34 Burst results for "19Th Century"

Traditional vs. Contemporary Classical Music

Rescot Creative

02:16 min | 5 d ago

Traditional vs. Contemporary Classical Music

"Today we are talking about the somewhat controversial topic of traditional versus contemporary. And this is a debate in pretty much all areas of life or art forms, whether you are thinking literary. So where you have a more traditional or even historical type fiction versus contemporary fiction or in music, if you like the traditional sounding songs, very classical, or a more contemporary pop genre, and obviously to apologize to everything else, like politics, if you have your more traditional people and your more contemporary progressive people anyway, I personally believe that it's important that we can appreciate things on both sides. Of the line. So when it comes to more traditional sounding violin music, you're going to think, especially a lot about Bach baro, classical era, music like Mozart, so here's a little box. Okay, so this very ornate decorative sounding music or you might have something even from the romantic time period, which was 19th century. Right? Now, if you are actually trying to do something more contemporary, you might do a little bit more with improvisation, although actually in the baroque era Bach did improvise a lot. But for example, if this was like twinkle little star. You know, Abu Dhabi in French Mozart did a ton of variations on that. But a contemporary version of that could be.

Bach Baro Mozart Abu Dhabi
Childbirth in the 19th Century

Everything Everywhere Daily

01:39 min | 3 weeks ago

Childbirth in the 19th Century

"Mid nineteenth century didn't have anything close to what we would consider modern medicine. The germ theory of infection still didn't exist and many medical professionals still believed in things like my asthma's and humor's and would prescribe things like bloodletting patients also at this time. The mortality rate for women in childbirth was significantly higher than what it is today. The primary cause of death was something called peripheral fever also known as child bed fever. It was a disease that would strike women within days of giving birth and it often lead to raging. Fevers putrid pus. Admitting from the birth canal open sores in the abdomen and finally sepsis and death. The maternity wards at hospitals at this time in europe were primarily for lower class women and often prostitutes the deal. Was that women who came to the hospital. Could receive free care but their care would usually be overseen by students as it was a training hospital. When someone weiss arrived at vienna general it had to separate maternity wards. That were run quite differently. One ward was run by male doctors and the other ward was run by female midwives however the outcome in the two wards were radically different. The word with the doctors had a mortality rate. That was five times. That of the ward the midwives. The reputation of the doctors ward was so bad that women would often cry and plead not to go there and there were some that would hold off on their arrival so they could give birth in the street as if they gave birth in route to the hospital. They could get the same benefits as if they gave birth in the hospital. Shockingly women who gave birth in the street had a lower mortality rate than those who gave birth in the doctor's ward

Asthma's Peripheral Fever Child Bed Fever Fevers Sepsis Weiss Vienna Europe
"The Murder Farm": The Story of 19th Century Serial Killer Belle Gunness

Female Criminals

02:02 min | 2 months ago

"The Murder Farm": The Story of 19th Century Serial Killer Belle Gunness

"Bell and mads lived a relatively quiet uneventful life in the suburbs. There were no more fires. No suspicious payouts. In fact there's hardly anything to note from this period of her life but then in eighteen ninety six one of the foster children under bells care died and then another in eighteen ninety eight officially the cause of death for both was colitis which is a chronic digestive disease. Not one batted. An eye at the diagnosis. Colitis was common enough at the time and no one dreamed of blaming bell. In fact she went on to adopt three more kids. Jenny myrtle and lucy without any problems but in more recent years there's some suspicion that bell might have had a hand in the children's deaths. We don't want to speculate too much here. Given that there's no real evidence to back anything up but for reasons that will become obvious later on many now suspect that the colitis was caused by strychnine poisoning. If that was in fact the case then that was the first time bell killed. It's hard to understand why she would want to kill her foster children. But we simply don't know what was going on in the household at that time. Whatever it was by nineteen hundred forty one year old bell was restless. There's nothing to tell us why but she wanted another fresh start. She reminisced about the last time she was able to start from square one. How easy it had been to set the fire. Get paid and start over. She wondered if she could set fire to their new house and get the same result but she had to admit the doing the exact same thing again might raise eyebrows so she tried to think of other ways to get similar results and then she hit on an idea. Maybe it wasn't a place. She had to get rid of but a person.

Colitis Bell Chronic Digestive Disease Jenny Myrtle Mads Lucy
Remains of Over 200 Children Found at Indigenous School in Canada

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:35 sec | 4 months ago

Remains of Over 200 Children Found at Indigenous School in Canada

"A gruesome discovery in a former school in Canada The bodies of 215 Children, some as young as three years old, have been found buried on the site of a former indigenous school in Canada. Officials say the remains were discovered last weekend by ground penetrating radar and more Not exhumed. More bodies could be found at the Kamloops Indian residential school, which was once the country's largest institution that held Children taken from families More than 150001st nations. Children were forced into state funded Christian schools from the 19th century until the 19 seventies as part of a program to assimilate them into Canadian

Canada Kamloops Indian Residential Sc
"19th century" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:46 min | 5 months ago

"19th century" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"We roll on Big House currently got the lead with two correct answers to correct answers. Initials today are B A B A. In radio clue, number one gates back to the South East England in the 16 twenties. Clue Number two adopted in America in the late 19th century. E again The initials are B a clue. Number three Englishmen. Harry Chadwick was instrumental And its implementation in the United States again the initials B. A flu. Number four having one that is just 30% successful can equate two million's Kathy batting average. Baseball forces candy. I'm a fan. Did you just turn his microphone on? That's on him that his microphone was off? I was You didn't hear me when I was saying batting average a A..

Harry Chadwick United States South East England 16 twenties America late 19th century 30% two million today Big House three two correct answers four Number two one
How 2 Skiers Conquered Yosemite's Half Dome

The World

02:19 min | 7 months ago

How 2 Skiers Conquered Yosemite's Half Dome

"Valley, 8800 FT. Above Sea level is a rock formation called Half Dome in the 19th century, a report said. The granite landmark was so perilous that it quote Never will be trodden by human foot. Well, today, Half dome is a popular hike for thrill seeking climbers. Yosemite resident Jason Tor Llano has always looked at the massive rock with a feeling of wonder. I went to school, right New 70 Valley next to you, Somebody falls. Um and you look up you somebody from the playground is a little kid. That's where the big thunderstorms come from. And when it snows, it just gets packed with snow and And it's just always been attracted to have them. But Torre Llanos attraction to half Dome has always been tied to another interest of his skiing since the very first time he clicked into skis. From that moment on, I just looked around and Kept seeing shoots our ski able to this age. When he was 17 Tor Lana went climbing with a friend on half dome. Remember walking down the cable's going? Wow, I bet you this thing's cable, and it turns out he was right this year, Jason to Orlando and his friends act, Milligan finally descended. Half dome on skis mean climbing half dome is dangerous enough descending on skis. It's a slab of no anchors. So avalanches occur all the time off that. And if you fall or get caught in an avalanche, you're gonna fall off the South face 1000 ft Cliff, so they scouted the location a day early. We walked up there the day before, and we slept at the base in a tree. Well, we start a little fire and kept warm for a few hours. So we're so cold at three in the morning. We're like okay with mice will go to the top. We got it in perfect conditions. This time, it was like a lay an inch layer of ice with about 3 to 4 inches of snow. Trevino and Mulligan weren't the first to descend Half dome in the snow. It's been done on skis and on snowboard, but their trip was special. Well made Our stand a little different is we? We skied the cables with no ropes. But then we see it all the way down to near Lake So another 4000 plus Vertical feet. Achieving this lifelong dream has not stopped to Orlando from eyeing other slopes in the park. Every time I go to Yosemite. I look up into the mountains and just there's so much I want to do. They're still that's Jason Tor Lana, who skied down half dome into the Yosemite Valley last month.

Jason Tor Llano Torre Llanos Tor Lana Half Dome Yosemite Milligan Skiing Orlando Jason Trevino Mulligan Jason Tor Lana Yosemite Valley
Norton proposes ban on permanent fencing around US Capitol, Washington DC

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:36 sec | 8 months ago

Norton proposes ban on permanent fencing around US Capitol, Washington DC

"DC's congressional delegate once all that fencing around the Capitol building to be removed, delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton says her proposed legislation banning permanent fencing at the U. S Capitol complex will quote helped put the needed focus back on security options that don't wall off the capital like a fortress. Release. Norton says she's both written and spoken to acting chief of U. S. Capitol Police Yoga Nonda Pittman to express her opposition to permanent fencing, which Norton refers to as 19th century security. Hitman has suggested the fencing remain to ensure the security of the Capitol building and

Eleanor Holmes Norton Capitol Building U. S. Capitol Police DC Nonda Pittman U. Norton Hitman
Andrew Neil Comments on Trump's Ban From Twitter

The Charlie Kirk Show

03:23 min | 8 months ago

Andrew Neil Comments on Trump's Ban From Twitter

"On our live stream of first. I want to lead with this paper here. Of I think Andrew Neil is his name. Very serious journalist from England. I wish our country had someone is serious is him in a high position. He's very tough on both sides talking to the head of Twitter advertising former head of political advertising a Twitter play tape, I think what does concern people Pizza, though, is the sense of unaccountable power. Whether you agree with what Twitter is done, whether you think it's bias that attends school for those on the right rather than the left. The bigger issue is unaccountable power, particularly when they seem to act in concert. I mean, these air is a company's far bigger Then the oil, the railways, the steal the robber barons of the end of the 19th century in America, they've got much more money and much more influence. And yet Twitter bans trump for life. And you've given the reason why, and then Incitement to violence is something that has there's not a right to that in free speech, but Trump's people then C. All right, we're gonna move to parlor. We could do stuff there and then immediately. The rest of big tech causes that down as well. The APS are you cannot get either from Google or from Apple, and Abbas says we hosting you anymore. That's a cartel. In America cartels are legal. Amen. I love Wen. Non Americans tell us about our laws. No, I actually mean that non sarcastically because I feel as if we get so wrapped up in our own. Political circus at times that we lose kind of a connection to Exactly what It's happening in our own country, and whether the Department of Justice will investigate cartel like behavior remains to be seen. Probably unlikely. With the new administration that is coming in, however, a Zenger Neil, I believe that's his name, pointed out. The behavior of these companies is that one hand washes the other. That is literal cartel type behavior that they don't put profits and even their own fiduciary interest First. Instead, they put the incumbent economic protection of the combined interest of their company's first That is not legal. That is that is that that's beyond monopolist. Just so we're clear that is a different threshold than monopolistic behavior. So monopolies are illegal because you dominate in one space. Cartels are illegal. Even more so than monopolies because then you have different types of companies that are leaning on each other, too, then go after competitors wherever they might arise. And so we've seen this now with Amazon that dominates the server space 49% of all rented out server space goes through Amazon Web services we've seen that threw Apple, which provides a majority. Of the smartphones in this country, so that through Google that has 92% of all search results in the country's Elvis. So you Google plus Apple plus Amazon. That's a cartel. To say the least. What you think is about? Yeah, we've reached a new level of antitrust violations here, and obviously we created antitrust laws in response to monopolistic behavior from corporations in the past. But honestly, that's not even touching what's

Twitter Andrew Neil Zenger Neil America Donald Trump England Abbas WEN Apple Google Department Of Justice Amazon
Hot cocktails warm up outdoor dining this winter

WBZ Afternoon News

00:44 sec | 9 months ago

Hot cocktails warm up outdoor dining this winter

"In many cities, restaurants can only serve customers outdoors. The challenge is keeping customers warm in the winter, and some establishments have been finding a new way to Turn up the temperature. Chris staying CEO of Zagat Restaurant guides says Hot cocktails are part of that survival you confined spiked cider, a Washington, DC's Truxton in the sport's been club in Chicago has hot toddies and Atlanta's wrecking Bar is serving up hot buttered rum. There's been a lot of necessary, I guess what you would call innovation in New York that includes the 19th century flaming whiskey concoction of Dante. And the restaurant needs sneeze, offers a boozy hot chocolate top wish our truce laced whipped cream. This is really a hot ticket here, which has the restaurant developing new hot cocktails for future

Zagat Restaurant Guides Chris Washington Atlanta Chicago Dante New York
'Where Are The Women?': Uncovering The Lost Works Of Female Renaissance Artists

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:22 min | 9 months ago

'Where Are The Women?': Uncovering The Lost Works Of Female Renaissance Artists

"Could not enter art academies in Italy, the cradle of Renaissance masters, no matter how talented Names of a few female artists of that time, and some from the centuries that followed, have often been lost in the mists of history. A Zen prior Sylvia Poggioli reports. There's an effort to bring their names and their work into the light. In this video tour of Florence is famed you Fitzy Museum travel writer Rick Steves list. Some of the highlights the United of Inches enunciation is exquisite. Michelangelo's holy family shows he could do more than carved statues. And Raphael in 2009, a nonprofit group was founded in Florence to see who's missing. I started going into the deposits and the museum storage is and addicts and Checking what was actually there. What works by women? It was something that had never been done before. Because no one had ever before. Asked the question, Where are the women? That's Linda Fanconi, an American writer who helped found a W a advancing women artists. The group has identified some 2000 artworks by women in museum basements and damp churches and finance The restoration of 70 works. Fanconi describes the challenges women artists faced in the Renaissance. Women didn't have citizenship. They couldn't produce art as a profession. They couldn't study anatomy no in the nude figures, for example, because it just wasn't considered appropriate. The inability to study in the same in the same forum as male artists is very significant. A major discovery was a huge canvas 21 ft. Long off 13 life sized men. The only known last supper painted by a woman. She's the 16th century Dominican nun, Clumpy Llanelli who worked inside a convent. Florence has a long last supper tradition. But, says Francona, most of them are static. Whereas Nelly actually chooses sort of the key moment in which Christ announces his betrayal and you have all of the apostles. Feeling the emotion of that very serious news. And so she is able to do. A study of their their responses of their psychological responses Give her time the nuns works were prized because they were believed to be imbued with spirituality. Art restorer, Elizabeth Week says. Like so many female artists, medley was then for gotten It seems to me to be about the middle of the 19th century when these paintings stop being mentioned in the guidebooks. Women artists stop being mentioned. If nobody writes about you, Then you fade from history. Weeks is restoring two large works by the Atlanta Ferrone E an 18th century child prodigy. Little is known of her other than she was born in 17. 20 lived in a period of great change, says writer and Ghaleb. We do know that well educated women. Certainly we're getting much more of a seat at the table, and there were definitely a few women who were achieving much greater. Prominence. Then before hands while still in her twenties, Federal Me was awarded a prestigious commission by a Florence hospital to paint two ovals. The subject matter was usually reserved for men spirituals scenes to help heal the ill. The art of healing has been a constant theme of AWS mission, says director Fanconi. Piece of art has its life. It gets hurt. It gets damaged. It needs renewal. It needs to be talked about and paid attention to accept the restoration as well as exhibits. Advancing women artists has fulfilled its mission, says Falcone, and the organization has announced it's shutting down next June due to insufficient funds. But it's not a sign of failure, she says, because art lovers are now finding answers to the question. Where are the women? Sylvia Poggioli NPR news

Sylvia Poggioli Fitzy Museum Linda Fanconi Fanconi Florence Clumpy Llanelli Rick Steves Michelangelo Raphael Elizabeth Week Italy Francona Ghaleb Nelly United Medley Florence Hospital Director Fanconi Atlanta
'Say Their Names' memorial now open on Boston Common

WBZ Midday News

00:29 sec | 11 months ago

'Say Their Names' memorial now open on Boston Common

"Names is the name of a new memorial on the common in Boston, remembering the victims of racial injustice in America. Debuted Sunday, the quarter of Charles Street and Boylston, and it shows the names and faces of black lives lost to racism dating back to the mid 19th century. There are now 25 say their names. Memorials in cities nationwide, the first going up in Portland, Oregon. The memorial on the Common is Open until this Sunday, November, 22nd.

Boston America Portland Oregon
Jewish family's painting looted by Nazis in 1933 is returned

America's Morning News

01:21 min | 1 year ago

Jewish family's painting looted by Nazis in 1933 is returned

"Two young 19th century skaters that was looted by Nazis from a Jewish family in 1933 and recently discovered in upstate New York at a museum. Has been returned after just 87 years. Just amazing and the painting winter by American artist that Gary Melchers was among more than 1000 pieces of art and artifacts seized from a prominent Jewish family in Berlin who became early targets. Of the Nazi Party 87 years ago. This painting in front of you Ain't no way to 19th century find culture. Free from Berlin. A small family a couple months after our 19 thirties. Masa family lost nearly everything because they were Jews. That day, did not lose hope. And neither did the Department of Justice. The FBI has a program dedicating to finding and returning stolen art and cultural property. And winter is one of the latest examples of the FBI success. We are delighted today to return winter to its rightful owners. Now. That painting returned Thursday to family heirs, and it is expected To go to auction. And from Britney

Berlin FBI Gary Melchers Nazi Party Department Of Justice New York Masa Britney
"19th century" Discussed on Alchemy This

Alchemy This

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"19th century" Discussed on Alchemy This

"UP THE WORKS <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Thank you <Speech_Male> I wanNA take this time <Speech_Male> to <hes> just <Speech_Male> send thoughts <Silence> and prayers to James. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> For no reason. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> you know. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> I think that's <Speech_Male> very yeah. <Speech_Male> <Silence> Thank you. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I guess I'll <Speech_Male> take my time <Speech_Male> to request <Speech_Male> thoughts and prayers from. <Speech_Male> It's now <Speech_Male> getting them from Joey <Speech_Male> I realize how much <Speech_Male> I love Them <Speech_Male> Send <Speech_Male> them towards me. <Speech_Male> It would <hes> <Speech_Male> Kosh <Silence> I'll gobble it up. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Okay just so <Speech_Male> I'm clear what we're talking <Speech_Male> about. <Speech_Male> We say, thoughts <Speech_Male> and prayers we're about. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> Delivered <Speech_Male> Pizza <Speech_Male> Right. <Speech_Male> Yes. I was hoping <Speech_Male> more. What I was thinking <Speech_Male> is like <Speech_Male> I'm gonNA attention <Speech_Male> sucker. I love it. <Speech_Male> So if you're just thinking <Speech_Male> about me, that's pretty <Speech_Male> good but if you're <Speech_Male> also wishing <Silence> things out there. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Can't hurt <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> wish whatever you want. <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Preach. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Let's thank <Speech_Male> our producer <SpeakerChange> engineer <Speech_Male> the

"19th century" Discussed on Alchemy This

Alchemy This

07:14 min | 1 year ago

"19th century" Discussed on Alchemy This

"Up Little Gary. I'm looking I'm looking for my sister dawn. Has Anyone seen my sister Don. Oh my gosh. You know that that woman Don it's been missing on the news northern you. It's assistance he's calling. On us for I, don't know. The last thing I was looking at and bills because I'm going through mail because she's a ceiling today head at this call. I've found a receipt for a circuit city being bill. It was suspect and found never seat for rain and we can't find dawn. But you got your receipts. I have learned receipts but I don't have my sister right but I mean it's not so bad. You got the receipt says good. The receipts I want my sister. Is expecting this to be somewhat of a dead end. But now I think that maybe you do something about Tom. With a computer was in. I don't know what she was charged for a service I say I don't. Touch. Four, hundred, eighty, two dollars. So you got the receipt see came in Handy. But I bet it's not my computer I want my sister that. Missing. Just hear me out shuffle your feet on the ground. How do you get rid of cavities and germs in your mouth brush your teeth don't you uh-huh. So. What if you and I? Just shuffle their feet really really fast really really hard for a long time. Maybe we can. You know kill the germs of this. Weird land maybe hold on a second. Okay. So I've been torturing this candy right? He's been giving you all. Have you seen? Seems crazy. Human right who gives a shit right now what I want. Check this out. I'm going to break off one of his candy cane fingers it's going to grow. Ask. To tell me, you're telling me what you're telling me I don't want. To. Find out just sits true. Okay. Hi. Hi I met a lot of paying. that. Flow two quick theory by you. What would you think if he I started shuffling really quickly as if he were simulating teeth brushed and therefore getting rid of all the germs of this land you know work. More on your feet. No. Jeremy. Just a lot of shit her food but what's What's the WHO's coming out of your broken fingers? I guess that's I. Guess That's my blood I guess. What if a used the blood? Cleanses filthy. Land. Yes. Let's. Six of these rocks McCain Now guys. Smashes. Range use. Katie do chest open. You. Can't. Go. Home. Can't see you. saw. Can't kill. Gillian. I. Oh. That is our show today. Not Till you've heard the death rattle of Kanye job. My own mind lets thank all of our alchemists starting with. Vanessa Ryan thank you. Coming back and I hope you have no grants I have no grits good. Number. Have Gretz. Gretz? Yeah. Thank you so much and As their. Typewriter Theater folks. Check it out Thanks for having me. It's oblast side Michigan so much this is such a treat to get it back in the mix a bit we announced today I don't know when this will be airing. We're having a classes starting including the Great David Holmes is teaching a personal essay class that's going to be amazing and bread foresters teaching a pilot pitching class cameras, Bazookas Teaching up so. Interested in learning CABELA's great time to get some stuff like this, and all the classes are really going to help the teachers artists out and also there's a great community building up. So think about it were should folks go to find all that dynasty tight writer dot com perfect and thinking Oh, you're welcome. Greg. So glad you made it back across this country I've hours and rejoining us. Back I actually do have something to promote for one. I been an Improv group called deaths risky for about twenty years and. We're. We're doing a little risky klaserie. Ski. Sunday October eleventh at one PM Pacific Time. We're GONNA read through a vintage Improv show that we have revised a number of years ago. See if it still holds up and that we're kind of break it down and do a little Q. and A. and lecture so whether you're an Improv student, just a fan of the of comedy this might be fun rsvp by sitting email to info at bronze-medal entertainment dot com it's only fifteen dollars for the class you'll get more information that way. Okay thank you for that. And October eleventh you said that's right. Okay. Great. Check. That out folks Chris Alvarado. Thank you so much. Thank you I. Love You. Vanessa left the play now I miss you miss you you like me more than no. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. That's what I heard declare. Spend my last ten seconds promoting Craig's. Project. The desert receive passers I, mean for those of you who love improvisation, this is the these are the guys I mean I watched them for years. They're so fucking good and to me, and maybe it's very may very nerdy. Nothing sounds more enjoyable than listening to them go through Improv show and discussing the choices made it just sounds like a real dream. So that's what I wanted. Everybody to come. Join join them say. It's not my project. cited. Info. bronze-medal Improv Yeah Chris's over agents. No. That's great. is the ultimate behind the scenes in. Thank you for explaining it a little better than credit. Joey. So much I think. MOCKING.

Don it Vanessa Ryan Chris Alvarado Craig Gary CABELA oblast side Michigan Tom McCain Kanye Jeremy Katie Gillian Joey writer David Holmes Ski Greg
"19th century" Discussed on We The People

We The People

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"19th century" Discussed on We The People

"Main lesson. In my professional capacity. Maybe that what coalitions want of the court. Changes. And can often change rapidly. So why are people like Steven Field on the court and by the way? Why is Andrew Johnson Vice President And the answer is the Republican. Party. In eighteen sixty four is united on the measures. That are being used to fight the civil war. Legal tender is constitutional. Suspension of Habeas Corpus is constitutional. The blockade is constitutional. The emancipation proclamation is constitutional. What's going to happen if the north winds? They don't know. But they want to united front and Andrew Johnson believes in all four of the legal tender not gonNa Find Habeas Emancipation proclamation blockade. Anything Johnson is more are hanging while the traders because frankly they were trying to kill him and he was in the state. By. Eighteen sixty six. Republican Party has a new set of goals and wants different things from the court. And some of those things to link injustices can't deliver because there are mixed lot. For every Salmon Chase who is an abolitionist? There's a Stephen Field, a flat out racists who simply doesn't believe in session. So part of is the mere fact that people want something of the court today. Doesn't tell you. What they're going to want tomorrow. which makes futures very, very hard to predict. Tim The last word in the fascinating discussion his to you what for you are the historical and constitutional lessons. Of fluctuations in the size of the Supreme Court. Between Eighteen, sixty, three, hundred, sixty, nine. Well it is true that there's this really interesting period of change that we've been talking about here from eighteen, sixty, two, day, ten, sixty, nine, and the size of the court changes and all the things we've been talking about What's interesting though is that that was only possible because one party is in power and dominates everything I. Mean we sometimes forget the fact that in eighteen sixty one when the south secedes from the Union though southerners all go home and they're no longer in the congress and so basically, what you have is the Republican Party dominant in the thirty ninth Congress starting in eighteen sixty one. They're able to pass a whole host of measures. We've mentioned you know some of them already and the Republicans stay in power. Until Eighteen, seventy, five, and so for this whole period, they dominate both houses of Congress Johnson is the only outlier he had run with with Lincoln on a National Union ticket in eighteen sixty four understanding that Johnson was a unionist from Tennessee. He'd he had been the only southern member of the Senate not to resign his seat and go back Home Lincoln called him an indispensable man in Tennessee. So there was a good political reason in eighteen. Sixty four when Lincoln was running for re election that he would run with Johnson but Johnston after Lincoln's death turns out to be what really hit always ban, which is a states, rights Democrat, and that puts him at odds with Congress but again, one party in Congress is dominant in both the House and the Senate and that same party occupies the white. House. For the vast majority of this period from eighteen, sixty, one, eight, hundred, seventy, five. And so that party is able to have its way since we're in a very much divided country. Now, where one party is not the dominant party when it comes to public opinion in any sense, if we go back to the last several presidential elections, it is hard for us to imagine that such far reaching changes like what happened during the civil war when it comes to the size of the US Supreme Court, it is hard to imagine any such changes happening now because we're so divided politically in one party doesn't rule in the same way that it did in this era from eighteen, sixty, one, eighteen, seventy, five. Thank you so much more graber and to. For a extraordinarily illuminating nuanced and important discussion about the history of nineteenth century court packing I know that our listeners learned as much as I do, and I'm very grateful to both of you for illuminating and educating all of us. Mark Tim thank you so much for joining. Thank you. Thank you Jeff. Today's show was engineered by Greg Shekar produced by Jackie McDermott research provided by grace's Andy and Lana warrick. And please review and subscribe to we the people on Apple podcasts and recommend the show to friends colleagues or anyone anywhere who is hungry for constitutional illumination and to beat and always remember that we're a private nonprofit and we rely on the generosity and.

Congress Johnson Republican Party Lincoln congress Supreme Court Andrew Johnson US Supreme Court Senate Steven Field Vice President Tennessee Mark Tim Salmon Chase Stephen Field Union Jeff Apple
"19th century" Discussed on We The People

We The People

08:13 min | 1 year ago

"19th century" Discussed on We The People

"By the eighteen thirties, what we're starting to see. Is Sort of one party dominance when it comes to national politics if we look at the president's who win the eighteen thirties, eighteen forties and eighteen fifties. They're almost all democrats and you have a solidly Democratic Court. many of those justices who are appointed by Andrew Jackson and his successors in the eighteen forties and eighteen fifties are from the south, and so it's a southern Democratic court that starts to take shape in the aftermath of the expansion of the court in eighteen thirty seven and I would argue it's that solidly Democratic Pro Slavery. Sort of influence on the US Supreme Court from the Eighteen Thirties to the eighteen fifties that leads to the most controversial ruling in the history of the Supreme Court, and that is, of course, in eighteen, fifty, seven dread Scott Versus Sanford mark. You've written a really important book about the dread Scott Decision tell us how the politics of slavery leading up to the dread. Scott. Decision and including the dread Scott decision shaped the composition and reputation of the court from the eighteen thirties to the time of Lincoln's election and eighteen sixty. The book by the way is on sale in the lobby but to follow on what Tim said. Remember the circuits are located geographically and the understanding is that. A justice should reside in the district. Well one of the things Jacksonians did is even though population. was moving northwards and north westwards. In eighteen, thirty, seven. Five of the judicial districts. Are located entirely within slave states. Only four. Are located. In free states. So, the first thing that means is at all times, the Supreme Court before the civil war has a five to four judicial majority. Second Point that Tim also raise is most of the appointing justices of mostly appointing presidents are Democrats. And it turns out northern Democrats are far more accommodating. Of. Slavery then northern whigs. So it turns out time of dread. Scott for their foreign north injustices. To are Democrats. To our wigs. So what's the vote in dread? Scott it seven to two? It's the five southern justices and the to Democrats against the two wigs. So. This is why Democrats say SEE NONPARTISAN JUDICIARY Northern Republicans said, what do you mean? It's the slaveholders and their democratic allies. Fascinating and all call out the book for our listeners is dread Scott and the problem of constitutional evil and mark grabbers powerful book notes and argues that Dread Scott was actually constitutionally plausible in its day, check it out and learn. Timothy, evener, you also have written about the way that the politics of slavery influence the composition reputation of the court from the eighteen thirties leading up to dread Scott. So take us through the same period and then introduce us to the battles over the size of the court that began during the civil war. Sure. So the major issue in national politics in the aftermath of the war with Mexico, which ends in eighteen forty eight is the question of the extension of slavery into the West. So starting in the late eighteen, forty s then into the eighteen fifties. Northerners. Southerners Democrats whigs are all weighing in on that issue of whether and how slavery is able to or shouldn't be able to extend into the West. And what happens by the middle of the eighteen fifties as a new political party the Republican Party. Forms and that party takes and explicitly anti extension of slavery stance. They are a free soil party. They nominate their first candidate for president eighteen, fifty six. That's John. C. Freemont he loses to James Buchanan but their second nominee is Abraham Lincoln and when we talk a little bit about Linkin and why he's so significant here in the context of Dread Scott. Eating to say that Abraham Lincoln makes his political reputation nationally. For his opposition to the Supreme Court's ruling in Dread Scott. So in eighteen, fifty, seven in that case, Chief Justice Roger B twenty who had been appointed by Andrew Jackson back in the eighteen thirties and is still on the court by Eighteen fifty seven chief justice Roger Tony Rules vary significantly. That slaveholders have a right to take their property there and slaved people or property as chief justice. Tawny. saw them into federal territory. So in other words, the Supreme Court, in that case tries to resolve the major political issue that had been around as I said since the war with Mexico. So this has been an issue National Politics for ten years twenty in his fellow justices are trying to resolve it. And they do so in favor of slaveholders in what they understood as the property rights of slaveholders. So Lincoln of course, in eighteen, fifty eight when he's running for the US Senate in the State of Illinois he's basically debating, Stephen Douglas all over the state in eighteen fifty eight what they're really arguing over the Supreme Court's ruling in Dread Scott. And Lincoln is in a difficult position because his whole Party platform has been deemed unconstitutional by Chief Justice Tony's ruling But that energizes his own sort of political base and it. It turns Lincoln into a national figure in that, he's the leading opponent of the Supreme Court ruling in Dread Scott. Verses. Sanford Mark I want them to now connect the battles over the constitutional status of slavery and Dread Scott the battles over the Size of the supreme. Court. So in eighteen, thirty, seven, as we said, President Jackson added two additional justices and expanded the number of Federal Circuit Court districts and then the next expansion is in eighteen sixty three one congress creates the tenth circuit during civil war and the court briefly has ten justices. Why did Congress create that additional circuit in eighteen sixty three and how does that relate to battle over labor? Well, Congress has two reasons. Reason. Number one again was nonpartisan. The Tenth Circuit was, California. California was growing by leaps and bounds. It made no sense. To have a Justice Riding Circuit where say your circuit was Arkansas Louisiana Texas California. Given the policies you need. A circuit in California. And when you have the certain you how to judge. But if I may go back a year, the really.

Eighteen Thirties Scott US Supreme Court Abraham Lincoln Supreme Court President Jackson Federal Circuit Court president Tim Justice Riding Circuit Mexico Democratic Court. Republican Party Chief Justice Roger B whigs Chief Justice Tony congress California
"19th century" Discussed on We The People

We The People

07:48 min | 1 year ago

"19th century" Discussed on We The People

"The circuit at a period when there are no roads, no railroads difficult to travel around the circuit riding was very. It was very difficult. Justices didn't like it, and so a building on Mark's point part of what happens in eighteen a one is that when Congress passes the Judiciary Act of eighteen o one part of what it's doing is it's ending the process of circuit riding in order to add Federal Circuit Court. Judges. So what this does is it adds a a sort of a separate layer of federal judges in the process establishes fifty some odd new federal. judgeships right as President Adams is about to leave office. So these are the individuals known as the famous midnight judges. So this is very, very controversial in that. These are all individuals who will be named by President Adams. So it shouldn't be so surprising to us that in eighteen O to a Jeffersonian Congress. basically is able to repeal that act of eighteen o one and to put back onto the justices of the Supreme Court, the duty of having to ride circuit. So all of those federalist appointed judges sort of disappear at that point and that task then has to go back to the supreme. Court. So. Many of these arguments in the early nineteenth century or not so much focused on the size of these supreme. Court, as focused on the number of federal judges that are part of the entire federal system mark can you tell us more about the midnight judges experiment law students know from Marbury versus Madison that President Adams is staying up until the last hours of his administration signing digital commissions, which he then gives to his secretary of State John Marshall to deliver in Marshall for famously to deliver to Marbury. The obvious question does that establish the president's can appoint judges until the last moments of their. Administration and then tell us more broadly how the politics of Party competition in this era were reflected in competing understandings of constitutional authority and reflected in these court back and battles. The. Interesting feature. Of early American constitutional politics. That the Judiciary Act of eighteen o one highlights. Is, Congress the early congresses had two sessions. The second session began in December after the election. So it would turn out that half of what a Congress did. Happened after the election. Well. In November eighteen hundred, it becomes clear. Guess what the federalists have gotten shellacked. And what happens in December? Eighteen. Hundred. The federalist who still have majorities in both houses of Congress and control the presidency. Have three months to do their best or do their worst depending on your perspective. And one of the things they do is they dramatically expand. The Federal Judiciary is professor has highlighted. And in particular, they create thirteen new. Circuit Court justice ships, and Adams appoints them. And it's interesting that whether the Supreme Court could declare a law unconstitutional everybody thought. The law that Marshall might declare. Constitutional was the judiciary act of eighteen O two which repealed the judiciary act of eighteen o one. Na. Marbury versus Madison which dealt with us very unimportant. But first thing this established. Was a president and Congress get to nominate. Appoint. And confirm justices. Until they are constitutionally no longer in office. So. Donald Trump. Contemporary, art. Simply, factually everybody agrees. that. If Donald Trump appoints. Congress Confirms Donald Trump Commissions a supreme court justice five minutes before his term of office ends that person is a Supreme Court justice. The question which is debated. is whether in fact, Congress can do anything about it, but Congress has to do something about it. So if Congress were to do nothing. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, one. Everybody agrees those justices were legal. The question is whether Congress can say as Congress said in eighteen O two, they didn't say by the way it's a partisan judge I said you know. The federal judiciary. It's costing lots of money. And we all agree. You know there are budget deficits, a budget deficits. Now, we could save some money. By getting rid of the offices. So there's an agreement. That you can't get rid of a judge. But. To suggest, maybe you can get rid of the office. Now here's what we don't know. The Marshall Court would not touch that. At all. The constitutionality of the Judiciary Act of eighteen o two has never been tested. So we don't know. What the law would be if a congress decided to get rid of offices. But not the judge and then a judge say sued and said I want my salary. And by the way, my vote counts. We do know by the way, Congress refused to pay the salaries of the midnight judges. Wow Tim I have to ask the obvious follow up. How would it work hypothetically today a congress could eliminate an unfilled supreme court seat or lower court seat. Or could eliminate the position of an actual judged that judge would retain article three tenure but wouldn't be able to occupy the seat and then what would the arguments for and against the constitutionality of doing that be. Well. It is true that seats have. been eliminated but that process in the nineteenth century mostly happens through acts that do so by attrition and the best example of that comes during or immediately after the US civil war in eighteen, sixty six. But you know. To to sort of bring this back to the politics and the party basis for all of these controversies. One of the interesting things that happens by the eighteen thirties. Earlier, we were talking about that act of eighteen, thirty,.

Congress Supreme Court President Adams Federal Circuit Court Federal Judiciary Donald Trump Circuit Court Marshall Court Marbury president John Marshall Mark US Tim I Madison professor
Banksy's migrant boat overloaded, stranded at sea

ABC Perspective

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Banksy's migrant boat overloaded, stranded at sea

"A mayday call from a new migrant rescue ship funded by the famous artist Banksy that ship tweeting today it's rescued more migrants in the Mediterranean and is looking for a port with more than 200. Now onboard. Bright pink boat is called Louise Michel, named after the 19th century French feminist and features a Banksy mural. Of a girl in a life vest holding a heart shaped safety boy. ABC is Megan Williams. This is ABC News.

Banksy Louise Michel Abc News ABC Megan Williams Mediterranean
The Big Tech Hearing Proved Congress Isn't Messing Around

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

10:03 min | 1 year ago

The Big Tech Hearing Proved Congress Isn't Messing Around

"The purpose of today's hearing is to examine the dominance of Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google. Roger the covert 19 pandemic. These corporations already stood out as titans in our economy. As American families shift more of their work, shopping and communications online, These Giants stand to profit. Locally owned businesses. Meanwhile, Mom and pop stores on Main Street facing economic price is unlike any in recent history. Rhode Island Democrat David Cellini, opening today's House hearing with the heads of the world's big tech companies. Amazon's Jeff Bezos out of Apple's Tim Cook, Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg and Google Sunder Pitch I. The foremen faced hours of questions from House lawmakers over whether they've used their superpower status to crowd out competition. And enrich themselves. The House Judiciaries Antitrust committee, which Cellini chairs has been looking into that question for the last year. Joining us to talk about the hearing today is tech expert Tim Woo. He teaches at Columbia Law School and is the author of the book The Curse of Bigness, Anti Trust in the New Gilded Age. Him welcome back to press play. Thanks for having me here. Well, you've argued for a very long time that the's tech giants have gotten too big. What do you think today's hearing accomplished in terms of getting more support to break them up? Well, they I think there are you know, for the first time, putting the most intense documents right in front of them and seeing how they react, and I think what we've gotten out of them, especially on Facebook. Is already some admissions of anti competitive intent that to my mind, make the case for filing a complaint even stronger. And what were some of those admissions that you heard today. Well, Ah. Mark Zuckerberg was questioned about by Jerry Nadler about the his. Ah, why he bought Instagram and pretty much Zuckerberg admitted they were ah, dangerous competitors. We sought to eliminate them at Natalie reminded him that it's illegal to buy off competitors because I don't want to compete with them, and they left it there. But, yeah, that was, I think a big admission and the main thing I've taken from the hearing so far. But isn't that part of business of hostile takeovers and trying to squeeze out the competition isn't part of the American way of doing business, so there's a difference between beating out your competitors and buying them. And since about 18 90. It's been illegal to buy a company just because you're sick of competing with him. You know, you could imagine. Let's take Coke was tired of Pepsi People's Children, Coke and Pepsi, you know and said, All right, forget it. We'll just buy each other and, you know, settle the so so Now it's been illegal since 18 90 or so. Right. So when it comes to Facebook, what about the issues of how it Spreads misinformation, especially campaign misinformation, and, you know, fake news for lack of a better term. Yeah, I know. It hasn't so far. Um, it has a little bit sorry, especially hate speech. I think the big issue there that they're focusing on and Is this idea that that Facebook has an impunity because they have such a secure market position that they're not really afraid of advertising boycotts. They're not really afraid of people leaving That's the least a point that the House representatives were trying to make, and so therefore they don't really have an incentive to clean up their act. What about the other companies? Amazon that also has incredible market share. Can you first catalogue just how big Amazon is and how much bigger it's gotten since the current virus epidemic? Yeah, you know, the Amazon has closed in on the market cap of 1.5 trillion They have 280 billion in revenue. They have increased dramatically. Actually, stock prices increased since the beginning of the Corona virus by I don't know the exact percentage don't want to get it wrong, but by a tremendous amount, in fact, And there was one day in which Jeff Bezos gained $13 billion personally, so they are the biggest of big attack for the first part of hearing they didn't get any questions, but representative Dia Paul brought it in accusing them. Of lying in front of Congress about how they treat third party sellers and pressing bass. Those hard on how he runs his marketplace. So they they, they've got some of they've got some fire. Coming in. Yeah, I guess the problem. There is not only well they sell, you know products from third parties always there slow selling their own products, and so they are. I guess in competition with 1/3 party supplies on their own platform. How does that work? I mean, that's I think the acquisition or the problem is that people worry that Amazon has become more or less the dominant online retailer. They have some competition Homer, but you know, more or less dominant. So you make it on Amazon are Or you don't make it at all. And if that's the marketplace, the prospect of You come up with successful thing? I don't know Better mousetrap, and then Amazon makes their own copy of it. So the Amazon version of it and then sells it for less. You know, that turns into a sucker's game, and I think that's been the main complaint about Amazon is ah, less that they You know about their competitors or something but more that they have turned the marketplace into something of a rigged game for their own products. Right and a sweet noted Jeff Bezos is the world's richest man. Right now, the company is you outline is just so big. It's hard to even wrap your mind around it. Is there any way you could break up Amazon or hasn't just become too big to break up? That's a good question. You know, it hasn't been subject to a lot of discussion, probably for the reasons you suggest. Most of scrutiny of Amazon is how they treat the marketplace. I think for a true old school antitrust type who just believes that too much power to concentrated should always be broken. Would want to switch, you know, break Amazon into some kind of pieces. One way might be to break off their Web services division, which is a dominant in its space. You could also imagine, as with it and t breaking it into baby Amazons. I guess that are supposed to compete with each other. But I know it hasn't been unlike Facebook and even Google. Has been talks about how would you break them up? Think Amazon. It's been more about can they? Can you get them to run their at their market place better? And then Google. Obviously a search giant and it's become a verb. It's such an intimate part of who we are at this point again. How would you break up Google if you could It's a good question. Let me let me say that Google has come under fire this hearing both from Sicily knee on the idea that they are essentially eating their ecosystem That is to say. You know if you if you like like with Amazon actually similar that if You know, you could come up with a really successful Web service of some kind in your sort of small enough that Google will make a version of it and then send all the traffic to it so that that's the accusation against them. As for you know, what would you do to Google one You could say, don't do that. That's what the Europeans are trying to dio. Another would be to say, Well, listen, it Google, you run the search part and just leave it there. Don't do everything else. Okay. Maybe run Gmail, maybe right maps. But all these other little things that are just clones of other companies. Stay out of that, or make them be independent companies. I should add. By the way, there's you know, I'm maybe we get to this, but there's been AH, Google face us a lot of Republicans during the hearing, talking about different issues. Trying to get Google to admit that it Ah Is too friendly to China. Eyes too unfriendly to the US Pentagon. That's been another theme of this hearing is that I think should be mentioned. Well, you bring up China, and I guess the argument against breaking up these companies is that they're competing against Chinese companies, which In many cases have the backing of the state and there's there's no limit to their monopolistic practices. And so if these are global companies, should there be different rules when it comes to monopoly now than there were, you know, back in the 19th century. Yeah. Or the 20th? Yeah, that is the argument. So you know, kind of goes like this. If you break up Facebook or make fix books, life difficulty the Chinese will take over. It's kind of a national champion like argument. So we have to have our guys. Um I don't find it convincing at all. Last time we heard that kind of argument was when Japan was the all great mighty power that was going to take over everything in America. And they said it so you can't break up the tea and you can't break up IBM. I think we've had a better track record. Forcing American companies to be competitive. It's not breaking them up, at least putting him under heavy scrutiny like Microsoft and hoping a new generation arises. So yeah, I think that's a pretty lame excuse not to enforce the law that put it that way. So what do you think is going to come out of this? You know, I think from what I've heard there was some documents that were coming out of this that nobody has seen. And I think they put more pressure on the administration and also the states to file complaints. I would not be surprised if Google ends up on the receiving end of an antitrust complaint before November. And after this hearing, I wonder of Facebook's gonna get 12 or whether that's going to be something that the election decides. But, yes, I think it adds to the pressure to file actual cases as opposed to talking about it.

Amazon Facebook Google Jeff Bezos Mark Zuckerberg House Judiciaries Antitrust Co Columbia Law School David Cellini Tim Woo Rhode Island Tim Cook Titans Roger Apple Jerry Nadler Congress Microsoft Natalie Coke
"19th century" Discussed on The Clappers

The Clappers

06:14 min | 1 year ago

"19th century" Discussed on The Clappers

"Jecklin is somebody I think I've avoided saying anything and everything for as long as he's been ejectment, except something on Fox where he he was doing lifestyle program, I sort of television studio wants, but otherwise I've avoided key Jackman all his career, but not anymore. Won't want, it is not bad education. Oh, right, which I haven't seen I a good. Look it depends on the kind of silly cow. Few if you're the kind of fellow. Fellow fellow him since Fila. Fail that was. Absolutely couldn't take your eyes away from Craig Thompson and Visa cards. And then what Ching Kathy Jackson lying to him like he was. A little refresher course here android. Going he'll services. You Yeah, okay gene. Craig Thompson was accused and eventually convicted. Craig Johnson was was A. He was a member was a member of parliament. He was a member of parliament he had. Worked for the Hill Services Union. And he had. Used the credit card for forms of entertainment that we're not generally sanctioned for us for somebody in his position the word. Into into, this chance brothels. Cigarettes from the civil living I'm having to go back to remember banks the booze as well. It was told resource prostitutes, and but what was what was most delicious of course is how with fiery A. Cathy laid into him. And of course it has being Kathy Jackson being the head of the. Whatever that position. However it was of course discovered and revealed and that at least seventeen. Counts of fraud. She committed herself from paying her then husband fifty thousand dollars. Nothing that anybody can see. That was apparently sanctioned, but there's no proof of that too shopping sprees. Innovation, so basically. Only now I think the charges actually been. It's been going on for a very long time and. There is. If people aren't people who are interested in corruption, people interested in people with clean fingers or apparently clean things denouncing those with dirty ones, then turning out to not have such clean fingers themselves people interested in the interesting way that that it almost seems like the system can be gamed Kathy Jackson. was applied for Legal Aid for instance, and was refused because of the the wealth between she and her partner, who was a vice president at the Fair Work Commission, whose name is I, think Michael Moore. Yes my waller. who took nine months of sickly barrister worked for the Abbott government briefly. Barrister took nine months of sick leave to represent her. It's Tawdry and amazing strength this the real life stuff right now. This film bad education is an American film where virtually that happens, but transferred to the education system right Allison Janney, who we all know and Love Place Assistant Superintendent. based in one school. and. The school. Reporter on the school newspaper is. Researching into something that's happening. They like some construction. And she starts to find strange things in the finance seemed to do with the construction of this thing happening at the school, and she just keeps digging and digging and digging and finds that that the Allison Janney character Pam Glacken. Has Been Embezzling and so Hugh Grant's character, frank frank to sunny side throws were under the bus and. Go, but now it gets even deeper. Than, and it's delicious. It is just delicious. It's it's not at anybody wrote. This is actually a true. This had actually happened in real life, so it's got nothing to do with the hill services union here in Australia, but I think the you're drawing the parallel with the a similar rip off. That went on in the public education system in in Victoria as well so. seemless was. The status of the charge. was going to mention the at a nepotism that's come up in the state schools and get weekly shorter time, not going to deal with that. But it's very. That's also very interesting. I was. I was delighted when I read about that. Eating in that. Mrs Ropes are delighted when they find out things like that so anyway. This is a very enjoyable film acting 's. Of Hugh, Jackman and Allison Janney of superlative, it's a great story and he's very charismatic. Philo to everyone loves him. He's the guy that's made everything great in the Long Island. School district's. You know typically yeah, easy. Just like Kathy. Exit was heralded as a hero and a whistle blower by tiny Abbott and guess what happened. It's just delightful and delicious. HBO So I can't see it anymore on constantly. Yep You people fuck still now. People Fox still people. You guys can see that if you like and then I'll post a little thing on Kathy. Jackson and Craig Thompson and Michael Lola. Four corners thing that you can which I will have watched ever since it came out. Between what to get on the clap is facebook page. What's that I? Get a taste of reality and then go into the The fiction of bandage -cation. Hide we talk about the beach before. Thornton. Yes! We did yes, we did YEP YEP. Yeah, we did. We really did like I. Mean really edited that one so. Wait into that. All right okay. Anything else until. I'm I want you took something finish finishing up all right Andrew..

Kathy Jackson Allison Janney Craig Thompson Kathy Hill Services Union Fox Hugh Grant Jackman Craig Johnson Fila Kathy Jackson. Jecklin Long Island facebook fraud A. Cathy Abbott government Australia Thornton
"19th century" Discussed on The Clappers

The Clappers

07:28 min | 1 year ago

"19th century" Discussed on The Clappers

"Consider. My boyhood days see now like a scarcely believable. Full of wonders and wickedness. Night go wherever we choose. On their credits says Mike impossible to tyler's most unreasonable muffin man. Is. Very very ill vario. Dangerously she. Very, sorry. Adaptation of Charles Dickens, novel, obviously and Eddie. Amando is a guy who made in the thick of it sorry. The thick of it in the loop. Avenue, five spice. Thing that's on on TV at the moment the death of Stalin so if you're if you're familiar with the with his work, you'll know that language is such a vital part. Of his interest, and he's funny, right, it's very funny. Yeah, so this is this is. Probably Dickens's most personal novel in some ways I think there's a lot of awareness that has drawn from his own life story. You know this sort of the experience of working in a boot blacking factory of childhood, poverty and Deprivation and so on. So Dev Patel plays. Plays David Copperfield as I certainly as an adult in this. And Obviously they're patil of Indian parentage, and so you've got brown skin, diver Copperfield, which is remarkable and not remarkable, it becomes very quickly. Not a thing you know it's it's. It's the most I think it's the boldest piece of sort of colorblind casting I've seen. You'll have parents of character who are of different ethnicities of different cities that is not reflected in the character, and he kinda got well whatever. All bets are off you're not. I come into my for my wife that that that's like that's the best example of colorblind casting scene. She said well. It's not it's not one hundred percent. Call Blind. What do you mean she said well? If you're going to completely colorblind than the young version of a character, and the division wouldn't need to look at all I could be different. E S. That money, really really. Ought! To not have to worry about that question. and. The anyway. It's it's. I found really really enjoyable at rattles along such apiece. It's just. It's a fairly riot story in which David is always struggling to get a toehold in the world. Everything is falling apart around him. The you know the famous character, Araya, heap pile by Bam wish, or in this sort of starts off as a sort of sniffling servant at a at a at a boys college when we first meet him the boarding school to which Davis sent in one of the brief moments where he seems to have found. A little bit of soccer in the world and then now. You're Ri- heap. Ends up sort of. Working his way into. A firm of Accountants lawyers and taking over and sort of embezzling his way to success. It's just. It's a really really interesting story. Because that the euro he story is actually in some ways you can go. He's a villain of the pace, but actually it's about class. Story is about a guy who is destined to be denied opportunities. Is Life doing you know by by any means necessary? You're riot until now you're right, yeah! It's a really really interesting characterization in this film. I mean he's kind of. He's a polling, but he's also. He's also a character. It can kind of empathize with which is. I mean it's a long time since I've read the book and I can't really recall if that's how I felt. I think you take it as satire we've. Saron humanise comedy with an under under sort of current. I think of of. Social criticism of social analysis I suppose. I never knew have funny. Charles Dickens Waugh's until I saw Simon callow doing that thing I think he might. Did you see that two or not in at the? Nine. He's one man one man things really good, but it was. It was really funny and I thought well. That's good. He's being Dickens and he's making it funny because these kind of actor. But then I heard him reading from pickwick papers. It was who Larry's I haven't laughed like that at anything that I've read in deacons and. Simon callow! Fun and an excellent actor. Dickens's except a lot of the plaudits as well for being an didn't when I was young when I read a lot, and it just seemed frightful, and and terrifying in Maine and nasty didn't seem funny to me at all, but as a as a man. Has. Somewhat of MISANTHROPE EST himself. MISANTHROPE I laugh now. This this is definitely dark elements like come. The young David's mother remarries a fellow called mood stern while the names that great. Fantastic. Gwendolyn Christie from Gamma threatens turns up as the sister of merged stern, and it's like a fantastic cast. Bendik Wong is the guy who plays the the the accountant Mr. Wakefield ben wish as a size your heap. TILDA SWINTON is in there as a sort of wealthy and completely dotty betsy, trautwein. Who has this permanent house guest? Splash Miami love apply by Hugh Laurie. Hugh Laurie into this week at last together. It's just it's just a really really great cast. In vape briefly hugh, Laurie. was He inherited his character and I? Think this whole Larry is so guess I have a friendship for that he. He knew I'm well speaking of. People worked together. In the past pita capacity. As Mr Mukuba, who at one point I'm David, some sort of I guess you'd call them a benefactor except that he's always trying to outrun. The bailiffs is completely destitute at every moment, and never picture him with the Physique of Peter Cappelli. Interesting. About Physique but the the accent is just. It's hilarious because it's capacity is of course Scottish, but s macabre is I think. We're probably supposed to pay him somewhere around the center of London, but he's always is always trying to do a slightly posher accent site, slipping and sliding all over the place which I think is deliberate number fairly certain is delivered so it kind of. Social aspiration thing going on. Anyway. It's A. Confined to see this. Thing about it sounds great. I watched a film. I tell you what it was called. You'd like this film I. Think it's Got Hugh.

Charles Dickens David Copperfield Simon callow Hugh Laurie accountant Larry Charles Dickens Waugh Dev Patel Amando Deprivation soccer TILDA SWINTON Eddie Mike Stalin Peter Cappelli Araya Ri tyler Gwendolyn Christie
"19th century" Discussed on The Clappers

The Clappers

07:56 min | 1 year ago

"19th century" Discussed on The Clappers

"Class is and this is called. On this episode of the Clapper's kidnapped Robert Louis Stevenson, and because we're really keeping on top of what's going on just out fresh releases David Copperfield. Better Education Film you can see with great resonance for us here in Australia and sticking with the late nineteenth century literary. Sauce! We're also talking of the well. Last time we spoke, we were enjoying some of the new freedoms. Doesn't that seem like a long time ago? Does that now Rebecca. Seventeen. That's the film with Liam Hold Holding in Petah grades I believe. Good film I enjoyed that philosophy surprise when paid stats shouting in German while getting mown down by the prison guards very surprising. If you haven't seen the film I've just ruined it for. As you want. I love ruining film I really do. You should avoid. What sixty years. I. Think I think I'M GONNA exercise that would from my that phrase from my vocabulary? No, it spent online. Yes, spent a lot of time in my vocabulary. Anyway, spoiler alert! Look I think the a statute of limitations I'm just not quite sure where he said it, but. Sixteen years is probably the limit. Sixty seven sixty seven years as a matter of fact. I was not sure when it was my. Only made fifty three. Three all right so. Yes it. We are no longer. We're in Maryland of. Free, we are to Rome For Walk the other day and Show he did. It was good. It was good. I hate long walks well the thing the thing is. We might have talked about this before but I I find that the dividing line between work not work has just about being obliterated and yeah I I find I can. Days, and in some cases, many many days without bicycling, leaving leaving my office, spice or the couch either a lot of you know watching stuff. Get much of it work. And and I'm suddenly like I've been out of the house and it's been. It's been free dis days five days and I'm going a little bit mad. So Yeah, so I think every now and again I I went walking walking in the rain and it was really kidding. A love to are you GonNa? Read some of your power in this episode of the Clapper's Pekinese. Behind my. I, happy to I would love to hear your poetical IAMBIC response to walk down a beer. pent-up pent-up amateur. The. Meter in which I'm writing. What about you? You've been well. Yes and no. I was going to go up to see me for week, but we've been banned from Sydney. That we were banned from Sydney, and from, didn't go didn't go to Sydney, and then we were still banned from everywhere, so booked a couple of nights. In AIRBNB not far from here so about an hour and a half from he and like the very day that we would sit to. The announcement came that we will have to be in our bids by midnight so. So, it didn't go now, we could have snuck fe I mean we could have gone because it wouldn't have been anyone there in the middle of the Bush. We could have snuck the quite effectively I. Think and none the wiser, but just didn't feel. It was in the spirit of doing the right thing, even though we could fat loop, there's been a lot of tricky information like you got to one website and we would have been right to. Go to another and no, you must not get your holiday house or I. Hold I, but if you're on holiday, you can stay on holiday. He'd have to a little bit on the confusing. We actually why. We had three nights in a rented house down in on the peninsula group, Peninsula and And when you know when the order came, it was coming Oh God to have to stay here for the rest of our lives on no seven tariff several hundred. About a week and we're broke. So we we we managed, we managed to sort of a ls. Die Income. Heim and it was it was nice to actually manage to like. Be somewhere else somebody that wasn't. My House. That was the thing we've been in our house and this is. The first worse will of problems I mean it's nothing to complain about at all given. What's happened in the Flemington Kensington thousand. What is supposedly a healthy becomes a police issue and That is shocking and surprising as it was. Not, surprising and inevitable, using weaponising the police in using them to force people who've committed no crimes. Just was absolutely. Infuriating and a very sorry example of how not too many inch a health crisis. You know it's not one of those apocalyptic films with Clive Owen Michael Kind. You know it's it's still we're still in a reasonably civilized society here Did you have a test for Covid nineteen I've had yeah. I had one in my I think it was. Okay and holds good for a few months. Does it you have? To think. Tells you I mean it's like. It's like a survey gives you, it gives you. A gives you. Like finding at that point in time I, mean I could have walked out of the surgery. Well two days. To attitude is lighter I got my my result of negative. I by the time I got that result type could well have been infected and. Exactly I mean it doesn't it doesn't last? It doesn't have any lasting I was I was. When I saw. Keisha didn't notice it hard to see my facial expression. Doing this we cloudy this. Time. People have used that as an excuse anyway. Should I have also? It took me about some of say. Seven goes to get the COVID nineteen tests. It was not easy I heard. That doesn't mean you had the finish up. In is seven times. Unpleasant we always together and we got to the the SH THE SH shopping Santa nearest asks. That was doing it. Up in the cock you got to the point where you turn off to go into the Compaq testing close for tonight. Oh, about four thirty. I kind come back the next day. Get into an even longer Q. Get directed past the point where you go into, take your test up and around on this massive maze and I'm thinking this is very odd, and it was in the morning and woman on the other side of the road. Yield that dot don't bother turning everybody away and I I seriously. And, they they were at at. In the morning they had a bank of about a thousand cars during these loops and circuits all around that that will just keeping holding, and not letting anybody in it was, it was amazing and the day before I Brung Savita say, said yet. Come down, nobody wedding, but they're not doing children. I said all that's no good and I said what were the Alfred says you have to. To make an appointment called Alfred Nolan's during the phone like covid nineteen is like the most important healthy shoe in the state. There's no one urging the phone at the Alfred..

Sydney Alfred Nolan Liam Hold Clapper Australia Rebecca Maryland Covid Robert Louis Stevenson David Copperfield Compaq AIRBNB Brung Savita Alfred Clive Owen Michael Kind Rome Heim Keisha
New York City-based Brooks Brothers to see how bankruptcy suits it

All Things Considered

02:20 min | 1 year ago

New York City-based Brooks Brothers to see how bankruptcy suits it

"Filed for the legal protections of Chapter 11 of the U. S bankruptcy code this morning. Lockdowns and working from home obviously had not been great for the menswear industry. But Corona virus isn't the only thing Brooks Brothers has been dealing with of late. It's go to offering the business suit has been going out of style for years now. Oregon police Justin Ho has more on the rise and the fall of the men's uniform of the business World. Brooks Brothers opened its first store in lower Manhattan in 18 18 when the U. S was made up of 20 states. Future customer Abraham Lincoln was only nine years old when the suit as we know it today started becoming popular in the late 19th century Brooks brothers cashed in. They were right there at the heart of finance at the heart of politics, Really when America was getting it starts? Susan's graffiti is the founder of the Fashion Law Institute at Fordham Law School, she says Brooks Brothers really popularize suits that were ready to wear off the rack that helped that suits fit more people. That's confetti says it also made the suit and the high status that represented more accessible. Everybody had tohave Brooks Brothers suit if you're going to be and they'll class or upper middle class or even another class business person. Graffiti says. By the middle of the 20th century. The suit also became a symbol of corporate conformity. Think mad men. But in the 19 nineties, casual Fridays had become a thing. Then Silicon Valley. Okay hoodies and sneakers and casual became mainstream. Justin Shack, managing director at Rosenblatt Security's on Wall Street, remembers the suit and tie days. I used to own Brooks Brothers suits back when I'm starting my career, and I can't remember the last time I did. Since 2014 the market for men's suits has shrunk by 11% according to the research from Euromonitor and menswear has changed with the Times can get in Cohen's Rothman's menswear store based in New York, he says his biggest seller these days is there. So we saw a lot of genes. We sell a lot of sport codes with Gidon says the suit isn't dead. But the suits he sells tend to be fashionable suits meant for special events. It's not really classic work where that's not what the young guys looking for a suit. The Koven 19 pandemic has only made things worse for the suit. Industry is people work from home in stars have closed. His Brooks Brothers files for bankruptcy. It says it's seeking a buyer for the grant. I'm

Brooks Brothers Brooks Founder Lockdowns Justin Ho Gidon Justin Shack U. S Abraham Lincoln Manhattan Euromonitor Silicon Valley Oregon Susan America Fordham Law School Rosenblatt Security Rothman Managing Director Fashion Law Institute
"19th century" Discussed on No Such Thing As A Fish

No Such Thing As A Fish

13:48 min | 1 year ago

"19th century" Discussed on No Such Thing As A Fish

"The focus okay. It's time to and that is and my thought. Is that the man who invented? Jumanji did so because he hated monopoly. Wow if only we could all kind of channel hatred for monopoly into so creates. I mean. We've all been there right. Yeah he's awesome say his name. Is Chris Van Berg? He is a children's author and illustrator and he's got really interesting ways of how he gets ideas so as well as he looked Monje. The original picture book anti also wrote the Polar Express which also turned into big movie and he said that when he was younger he used to find it frustrating. That if you were playing Cluedo. You couldn't actually interrogate colonel. Muster I if you were playing monopoly. You didn't get any money actually rich at the end. Even if you've built lots of hotels and had all the expensive properties and then he also thought well what are things. I see a lot like everyone's seen footage of Rhino stampede. But they haven't seen vinyl stampede in a living room and then he was like a jungle game that comes to life. That's what I'm GonNa make okay now. Is this huge thing. But which game was he playing when he decided to do Polar Express? I think that would be that train game which I've forgotten. The name of that goes through here on ticket to ride. Wow the annoyed that at the end of ticket to ride in Budapest. This guy has very high demands of his ball games. I would say accepts the fundamental conceit that the the end of monopoly. You don't get thirty grand and the Hilton. So yeah it's interesting. It's another interesting leap. Isn't it that he went from monopoly to rhinos? He must have had a jungle pond. Sean running alongside his hatred of monopoly. You just saw very cool. No I love him and his approach to as he shared a letter fan wrote to him. This is a girl called Alexandra and she said Dear Mr von Ellsberg. I love the books you right. I'm glad you're books is so weird because I am very weird. I think you are weird but great. I wish that volcano in flood would be in my room. Okay What a silly thing to wish for very very troubled home life that we're not really going to have time to get into probably my favorite origin story. Actually for booed game is the two men who invented trivial pursuit in nineteen seventy nine and it's an incredibly boring story After you get to the phones to businessman who thought yeah should we invent trivial seat so it came about one of them said they were inspired to invent it when they were playing scramble and some of the pieces were missing so they couldn't play anymore now if you think about it if you have pieces missing and scrabble? It doesn't Massa the pieces missing that that's a problem secretion. Yeah absolutely crucial piece. I think there are lots of different ways in which you lose pieces so for example if you lose all the vowels that is going to be a tricky game of scrabble to get through. I mean that would actually be great prank to play on someone a maybe. It was the holder for the counters. And they couldn't find a way to display them without the other person seeing what they had must have been the whole very good. We found three different ways in which this origin story stacks. I like the origin of the operation. That game it's like it's a guy in a hospital and you have to pick out bits of his body with tweezers right and if you hit asides that it makes a bus now. This was invented by a student in the nineteen sixties. He was a design student and it was for his job. But before that Benjamin Franklin invented operation in the seventeen hundreds he invented a game which was basically the same it was called treason and it had a picture of King George the second and you had to get a crown out of him and if you touch the sides that it would make a buzzing noise so Benjamin. Franklin invented operation. Isn't that amazing? Incredible James If real life operations anything like operation then surgeons would open up their patients and go. Oh Shit there are. No organs inherited this taken. The organ is that what happens. Brain-dead lose the time pretty much okay. I've never I've never owned a set. Now's a good time. Yeah that's true. I've only got four games one of which I bought for an earlier episode of Fish. Which was the cattle semen? Trading Ballgame Cow. Wow I've I've got the others is the cue ball game. What is scrabble? I think they could turn the you know how. Jumanji is like kind of ball game but then also a movie. Do you think they could turn the cattle semen trading board game into a movie? Yes I absolutely do. I think that guy's hold the world's calcium in stock to ransom and and the rock will have to be involved somehow because they did have a monopoly. The movie didn't they are not making. They've I think they've tried before but they're making a new one with Kevin Hart. He was in the demonte movies. So I feel that he's GonNa Absolutely Concord. Board game. Movie crossovers was going to be very very long. That's the only thing we know about the monopoly Phil House. Loan ruin monopoly. I think they might have ruined already by inventing new updated version. Where it's cashless so they WANNA get in tune with modern man or woman and said cashless monopoly. We'RE BASICALLY MR monopoly. Is THE BANKER. So no player gets to be the banker anymore. Mr Monopoly is a top hat of big top who sits in the middle of the boat on the voice recognition technology to know which players talking to him in a play will say I want to by Park Lane and then he'll deduct that amount from your amount that's gene so takes away the joy of cheating the banker which is the only reason anyone plays monopoly in the first place partly the whole point is to cheat and I know which version you should get. Because they've also made monopolies cheaters edition. Where part of the game is to try and steal from the bank. Lie About your dice rolls and that comes with a set of handcuffs like took handcuffs graves embracing the chasing but there's tons of like nobody monopoly. I had a big list of them and just the ones beginning with a include Aba Monopoly Alton Towers Monopoly Alice in Wonderland Alpaca played that unofficial and Aberdeen Monopoly. There are so many if you if you look up monopoly and if you're attempting find facts about it then half. The news results are different places. Kingston-upon-thames getting its own monopoly set. I wonder what the advantages or whether they franchise it or whether because it seems like no one you know look what necking so. I DIDN'T WANNA KICKS MONOPOLY THAT. I think they're all pandering to this. One Guy who has the world record most number of monopoly sets okay? He's called Neil Scallon and he has the Guinness World Record and how many monopoly sets. Do you think he owns completely. Each one is completely different. Three hundred twelve. I'm going to go over a thousand novelty ones. I'm going to go thousand thousand one on the four hundred. He has as of the twenty fifth of January twenty nineteen so a while ago. Yes two thousand two hundred forty nine different monopoly sets and if you go into the amazing website wealthed of monopoly card and you could see a list of all the ones that you got a lot of money on when he almost have real monopoly on. I'd also on a you and I have a copy of an extremely random monopoly. Don't we we do the University of Kent? Yeah this guy also has no way. That's okay Christmas. In this guy's household must be. I would have loved the aid enough. But it's amazing. Jesus Christ. I wonder what has like like the most sought after the most the rarest special monopoly is 'cause I read about one they made for Wall Street whereas made of solid gold pieces. I think is a bit overkill but I wonder if there's like a I don't know what's like from a tiny village somewhere. Hit just got their own one and selling it and the post office. I wonder what's the hardest to get? I went onto Ebay. I look for the most expensive monopoly at the moment. Oh and it was a Bulgarian monopoly. I guess for some reason the web many made or something like that but yeah it was quite a few. It was about seven hundred pounds or something for Bulgaria monopoly on the Q I I just. I don't want deal scholar to stop him. I wonder if Chris byles book ever like makes up with monopoly. They could make Jumanji monopoly. That would be quite fun. Must be one. I don't think I don't think the world needs more editions of monopoly. I have to say it's so interesting. People who play board games in any serious way all hate monopoly so much. So The Guardian asked people for their least favorite ballgames for a feature. They were writing and one of the responses. Just said monopoly is awful because of the vice grip it has over how the British public ballgames. I'm going to a ball game night at a local comic shops evening. Nobody will be playing monopoly and if it was suggested that I would assume it was a sick joke of some kind in two thousand Sixteen House. Bro Now makes monopoly of announced. They were operating a special hotline on Christmas Day. Where people who'd been traumatized by the monopoly based experiences could call actually run from Christmas Eve to boxing day and I just feel so devastatingly story whatever. Intern was after by Hasbro they. It wasn't a recorded message. They said we'll have experts own hands with the official rule books to instantly settle any disputes and advise on hundreds of common complaints. God Okay so it's Christmas Day. You're an intern. You have to work on your sat by the phone. Would you rather no one called you? All someone called you to talk to you about monopoly. God It's Sophie's Choice isn't it? I'd rather go directly to jail to be honest with you. I was reading monopoly strategy and I'm sure so. There was an article in the New York magazine with the headline. You don't hate monopoly. Just suck at it and said the reason we hate. We can't play it properly but if everyone can play it properly than we all suck it again because there are only so many key skills and tricks You can get but the main things they say are if you're after. The oranges is good to stay in jail. Because there's more chance of rolling double completing your sets When they are not so many properties available. It's good to sit in jail because then you'll have to pay any rent and they were very cross about the some people play at version where you collect the money from fines if you lend them free parking and they are very angry about that because apparently it messes with the game and makes it more random oh is the only joy monopoly game to pick up. I hate the well. You hate the people use the actual rules of monopoly. You need the hotline. I read an article with the twenty-fifth UK championship when Natalie Fitzsimmons. And she gave her tips of how to win monopoly and this is I mean I think this is terrible. What she does so she basically goes and buys all of the property she can mortgages the ball and so she gets the money back but she doesn't collect any rent but it doesn't matter because the rent so small and then she collects one group and then put full houses on each of those groups. She doesn't a hotel on there or anything like that and then she tries to get into jail for as long as possible. Apparently this is the best technique to win the game. Wow Oh isn't that another thing she says is sometimes you can get instead of mortgaging the mall you get a few different groups and then you always put four houses on each so. There's not enough houses left for anyone else to build out says when you just run out the pieces of the game yet this enough houses in the bucks for everyone to put four houses on each things so if you put forward all yours it stops anyone else would be able to do it. Dot COM run out of houses? You Oh is this the real? When we were younger we used to just put like a thimble. Instead of a house spoke at Rome. Oh my God that's amazing. That's realistic building materials. You can't replace him with a thimble that's true we've actually never mentioned on this pocus though. I think we have on. Cue I the origin story of monopoly. So basically there's this Guy Charles Darrow and if you go on the monopoly website actually if you look fine. The history which I think they've buried a deeper than it used to be. Charles Darrow. Who Dreamed Up Monopoly in the nineteen thirties and this guy dour went around saying he just come up with it in one interview. Someone said well you know whether they come from and he had no origin story he said it was like Mushek. It just came to me in fact what happened. And this was only really uncovered in the Nineteen Seventies. Was that there was a woman about thirty years earlier in Nineteen Zero Three. Elizabeth Magee and she sounds so awesome. She was very unusual. Proper self made woman who was independently made living. She was a secretary she wrote. Poetry and short stories should stand up comedy And he came second in a beauty contest. Wouldn't have thought that someone would invent monopoly. But she did lambda odes game and the whole point of it at the time was the expose the folly of capitalism so there were two sets of rules that was the anti monopolists rule where everyone is rewarded for the wealthy they create and then there was the monopoly rule where you build up monopolies and crush your opponents and she didn't quite mean for humanity to fully embrace the second one and this is play but.

Mr Monopoly Aberdeen Monopoly Polar Express scrabble Benjamin Franklin Charles Darrow Jumanji Intern Chris Van Berg Monje Budapest Nineteen Seventies demonte University of Kent Ebay Sean Massa Mr von Ellsberg
"19th century" Discussed on Black History in Two Minutes

Black History in Two Minutes

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"19th century" Discussed on Black History in Two Minutes

"Discovery is at the heart of the study of African American history. Lewis Latimer's parents bravely escaped from slavery to freedom and settled in Chelsea Massachusetts where Lewis was born. He taught himself mechanical drawing while working in Patna. And those skills would lay the foundation for his achievements as an inventor. Having I collaborated on a water closet for railroad cars. Latimer set to work inventing a light bulb that would dramatically improve upon Thomas Edison's original design Latimer, figuring out how to make the carbon filament work more effectively and therefore become more useful so that the my bubble birth much. Eventually sold one of his patents to the United, States Electric Lighting Company. This breakthrough would lead to a productive creative relationship between Latimer and Edison. Working with Edison in his lab, Latimer played a key role in the burgeoning electric lighting business. In the late nineteenth century, a woman named Sarah Boone played a pivotal role as an inventor who would transform the everyday tasks of ironing clothes. At that time, most people would iron fabric by placing a wooden plank between two surfaces as skilled dressmaker. Sarah Boone was determined to find a better way what Sarah Bowen was able to figure out in order to iron women's clothes in particular and more effectively than simple rectangular ironing board was not as useful as one that was curved a narrow at one in boone was granted a patent for her invention in eighteen, ninety two, she earned a place in black history as the fourth African American woman to be awarded a patent in the history of the United States. Against Enormous Odds Lewis Ladder and Sarah Boone. Standard for future black inventions. Today many African. Americans extend the tradition and innovation that they pioneered in science and technology..

Lewis Latimer Sarah Boone Thomas Edison Lewis African American history States Electric Lighting Compa Sarah Bowen Chelsea Massachusetts Lewis Ladder Patna United States
"19th century" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"19th century" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"Catch Thursday <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> just the history <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> of fashion as a production <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> of I heart radio <Speech_Female> for more podcasts <Speech_Female> from iheartradio <Speech_Female> check out the iheartradio. <Speech_Female> App APPLE PODCAST. <Speech_Female> Or whatever <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> else you listen to your <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> favorite shows <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> dear. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Young rocker is more <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> than just a podcast <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> about music. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> It's a memoir <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of how it feels to survive <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> high school <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> when you don't fit in <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and the freeing feeling <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of picking up a deter <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> for the first time <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> it's also advice <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> for anyone <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> who is for was <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> young and his <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> ever felt weird <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> or alone <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> dear. Young <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Rocker is written <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and narrated by me <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Chelsea Ersan <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> executive produced <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> by Jay. Brennan <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> comes to you from <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> double elvis productions. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Listen <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> mcgeer Hawker <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> on the iheartradio <Speech_Music_Female> APP apple podcasts. <Speech_Music_Female> Or wherever <Speech_Music_Female> you get <SpeakerChange> your podcasts <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Hi everyone I'm <Speech_Female> Brooke Burke. I'm <Speech_Female> making King Edmunds. <Speech_Female> And I'm sex and intimacy <Speech_Female> coach <SpeakerChange> Leila Ville <Speech_Female> and we have <Speech_Female> a podcast called <Speech_Female> intimate knowledge. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> That's what this show <Speech_Female> is about <Speech_Female> sack sex <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> It's <Speech_Female> so much more <Speech_Female> than that. <Speech_Female> It's about the ups and downs <Speech_Female> near patients. <Speech_Female> Share your sex. <Speech_Female> Life is about overcoming <Speech_Female> heartbreak <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> and infidelity. <Speech_Female> It's about understanding <Speech_Female> intimacy. And <Speech_Female> what makes you <Speech_Female> happy? And it's about <Speech_Female> everything he wanted <Speech_Female> to know. <SpeakerChange> But you might <Speech_Female> be too embarrassed <Speech_Female> to ask. We're giving <Speech_Female> you intimate <Speech_Female> knowledge. <Speech_Female> Listen to intimate <Speech_Female> knowledge on iheartradio <Speech_Female> APP on <Speech_Female> Apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts find us.

"19th century" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

11:10 min | 1 year ago

"19th century" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"Hi Everyone I'm Brooke Burke I'm making King Advance and I'm sex and intimacy coach Leila Deville and we have a podcast called intimate knowledge. That's what this show is about sack sex bugged. It's so much more than that. It's about the ups and downs near patients ship. Your sex life is about overcoming heartbreak and infidelity. It's about understanding intimacy. And what makes you happy? It's about everything he wanted to know. But you might be too embarrassed to ask. We're giving you intimate knowledge. Listen to intimate knowledge on iheartradio APP on Apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts. Find US welcome back so about those calling cards. They were not exactly new. During the nineteenth century notes one manual from eighteen eighty seven. We say that cards have changed less in the history of etiquette and fashion than anything else. They the shifting pace boards are in style about what they were fifty years. Nee Hundred Years Ago. The plane on glazed card with fine grapes. Script cannot be approved upon the passing fashion for engraved autographs for old English for German texts. All of these have had but a brief our nothing is in worse tastes than for an American to put a coat of arms on his card only serves to make him ridiculous in fact across the board all etiquette books. Recommend this. You know the simpler the calling card of the better so at their most basic a calling card simply had one's name printed engraved upon it and women were compelled to either US miss or Mrs in front of their name. It was kind of unthinkable not to do so. Because this of course indicated your marital status however men could omit Mr in front of their name because it was obviously implied so it was optional but also considered quite proper if one wanted to have their street address engraved in a slightly smaller script and place at either the lower right or the lower left corner and In terms of like the size men's cars were generally a tad more narrow than women's cards. Which in all of this varied a little bit. But it's fair to say that women's cards generally averaged three inches by two point five inches or in metric it's Seven point five by six point five centimeters so it was kind of like a squashed square shape but men's cards were far more tabular but in general the kind of the size of business cards right right and men carried these cards in pocket however women were advised carry cards and card case held in their hand which was an intern held with an embroidered handkerchief. And boy did some of these ladies do it up with their card cases. Let me tell you there are exceptional examples that can be found and they're created from mother. Pearl Exotic Woods Sterling. Silver was especially popular. Any silver cases were often engraved with ladies or the Lady's name or initials. Some of them also included little chain. So they were almost like tiny handbags but they were very flat as they were intended to carry cards only and you can actually herself find surprising number of these little gems for sale on Ebay. These little calling card cases I if you WANNA tumble down the rabbit hole like I did One evening you know because apparently cast this my idea of jamming Friday night when you put on some pants comfy pants you have a glass of wine and then you start trying to research extant examples of calling cards on Ebay. Who Doesn't love a good old fashioned research rabbit? I mean honestly when we began digging into a brief reference an etiquette book from eighteen eighty seven. That's exactly what happened. It says a gentleman does not turn down the corners of his card indeed. That fashion has become almost obsolete. Except perhaps where lady wishes it distinctly understood that she has called in person? So that's right dress listeners. So far we have only covered the most basic of base accuses of the calling card to know an in person visit but in practice. Things got a lot more complicated. Sometimes they were simply left at the front door or delivered by way of a servant or later in the nineteenth century even in the mail and they were considered a token of regard and often times stood in as proxy for an in person visit. And we could go on and on about this for days. All these little INS and outs so cast I propose that we do a speed round highlighting just a few of the copious rules and customs of governing calling and the use of calling cards but do you say just just so we can get them out there and the world freight. Let's do it okay. Betty set you up. I in the I call this season and lady leaves her own card and those of her has been sons and daughters in calling on the sons and daughters of the House. Every visitor should leave a card for the father and mother. The ladies are at home. Cars should be left. The gentlemen of the family after balls amateur concerts theatrical parties garden parties are at homes. Car should be left by all invited guests within a week of the invitation. This is the real kicker. Are you ready for this one? A servant must be taught to receive the cards at the door remembering messages and recollect for whom they are left. Because it is not proper in calling upon Mrs Brown at a private residence or private house to write her name on the car at a crowded hotel. This must be allowed but not etiquette when visiting private houses so that means casts if someone was giving multiple cards to the residents of the House The servant would have to remember who that person was that left the card. For whom saying like. You wouldn't right to this person. The Servant was expected to remember all of this. Oh yeah a lot of things so continuing on after dinner one must inquire for the hostess and pay a personal visit however it is not considered necessary to leave cars after a Tea Lady. Leaves her cars as she enters. The hall pays her visit and the etiquette of the visiting acquaintances thus established for the year. When calling on a friend who was staying with people and with whom you are not acquainted always leave a card for the Lady of the House and then there's also no lady should leave a card upon an unmarried gentlemen except in the case of his having given entertainments at which ladies were present then the Lady of the house should drive to his door with the cars of herself and family allowing the footman to leave them. Young ladies. Cars should almost always be accompanied by that of her mother or her chaperone. It is well on her entrance into society that the name of the young lady be engraved on her mother's cart. After she has been out a year she may leave her own card. Only Oh Gosh. We could do a whole episode on coming women's come out with a two. We should do like a debutante coming out episode. We'll do it for sure. So let's see what else. If one of your friends has delivered a public ration- call upon him when he has returned home and tender to him. You're thanks for the great pleasure and satisfaction for which you are indebted to him and express your high estimation at the luminous elegant etc discourse trusting. That he will be prevailed upon to suffer it published. Okay I don't know about you but first of all. Why is it a him that gave us right right? And I don't know about you but my friends are miserably. Failing at that rule I mean you and I give public lectures all the time and never once has anyone shown up on my doorstep lauding my quote unquote luminous discourse. That's because it's all done on instagram or through text message. Of course all right. This is the final homestretch. So we've GOT VISIT VISIT OF CONDOLENCE. Should be paid within the week after the event which occasions them but if the acquaintance be slight immediately after the family appear at public worship which brings up the point cast that if you are in mourning you're expected to have special calling cards marked you're being in a period bereavement and the book say quote morning cards are surmounted with a broad black margin half morning ones which is about six months in with a black edge. Only that's another entire episode in itself. It is bad taste to keep the cards. You have received around the frame of a looking glass. Such exposure shows that he wished to make a display of the names of visitors which bakes the question. Just how were these calling cards to be kept generally speaking? They're kept on a little trays on the entry hall table and oftentimes the trae featured fluted lip kind of like a pie crust to keep the cards from slipping out as they piled up. Yeah and so while it might be in bad taste to put the cards up around mirror. It was also not uncommon that there was a little manipulation of which card happened to be on top. You know what I'm saying. You know you might just conveniently place the card of your most prestigious social contact on top so that all the other visitors might see it and they would know that you had this social connection and cast ultimately like working on this. It struck me really hard. That in many many ways calling cards at that time function not similarly to the ways that likes function on social media. Today it's just been completely replaced. I guess in This Day and age by social media and like I said earlier text messaging. We just communicate in an entirely different way and speaking of stress listeners. If you enjoyed this episode and with like a follow up show on other aspects of etiquette. We can do that. There's so much more to say it's a whole vast world really so just reach out to us let us know on instagram. Just underscore podcast and this is also our twitter handle. I suppose you could also send your calling card if he really wanted to. I think that does it for us to speak dress listeners. Please consider a mind your PS and QS. Next time you get dressed. Join US Thursday for our weekly Minnesota where we answer listener questions and or keep you up to date on the latest happenings on the world of fashion history whether it be a recommended reading an exhibition or a fun event that we attended recently. If you're a fan of the show we want to grow our community and share with you how you can engage with fashioned history. Now thank you as always talk producers. Tcp and Holly Fry and everyone else at Iheartradio that makes the show possible. Each and every week.

Iheartradio instagram Brooke Burke Leila Deville US twitter Ebay Apple Silver Minnesota Mrs Brown intern Betty Holly Fry
"19th century" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

08:12 min | 1 year ago

"19th century" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"Breeding ground for so much unnecessary drama right. What if you thought your social standing was higher than someone else's and then you found. It wasn't a feels quite subjective. Yeah we also do have to remember that like all this complications and intrigue that it was a rarity at this time that women of the upper middle classes would have job outside the home. So they're role at this. Time was largely wife mother and also to be the social representative for her entire family so knowing the INS and outs of this quote unquote you know these really strict rules. This was an accepted part of her duty and her station and responsibility to her her family really. And I just want to mention one. Notable exception to the rule that introductions were always to be agreed upon by both parties in advance it was always considered appropriate for a woman to introduce her children and husband without asking their permission. I likewise it was okay for her husband to introduce his wife without asking her permission. First of course so now at this point and this is where things start to get a little fuzzy because social gatherings like teas dinners and balls. They created a scenario where it might be possible that not all of the attendees have been formerly introduced prior to the event. No right so this is win. What was known as an introduction by roof went into effect and the gist of this cast? Was that all of. The guests can socialize or may socialize at will as a courtesy to their host but once the entertainments had ceased and as soon as they stepped out of the door into their carriage or onto the street. Neither guest who had interacted with with each other over the evening had any obligation to formally recognize each other ever ever again. Who Just hilarious and strange twists today and also if they did want to continue this association or develop a friendship this process of requesting a formal proper introduction. That would then start from that point forward. So what you're saying is that there's no meeting someone at a party and hitting it off and then texting each other. Your phone number is it was way more complicated. You'd have to reach out to your host actually at this time and request to be formally introduced and get this. The other person did not feel the same way about you. They could refuse your introduction. It was considered entirely acceptable to do so if they did not want to pursue an acquaintance or friendship and if this happened the refuse party would then be expected to pretend as if the initial meeting never took place. Yes so basically. What you're saying is that ghosting is nothing new. You know the Edwardian Victorians knew how to play this game too. So it's pretty funny. Interjections weren't necessarily all that complicated. The long and the short of it boils down to. It's always best practice to ask a friend or a relative to inquire with the other person if they would like to formally make your acquaintance and once that acquaintance was established it would then be expected that this dance of calling on each other would now go into full swing and calling being this process of paying personal visits back and forth. I'm we're going to learn more about that right after this sponsor break. Hey guys it's bobby bones host the bobby bones show and I'm pretty much always sleepy because I wake up at three o'clock in the morning a couple of hours later I get all my friends together so we get into a room and we do a radio show. We share our allies. We tell our stories. We try to find as much good in the world if he possibly can and we looked through the news of the day that you'll care about also your favorite country. Artists are always stopping by to hang out and share their lives and music to wake up with a bunch of my friends on ninety eight point. Seven W M Z Q in Washington DC or wherever the rotates you on the iheartradio APP. Welcome back before the break. We were talking about what happened after two women made each other's formal acquaintance and it was generally expected that the older woman or the woman with the higher social standing would visit or call upon the younger woman. I and she would do so by stopping by her home between the hours of two and six. Pm Although it must be said that different locales sometimes had slightly different hours that were deemed appropriate for making and receiving visits. Yes some other sources that I read said absolutely no earlier than noon. It seems most agree that six. Pm was absolute latest so cast you know noon. Seems a little bit problematic to me because what if someone was having lunch around that time or even a little later and this is actually our servants come in and servants play a really critical role and calling culture. Even many middle class households at this time had servants during the nineteenth century. So it was really expected that a servant would be the individual to answer the door and a visitor would then present her calling card to the servant and inquire. It's an individual. They were there to see where at home the servant would then deliver the card to set individual and or the Lady of the House and if the person was at home and available the visitor would then be ushered into our the dry Rome or the parlor to strike up a conversation. It should be noted that it was considered very bad taste to socialize in this manner in the dining room because the dining room was to be avoided at all costs and less it was a very specific type of social occasion which centered around dining such as luncheons or dinners. So you know hanging out in the dining room. Basically and the very first visits between Newark female acquaintances were considered much more formal than those between longtime friends. And therefore these kind of initial visits were conducted with a little more ceremony and generally. Actually they were not expected to be any longer than fifteen minutes they were really prescribed. Nicety that in indicated one's willingness to cultivate the acquaintance. Perhaps eventually leading it to be a friendship and for these formal visits one tended to dress up for the occasion. Yeah absolutely and one thing that I found a really fascinating is the fact that due to the copious amounts of accessories casts as we know which women war during the nineteenth century. It wasn't expected even on the most formal visits that have visitor remove her bonnet her gloves or even her shaw when she entered the House and we see this to picked it in fashion plates frequently because there might be a an image where a friend is dressed for. Daytime like to the absolute nines and the other woman in the image is slightly more casual. Because she's in her own home so once this very first social call was complete. It would now be expected that the woman who had received the visitor in her home it expected that she would repay the call within one week and there was this absolutely no wiggle room for this. It was considered unfathomably. Rude if you didn't repay this first visit within the week and the to necessarily have to continue as more than formal acquaintances after this point the initial visit and the repay of the visit but the initial call and the repay were really kind of compulsory. You had to do this and I just want to interject. And just kind of put into context that this is the nineteenth century so pre cars that we're talking about so you know this calling is often done with the requirement of a horse and buggy taking your carriage and all your driver. Yeah and the whole time. I've been.

bobby bones representative Washington Newark shaw Rome
"19th century" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

10:29 min | 1 year ago

"19th century" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"Partnership with iheartradio under armor players coaches and athletes will share intimate and personal stories are performing at the highest level. Here is Canadian tat. Lee Georgia Ellen. Were the reason I want is because on the day I was confident and need to continue that mentality to understand that I can be an Olympic athlete. I can compete with the best in the world and just perform listened to the only way is through available now on iheartradio APP or wherever you get your podcast dress. The history of fashion as production of iheartradio Seven billion people in the world. We all have one thing in common every day. We all get dressed. Welcome to dress the history of fashion a podcast that explores the WHO. What win of why we wear. We are fashion of stories and your hosts Cassidy's Agri and April Kelly. Okay dresses ours. I think that any of you out there. Who are Jane AUSTEN OR LOUISA? May alcott fans are about to get a little bit of a thrill because today we are taking a trip back in time to explore the elaborate and prejudice intricacies of nineteenth century etiquette. And you know manners may not be exactly the first thing that comes to mind when you think of perilous situations but let me assure you that some of these codes which govern the social graces during this time period and we are talking specifically here about Europe and America. Here say well. These codes of etiquette can be mind blowing Lee complicated and one false step well. It wasn't just embarrassing. It could potentially mean utter social ruin not to mention these codes of etiquette were specific to gender age and even Marital Status. So you had to keep all of these designations in mind with each and every social interaction you had throughout the day. Many of the rules governing behavior during the nineteenth century can fill a bit overwrought and even a tad ridiculous to us today but at the time they were considered the very fabric and structure of society to even begin to comprehend them ourselves. We of course while we headed straight to the bookshelf for etiquette books of the era. Yes and we are super fortunate to have a whole slew of these types of books special collections at fit. And I look specifically at the following books. I looked at etiquette for ladies which is published by Leeann Blanchard in eighteen thirty nine. I looked at the American gentleman's guide to politeness by Henry. Liu Nets from eighteen fifty nine social etiquette of New York by Abby Buchanan Long Street from eighteen eighty four manners and social usages by Mrs John Sherwood from eighteen eighty seven and manners culture and dress of the best American society by Richard A wells from eighteen. Ninety three okay that was that was a mouthful and that cast is just the very tip of the iceberg in terms of our holdings. We have so so so many more including also ones that are kind of blend of being etiquette and also like a beauty guide as well so right and the great number of these relate directly to the fact that these little books were immensely popular at the time the beginning of the nineteenth century San explosion of not only etiquette books onto the market but also ladies magazines which frequently codified and coached the readers into their finer points of quote unquote proper behavior and in the wake of the French Revolution. The spread of democratic and Republican forms of government really spurred the growth of the middle classes and with all that brand new upward mobility came increased tensions and anxieties over one social standing quotes etiquette is the machinery of society. It is like a wall built up around us to protect us from disagreeable under Brad People. Who were fused? Take the trouble to be civil. Wrote one source from eighteen eighty four so basically anyone who is interested in bettering their station in life. A deft knowledge of etiquette was key to gain acceptance into the world of society proper. You know an an a lapse in this performance of manners and I say performance because it really really was It could be quickly. Chalked up to one's lack of so-called good breeding. And this is the phrase that you see over and over and over again in these manuals good breeding and if one was deemed uncouth or quote unquote. Ill bred that could also make you an undesirable acquaintance at the time because basically anyone who was in your social circle was very much considered a reflection upon yourself yes and this rapid expansion of the middle classes Europe in America during the nineteenth century is a big part of the reason why etiquette books were so popular at the time as we just mentioned so if you weren't necessarily raised in the know you could just buy a book that delineated roles on the proper way to move throughout the world and these books covered all sorts of events and occasions from things. We consider pretty standard today so like table manners wedding etiquette or how to console a bereaved friend but also more than a few topics that we would consider. Well a little niece today. Yes and just a couple of my favorites include how to format a personal letter to the president of the United States. Naturally clearly we've all done right The proper deportment to have when taking one's Harvard exams which I found this especially funny because this is the only university mentioned this etiquette book and I believe at this time. It was only men that could enroll in Harvard. So I guess the etiquette manuals saying go go harvard or go home. I don't know One source I looked at had hilariously titled Section called Lives Shipwrecks. I haven't dove into this quite yet but I remain most intriguing. I will return to that chapter but last but not least is how to deal with quote. Low Bread Women cads slanderers and scandal. Mongers timing. Come on you gotTa love that Punchy Nineteenth Century Language of course there is no way we can possibly cover all of these topics and a single episode of dress so we had narrowed. Today's focus down to what was one of the most interesting aspects of nineteenth century etiquette. And that is the practice of calling and by this. We do not mean placing telephone call because we have to remember that the very first telephone systems were really only commercially. Viable starting in eighteen seventy seven and the adoption for home. Use was rather slow. I have to say According to the US Department of the Interior in one thousand nine hundred only three percent of US homes had their own telephone so that begs the question. Just how did people communicate with each other during the nineteenth century? I mean letter writing. Of course that's a given but there were also this other form of calling these in person visitations which were governed by some of the strictest rules of etiquette but before we even get to the matter of visits and calls. We've I must address the matter of meetings and introductions during the nineteenth century it was rarely considered appropriate for to individuals regardless of their sex to meet without a formal introduction by way of a friend or a relative and even then both parties were supposed to separately agreed to the introduction in advanced unsolicited introductions are bad for both parties and this was stressed by one etiquette. Manual we consulted. Yeah and you might be asked why. Well a formal introduction had the implications that the association between the two parties was going to continue and this was especially true when it came to introductions to women quote great prudence or action must always be used but infinitely more care is necessary as a lady cannot shake off an improper acquaintance with the same facility as a gentleman can do and their character is much easier affected by the apparent contact with worthless and the dissipated out. That's rough the weaker. Fairer sex. The more impressionable right so once. Both parties had agreed to a formal introduction. It was protocol to I. Present not introduced a gentleman to the lady. She in turn was expected to respond with a slight bow. A faint smile and saying his name so the person making the introduction would be like Mr Smith desires to be presented to Miss White Miss White wishes to be acquainted with Mr Smith. Then miss white would bow smile and say Mr Smith and April. This bow was absolutely necessary according to etiquette books which say that unless she bowed gentlemen cannot claim her as an acquaintance. When we say some of these finer points finicky were not lying and right now in my mind so many historical period films are coming into my my mind right and all of that. Formality is making so much more sense. Now because men were to be presented to women and women had to formally accept that social connection so that's between men and women but cast what about introductions between Women Shirley? These were a little bit less complicated. One might think but I mean not really after agreeing to be introduced in the case of two women the younger was to be introduced but not quote unquote presented to the older of the two ladies. If the two women happen to be of similar ages their marital status now came into play and the single eighty would be introduced to them married woman and if two women of the same age and marital status were being introduced the one of lesser social standing would be introduced. I this just sounds I mean. It's exhausting yeah. And also like the.

Mr Smith United States Harvard Lee Georgia Ellen Europe America Jane AUSTEN Leeann Blanchard San LOUISA April Kelly Brad People Henry president Cassidy Liu Nets New York Abby Buchanan Mrs John Sherwood
The Perils of 19th Century Etiquette

Dressed: The History of Fashion

09:08 min | 1 year ago

The Perils of 19th Century Etiquette

"We are taking a trip back in time to explore the elaborate and prejudice intricacies of nineteenth century etiquette. And you know manners may not be exactly the first thing that comes to mind when you think of perilous situations but let me assure you that some of these codes which govern the social graces during this time period and we are talking specifically here about Europe and America. Here say well. These codes of etiquette can be mind blowing Lee complicated and one false step well. It wasn't just embarrassing. It could potentially mean utter social ruin not to mention these codes of etiquette were specific to gender age and even Marital Status. So you had to keep all of these designations in mind with each and every social interaction you had throughout the day. Many of the rules governing behavior during the nineteenth century can fill a bit overwrought and even a tad ridiculous to us today but at the time they were considered the very fabric and structure of society to even begin to comprehend them ourselves. We of course while we headed straight to the bookshelf for etiquette books of the era. Yes and we are super fortunate to have a whole slew of these types of books special collections at fit. And I look specifically at the following books. I looked at etiquette for ladies which is published by Leeann Blanchard in eighteen thirty nine. I looked at the American gentleman's guide to politeness by Henry. Liu Nets from eighteen fifty nine social etiquette of New York by Abby Buchanan Long Street from eighteen eighty four manners and social usages by Mrs John Sherwood from eighteen eighty seven and manners culture and dress of the best American society by Richard A wells from eighteen. Ninety three okay that was that was a mouthful and that cast is just the very tip of the iceberg in terms of our holdings. We have so so so many more including also ones that are kind of blend of being etiquette and also like a beauty guide as well so right and the great number of these relate directly to the fact that these little books were immensely popular at the time the beginning of the nineteenth century San explosion of not only etiquette books onto the market but also ladies magazines which frequently codified and coached the readers into their finer points of quote unquote proper behavior and in the wake of the French Revolution. The spread of democratic and Republican forms of government really spurred the growth of the middle classes and with all that brand new upward mobility came increased tensions and anxieties over one social standing quotes etiquette is the machinery of society. It is like a wall built up around us to protect us from disagreeable under Brad People. Who were fused? Take the trouble to be civil. Wrote one source from eighteen eighty four so basically anyone who is interested in bettering their station in life. A deft knowledge of etiquette was key to gain acceptance into the world of society proper. You know an an a lapse in this performance of manners and I say performance because it really really was It could be quickly. Chalked up to one's lack of so-called good breeding. And this is the phrase that you see over and over and over again in these manuals good breeding and if one was deemed uncouth or quote unquote. Ill bred that could also make you an undesirable acquaintance at the time because basically anyone who was in your social circle was very much considered a reflection upon yourself yes and this rapid expansion of the middle classes Europe in America during the nineteenth century is a big part of the reason why etiquette books were so popular at the time as we just mentioned so if you weren't necessarily raised in the know you could just buy a book that delineated roles on the proper way to move throughout the world and these books covered all sorts of events and occasions from things. We consider pretty standard today so like table manners wedding etiquette or how to console a bereaved friend but also more than a few topics that we would consider. Well a little niece today. Yes and just a couple of my favorites include how to format a personal letter to the president of the United States. Naturally clearly we've all done right The proper deportment to have when taking one's Harvard exams which I found this especially funny because this is the only university mentioned this etiquette book and I believe at this time. It was only men that could enroll in Harvard. So I guess the etiquette manuals saying go go harvard or go home. I don't know One source I looked at had hilariously titled Section called Lives Shipwrecks. I haven't dove into this quite yet but I remain most intriguing. I will return to that chapter but last but not least is how to deal with quote. Low Bread Women cads slanderers and scandal. Mongers timing. Come on you gotTa love that Punchy Nineteenth Century Language of course there is no way we can possibly cover all of these topics and a single episode of dress so we had narrowed. Today's focus down to what was one of the most interesting aspects of nineteenth century etiquette. And that is the practice of calling and by this. We do not mean placing telephone call because we have to remember that the very first telephone systems were really only commercially. Viable starting in eighteen seventy seven and the adoption for home. Use was rather slow. I have to say According to the US Department of the Interior in one thousand nine hundred only three percent of US homes had their own telephone so that begs the question. Just how did people communicate with each other during the nineteenth century? I mean letter writing. Of course that's a given but there were also this other form of calling these in person visitations which were governed by some of the strictest rules of etiquette but before we even get to the matter of visits and calls. We've I must address the matter of meetings and introductions during the nineteenth century it was rarely considered appropriate for to individuals regardless of their sex to meet without a formal introduction by way of a friend or a relative and even then both parties were supposed to separately agreed to the introduction in advanced unsolicited introductions are bad for both parties and this was stressed by one etiquette. Manual we consulted. Yeah and you might be asked why. Well a formal introduction had the implications that the association between the two parties was going to continue and this was especially true when it came to introductions to women quote great prudence or action must always be used but infinitely more care is necessary as a lady cannot shake off an improper acquaintance with the same facility as a gentleman can do and their character is much easier affected by the apparent contact with worthless and the dissipated out. That's rough the weaker. Fairer sex. The more impressionable right so once. Both parties had agreed to a formal introduction. It was protocol to I. Present not introduced a gentleman to the lady. She in turn was expected to respond with a slight bow. A faint smile and saying his name so the person making the introduction would be like Mr Smith desires to be presented to Miss White Miss White wishes to be acquainted with Mr Smith. Then miss white would bow smile and say Mr Smith and April. This bow was absolutely necessary according to etiquette books which say that unless she bowed gentlemen cannot claim her as an acquaintance. When we say some of these finer points finicky were not lying and right now in my mind so many historical period films are coming into my my mind right and all of that. Formality is making so much more sense. Now because men were to be presented to women and women had to formally accept that social connection so that's between men and women but cast what about introductions between Women Shirley? These were a little bit less complicated. One might think but I mean not really after agreeing to be introduced in the case of two women the younger was to be introduced but not quote unquote presented to the older of the two ladies. If the two women happen to be of similar ages their marital status now came into play and the single eighty would be introduced to them married woman and if two women of the same age and marital status were being introduced the one of lesser social standing would be introduced. I this just sounds I mean. It's

Harvard United States Europe Mr Smith America LEE Leeann Blanchard SAN Brad People Henry President Trump Liu Nets New York Abby Buchanan Mrs John Sherwood Richard A Wells
The island where 19th Century land ownership is at risk

Planet Money

04:38 min | 1 year ago

The island where 19th Century land ownership is at risk

"Are two ways to get to them on a seven consider unreliable plane or a rocky fairy oh Iraqis terry weeks. Once a day from Antiga Thika Antique and Dr Two islands that make up one country and the trip takes about two hours Antiga is mountainous and touristy with about ninety eight thousand residents. That's where the government is. Barb Yuda is flat flat flat like it looks like a penny wow. I've never seen an island that clap before you could drive across bar in about thirty minutes. It's rural just about a thousand homes. Fifteen hundred residents probably more more animals here than people goats and she. It's the kind of island where wild donkeys. Just walk into your home. The houses are like Pastel. L. Turquoise with gray minty green with peach peach with orange and square no one wants lobster anymore. We have lots of breakfast. We all did for lunch for dinner. Doc We'd love three times a day so a piece of chicken in between is not bad. They're fruit trees everywhere. Loaded the lots of vitamin C.. This and it has the most powdery untouched. Pink sand beaches job tough job. The Landau Sullen see beautiful. Bob Yuda. This is Natalia John but everyone calls her. Why is that your nickname long story? My brother couldn't say Talia so he would just say hey. Hey Hey gal was born in Barbados. Her Mom and her grandma were to you. She actually lives in her grandma's house. She has her own plot of land to but she hasn't built anything on it yet. No not as yet but I have my sign and my stone on it so nobody can take. What does that mean? You're sand in your stone just to show that something is going to happen on that land who you put some sand sand and some stone down just to show that. Something's going to happen on that land soon. So don't take it because in Barbuda land isn't and something you buy and sell. It's something you just have people. Just go cut what they want. Clear it and stop bill. You get your steak or whatever and you bill just take a piece of land and be like okay. There's my this is my land. That's so that's so. We usually do perfect for a free no money no money. So that's how I grew up not even taxes not even taxes that even like a permit fee nothing like really elise their zero dollars dollars free free. No paperwork no lease no rental agreement. No title just a whole sixty two square mile tropical island shared community and informally. This is why we came to Buta by say they don't just own the plot of land and they put a fence on they own and share the whole island collectively all three sources all the land. They use it in common. That's what it's called. Most of us know where the line is available. You know what is available sometime. Somebody's but hey you didn't say anything to show so they just get an expedia desk. This is student put offensive. So get the next chunk. Only Barbuda's have this right people on the neighboring island Antiga the can't claim land in Buta even though it is the same country you have to be born in Barbuda and have a grandparent born in Barbados or parent. That's the only rule. And that's is basically how it's worked since the eighteen hundreds but now all that might change can you say hello and welcome to planet Welcome to planet money. Today are went onto them. Bob You the right. Yeah I'm Sarah. I'm Scott Gurion from his podcast far from home. Owning lands individually with title is one of the basics of old school capitalism but getting a little piece of paper breath at says. Yes you own this lot not. Everyone does that today on the show the island nobody owns or everyone owns depending on. Who you ask uh-huh and what happens when someone finally decides to start selling it

Barbuda Barbados Antiga Thika Antique Buta Bob You Barb Yuda Government Dr Two Islands Natalia John Antiga Bob Yuda Scott Gurion Talia Landau Expedia
This guy is cruising up the nile in a 19th century steamboat

The Frankie Boyer Show

01:45 min | 3 years ago

This guy is cruising up the nile in a 19th century steamboat

"Frankie Boyer and welcome. It is so nice to have you with us right here on biz talk radio while my guest today is John Paul Sinclair Lewis, and he's the author of the new historical novel, the Tri color and the same time. Seven years of research. And if that were not enough he's getting ready to embark on a trip up the Nile on a nineteenth century side decide side wheel steam cruise boat to conduct more research for the sequel is John Paul. I you crazy or what? I always liked adventure. I always like anything that. I'm getting me out of the house to kill the tedium and boredom of life. Yeah. Okay. So you've written two books about the American west on the buffalo soldiers. The sequel buffalo Gordon fighting on the planes and those were nominated as the best novel of the west by the western writers of America. You've pub published short academic work for the American waterways and underground railroad. Honey. How did this new project? Come about. Because it was never done before. And I wanted to put the readers into my characters head. The center is actually the first. And hopefully, I'll finished with the sequel in about nine months or so and. So this one here who recounts Napoleon Bonaparte and his army on the orients thirty to thirty five thousand men, women and children who invaded and occupied Egypt and the holy land. Seventeen ninety eight in eighteen o one. Now, the book opens with the conquest of Malta in June of seventeen ninety eight and then moved to Egypt and the death March to Cairo the battle of the Annunciation of Admiral by Admiral Nelson on the French Mediterranean fleet at the battle of the Nile, initially victorious and land. But now he was marooned. All of its ships were destroyed by the British so Bonaparte and his troops is thirty five thousand soon confront fanatical resistance insurrection. Gorilla desert warfare. Ancient superstitions slavery. And the birth of Egyptology that's one maybe is why am going down the Nile to see some of those monuments that were recently actually, only two hundred years old recently discovered by French archaeologists and so forth. And I used a lot of nineteenth century French military records journals and so forth to bring to life, but thousands of actors on this incredible time in history from ranker's famous generals to a young Bonaparte who was only twenty seven years old. Obsessed. He was obsessed with power even at that age and wanted to create his legacy. That's correct Napoleon Bonaparte. I don't think wasted a minute of his life. He didn't live very long. I think he was dead by fifty four. But this is a man who kept busy twenty four seven. He would sleep, you know, and map style. A couple of hours year a couple of hours there. But. This man had an agenda already when he was a boy who calling in elementary school in France. And he he sees people followed in. Unbelievable. So your trip down the Nile is happening in October. Did you where did you find the the? Old both that you're going on the steamship. Well, it's a French travel out sent then owns this concern some growing with them. The small group. You don't even does this twice a year. And I had some friends who took that trip. And they waived about an. Maybe I should do this trip. So I do it to get away from the maddening crowd. I don't wanna be unaccountable crews and seeing and seeing in Egypt from the water and taking this little day trips. You appealed to me more than being thousands of on the people on well travel lanes.

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"19th century" Discussed on Thinking Sideways Podcast

Thinking Sideways Podcast

01:56 min | 4 years ago

"19th century" Discussed on Thinking Sideways Podcast

"On this is this is the 19th century though wallet of course rents alive but obviously not on seriously literally been eyeing south i'd accurately yeah i know you're right i mean he could she could have just poison him in a bunch of different ways yeah so let's move to our third theory are third culprit which is the reverend george dyson now the hardest part about this story is that as we talked about earlier dyson says he would all these places in and got the chloroform and then when everything was said and done and the cops were onto him quote unquote it seemed like copper onto him he was walking on a path and he truck the bottles on the side of a path so he just he got rid of that evidence which you know i would imagine if he truly had gotten from different places they might be able to id that i dunno mass spectrometer whatever they would use with have there he elible she also though she threw away the bottle did she had her chloroform in the four ounces that he had given her thinks she chapter in a railway trash can if i remember it so they're both the bull seen guilty here the roles throwing evidence away and especially see look the the guilty is to the two if you could believe his testimony anyway because apparently seized said or the reasons you he asked their well why does he the chloroform and and she was like while he's got this this internal problem rumor that it gives in peroxides isn't or something and then of course for that and then after that they get to the chloroform in the end that he does and then there's an autopsy talked to the doctor after the autopsy about the autopsy results then there was chloroform in his body but also no internal problems noted at all yeah so he confronts here and says well what's a cell you said he had all these these big internal issues and but there's nothing shows up in the autopsy well as that about and she's in and then he says a.

george dyson four ounces
"19th century" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

TEDTalks (audio)

02:21 min | 4 years ago

"19th century" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

"The fifteen to the 19th century i want to show you how with one image giap is able to touch on our african indentity on the politics of representation but also on our social value system in this particular selfportrait drop is actually referencing another portrait by and we should all day is picture is doing a portrait of robots his speedy sean betis bailey was a nazi of of senegal a former slave of heike but during his lifetime he also was elected to represent the colony at the third government of the french revolution and he advocated strongly for the abolition of slavery what is very smart and clever about job pierre is that his going back through history he's reclaiming this figure by restating this beautiful you know rule do uniform where he's restaging also the dipose and he's doing that to actually underline issue that are still in acting individual of color today there was nothing special about this very typical political portrait of the time except that for the first time an individual of color in that case sean betis baby was actually named and acknowledge inner painting what job is adding to this picture is this crucial element which is the football under his arm and by doing that job is actually touching at our hero worshipped culture of african football stars who unfortunately despite their fame the immense talent and their world statues there are still invisible drop is asking us to dig deeper to go beyond historian what has been written and basically see how it still influences and impacting us in the present i wanna share this other beautiful serey called cash angels by artists hasn't has yardage so in this particular siri they're artists is really pushing on the boundaries of sterotype and cliche has son has judge is a friend and honestly i admire him dearly but this particular serey is talking to me directly as a muslim woman i experienced this all the time where you know people have a lot of expectation religious one and cultural once but what i love.

sean betis bailey heike pierre football siri senegal sean betis