandemic caused stocks to collapse in parts of the first quarter, the quarter just ended was a blockbuster tele. Stock prices are being driven in part by low interest rates, prompting investors to bet on higher returns in stocks. Let us consult Susan. Schmidt head of US equities at Aviva investors, good morning. Good morning, right so if you just take the S&P five hundred, not a bad index for the sort of thing was quite a quarter of seen something like this in a couple of decades really. That's right. It was quite a quarter with great research in the market, and we saw the SNP really regain. Most of the losses suffered in the first quarter, still negative year today, four percent, but that kind of volatility in the market from one quarter, the next been seen since the Nineteen Thirties, so it tells you about the magnitude of those moves all right, so if you like the S. and P. Five hundred for the year, even if you liked for the latest quarter there, how about the Nasdaq composite? Index lots of tech companies there went. Went up thirty percent, and it's still up pretty well for the year so far it is seen continued discrepancy between the performance of the SNP and the Dow and the Nasdaq while the S&P and the Dour both negative today the Nasdaq is up over twelve percent. I think it really indicates that investors are separating businesses into the old economy in the new economy, and they're looking at that tech heavy Nasdaq is being a beneficiary of the future that is Susan Schmidt. She's in Chicago and head of US equities at Aviva investors. Thank you, thank you. In early trading, the Dow is up one hundred thirty seven points, four tenths percent, the S. and P.. Five hundred is up three tenths percent. The Nasdaq is up a tenth percent forty five percent of Americans own no stocks at all. The Info is not yet peer reviewed, but the drug company Pfizer and its partner bio tech put out data today, suggesting there covert vaccine candid, it does create antibodies that fight it. They're also side effects of the shot including fever visor stock is up four and a half percent now. The private payroll companies. ADP says two point. Four million people were added to the payrolls that counts in June that is less than expected, but ADP reported a huge revision upward for the month before may the official jobs report for June is due tomorrow morning? After months of lockdown European countries on this first of July will start opening their borders to travelers from a list of countries. They judge to have their covert under control. The US is not on that list, so Americans remain banned from Europe with virus cases rising rapidly in parts of this country. This is just one more problem for the travel industry. Marketplace's Jasmine Garcia reports last year in the month of June alone. The International Trade Administration says more than two million Americans traveled to Europe this year. The ban will be a huge economic blow to Europe and to the US Travel Industry Scott Mayor. Mayor wits is with the travel website. The points guy. The transatlantic market is one of the most profitable for the airlines the European and American. Airlines have all entered into joint venture agreements where they share revenue, and it's not just airlines, Mayor Woods says travel agents workers who clean airplanes airport suitcase handlers will all be affected travel analyst David Tarsha predicts some US travelers will now seek domestic adventures for many will be jumping into that 'cause and they'll be driving somewhere you. Ben will be revised every two weeks, but cova cases in the US are still on the rise. I'm Jasmine Guards for marketplace..

"20 years" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

14:01 min | 9 months ago

"20 years" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Companies in recent years is the big get bigger. The pandemic seems to be strengthening narrative and speeding up the shift to services it was already underway and lots of big music releases have been put on hold recently but not all we have listened to what could be called breakout outbreak album chart the history of surprisingly upbeat music. They comes about during downturns first up. Though twenty years ago today let them you're Putin was inaugurated as president of Russia but he s which is linear which it but he's that's was it swapping his job. I can't president and prime minister. He's essentially run the country ever since the former intelligence officer in the KGB took charge of a country that had opened up after the disintegration of the Soviet Union world leaders regarded him with optimism. I looked the man in the eye. I found to be very straightforward and trustworthy. I was able to get a sense of his soul. Man deeply committed to his country and the best interests of his country. Those hopes eventually faded as he began a program of aggressive adventurism abroad and pitching off freedoms at home for a long while Mr Putin enjoyed a degree of popularity among Russians. The public opinion had already begun to turn before the Code Nineteen crisis struck. Mr Putin is being blamed for the world's second fastest rate of new infections the oil price. One on which much of the country's economy depends as tanked and what had worried Russians even before the pandemic was Mr Putin's increasingly cunning plans to remain as leader two decades on despite his modest early ambitions. It's in what he came to power and it's hard to say we don't know what was going on in his head but from everything that people around him say he didn't think he was actually going to stay for very long. Arkady Ostrovsky is a Russia editor e was not a politician who was actively striving political power. He was not as nearly as confident as he is now. Putin today is an aging authoritarian aging dictator. Who's refusing to leave his post? He's overseeing comment where the stage all its proxies cronies control most of Russian assets and where the majority of people have been left out in the cold. And how is this this aging dictator as you called dealing with the threat of the corona virus? Well hasn't been didn't that well. He's bins tragically absence at the very beginning. He played down. The threat of carnival. Is Dan if actively vanished from public view not wishing to be associated with the virus he was conspicuously absent and when he did appear on television he was then known to explain the severity of Arana virus outbreak. He tried to play good cop. In the first thing he did was to announce a week of nonworking days effectively holiday which led a lot of people to take off to the countryside together at Park City. You shift mice give pricing he. That had to come back and extend those nonworking days was actually rubbish. Because you know you in terms of businesses particularly private small and medium-sized enterprises. They've been left completely high and dry and so now Putin is starting to attract blame particularly for now from the opposition for being too focused on his own agenda at the cost of Russian lives and health of the Russian people. And what is that agenda? Exactly he's been preoccupied with two things. One was the change to the constitution. That would allow him to stay. In power indefinitely. Factory was constitutional coup. And he's been very focused on holding the ninth of May Parade for the seventy fifth anniversary of the Soviet victory in the Second World War. This was supposed to be the moment that would legitimize his rule legitimize his constitutional change which would be attended by foreign grandees. He had to postpone that Modesto. Much to lose got stopped me. She would doctor visit to the crisis. That Corona virus outbreak hijacked croutons political agenda. This is not something that autocrats who obsessed with controlling everything. Take likely to and so. It's already clear to you that his popularity is suffering among the people. Yes it is and the figures support the the trust. Putin is going down. The approval rating is going down this perception of Putin being an autocrat but by popular consent this concept that Putin is popular with ordinary Russians which was still there a year and half ago is pretty much gone..

Mr Putin Russia president Arkady Ostrovsky Soviet Union KGB Dan prime minister Modesto Park City officer editor
"20 years" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

05:12 min | 9 months ago

"20 years" Discussed on The Daily

"My banker.

"20 years" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

05:10 min | 10 months ago

"20 years" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

"Dan knows there are certainly things this administration could have done better if that followed suggestions from previous administrations they would ordered protective gear for doctors three months earlier. And that's just one example. It's interesting because you also said that they're even things that the administration could be doing now. Like a disease surveillance tool that was built within health and human services that would allow the federal government to flip a switch and kind of gathered data that local municipalities have really wanted. Which is you know racial and ethnic breakdowns infections and things like that. Can you explain a little bit more? Like what are some of the things that could be done now? No one knows yet. How significantly cove in nineteen is hitting minority populations we have some regional data? We have some city data public health. Experts want to see the national data on this now that we're weeks into the outbreak again trying to figure out how to structure responds where resources should go. The trump administration has not released national data on the racial and ethnic disparities. Here and a point that came up in my conversations for for my preparedness story was the Health Department. Had prepared a tool exactly for this moment. Who's used in? H One n one to offer real time pictures of who had h one n one by a slicing that by race by ethnicity by gender drilling down into different regions or areas. That tool was built ten years ago. It's not being used now. And there are other initiatives that were begun. Forgotten started unfunded. I'm picturing this like basement and health and human services just like records and you know things stacked up from years and no one flips through them. If you've seen health and human services it looks like a giant bunker. It is one of the ugliest buildings in Washington. Dc and it's quite possible that wedged into the walls they have all kinds of secret plans and preparedness strategies. That folks aren't aware of. I actually thinking Mary not just about health and human services though the White House had its own plan it. Its own playbook that my colleague hall Tuesday and I scooped a few weeks ago. And that was the Obama era pandemic playbook designed exactly for this moment step by step guide on what to do when a threat like Cova nineteen shows up. That plan was ignored so even when these plans are found when they are aware of these preparedness strategies. There's no guarantee that current officials are going to use them because they think they've got a plan now or there's there's animus toward who came up with a plan for years ago it's unfortunately an imperfect response in the middle of a perfect storm of crisis. Is that new? Like I heard that and I was just thinking like is this how it's always been that. Every for eight years in administration comes in and just wipes the slate clean. Did any of the administration officials. You spoke to who had maybe been around for a while. Say things had changed or was this just status quo. Great question and one that I definitely tried to answer the handoff between administrations can be fraught. You've got one administration leaving another one coming in that. The past number of transitions has been opposed to what that administration did The the trump campaign and trump himself railed against Obama. Obama ran against Bush. Bush was refuting Clinton. So it's it's not the warmest hand off but there were efforts between the administration's to try and prepare the next one. I think what was different. This time is just how much animus the trump team brought to the transition. We reported a few weeks ago about the tabletop exercise where the trump team was warned. A few days before the inauguration on what it meant to respond to a pandemic they were warned. Basically on a scenario just like the one. We're living through now Mussa. Those officials have now left government just because the trump administration so tumultuous at some of the officials who were there and and continue to be in the government per our sources weren't all that interested in the exercise. Betsy Devos the education. Secretary was there Wilbur Ross The commerce secretary couple of our sources told us that he fell asleep during the preparedness exercise that said there are reasons for a new administration to come in and think we will do it better. We'll do it differently than the last team but to do things better requires having those conversations and understanding what the last team did in the trump team didn't do that the same way that previous administrations paid more attention.

Obama Betsy Devos Health Department Dan Bush Secretary Washington Mussa Dc Cova Mary White House Clinton
"20 years" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

10:54 min | 10 months ago

"20 years" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

"A. Sue Dan you start the story of pandemic preparedness. With nine eleven. Why because I think that's where the story of pandemic preparedness really starts in the United States. That was the moment where the United States realized how unprepared this country was for a major crisis. Not just a terror attack. But the potential of follow-up bio attack and within a week the health department was pivoting to try and prepare for a smallpox attack an anthrax attack and and those fears were hammered. Home in the coming weeks and months we forget this now but lawmakers were getting letters in the mail that that raised concerns of a bigger anthrax scare so it was a moment where the Bush administration and Health Department in particular was forced to confront the lack of readiness for a bio event at first the Bush administration was laser focused on a biological weapon. Not a naturally occurring pandemic vice president. Dick Cheney advocated for vaccinating. The entire country against smallpox fearing Americans were sitting ducks. Health experts cautioned against that plan worried about unintentional side effects. In the end president. Bush quashed the idea. Not everyone was happy that that Bush didn't pursue national vaccination and said the Bush administration pursued a much more targeted vaccination campaign for for health workers and military. But even that wasn't enough for some observers. Who said that? Bush wasn't preparing the United States and that he would regret it by not vaccinating. Everyone it just shows how complicated this decision making is like. It's usually very expensive to prepare for something that hasn't happened yet and that's one barrier but the other the other thing that stood out to me reading this twenty year history of pandemic preparedness that you put together was just the fact that every administration seemed to have this moment where they thought we don't need to prepare for this like every every president came in and was like. What is this office on global health threats? Do we really need that. We just get rid of it. President Donald Trump has gotten swag. He's gotten so much heat for the decision to disband the pandemic office in the White House the the National Security Office on pandemic repairing us. He was just following the script that that other white houses did to Brock Obama. His team initially disbanded. The White House held Security Office. George W Bush to the same inheriting from the Clinton administration. So yeah there are new white houses that come in and despite being warned by their predecessors that you will need these tools you'll need these teams. They almost always opt to scale back until there's a crisis that reminds them. This is why that team was there in the first place. If President Bush learned his lesson after nine eleven president Obama learned it after h one n One. The swine flu hit during his first year of his presidency. Then he learned it again when a bullet struck in two thousand sixteen h one and one. The swine flu confronted the administration from from the first year of Obama's term and what the Obama Administration tried to take from h one n one was a sense of readiness and preparedness for the next fight and I took a look. At the lengthy review commissioned by the Obama Administration and an improvement plan that was drawn up. Many of the lessons are things that would feel familiar to someone. Following the Cova nineteen response like what there was an emphasis on developing non pharmaceutical interventions N. P. is where we're there would be shutdowns of schools of businesses of community events to avoid spreading h one n one or whatever respiratory. Illness came came next. Another takeaway was the need to quickly spool up treatment and vaccines as soon as possible. And then I think the third thing that would be constant between the h. One one crisis future. Crises was the focus on widespread testing Th the need to have testing up and running as soon as possible just so public health experts could get a handle on where the problems were. Who's actually sick and how to channel resources to fight the emerging threat Someone who has been thinking about pandemics for nearly all of the last twenty years is president. Trump's health and Human Services Secretary Alex as far back in the Bush administration he was a lawyer at the agency had a front row seat as Washington began taking biological hazards. Much more seriously at Politico we think about our beats very much like a White House. Reporter thinks about the White House so my job is to cover the health department that means in some ways that Alex as ours like my president And his his team is like my cabinet so all of the energy and effort that goes into covering White House escapades by by some reporters for me. It's a health department which means I watch. Almost every Alexander press appearance and speech and I knew that he had done pandemic work in the Bush administration but before working on this story Mary. I didn't realize just how much he had done. Alex as our arrived at the health department in in two thousand one he had been one of the Lawyers Fighting in Bush v Gore on behalf of Bush. He'd been this Republican Party Legal superstar he was known really not for any any healthcare expertise just for being one of the guys that the Republican Party went to to get things done so he arrives at the Health Department in two thousand one and from all understanding Wasn't necessarily keen on the job. Had to be talked into being the top lawyer at the health department but came to really like the work. Love the work and as general counsel as ours fingerprints were on basically everything that came out of the health department for the first four years and because there was not a major preparedness effort. There was not a big preparedness shop initially after September Eleventh. The General Counsel's office the lawyers shaped a lot of the early preparedness work so as our himself the S. as our as our himself was either working on these projects writing some of the the plans so as our was very closely involved out of the legal shop and then in two thousand five he became the number two official overall at the health department which meant he played a major role in what would become the bush. Administration's pandemic flu plan in. Two thousand. Eighteen is our would come back and assume his current role as secretary of Health and Human Services as time there has been fraught. Though to the winter of twenty nineteen he got caught up in feuds with one of his subordinates. Seema Verma the head of Medicare and Medicaid. That left as are in a pretty weak position entering twenty twenty where the White House had months and months of grievances against him he had fights inside his own health department and here he is trying to convince. Donald Trump to take dramatic action to shut down the economy to lockdown Travel and and hurt our relationship with China. He was not coming in with with a strong hand as he was trying to make those cases. Yeah I'm wondering in all of your reporting kind of how. You came out feeling about Alex's as our because your reporting others reporting has really painted him as someone who was early on warning of the dangers here but then at the same time bickering other people in the administration and then of course he was one of the people involved in you know the idea of approving tests and so the CDC has at times pointed Aj Jess and Alex as part of the reason. We don't have test is because of actions that were taken or not taken by those folks so I wonder he just seems like such a complicated guy because you also found transcript from two thousand nineteen where as our specifically said the thing that keeps me up at night is the idea of a pandemic flu. So he clearly knew the risks and was clearly concerned about them and was deeply knowledgeable because he'd been h us for so long but at the same time. It's almost like tripping over your shoelaces a little bit. We like simple narratives. The simple narrative of trump failed on pandemics. The simple narrative of Obama would have done better. I think the truth is always more complicated. And whether it's trump and his handling of this pandemic can't be totally separated from all the years that led up to this moment or in this case Alex Cesar who was right on so many things with pandemics but may be went about running his health department in a way. That made it weaker for this moment. Seema Verma wasn't the deputy on the outs with Alex as our former. Fda Commissioner Scott Gottlieb had his own battles with health secretary as our and the New Commissioner Steve Hahn who took office just a few weeks before the corona virus threat wasn't initially looped in on on a lot of the key decisions at Asia and his team were making so he was walking into this crisis with only part of a team that he really trusted and while as our absolutely recognized the risk of pandemic. It's not clear that all of his department was activated in a way that we now realize it needed to be so. I think I think the report card on Alex's are is still incomplete. It's still TVD. We won't know for sure until this crisis is over. But he certainly was a loud and vocal voice inside the administration on the pandemic threat deed. He do everything did he have his team ready to go. That's a separate question and one that I'm still working to answer.

Health Department President Bush Alex Cesar President Donald Trump president Brock Obama White House United States Obama Administration secretary vice president Seema Verma Dick Cheney anthrax smallpox Clinton administration A. Sue Dan
"20 years" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

02:20 min | 10 months ago

"20 years" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

"Thank you very much earlier this week. President trump got up in front of the cameras for one of his daily press. Briefings flanked by two huge flat screen televisions. Now with that. I have a couple of interesting. We have a few clips that we're just GONNA put up a few minutes in. The president asked to demand lights. Then he teed up video snippets that put a positive spin on his administration's response to the Corona virus appended that has cost tens of thousands of American lives. We've asked them to accelerate auto someone had even scored this video with kind of West Wing Soundtrack. We could give you hundreds of clips just like that. We have them We did what this to go onto long but I just WANNA say for members of the press watching this spectacle unfold. You could sense this. Disbelief settled over them. One reporter asked who made this video other reporters jumped into say hold it. Are you saying you couldn't have acted sooner to prevent people from getting sick? You couldn't have done more back in like February January thirty time that your travel ban a lot lot and in fact will give you a list what we did. In fact part of. He's at some point. We'll give you a list of everything we did. And you actually. You saw that list right. I did see that list. I saw circulating on twitter by one of his campaign staff. Dan Diamond is a reporter over. Politico he was watching this press conference play out waiting for that list the list of things that the trump campaign was touting the list of items across February. I counted it up. There were twenty distinct achievements as they saw but when I actually looked at those twenty. Seven of them were announcements. One was vowing in the state of the Union to protect us from Corona virus. And then a couple of the others were things that had failed to roll out tests in February that that was one of the action items on the West. We know that those tests didn't work..

trump president reporter Corona twitter Dan Diamond
"20 years" Discussed on Function with Anil Dash

Function with Anil Dash

09:05 min | 2 years ago

"20 years" Discussed on Function with Anil Dash

"This character and they had done a lot of writing dyrlund as well Ms username terminator and that was really striking to me. Just that something like that. People were doing these major things like publishing books books and doing a cool hoax but also you know they went to their also sort of adding an online element to it and it wasn't just your average sort of diary of a a twenty year old in Utah or whatever a lot of the other things were so it really connected into into what was happening in popular culture. That's interesting because I think at least for a little while you and I worked together on live journal for a couple of years and that was the first place I ever heard of an author named George R R Martin right and he's still on live journal Right But he's never updated right but I mean he hasn't finished any of the books so he's probably not updating us live on that much achieve better not be and yeah. I'm curious for you about like as these moments and you get to work both across live journal and twitter and many other sides. Wh what what was something that jumped out to you of you realizing okay. This is going to connect into the world at large. And it's not just our little. You know bunch of Goth kids writing journals. How'd you know he regards? Everybody was gone right for me. It's again it's another personal note I I had been working for a while for live. Journal is the only system men. They're only a couple of US really keeping it going and I was burned out okay. Just physically mentally emotionally exhausted working long hours and I got to go home for a visit and my sister-in-law was there and I was telling her you know how tired I was. And why am I even doing this. What does this even worth? Does it even matter to people. I mean it's just a website you know it's just tack doesn't have meaning in the real world because at that point it wasn't totally you know a given that the Internet would become as ubiquitous as it is still see him like Pr- Frivolous and it was having real impact on my on my body. I was telling my sister in law. You know the sites used by more than in a million people and that doesn't mean anything to me it's you can't visualize can't really feel a million people and how they interact with site and she said to me through tears Lisa. Do you realize what this site is for me. I have a new mom. I moved into a new community. She Herself Office Bhai and Liberal. She moved onto conservative community and she didn't have any friends around her and she had postpartum depression and she made a community. It community back then called hip Mama's which was a community of MOMS online? who found each other no matter where they lived and could talk with each other around the things that were harder to do in their community where they lived and she said without them she? She didn't know where she would turn. She would just be depressed. You know and She had a were fulfilling life just because the site was available to her and that actually kept me going for years after that and being open to those stories about the individual people and what the Internet did for them is what kept me motivated you know and then moving onto twitter a lot of similar stories like that now is it for me was sort of when I could feel on an individual level. How how a person's life was made better or more full from this site that that was actually bigger to me than some of the news stories? That happened later on. Sounds like that's still part of your motivation. Still today definitely a huge part of my motivation. Shen later on twitter. I've heard stories directly from from women that were in the Meana region during our spring. And what twitter allowed them to do and how they communicate with each other around things like whether or not the street they were on was safe for them to go outside and hearing those stories directly Klay from these women was so powerful can going longer there So as long as people are sharing those stories with me it it continues to motivate me to participate in this. And this thing that I still believe to be Overall a positive influence on an individual level bruce curious for you you were may be one of the very first people to build a platform that gave million other people voice What was that that early moment? That comes to your mind. Yeah I can I. I can define the moment easily because We had a user. His name was bladder He was living in San Francisco and he was He was a gay man older. Gay Man I think Middle aged at the time and again this is twenty years ago and He was somebody who felt disenfranchised by society. And by the culture he lived in The AIDS crisis had been You know huge in the late eighties season he had lost. You know a lot of his friends who were his real family He was somebody who had been separated from his from his family. Because of of WHO and what he was And and was alone and he found open diary and started posting very soon after we launched like take a about a month or two months in he started posting and he started with very tentative things. Just kind of saying you know what life was like for him and not not introducing all the problems that he had had and The places where you know culture society had had treated him poorly poorly And he met a lot of people and a lot of people fell in love with him because of his style of writing and the honesty that they could feel coming through and it really was an amazing thing to watch people who You know in real life maybe would have ignored that person discounted that person or minimalized him because of who they were which you know today I like to think culturally. We're in a much better place than that. But in nineteen ninety eight. There was a lot of stigma and he He was one of the people who sent an email into us More than once and said you know I was having a really difficult time In my life I had lost a lot of people. I didn't have a community and I found that here here and the site saved my life And I had more than one email conversation with him where I said you know. I really appreciate that. Like like what. Lisa said. Those are the things that still motivate of eight me. I think I think it's easy to forget the personal impact that the online world has on people today good and bad and that it can N. B.. Good it's easy to look at twitter and look at facebook and look at the things that are happening and how awful people are to each other and say the world will be better off without the Internet and I don't believe that I think I think there's still space for there to be a place where people can be good to each other and understand each other And Not Judge People by what they know of them in real life. I think that's that's the real power of what we do. And that's what keeps me going is knowing that you you know. It's there are still people out there who are disaffected for whatever reason and what we do can give them a voice. I think that it's a beautiful sentiment to wrap things up with Bruce Andrew Lisa. Thank you all for joining us on function. I appreciate you taking time. Thank you thank you. Thank you thank these days. It feels like we all live in a world that social media created for us and so it's easy to forget that somebody had to build these tools in the first place all of us check facebook instagram and twitter every single day but those apps that we use were shaped by the work that was done twenty years ago people people make decisions about how we were GonNa comment respond to each other. How we were going to share ideas and it really affects the way that we see the world and so I'm glad to give voice nice to the people that made those choices invented those tools one because we should give credit to creators who should get credit to inventors also people can realize there were some really thoughtful choices that maybe we should revisit and start to think about again? If we're going to start to fix some of the problems that have happened in the social media created world that we have now functions produced by bridget. Armstrong are associate producers Maurice Cherry. The shocker was the executive producer of audio for the Vox media podcast network. Our engineers are soon invest. Rama Murthy at Floyd. Our theme music was composed by Brandon McFarland and pick. Thanks to the entire team glitch. You can follow me on twitter at the DASH and of course you can always check out function at glitch dot com slash function. Please remember to subscribe to the show wherever you listen and we'll be back next week week with a brand new episode.

twitter Bruce Andrew Lisa Journal Utah US George R R Martin depression Vox media San Francisco Brandon McFarland Meana Shen Rama Murthy Klay bridget Armstrong facebook Maurice Cherry
"20 years" Discussed on Function with Anil Dash

Function with Anil Dash

11:54 min | 2 years ago

"20 years" Discussed on Function with Anil Dash

"Brad Pitt and it was sort of a satirical pretending to be Brad Pitt and very over the top way very odd and then it became the The top Google result for if you search for Brad Pitt hit. That seemed like a big thing. That was getting a lot of people and then Brad Pitt's lawyer Jennifer Aniston at the Times lawyers made them shut it down but it was just stuff like that. There'd be the odd thing where suddenly some page was getting. You know five thousand people a day or something as all the coverage of blogs grew you know and maybe I guess two thousand two thousand and one something like that you know. There is a very obvious traffic boost. I had to get more powerful servers stuff like that and these days somebody like that would probably just make like fake Brad Pitt twitter account absolutely. Yeah absolutely I think at that time. That was something people weren't used to that kind of parody and now it's commonplace because wikipedia hadn't even really become a thing yet. I mean I think it existed hadn't taken off so the idea of like you're editing it yourself or there could be information putting out there and you don't know if it's reliable or not was was pretty new yeah and there was a big period in two thousand and two thousand and one and two were. There was a lot of press coverage where people were like logging. Is this new thing. Hey they are these people crazy like. Why are they writing about themselves online? We've got a lot of really a lot of great press from that and a lot of Technology writers saying you know. Here's something really interesting. That's happening with technology being done with it. That's giving people a voice so that was cool. We got a lot of traffic off of that was Lisa. was that some of the some of that attention why you decided decided to start working on a platform like live journal or like when when was this which over for you where you thought this is interesting enough that I want to be part of it. Well I I knew Brad Fitzpatrick. It's Patrick who started live journal When I met him which I think was in ninety nine or two thousand He needed some server space because live journal was growing bigger than the his closet or wherever he had it at the time in his dorm room. So I said hey this is really cool Yeah go ahead had put you can put it in our in our Colo space For this ISP. So that's kind of how we started talking with each other and you know we all used it at this company so we thought well you should we'll just host it for free. It'll be fine so it's kind of how we I started getting involved with it and He couldn't keep but with growth. Just like you guys are saying. All of a sudden things started growing exponentially more people were getting online and feeling comfortable sharing Live Journal actually had quite quite a few impersonation kind of you know accounts kind of what you're talking about but there'd be whole communities of it where you would just be online a character interacting with each other right and the phantom community as well so what was going to be huge like what was the thing where it just blew up. And you're like oh my gosh. This is going to be everywhere. He told me I said. How much bandwidth do you need? And he gave me the numbers in terms of like the total amount of traffic transferred in a month and didn't really know much about throughput. At the time. The idea of bandwidth where you know if you exceed a certain amount in your pipe any given second you're going to be over capacity and the second. Can he moved in and we gave him what he thought he needed. He was over it and I think that watching that sounds silly. But even he wasn't able to sort of comprehend how large it was at the time in terms of the the sort of the machine power and the bandwidth needs. I feel like that was a story for a little while which we just. Couldn't we had a really hard time keeping up with the growth And so oh you know watching that with broad. Eventually I said you know I do this for this other company. It's not that interesting anymore. I come into this for you. Can I come in. Scale Live Journal all Because I think it is I think it is big. I think for me when I knew that it mattered was when I started talking with people that weren't in my day to day life telling me how important the service was how it was their lifeline. How something that Kept them going. You know if they were dealing with depression or they were dealing with having a hard time developing community wherever they were. When I started to get a sense that this matters more than as a play thing as like a pastime this matters in in your day to day life this is you know it's connecting you on a on a deeper level and so therefore my job which was to make sure the stings available? All the time online online Started to matter on a I guess a deeper level for me and I think that's that's sort of my realization of it being really powerful and important to people. Aw Bruce what were the stories of people don't do. Yeah well. I think we've probably all of us had similar experiences to that right where you found out that people were Using the site as a community because they couldn't find support elsewhere and that we would get e mails every day. We have emails from people who were saying you know. Thank you so much because I've been looking for a place where people would listen to me. We would get emails from people who had been you know considering suicide or considering You know other terrible things and saying you. I've found people to interact with here that I could talk to. And they understood me and We built a community there. And that really you know out of all of it. That was the one thing thing that looking back. You can say feel like we made a difference. We did something that people hadn't seen before and we built a place where are people could interact and get support. We had a lot of people who you know. We're dealing with any number of challenges in their lives and you know it's twenty years ago. It's hard to think about how long ago twenty years ago is but people who were in communities that were You know minimalized by society so the people who were Lgbtq then people who were Living you know below the poverty line or you know there were any number of kinds kinds of communities that didn't have a voice them and they found places like this and found that they could have voice and that people would interact with them. I think one of the main powers of sites sites like this was that you would come on and you would interact and read these people stories without knowing anything about them. I don't know what your races or your religion is or what your beliefs are and I start reading your journal your diary and realized that your person your person just like me And that's like that's one of the things I think is missing in today's social and that's why I think there's space still for things like open diary because people don't have that experience elsewhere Andrew. What was the first time somebody thank you for making diarrhea lander making pizzas? Oh Gosh I don't know I've got a terrible memory for stuff like that. What about blame? Somebody blamed you and said you know your your. Your site made my road my day. People were not email me but every once in a while somebody would ask me to say they They lost their password to their site. Or something they change your email and so I'd go to their site. A you know check it was them or whatever and then their last entry it'd be from six months earlier and they'd be like Andrew Sucks. I hope he dies. This guy's terrible and so I have to reply to apply them like okay. Since you a password reset email go ahead go ahead go ahead. Yeah so not not to really horrible. 'cause you know for for you percents sort of thing. What what what? What were the things or somebody is like you know you did this to me? By giving me this great greats. I utter free. Yeah there were a lot of challenges. I mean we. We were facing a lot of things that hadn't really been like You know litigated in in the online world before there were free speech questions and there was you know we dealt with. Is it okay for somebody to post a picture of them breastfeeding their baby. What's the line? Where do you draw that? And so we were you know I was just navigating that without any there was no previous experience. Anywhere that anybody had with that and The free speech one was huge. Just like we have very specific rules that you can't attack other members you can't call them names. You can't say you know you can't say they're stupid because of their political or religious beliefs whatever ever So there was a lot especially back then of. Oh you're infringing on my free speech. You're taking you know and people posting about the First Amendment and shouting shouting and shouting outing in saying and then saying no. You're in my space right. Not My space our speaking. You're in in my space now so you got follow my rules and we did. There was a lot of that. Like people are. Oh you gave me the retool and you connect with all these people and now you've taken my free speech away. I mean there's always this moment where I have to remember. You know we were so young so some of these issues which now we look back and think well of course we had a hard time with that. Of course we made mistakes. What are you gonNA expect? You're twenty years old But at the time just seems so big and daunting But you know we you know. We experimented with ADS That was the people. Were pretty vocal about that experience. Vocally supportive right. The great you know and again it's I have a different perspective just because I was so involved with the performance and availability side of the service. But you know we you know when I think going back to the question of knowing how big it was and the Aha moment the faster we can make the site. The larger the community grew not just in terms of traffic for the number of users. So we figured out pretty early on if we can keep keep this thing clicky fast. That's what we would say You Click you get the thing which back then was not necessarily guaranteed all for sites online. It wasn't is an easy but we figured we were like. Wow this is insane I mean it. was you know visceral lake. I made this piece of the site faster and it grew to fill that space immediately mmediately and then the community grew so there. You know figuring out that there's this connection that people wanted this so much that as much as we can make available they would take and they would grow and Dan so anything that we did decisions. The ads were one of them You know if we ever made you know had regressions after deploy if we made decisions decisions around our network or machine changes that caused the site to get slower for any reason caused this great just horde of complainers. Because you know they're like you showed me that. This site was awesome and fast and you just took that away from me so that that was the that's one that I will never ever forget which is as fast as I could. Were people. Were still probably complaining that it wasn't fast enough so we've talked a little bit out all these challenges of growing going in scaling and success problems really Andrew. I'll start with you. I'm curious about like people may not understand what was considered big back. Then so ascites started to grow How many people are you talking about? How many diaries or you know different sites we were you hosting the that was considered a big scale back then I mean at the probably at the peak I remember getting about And this was all due to sort of media attention like you'd get a few more but probably at the peak. I I was getting maybe two thousand twenty five hundred new users a day and you know these days that's not really considered too much For a start up with a bunch of funding or whatever but that was Yeah really exciting back then. I think that probably had a few hundred thousand active active users really posting all the time. Well and nobody had been growing at that level of signing up two thousand people and you were doing. I assume zero advertising of any kind..

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"20 years" Discussed on Function with Anil Dash

Function with Anil Dash

08:14 min | 2 years ago

"20 years" Discussed on Function with Anil Dash

"Only your small community of friends. It wasn't all public which I think a lot of the things before then were pretty public. Let's talk a little bit about timeline. When did open? Diarrhea launched to the Public October Twentieth Nineteen ninety-eight roughing was. Yeah that's when it went online about seven pm eastern right and then Andrew. Diary Landon landed Pitas. While Peterson was I was was not too much later. In Ninety nine right yeah Pitas was first. DYRLUND was probably five months later or something like that. Yeah to my recollection election. I think I think pitas was in the springtime a ninety nine and was like August September October right. Yeah I think it was August or so and then blogger Dot Com launched in September of ninety. Nine so what we have. Is You know in the span of a year The three four five sites come online and there. We're maybe one or two others but these were certainly the dominant ones across. You know. I guess I don't know what we'd later may be because the blogosphere whatever it was but part of it was blogs and diaries hirees internals were all seems very different things. What was your perception of a block? Initially called a weblog. Yeah exactly so. In Ninety eight when we first launched a weblog was kind of very similar to what Andrew was describing like. It would be somebody who was maybe posting links posting Information about like. What were they doing their job? Or things like that You know the the idea of like actual journalists blogs was still a long ways vice off them so you can't really compare them to blogs today to whereas we thought about a diary or journal that was a regular person talking about their our regular life and what are their everyday experiences And then when you add in the interaction with the you know what Lisa was pointing out we saw the same thing As people started interact with each other became this whole huger more amazing thing than just people posting their personal journals and like one of the key differences we we saw between live journal and open diary was with Lisa describe with live journal where groups of people who knew each other would use it sort of like how facebook is now was much more prevalent avalon on there then open diary opened Ari tend to be more people were posting their You know personal things that they didn't WanNa put somewhere else and didn't necessarily invite their friends friends and family to come in back then. Your friends and family weren't necessarily online. Have Modems right and at least I'm curious for you whether that sort of beers you're expressed i. Yeah I was actually just thinking as I was remembering my diary land account I maintained that account even as I started using journal and create you know became part of that whole community because my diary land account was actually sort of more like a diary like literally talking about my inner feelings and desires and sort of how I interacted with the world in a certain way that was not how I projected or what I talked about on live journal because I still was talking in my community and my friends in so diary land. I actually kept as a sort of private diary now. If somebody happened to read it or was totally anonymous on there. That would be fine fine but I maintain that for quite a while. I had both Because I did see the distinction there. Repeaters was almost pointedly. Not about about weblogs. It was about Peterson about diaries. Right I would say the main thing it with Pitas that differentiated it from dyrlund was just the pitas. It is was multiple posts on one page that I would say it was more like the weblog format whereas diarrhea land was just To begin with anyway was just one post per page which I mean. At the time there were a lot of people doing you know online. Diaries and I was sort of aware of those people people like doing you know with html and everything but Pitas was something. I just sort of throw up in the meantime while I was working on Ireland just to do that. Weblog LOG FORMAT SO YEAH I would say it was more actually of the weblog format. It's interesting because it feels like well. Maybe this is more of a diary land thing. There was almost a tension between these communities like diaries or one thing and blogs or another and you sort of picked one camp that you're in or or a different side your persona were expressed through different tools right. Oh absolutely There is quite a division back. Then I mean that was the whole reason that I started to different sites and then I guess when blogger started getting in big vase to me always. It seemed like they kind of made the conscious decision of. Let's call it a blog and kind of get everybody onto our thing you know and kind of Meld it. Maybe I mean I don't know if they actually were the ones that caused everything to kind of Meld or whether it was going that way anyway but I felt like people who used blogger and blog spot were more There wasn't that division for me when I think about that and how I I use those platforms and then I saw blogger and what I saw as a distinction with weblogs was that because of the sort of private nature of diarrhea Korea or journals. A lot of people didn't use their real identities. They didn't use their real names and their user names general and the Internet back. Then you weren't necessarily early coming forward with your real name. You weren't Presenting as the person that you were in real life you're presenting the persona that you had in your diary or journal and I you know that's that was true for blogs as well but that is in my mind that's when I think of starting to see blogs associated more with real writers real journalist has three people who are representing themselves online as the way that they that they've moved through the real world and to me that was a big change from the sort of diarrhea dowry and journals to blogs. And what we see today so the standard might have been You're either anonymous or you used used your your online hacker hindle or your AOL screen name or whatever it was you were you were neo from the Matrix. You had a very different persona. Yeah was that was. Is that the conventional an open diarrhea. We actually required users to be anonymous in the beginning like our rules. Were very specific. You could not post your personal information information And we considered that important for safety because of what people were writing about so that lasted for a few years. Obviously it's not like that anymore are posted him to be real name if you want to But Lisa makes a really good distinction like distinction to me between blogs then and today hey are blogs are usually people who are writing for an audience or to get their opinion out about something You know it's what happens on medium. It's what happens on a lot of different tools now versus somebody who's writing for themselves being interaction with the community that they don't necessarily want to share you know their absolute identity so if you're reading that piece that we have today and you're gonNA put your name on it and I want to be the leader on this idea and you were to do that on one of these platforms back around the turn of the century. What would the reaction be the response be? That's a good question I don't there wasn't it wasn't a distribution mechanism for think pieces. That was the thing could make a name for yourself off. No you couldn't make a name for yourself because you weren't using it real name and I posted things and I still do. I will write things that I think of as think pieces but I'm doing it more to say here's here's what I actually believe in and here's my manifesto but I'm putting out and You know if somebody figures out that it's my writing. That's fine but I'm I'm not doing it to promote myself. If I wanted to promote myself I'd go on medium or on twitter You know somewhere else other channels to my real name Andrew. When you had people that that had diaries stories started to get popular ARPITA starting to popular? What did that look like? How do people respond to it? How did you know something was catching on? You would just see the interaction between people on the site and you know you go to one diary. They'd be talking other people mentioning them. There are few cases early on that. Were really big One of the biggest or most popular users on the site he started a second account called.

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