35 Burst results for "1973"

"1973" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

03:23 min | Last month

"1973" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"You just wish that he had had more opportunities and had taken advantage of those opportunities. At club level to build a career. Yeah. We talked about, you know, you had a goal when you were younger, if you're writing for Sports Illustrated and you achieve that goal like relatively young, do you have a next aspirational goal in terms of your writing or your journalism? Do you want to move me on sports at some point? Is there a sports for the rest of your life that you could be content covering? You know, I don't know exactly where it's going to go from here. My FIFA presidential campaign didn't exactly work out. Yeah, we didn't talk about that in 2011. That was before all of these takedown scandals. Yeah. And it was fun. I caused them to change their rules where to run for FIFA president. Now you literally have to be an insider and have two of the previous 5 years in football administration. That's awkward administration. Which is actually a problem because if you had an outsider like a Kofi Annan who I think would be great to take over a new FIFA, according to their rules right now, he can not run. I had a good experience doing it in 2011. It was fun. It got people to thinking, I think, why does no one ever run against this set bladder guy? And really put out some of the honestly common sense issues that needed to be considered about making FIFA cleaner or trying to or getting it at point where it wasn't this kind of joke of an organization that could have happened was that you could have won and then gotten caught up in the corruption and you yourself could be in prison right now. Have you thought about that? I was gonna do a WikiLeaks on thief if that was one of my campaign promises, put everything out there. I had some fun conversations with people like the Iceland soccer federation president who was very nice and actually listened to me and then decided not to nominate me. So you're not going to be fee for president. Do you have any sense of where you want to go? Journalistically in ten years or something like that? I guess part of it is that I don't I've never had sort of aside from like this, I want to go to Sports Illustrated thing. I never would have predicted I would do soccer full time. Yeah. And that's happened. You know, I'd love to say this was all planned and inevitable, but it really wasn't. The sport is grown a ton. It's got a lot more growing to do, I think. I don't know if soccer is ever going to be the NFL in the U.S., but it's certainly I hope not. Yeah, seriously. But it's definitely gotten bigger. And I really enjoy it. I don't follow a lot of other sports. At this point, even college basketball, I couldn't tell you much at all about what's going on. I enjoyed covering that sport. My wife doesn't like sports, so I don't really spend much off time following it. And covering soccer if you want to be on top of what's happening in the soccer world, you really don't want to shortchange your readers viewers, and you need to spend a lot of time being on top of stuff. That was grant wall in 2016. This episode was originally edited by Jenna Weiss Berman, and then this week by Jackie suico. I'm Evan ratliff, myself, excellent ski and Aaron lammer, thank you for listening. And we'll see you next time.

FIFA Sports Illustrated Iceland soccer federation Kofi Annan soccer WikiLeaks football NFL U.S. basketball Jenna Weiss Berman Jackie suico Evan ratliff Aaron lammer
"1973" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

02:22 min | Last month

"1973" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"The more you really do realize how much national media international media attention impacts a young athlete. It's interesting you mentioned this because in the context, this is right around the same time. These stories were being done on LeBron James and Freddie ado. One guy makes it the other guy doesn't. And there was some similarities in those stories in that you almost have to have the obligatory obligatory two paragraphs where you throw in the caveats of like, you know, it's not guaranteed that he's gonna make it. Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. But there's a reason you're writing the story. And so you try to just find people who you trust who see the talent and can tell you about where the potential is and where the pitfalls might be and try to strike a balance. I remember when they decided to put LeBron on the cover as a junior in high school, it was during the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake. And I was surprised that they would do a non Olympic cover during that time. But then you also, I'd spent a lot of time with LeBron for that story. The timing seemed right, he'd had a huge ABCD camp, the previous summer, and had a really good experience flew into Akron and met him and his buddies. They all piled into my rental car and we drove to Cleveland from Akron for an NBA game that had Michael Jordan in it. And Jordan hits a buzzer beater to win at the end. Did you know that was your lead when you, when they got into the car with you? I usually you have a pretty good idea on a lead when you witness it or hear it told or what have you. It's kind of an instinctual thing. And after the game, Jordan comes out to talk to LeBron. And it wasn't the first time they'd met, but like I'm just kind of lurking and getting seen stuff. And there was so much going on there because you had the guy who was actually bringing Jordan out to meet LeBron was William Wesley, world wide west, the kind of most famous connector in the basketball world in the United States.

Freddie ado LeBron LeBron James Akron Winter Olympics Salt Lake Jordan Olympic Michael Jordan Cleveland NBA William Wesley basketball United States
"1973" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

04:01 min | Last month

"1973" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"We just can't guarantee it. Right, yeah. And so we met up in Miami in August of 2013 when the team was over here and did this crazy photo shoot on a pool at this Miami hotel that made it look like he was standing on the surface of the water. Yeah. And I remember having to persuade Mario to do this. I had just met the guy like two minutes earlier, right? And so my first task is to help Jeffrey salter, terrific photographer. Convince Mario to stand on this clear plexiglass surface on the pool in the sun for about 45 minutes to pose for these photos. And then you get what you get like a sad amount of time with them. And then I was gonna get time for an interview, which was I think promised at 30 minutes and went to more like 45 50. Do you prepare an opener? Do you just kind of go with the flow I'm going to meet this guy and Chad, and I'm going to rely on my natural charm or you sort of like, I'm going to try to start here and maybe he'll open up. I think one of the first things I said to him was because I followed his Twitter feed, knew what he was into, he's being a president Obama. Of all people. I mean, maybe not that surprising. And I said to him, I know you're into president Obama. There's a decent chance that he might read this story. You know? Yeah. He kind of perked up. I don't think I was deliberately misleading him. There was a chance. We just used that with every player. You know that president Obama might read this story. I just want to let you know before we start. And so it was great. His English was wonderful. He was able to really dig deep, I thought, and talked a lot in a very thoughtful way about racism, what he had experienced in Italy and elsewhere, what he symbolized, that he was aware of much more than people thought that he kind of led on. One thing I was really glad about when people read the story, a lot of them said, wow, I didn't realize that he was that thoughtful. Yeah. While we're talking, I'm going to ask you one more question about profiles, what we're talking about profiles. Because I was reading back these para profiles, one of which is very famous, which is the one you did of LeBron James when he was a junior in high school. Right. So he was 17 years old and it was this big deal. He was on the cover of Sports Illustrated and what was the cover line. The chosen one. The chosen one, which later got his tattoo. I saw you. I give credit to Greg Kelly the SIA editor who came up with that cover line because he got his a tattoo. That's influence. That's actually what I want to ask you, because a couple of years later, you did a profile of Freddie ado, who was you wrote about when he was 13, and then when he was 14, starting out, and if you look at these two people, the thing that was making me think a lot about was sort of like the influence of these stories over these people's lives. So clear you had one who was on the cover of Sports Illustrated, hyped in a way that no teenager maybe should be and could completely handle it and is now a famous sports figure and player. And then another one who it seems like maybe couldn't handle it or at least was not necessarily worthy of it and now is in a different place, still playing sports, but at a completely different level. Do you think about the influence of these stories will have on the people themselves and especially Freddie ado as a teenager? Or both of these guys as teenagers as you think about what does it mean to put these guys in this magazine? I think the longer I've been in this business and the older I've gotten, the more you really do realize how much national media international media attention impacts a young athlete. It's interesting you mentioned this because in the context, this is right around the same time. These stories were being done on LeBron James and Freddie ado. One guy makes it the other guy doesn't.

Jeffrey salter Mario Miami president Obama Freddie ado Greg Kelly Chad LeBron James Twitter Obama Italy SIA
"1973" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

03:42 min | Last month

"1973" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"We don't even really cover it much anymore. And then 98 was probably like the big change for kind of me doing longer stuff. That was the year that John worth M and I pitched a story on out of wedlock kids in sports. I went back and was reading that piece and I'm interested how it came about. I mean, I feel like there was a very delicate thing in there where you were kind of delving into this issue, which was very much like, in a way, accusatory, you've got these players, particularly basketball players, there are a lot of basketball players in there who have a lot of out of wedlock children. And then there was this part where it's sort of like stood back and said, this could easily be seen through a lens of race. And it shouldn't be. And I'm interested when you do that kind of story for Sports Illustrated sort of how as an institution like that approach that sort of thing. All along, I sort of thought that because we were these 24 and 25 year old guys that they would probably give the info to some other better writer. Didn't happen. They trusted us. They let us do it. And I think working with John on that was just a really positive experience because I think we both were sensitive. To the racial aspects of the story, but also knew that it wasn't a black only thing. I mean, Larry Bird and his daughter and that was the best part of that story. We literally holed up for a week in a small office in New York and wrote that story together. Sometimes co byline stories are done differently where one guy will write and then another person will come in afterward. This was literally just the two of us sitting at a screen together in writing. Wow. That's intense. You know, yeah, guys, like Sean camp, who were clearly, they had some pretty egregious examples. I forget how many kids he had with how many women, but I think it was like maybe 9 with 8. And we got letters afterwards saying it's actually more than that. I remember they put a two year old kid on the cover. Greg miner's son. Really well done. Portraits taken for the story. But I got to admit it when I first saw the two year old on the front of the magazine saying, where's daddy? I was like, oh my gosh. I don't know if that's what I was thinking of. I'm still curious about what this kid now thinks about being on the cover of Sports Illustrated because he would be how will that probably 19? Yeah. So maybe not a bad idea to try and track him. Yeah. I feel like that story was in some ways foreshadowing for some of the stuff you see now around the NFL and ray rice and domestic abuse. I mean, it wasn't about the best of you. So there was a little bit in there, I think, a couple of the players had been accused or convicted of or something. But now there's this question of like, are these our publications, whether it's SI in their connections or ESPN in some ways, like beholden to these leagues in various ways and can't report on them. And that seemed like almost like a simpler time in some ways where was it a big deal to report so negatively on the sports? I don't think the NBA was entirely thrilled with the stories Eric. I would imagine that. I remember the week it came out. I was not credentialed for a Knicks playoff game. One of the rare NBA games, I was assigned to cover. But I've never had anyone at Sports Illustrated tell me that I can't write something. Yeah. You'll never have these I've never had. Anyone say to me, we can't write about this because of an advertiser relationship or because of some deal on the business side. And you also, you know, you wrote this book about David Beckham and his experience at the LA galaxy.

John worth basketball Sean camp Greg miner Larry Bird ray rice John New York NFL NBA ESPN Knicks Eric David Beckham LA galaxy
The Big Lie That Was Sacheen Littlefeather at the 1973 Oscars

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:49 min | 3 months ago

The Big Lie That Was Sacheen Littlefeather at the 1973 Oscars

"I didn't really heard too much about sashi little feather for years after that. But now her sister is really doubling down and exposing her sister her older sister for the bald liar she was and would go on to become and I'll tell you that story a couple of seconds. So rosalyn Cruz has been on a campaign since her sister passed away recently from breast cancer because it turns out such gene little feather was just an alter ego. Rosalyn was 15 years old at the time and couldn't believe what she saw on a TV set, just like we couldn't. She gawked and disbelief from their grandparents home in a very rural plot of California called Salinas. As this sasheen little feather, who she knew to be her 26 year old sibling, Marie Louise Cruz, perform what would become the most pivotal 75 seconds of her entire acting career. And now it's been a few weeks since the woman known as sasheen died a lot of better identity, and she died from breast cancer, not too long ago, a younger sister is just blowing the whistle on all her bullshit. And there are some really weird stories on who this woman really was and where she came from. So Rosalind couldn't wait to uncover all this stuff. And she went on a bit of a tear calling reporters and making the scene a different functions, what have you, and she felt the time is right now that her sister's dead, to really tell people the truth and who's sajin little federal really was. Because basically, she said that that whole stunt mortified her family. Because before a system of re left for the Academy Awards that night, she told the whole family, just watched the show. I can't tell you anything more, but just watch. And, you know, a few years earlier, the sister had started her acting career at the American conservatory theater in San Francisco, but still couldn't make a name for herself in Hollywood. So she cooked up something really crazy. So when they saw Marie identify herself as Apache, their grandparents, everybody's blown away. They'll never forget how they just stand at each other. Absolutely dumbstruck. And that moment marked the first time that her eldest sister claimed she was part of a tribe.

Sashi Rosalyn Cruz Marie Louise Cruz Sasheen Breast Cancer Rosalyn Salinas Rosalind California Academy Awards American Conservatory Theater San Francisco Hollywood Marie
Sacheen Littlefeather, Activist Who Took the Stage to Decline Marlon Brando’s Oscar, Dies at 75

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 4 months ago

Sacheen Littlefeather, Activist Who Took the Stage to Decline Marlon Brando’s Oscar, Dies at 75

"Actor and activist session littlefeather who declined Marlon Brando's Academy Award in 1973 has died of breast cancer according to her family She was 75 I'm Archie Sara letta with the latest When Marlon Brando won the Oscar for The Godfather he sent sacheen littlefeather in his place She wore a buckskin dress and spoke in protest of the portrayal of Native Americans on screen She got a mix of applause and booze little feather told reporters in 2010 after the ceremony at Brando's house it got worse It was bullet holes here And I looked at him and he looked at me and

Marlon Brando Archie Sara Letta Sacheen Littlefeather Academy Award Breast Cancer Oscar Feather Brando
Mets retire Willie Mays’ No. 24 as Old-Timers’ Day returns

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 5 months ago

Mets retire Willie Mays’ No. 24 as Old-Timers’ Day returns

"It was a promise that went unfulfilled for nearly 50 years but on Saturday that all changed in a surprise move during old timers day the mets retired baseball great Willie Mays is number 24 fulfilling a promise that late Metz owner Joe and payson had made to the say hey kid in 1972 Maize did not make the trip to queens but his son Michael said that it was his close relationship with payson that made his time with the mets so special Her promises to him more important so a coming foolish like this is you know it's just something undone is done all the time coming Maze played for the mets from 1972 to 1973 Krishna Arnold New York

Payson Mets Willie Mays Metz Maize Baseball Queens JOE Michael Maze Krishna Arnold New York
Tom Weiskopf, major champion and golf course architect, dies

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 5 months ago

Tom Weiskopf, major champion and golf course architect, dies

"Tom weiskopf posted 16 wins on the PGA Tour his one major the 1973 British open championship weisskopf who was also known for the majors he did not win had four runner up finishes at the masters the most of any player without a green jacket His major competition Jack Nicklaus who cast an enormous shadow over Wisconsin for his entire career Lori weiskopf says her husband died of pancreatic cancer after being diagnosed in December of 2020 I'm Shelley Adler

Weisskopf Tom Weiskopf PGA Lori Weiskopf Jack Nicklaus Wisconsin Pancreatic Cancer Shelley Adler
 Lawyers argue to delay North Dakota law banning abortion

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 5 months ago

Lawyers argue to delay North Dakota law banning abortion

"Arizona judge is hearing arguments today as the state struggles for clarity on a near total abortion ban In Tucson Arizona a pima county judge will weigh a request by the state's attorney general who wants to lift an injunction against an anti abortion law enacted in 1901 before Arizona was even a state Blocked in 1973 the law would allow doctors to be charged for providing abortions unless the mother's life is in danger Arizona has passed several new laws since then including one recently blocked by a federal judge that grants personhood rights to unborn children Republican governor Doug ducey signed a bill that criminalizes performing abortions after 15 weeks

Arizona Pima County Tucson Doug Ducey
 Arizona judge to hear state request to enforce abortion ban

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 5 months ago

Arizona judge to hear state request to enforce abortion ban

"A judge has reinstated North Carolina's 20 week abortion ban I'm Lisa dwyer with the latest A federal judge has ruled that abortions are no longer legal after 20 weeks of pregnancy in North Carolina U.S. district judge William osteen reinstated the abortion ban saying that the June U.S. Supreme Court decision overturning roe V wade erased the legal foundation for his 2019 ruling That placed an injunction on a 1973 state law The ruling erodes a protections in one of the south's few remaining safe havens for reproductive freedom His decision does not align with the recommendations of all the named parties in the 2019 case

Lisa Dwyer Judge William Osteen North Carolina Roe V Wade U.S. Supreme Court U.S.
The Academy apologizes to Sacheen Littlefeather for her treatment at the 1973 Oscars

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 5 months ago

The Academy apologizes to Sacheen Littlefeather for her treatment at the 1973 Oscars

"The academy of motion pictures arts and sciences has apologized to the Native American woman who spoke on behalf of actor Marlon Brando at the 1973 Oscars A marchesa a letter with the latest When Marlon Brando won the best actor Oscar for The Godfather says she and littlefeather dressed in buckskin and moccasins took the stage instead she said Brando could not accept because of the treatment of American Indians by the film industry She not only was booed but she says she faced repercussions for years Now film academy president David Rubin has apologized saying the abuse she faced was unjustified The academy museum in Los Angeles will host little feather for a celebration event on September 17th

Academy Of Motion Pictures Art Marlon Brando Oscars The Godfather Oscar Brando David Rubin Academy Museum Los Angeles
 Appeals court says Georgia abortion law should take effect

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 6 months ago

Appeals court says Georgia abortion law should take effect

"The legal battle over Louisiana's ban on abortion continues with a court hearing today I'm Ben Thomas with some background Louisiana's anti abortion law has trigger language designed to make it effective immediately after the Supreme Court overturned the 1973 roe versus wade decision legalizing abortion but abortion supporters including one of the three clinics still operating in the state have fought the law in courts They argue it has conflicting language and is unconstitutionally vague So far they've won two temporary injunctions allowing abortions to continue while

Louisiana Ben Thomas Supreme Court
Charlie Welcomes President of Students for Life, Kristan Hawkins

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:08 min | 7 months ago

Charlie Welcomes President of Students for Life, Kristan Hawkins

"Here. Kristen Hawkins, phenomenal pro life warrior. I saw you right there in front of the Supreme Court as the decision came down wonderful students for life, Kristen, welcome back to the program. Thanks for having me, Charlie. Good to talk to you again. Thank you. Congratulations. It's been many years of work for you and so many others. Just first, your initial reaction roe versus wade being overturned. Yeah, I mean, almost indescribable to talk about this moment that we've been working for for 50 years to see the court admit that it was wrong, egregiously wrong in 1973 and disregarding the science of human life and when it begins. But to know that this decision immediately after this decision came down, states started to act to ban abortions, shutting down abortion facilities. Within one day we knew of over 400 children that had been spared the violent death of abortion. And this is really a turning point for our entire culture and our entire country. And I think really, as you saw with President Biden's remarks, the day of the decision, the start of the 2022 midterm election

Kristen Hawkins Kristen Supreme Court Charlie Wade President Biden
SCOTUS Could Block the EPA's Attempt to Fight Climate Change

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:14 min | 7 months ago

SCOTUS Could Block the EPA's Attempt to Fight Climate Change

"We have had some very important rulings from the Supreme Court on issues like religious freedom, the no establishment clause, obviously abortion, but also guns, gun rights, and this has been clearly one of the most important Supreme Court terms in modern history. Maybe for some decades, maybe even going back to 1973, which was the year of the road decision. But the court is not really done. We're waiting for one final big decision. It doesn't seem like a big decision when you first look at it. It's the case involves the EPA, the so called Environmental Protection Agency. And it has to do with the degree to which the Environmental Protection Agency can regulate greenhouse gases. Now, the federal government is littered with these regulatory agencies, and they are very ambitious. They basically think that they own the domain that they cover. So for example, the CDC, in a sense, owns the domain of health. The Environmental Protection Agency owns the domain of the environment. And so they think, yeah, we can basically tell any company what to do in the name of the environment. And just like the CDC said, we can tell people what to do in the name of health. But the question is, where do these agencies get the authority? To make these sweeping decisions. We had a taste of this, by the way, when the Biden administration, through the CDC, issued a rule that basically said any company with over a hundred employees must require a vaccine. And if you don't, then we're all kinds of penalties and fines, and this went before the Supreme Court. And the Supreme Court said, you know, you're a CDC. You have the authority to make certain declarations and proclamations and perhaps even rules regarding health. But you don't have unlimited power here.

Environmental Protection Agenc Supreme Court CDC EPA Biden Administration Federal Government
Rasmussen: Half of Voters Approve Supreme Court's Abortion Ruling

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:00 min | 7 months ago

Rasmussen: Half of Voters Approve Supreme Court's Abortion Ruling

"Rasmussen reports that half of voters approve of the Supreme Court decisions ruling on abortion. Approved 50% disapprove 45%, even though most voters identify as pro choice than pro life, a full half of them approve of the recent Supreme Court ruling that overturned the 1973 roe versus wade decision. And so look Jack, we're both pro life and we're outspokenly pro life. But you and I both know that in our broad coalition of trying to win elections, there are people that will not share the same life views that we have. And with that being said, though, it looks like this decision is I believe actually a moderate decision. Send it back down to the states, let the states decide however they want. You and I would both love to see national abortion, bans come through, obviously, but letting the states decide it seems as if, believe it or not, according to Rasmussen, 50% of Americans agree. It's remarkable, isn't it? Well, and it's also because you have to go in and look at the methodology. So I did check this out. And I check it out whenever I see any of the legacy media polls on pro life as well. Whenever you see the legacy media, whether it be CNN or MSNBC, et cetera, you go even will do this. They'll say has stripped the constitutional right to abortion, right? Or they'll say something like this. Do you agree? And they get these, you know, they get these huge, huge majorities. But the way Rasmussen asked the question was, do you agree with allowing states to decide and to set their own policy on abortion? Well, that's where you get this huge 50% number because well, hold on a second. Wait a minute. I thought that we were supposed to be the ones that defend democracy and all of this is about defense democracy here from the January 6th committee every single day that we have to defend democracy in these horrible far right conservatives or would want to say that that middle part of the country is just telling everybody what to do. No, that's not how it works, right? It's actually going back to the states. It is going to be a more democratic view.

Rasmussen Supreme Court Wade Jack Msnbc CNN
The US Military Is Struggling to Meet Its 2022 Recruiting Goals

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:55 min | 7 months ago

The US Military Is Struggling to Meet Its 2022 Recruiting Goals

"Is one of our great successes as a nation, strongest military ever to exist in the history of the world. NBC News. Every branch of the military is struggling to make its 2022 recruiting calls, officials say. With record low number of Americans eligible to serve, and few of those willing to do it, it's quote, is this the year, the question of sustainability of the all volunteer force. I wonder why. These people. It's an intentional destruction of the U.S. Military. That's what they've been doing. Every branch of the U.S. Military is struggling to meet its fiscal year 2022 recruiting goals. The official said The Pentagon top leaders are now scrambling for ways to find new recruits to fill out the ranks of the all volunteer force, defense secretary Lloyd Austin and deputy secretary Kathleen hicks consider the shortfall is serious issue. Yeah, maybe you should have thought of that before you wanted to mandate an experimental gene therapy and kick out active duty personnel, which Republicans did nothing to oppose. This is a start of a long drought for military recruiting, said retired general Thomas spore of the heritage foundation. He said the military has had not such a hard time signing recruits since 1973. Quote, 2022 is the year we questioned the sustainability of the all volunteer force. Now that NBC News article continues and they say, oh, it's because of the psychological trauma quote they think they're going to be physically or emotionally broken after serving. That's not why. I'll tell you why it's happening. Two things. They don't want to take in a vaccine against their will, and they don't want to serve under this. Put that on screen. Rachel Levine and the new LGBTQIA+ regime in our military and also people want to enlist in a military that plays to win Afghanistan was a humiliation. From Lloyd Austin and Mark milley.

Nbc News Lloyd Austin Kathleen Hicks Thomas Spore U.S. Military Pentagon Heritage Foundation U.S. Rachel Levine Afghanistan Mark Milley
Why the Constitution Means What It Says

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:07 min | 7 months ago

Why the Constitution Means What It Says

"We have a provably constitutionally illiterate country, right? We have people who just don't know what the constitution says and don't know how it works. The basics to wit. If there is something that is not in the constitution, it goes to the states. Period. Roe V wade was fictitiously found in 1973 by an activist court. That was a phony right that was fashioned out of whole cloth, and we've lived under that fiction for a stinking half century. That has been corrected thanks be to God. That has been corrected. I celebrate that. Not just as a conservative or a pro lifer or whatever I am. But as an American, I want rulings to reflect what the constitution actually says. And for three rulings inside of a week's time, we've had Supreme Court Supreme Court majorities who have delivered us the shocking news that the constitution actually means what it says.

Roe V Wade Supreme Court Supreme Court
Martha Raddatz Lies in Monologue About Roe Ruling

Mark Levin

01:48 min | 7 months ago

Martha Raddatz Lies in Monologue About Roe Ruling

"And one of them would be Martha raddatz Martha raddatz who had the obamas at her wedding Now listen to this ABC's this week Cut three go On Friday morning women in this country like they have for nearly 50 years woke up with a constitutional right to abortion a right enshrined by the Supreme Court's 1973 decision in roe V wade and reaffirmed again and again Stop That's not correct Matter of fact in the last trimester the state has a right to interfere Have you ever read the roe V wade decision Martha There you have it And there have been restrictions on abortion throughout the country depending on the circumstances and other and other matters You don't have a quote unquote right to an abortion Except in a handful of states a half a dozen states right up to the end But in the other states you don't You have some issues that put some limitations It's called the science Martha So you start out with a flat out lie because you're emoting Go ahead After 10 a.m. on Friday a legal earthquake The court stripping women of that fundamental right The court didn't strip women of a right to have an abortion This is why people get confused This is why they're misinformed because of the disinformation campaign of the media That is a lie

Martha Raddatz Roe V Wade Obamas Martha ABC Supreme Court
Lila Rose: 80% of Americans Want Abortion Restrictions

The Dan Bongino Show

01:45 min | 7 months ago

Lila Rose: 80% of Americans Want Abortion Restrictions

"Yeah so what happened in 1973 is 7 men on the Supreme Court decided abortion law for the entire country And the abortion law was this that there would be no restrictions or limits on abortion I mean which is completely out of touch with 80% of Americans 80% of Americans stand want abortion restrictions They want limitations on abortion And most Americans want what Mississippi's law was a 15 week abortion ban that was had to go to the Supreme Court because they said well roe V wade and KCB plank parenthood are preventing you guys for banning abortion at 15 weeks So this is a big lie that the media is touting an abortion activist they're touting that somehow this is anti democratic In fact it has turned it turning it it's turning it over to democracy now to decide And vote state by state Do I think that's the right response I think actually the Supreme Court didn't go far enough The Supreme Court undid the irrational unjust logic of the Supreme Court in 1973 but now they're basically washing their hands of the blood of children and saying well you guys figure it out state by state And listen the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution is very clear It says that no state shall deprive anyone of their life and then without due process You states have to provide equal protection It says for all people in the state And for a child to be deprived their right to live in California because they're so leftist that's so pro abortion That child had a right to live And our constitution is very clear on that I think under the Fourteenth Amendment and many other legal scholars So I'm hopeful that it's a future we're going to see that completely legal protection But now we got to work it out state by state

Supreme Court Roe V Wade Mississippi United States California
Dinesh Never Thought He Would Witness Life After Roe

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:36 min | 7 months ago

Dinesh Never Thought He Would Witness Life After Roe

"I mean, I came to the United States in 1978, row was, I guess, at that point, 5 years old. It had been passed in 1973. So my entire adult lifetime in the United States role has been you may say the law of the land. It was an illicit law, and it legitimate law that never was a constitutional right to abortion. But nevertheless, there it was as a practical matter we were living under roe. And only now can we say and I didn't even think this would, this would happen, probably not even in my lifetime. Then we would be living life after row. But that is the United States today. And it is a momentous shift, something that had been almost, you may say, not only in law, but law ultimately makes its way into the culture. People have certain cultural expectations or I got pregnant. Okay, that's fine. I'll go have an abortion. That became a sort of are you going to have an abortion? This kind of question suddenly now becomes problematic. In other words, it's not that aboard the abortion that you won't be able to get an abortion in the United States. That's not the case. Some people are acting like that is the case. And I think it's kind of, it's almost amusing to have all these people in blue states, protests and places like Portland, Oregon, California, New York, D.C., people screaming. Oh, my right to an abortion. And yeah, there's almost no question that they will be allowed to have abortions in those states.

United States Portland Oregon D.C. California New York
Why the Original Roe v. Wade Decision Was One of the Worst

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:52 min | 7 months ago

Why the Original Roe v. Wade Decision Was One of the Worst

"I believe that the roe V wade decision one of the worst decided constitutional cases that we've ever seen decided both liberals and conservative jurists and scholars have said this forever. Own the roe V case because it actually was a judicial solution to a problem that was beginning to be handled at the state level. And no matter what side you fell on, it was beginning to be addressed at these levels. And the controversy was real. 1970 one, USB Butch, virtue TCH, actually D.C. Washington D.C. allowed abortions and this was tailed by the courts in that. So you're starting to see the courts actually running on this as well. Now, that brings us to 1973 on the penult case of the ending case of roe V wade and also dovey Bolton. Now both of these are together, the roe V wade emphasized in what became of the trimester selection of when a state can do anything, you know, the first trimester that can do nothing second trimester only maternal. You know, if you don't have internal health, third trimester, they could ban those. But this was the interesting position of roe V wade that built on a previous case. Now, again, liberal activists Proto us pro abortion activists had been fighting in these states, you know, state to state to make it legal or to show it to be legal and certain stages to get an abortion in these states. We already saw this happening. This was not a new occurrence. It was a discussion, but it was being played out in the proper federalist doctrine if you would of the of our country and that is each state deciding for themselves what their value of life was and how they determine the def abortion was going to be legal or not

Roe V Wade Washington D.C. Dovey Bolton D.C. United States
Have Compassion for Others Following SCOTUS Ruling

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:19 min | 7 months ago

Have Compassion for Others Following SCOTUS Ruling

"Indication that the Supreme Court was going to overturn overturn roe V wade back in February. When there was a leak of a draft opinion, looks like the draft opinion held up. The Supreme Court has overturned roe V wade. And there's lots of tears in America. There's jubilation, there's a lot of anger, a lot of anguish, a lot of people who have been committed to defending and protecting abortion rights, and I would urge you to have some compassion and some grace for them. Because they are bewildered, they are angry, they are frustrated, they are perplexed because for many of them, since 1973, a lot of them were born weren't even alive. Prior to roe V wade. That's all they know. That's all they know. Is that abortion is somehow this magical constitutional right? It's real simple. There's nothing in the constitution about the right to an abortion. And now the states are going to decide.

Roe V Wade Supreme Court America
"1973" Discussed on Auto Archives

Auto Archives

04:32 min | 9 months ago

"1973" Discussed on Auto Archives

"At the same time, they couldn't lower price to stimulate demand. It had fallen when people lost their jobs. To make matters worse, the feds raised the and lowered interest rates. So many times the businesses were unable to plan for the future as a result companies kept prices high, which worsened inflation. They were afraid to hire new workers worsening the recession. Now this, of course, was bad news for people with gas guzzler cars. In other words, most every American at the time. Suddenly, the massive American cars of 1970s became way less practical than before. This was a brutal reality check. Gas prices went up nearly doubling, and this proved the point the Middle East was trying to make. Europe fared a little bit better than the U.S. probably because they already had a bunch of tiny cars. Now if your mini Cooper gets 30 miles to the gallon, going from $2 and 50 cents a gallon to $4 and 50 cents was still manageable. But if you're driving back and forth to work in an 8 mile per gallon land yacht with a 27 gallon tank, you are going to feel that price hike. And even if you could actually afford it, there was simply not enough gas to go around. It also worsened the recession. First, higher gas prices met consumers had less money to spend on other goods and services. This lowered the demand, it also weakened consumers confidence. People were forced to change habits, making it feel like a crisis that the government tried unsuccessfully to resolve. This lack of confidence made people spend less. For example, drivers were forced to wait in lines that often sneaked around the block. They woke up before dawn or waited until dust to avoid the lines, gas stations posted color coded signs, green was when gas was available, yellow yellow when it was rationed and red when it was gone. States introduced odd even rationing and drivers with license plates ending with odd numbers could get gas on odd numbered days. Now as you can imagine, there were some unbelievable scenes around gas stations in 1973. There were lines for gas that stretched down multiple blocks. People would wait in them for hours only for gas stations to run dry. Just like the 2020 pandemic, this time in history was not humanity at its best. OPEX embargo didn't last very long. They lifted it in 1974. After the government saw how OPEC's crisis affected the economy, they decided to do something about it. By creating the corporate average fuel economy. This played a pivotal part in the changes in Americans auto industry. Through the corporate average fuel economy, the government mandated that the average had to rise to at least 27 miles per gallon by 1985. This seemed like a decent idea, but American car companies were not excited about this new regulation. So in ten years time, American car companies were challenged with making their cars more fuel efficient. Fast forward to now. The Americans cars of today are leaks better than they were in the 1970s. But it pretty much took the whole 80s and most of the 90s and a lot of the 2000s to eventually get it together. And in the meantime, foreign car companies who already had it figured out took a large chunk of American car sales. And it is still going on today. Just last year in 2021, Toyota became the number one car company surpassing GM. And if you think about it without the gas crisis, there is no way that would have happened today. The gas crisis truly changed cars forever. Thank you for listening to auto archives,.

Middle East government Europe U.S. OPEC Toyota GM
"1973" Discussed on Auto Archives

Auto Archives

04:14 min | 9 months ago

"1973" Discussed on Auto Archives

"This story is just as important as any other story about automotive history. We're going to talk about the gas crisis. The early 1970s were pretty good times for American car companies and consumers. Cars were known for being big and having big V8 engines. Gas was cheap, like 36 cents to the gallon sheet, which is like two 50 in 2022. Mostly everyone had a muscle car and no one cared how much it cost to fill up. What a time to be alive. But unfortunately, good things don't last forever and soon there were EPA restrictions in place that sucked the power straight from the muscle cars. The solution American car companies came up with was quite simple, and it was to make the engines bigger. So that's what they did. But it didn't pan out how car manufacturers thought. In the 1950s, the government put restrictions on the amount of foreign oil that could be imported into the U.S.. Restrictions that help promote Texas oil. By the 1970s, Uncle Sam's oil fields hit peak production, basically they produced the most that they ever would, and it soon was all downhill after that. Americans domestic oil supply was in decline. But luckily there were plenty of other countries that had a bunch of oil and they were more than willing to sell it for cheap, and because of that Americans didn't notice any difference at all. And thus oil demand kept on climbing. Thanks to the U.S.'s oil price controls, gas prices couldn't go up, which is why that no one really noticed that Americans oil supply was already decreasing. The demand just kept rising. This would soon spell out a recipe for disaster. It started with a minor fuel shortage in 1971, then another one in 1972, and then that was enough to convince former president Nixon that it was time to ditch the oil import quotas, put in place by former president Eisenhower years earlier. Other countries would soon start helping the U.S. in exchange for money, but then something happened in 1973, the port sugar into the gas tanks of this relationship with foreign countries. And that metaphor of sugar was the Yom Kippur War. Now to make a long complicated story short and focused on cars, the U.S. and other Western European countries came to Israel's aid during the Yom Kippur War. A ceasefire was eventually signed, but the oil producing countries weren't happy about which side the Americans chose to defend. They were all members of the organization of petroleum exporting countries or OPEC. And they decided to band together to teach Americans and Europeans a lesson. By setting up an oil embargo to cut off the oil supply. On October 19th, 1973, Nixon requested $2.2 billion from Congress in an emergency military aid for Israel. The Arab members of OPEC responded by halting oil exports to the United States and other Israeli all allies. Egypt, Syria and Israel declared a truce on October 25th, 1973, OPEC continued embargo until March 1974. By then oil prices had skyrocketed from $2 and 90 cents per barrel to $11 and 65 cents per barrel. The oil embargo is widely blamed for causing the 1973 1975 recession. U.S. government policies helped cause the recession. They included the Nixon's wage price controls and the Federal Reserve stop go monetary policy. Wage price controls forced companies to keep wages high, which meant businesses laid off workers to reduce the cost..

United States OPEC Uncle Sam EPA president Nixon president Eisenhower Israel Texas Nixon Congress Syria Egypt U.S. government Federal Reserve
"1973" Discussed on Past Gas

Past Gas

01:54 min | 10 months ago

"1973" Discussed on Past Gas

"It was an unusually warm December night in Allentown, Pennsylvania, and the worker running the register at the corner store in Delhi off airport road was having a horrible time. She just hung up the phone with the police for the third time in as many hours that evening and hope they'd show up as fast as possible. This was 1973. So you'd think there was some unruly leftover hippies ruining the clerk's night with their stoner shenanigans. Or maybe some local teenagers throwing rocks at cats. Or whatever kids did before cell phones. But no, it was just regular, hardworking, Allentown folk. The line for the gas pumps ran almost half a mile down the road, almost reaching the airport. The air was thick with the smog of pre regulation era big blocks chugging away waiting to fill up. Gas prices were through the roof, and tempers were just as high. Drivers pulled hoses out of each other's cars, and eventually started going toe to toe. Before the clerk shut the whole mess down and called the cops on the rowdy scene. Unfortunately, this one small snapshot of gassing up in late 1973 wasn't unique. Noses were bloodied, and eyes were blackened all over the country as tempers flared over rising gas prices. Shortages at the pump, and the end of an American era. How and why did American cars go from hefty hefty hefty to wimpy wimpy wimpy? Why were Americans so scared of running in a gas? They were beating the hell out of each other at the pumps. How did we get to the point that we just accepted a 165 horsepower Corvette? Why did American manufacturers make undeniably inferior cars over a decade? And how do they dig themselves out of a mess that was largely of their own creation? Today on past gas we're diving into the dark history of the malaise era. Buckle up or don't. We.

Allentown Delhi Pennsylvania Corvette
"1973" Discussed on SpyHards Podcast

SpyHards Podcast

04:47 min | 1 year ago

"1973" Discussed on SpyHards Podcast

"It's a film recovering it's able to get on knock list so the question becomes more of a. What are we covering question because this has shades off. Going undercover espionage was identities espionage. I would put this as a conspire. Jason film i think if you said you know three days of the call north by northwest and the diet the jackal as a triple. Bill of spy films. I didn't think people would cinemark be like well. The jackals spy film. They would probably just watch three and enjoy them. Not saying we're going to say yes but you get my point all right. Well taking that under advisement. Then i'd say yeah i it's it's a classic you can't go wrong watching it. It's it's really it's.

cinemark Jason
"1973" Discussed on SpyHards Podcast

SpyHards Podcast

05:41 min | 1 year ago

"1973" Discussed on SpyHards Podcast

"Wick that would be pretty cool. Actually i'm not even joking. I think that'd be genuinely cool. They brought a character like that in show many. He's dead but show now. You know it's a whole there film universally not sure. We're going to cover the jokes at some points now. Talk about Is there like magical currency that he's using his will and unlike codes that you can't shoot each other in certain buildings and stuff like that and strange strange world these assassins. I won't talk about which maybe so it reveals a little bit of out behind the scenes Cam which is the first scene. We spoke about the firing squad. Yeah now camera. We're talking before jeff. Join the conversation about that scene and we we write notes as we watch these films and it turns out one of our. I note was exactly the same yes. Do you wanna reveal it skype. Because you've taken extra footsteps here to realize this so go ahead okay. So for just benefit. We'll sort of played out there so you have the firing squad and just before the firing squad. This person says don't worry. I'm not worried about this whole thing because no french ever raissi's his gun against me and then it's like quick cut to the firing squad raising the gun and shooting a guy in my notes i right guy gets show q. W. enthusiasm theme. Yes and and yeah and then the camera exactly the same thing me independently. Yeah mine just. Yeah just says execution curb. Curb as underlined bomb bomb bomb. And i've actually created this scene and we will be released in the video for. Yes that's right. It is funny. As i thought it would be It you really delivered your scott. It'll be on our youtube channel and will post links to it this week. I'm sure excellent one thing that kind of didn't work for me in some ways was the jackals violence on screen. Sometimes i think it's really effective. I think the best usage is the guy from the steam room when he finds out the jackal just kind of basically stopped him around a corner and we get the sense. Something horrible happened. But there's other scenes like we talk about the strangling of the woman like he strangled this woman in like a second and a half There's also the scene with the guy who's trying to blackmail him for the id's where i'm not even clear on how he killed this man. It seemed like with two punches or something. He's preferred yeah. I would have preferred that. They may be kept it more elusive in terms of what we see like just have scenes where he's doing something screen or just cut to him walking away cleaning off his shoes or something which i've seen in movies before later so this could have beat to beat those movies too that those types of depictions were.

raissi W. enthusiasm Wick skype jeff scott youtube
"1973" Discussed on SpyHards Podcast

SpyHards Podcast

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"1973" Discussed on SpyHards Podcast

"Basically o- over what's happened. And then she's caught by the authorities so like i don't know what kind of sentence she would get. It would be fairly lengthy. I would think considering what's going on here and i don't know that she signed on for this. You know with these sorts of stakes. But it's a pretty harsh reality for what she's facing. I'm not sure if she signed onto it at all. I get the impression she's being fullest which i think actually if look at her story in the film which is a c block the best is the story of matahari true and now the guy in this film. I know from a little bit history. The the guy who's assassinated the beginning get to that scene in a little while is actually a real life person and that attack on charleston was based on a real life event and he was the last person to be shot by firing squad in france. Okay in reality so that that's that is true. So i'll see her in the has been the same as the one from mata hari but i think she would have a pretty big sentence for that. I would think so. Yeah yeah well in that opening sequence is really interesting in that they recreated this actual assassination attempt on all that happened. That forsyth was actually on site. Right after that Because he was a reporter in france at the time for reuters and so he was saw the aftermath of that assassination attempt That really nearly got the goal. I mean new Barely made it out alive of that. And so i think that was. That was interesting part two with this novel and movie is that it really is based in fact. It's kind of almost like an alternative alternate history kind of a movie right where we're seeing. What might have happened otherwise if they decided to do to actually send an assassin after to call rather than using their own army folks though end ass. I wonder how this movie would play two people now in that because you have tarantino for example making films that don't necessarily follow the path of history as we know it. I wonder if there would be a little more. Even suspense to a younger viewers. Watching this now that it could happen because we've seen that filmmakers will take path and we'll show us you know just through its characters an alternate on history well or honestly for kids nowadays. I mean maybe they would think the goal really was assassinated by the jacqueline right. I mean isn't that documentary style in that you believe that this is what really happened kind of thing. So maybe there's a generation now that will grow up thinking that to you really did just missed getting shot. Wait are you saying are you saying. There's a generation of young people. Now they don't know about charles-de-gaulle..

mata hari france charleston forsyth reuters tarantino charles
"1973" Discussed on SpyHards Podcast

SpyHards Podcast

04:31 min | 1 year ago

"1973" Discussed on SpyHards Podcast

"Dramatic narrative. And i was really blown away by it and scott. You and i talked about the house on ninety. Second street on this podcast. A movie and high both struggled a fair deal with in terms of early docudrama form. That just felt so creaky and outdated and just it just really did not grab us whatsoever. Here we're looking at one that now also fifty years old basically but i think is just so effective feels like such a incredible evolution on what ninety second street was doing in that. I was tired immersed in this movie and this is a two and a half hour movie that you could easily say. Well there's no characters to latch onto. This could feel really dry. Any doesn't it's just as consistent pace. I was always interested in the investigation. i may have you know in the first few minutes been like. Oh this could be a rough ride for two and a half hours. But those fears were quickly knocked aside and it's just a masterclass from zimin director. Who i've seen a lot of his work in it feels you know as jeff said like in some ways in keeping with something like high noon but at the same time feels like this classic director almost read them reimagining what he can do on screen in a way that feels at the time i would imagine very modern and i was really just blown away by the direction and editing. This movie. so i'm a fan. I think for me. This one is really a testament to the fact i do what. She's films twice or at least tour i two. I'm glad i did. But this one. Because i didn't really enjoy my first experience with the film i have to say i think that the spy pl- spying air quotes. Thank you jeff is is. The story is great. But you know. I feel like you need to be in the mood for this film as campus. Soon half hours and it is at one speed throughout i. I was watching it the first time like. Hey this is going to step into the next year any point. Nope nope just long hallway. Shots okay okay. We're not going very fast right now. Okay this is one hour down two and a half right. Okay and i struggled a bit going back into the second time i think my and my hopes maybe were lowered and that sounds really bad but i think i just looked at the film from a different angle and tried to take it for what. It wasn't hoping it was something else. Because i've heard great things about the film. And i was hoping for this explosive spy story. And what i got was a procedural drama evolution of the house on ninety second street in all the best ways and from that perspective. I think it was great..

zimin jeff scott
"1973" Discussed on SpyHards Podcast

SpyHards Podcast

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"1973" Discussed on SpyHards Podcast

"That i have some questions about like. I love the sting. This thing is a fantastic entertainment. But when you look at the editing on display in this film arellano. This feels like a little more achievement to me. See i heard something in my research at the cinnamon was done with hollywood and kind of apathy about things so maybe he just made some enemies and people didn't want to vote films possible. I mean also this is also more of the time period. Where best editing goes to best picture like they would just pair them. It didn't really matter if you had the best editing but if you're the movie that's gonna win best picture. You'd probably editing as well. Nowadays it gets split a lot more you know. I remember years like where i believe. The matrix won best editing and believe me it was not in the best picture race. Or baxter road wins best editing and it does not win the best picture so they look at eating. I think in a different way now than they did then where it was more like well. Clearly if it's the best picture has the best editing. I also think the sting is really flashy in win. It operates right. And i think you know. It's that's always been the problem with editing. When it's seamless and you don't notice it is when you lose right. Yeah also of course the sting is a heist film. Which depends on so much on editing for sort of attention that you can also understand how people be so sucked in by the movie. But i will just say. I was pretty floored by the editing of this will be deserves to be in that competition at least while he's had the nomination that's more most of the films that year could say exactly yes. It was an honor just to be nominated. That's right and so a fun. Little side note on the soil. Frederick foresight who had eternal regret over the movie rights. Here with day the jackal. He was offered seventeen thousand five hundred pounds plus a small percentage of the film's prophets or twenty thousand pounds and no royalties whatsoever. Any thought i'm gonna rule. The safe dyson swarm and take the twenty thousand pounds and he said he lived forever with the regret of that because he would have made a small fortune for him. He said did they say what. The percentage were taken. No they never do okay. I was going to work it out in my head. I get you see a little game shows and people get a final round the hey do you wanna double your money and gamble and i'm going no i'll take my seventeen in go. Thank you So i i actually would be with the frederick on this one. Yeah i think. I probably would've done the same. You don't know the movie could do right well. At the time he wrote the book he was out of work. And so he. That's that's why you had the time to write it. And so i. I'm sure if somebody drops twenty twenty thousand on your lap. You'll take it at that point. I would have to imagine even now. That's a year salary for.

arellano Frederick foresight hollywood dyson
"1973" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

07:09 min | 1 year ago

"1973" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"He's the one that says after joke made up by journalists in need of copy my god. He's been Disarming memorable things in this. I did find a really interesting the way that i read the ending of him crashing. It and bright visit breaks to buy it breaks loose from the skull. Split is that white people can jump and they can't handle hybrid As as in that. That's kind of it's like. You're wearing a job handling this sheet storm than you poor more. When he runs away from the boat and runs and runs and runs. My wife was making run. Lola run jokes while we're watching this. And when he finds his bike. It's just like this is the only possession more really has in the world and now it's ruined. Thanks so much yeah. He's circus on escape. Is nothing else out. We don't even get in like we get more awareness of what anti has in her life but is just all we have is the bike and escape andy at short you referenced earlier when they're on the road after having sex images sorry next mullen said like they're on this. Ross that's just the very bottom of the frame are only just about enough to have a mean and the rest is just the And the border and they're looking off into that huge distance and that s always heads and it doesn't crack for maurienne to that marmot. He's about to take the step and he has these little vision his reaction and then it just freak out panic and is perfectly. I wonder too if he's going to get arrested after the cops are after him in these two various sinister sedans going down the streets and i i especially like the one shot where the two cars are coming down the street and there's no room really on either side of them and then one goes right. One goes left in the you know continuing to cover the city looking for these two criminals that ripped the sky off and i don't think they'd give a shit at all other than that. The sky was wealthy if he was just another dude in the village they wouldn't even pay attention to him. It's very i was thinking after. But who doesn't have that kind of nightmarish quality. Half peres has has at feels like a groupie described as the way all racing's coming affecting humans christine around different strange directions with that some of the surrealist aspects and traditions. But i had thought that the difference between an african version calf to retain European version is the white people are why because they think they're on top of everything but people do know why and this what dealing with sorry the calf risk for the emmys though disturbed freak out not these has presented by simple instead. It's more just journey. Which trips abroad but the title a turkey buki translate through journey. The hyena one. Vke what i can imagine is the hyena word or character. I mean from what i understand. the hyenas seemed kind of like. We're talking last month for spaghetti westerns about the trickster character that we have in italian Theater and it feels very much like the hyena. Is this type of trickster that we'd have in folklore for africa some of Kind of hyenas kind of demonic willow. The wisp lie in the league ties talking by rada is and join out into the night to be seen a gain in chad and that region. cer- africa. There's a common a belief of where wolves but it's like hyena like where. How eunice why the reason he feels about that because it would be hard inexpensive We really need. I would be much more scared of a hyena. Human hybrid than wolf human hybrid. I think just because of the i mean hyenas. Just the way that they're built is so fascinating with the shorter back legs than the front legs. Thank you i love. They're cute but they're little scary. Sometimes too i mean the laughter. The i mean. I've seen a lot of footage of them. Just light drooling like crazy as waiting to get their teeth into the karen. I mean i know who. I read an interview with the Talking about cowl. He's trying to use animals especially in hyenas to represent different people and hyenas. Don't necessarily kill really. That doesn't seem right to me. They are much more carrion. Feeders than active hunters. That's for sure. Do scare easily get and they garner they out. She can audits speak to a degree so that we see that in in in the main categories when it comes down to goltz events the going back to the high in fact like to the i always have to bring up that end the packs. If there is no dominant male the dominant female will grow a fake penis to late show. Her dominance in will enroll use it to like a show her command over like weaker males. That are trying to get her away. And that's to debate. Teapot to heinous medicine Somewhere i read that. He's in the board boarding. Backfield is yanni may integrate mentioned the only to feature films to keep and three and then hyenas in ninety will him back to pull the effort to get a feel may was that he wanted to find anta. They wanted to find this character and he found her in a play. Gold the visit and that the rich foreigner who comes back to caliban which is typically starts. In which raymond body grew up in and just reach woman comes back and they say the town. Please save the town where we need help of a and essentially she talked with her grevious Love when they were teenage ages Raped soulmate finder. The south who abandoned her screwdriver and She makes it pretty vicious deal and going back on watched hyenas and rewatch to hebrew. This is not a symposium on to absolutely not it you at was a great app into trivia relating tightening.

italian Theater Lola mullen Ross andy africa rada christine goltz eunice chad yanni Backfield raymond
"1973" Discussed on The Tennis Podcast

The Tennis Podcast

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"1973" Discussed on The Tennis Podcast

"Little we save him and how little i knew about him other than he was the wimbledon winner in the boycott year. Obviously billie jean king knows plenty about him danced with him at the wimbledon bowl. That year here is billie jean talking about yankee. Additional say stan smith who we heard her saying with was one of the biggest hit by By boycotting in nineteen seventy. Three's the defending champion up pm. Well here's a static. I mean he said thank. Thank you to the boycott. He said do you think. Do you really think i'd be dancing with you. Know if if everybody been in the tournament he said what unbelievable opportunity for me for my country. i think it was still czechoslovakia. Then so it was wonderful and i always liked yawn anyway. He was always been very wonderful. Nice and cared about tennis cared about the younger players. So i always. I liked him a lot. So i was very happy for him but he was great. You saw static. He knew he understood. It was an opportunity. We're not presented opportunities often and he took advantage of it. I'll tell you took. The real hit was stan smith. Because he wanted seventy two. He's defending champion. He boycotted trumbull. And that was very courageous. I thought i always appreciate stand for that crafted..

stan smith czechoslovakia Three billie jean trumbull one nineteen seventy seventy two wimbledon bowl
"1973" Discussed on SpyHards Podcast

SpyHards Podcast

03:15 min | 1 year ago

"1973" Discussed on SpyHards Podcast

"Just kind of being sucked in by the vibe and the john huston direction. Okay so of contrasting opinions they're different take certainly Yeah like i. i'm very mixed. It's just that it's the type of mixed that i was able to enjoy versus a movie that just put me off. If it's quite odd. I actually so of comedown in between the two of you a little bit because my first note is this plot is all over the place like it doesn't it doesn't seem to want to know It's a question. I kind of want on. Maybe a big topic is we. We all three of us do spy movie podcasts. Should spy movie plot spe- complicated to the point where that hard to follow this. This film. It's not like something with like say funeral in berlin. For instance where it's complicated but the breadcrumbs of there if you pay attention whereas filled doesn't give you anything you're left to understand it a Gives you information which is as full new characters. Learning it basically. That's frustrating at times. But there's this like. I just wrote down a cool factor to this film. It just has so effortlessly. cool coal to it. i really found heart of finger on exactly what it was. The pacing live at the place. Maybe a second tone thing like cam said martin was like. Yeah this is. This is pretty cool. Even frustrated by choice or pacing. I i still kinda like it's impossible to get emotionally engaged in the movie i found but in terms of a more kind of appreciating what. The director is kind of putting on the screen in terms of visuals and atmosphere. I was kind of sucked in by that. But i i agree like if you're hoping to enter this movie and become emotionally engaged in the journey of paul newman good luck. It doesn't help the hey doesn't seem to care. The poco. newman has one level. Yeah it's funny. 'cause paul newman as like one of the biggest stars in the world at this point. He's so famous for movies..

paul newman john huston martin two berlin first note three . one level newman one second tone
"1973" Discussed on SpyHards Podcast

SpyHards Podcast

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"1973" Discussed on SpyHards Podcast

"Paul newman had the sting this year the next year. He stars in the biggest blockbuster probably of the year the towering inferno paul newman's good. Don't worry about him. Folks and walter hill takes a bit of minor break before coming back. He writes the nineteen seventy five. Paul newman movie. The drowning pool and has his direct to'real debut hard times with charles bronson and that kick starts historial career. He's fine too. So it's more like i think the macintosh manage just sort of a curiosity among this really interesting trio. And how did this come come across your lap camp. This is your choice so yeah a little behind the scenes. We have a big master list of spy films to cover for the podcast. And i will just sometimes google around and look for spy films to add that maybe are hidden gems. Or just things that you know. People don't have on the tip of their tongue. And when i saw a john houston film. Starring paul newman listed as a spy film. I said this is a must do at some point because easier to big talents. Here we are okay. Giovanni else i can. Nope that about wraps up the macintosh man. Okay so let's get into what we feel about the field. We've kind of hinted little bits and bobs. but i really wanted cristina. Our guest take away. What did you think of the macintosh man. so i was fascinated by just what was going on fascinated. Not not integrate. Good way but just this felt like three or four different movies all into one with makes complete sense with all the different writers they had on this like are at the very beginning. I was getting a very like spy. Who came in for the cold vibe from okay. You know we're gonna send you in. We're gonna you know you but of course we don't know what he's supposed to be doing because they give us zero information of. Oh what you're trying.

charles bronson three next year macintosh this year john houston Paul newman paul newman Giovanni cristina nineteen seventy five four different walter hill zero trio
"1973" Discussed on SpyHards Podcast

SpyHards Podcast

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"1973" Discussed on SpyHards Podcast

"Dot dot o. Wow you really left me. hanging there. Macintosh man that is a synopsis with dramatic value to it. Yeah it's semi. Carlos callers dots. It's everything that's right. I think that was an okay. I'm really so it up can't complain you know. I think if i had heard or read that before i watch me. That'd be a lot less confused watching the movie. 'cause i felt like well. Yeah they. they didn't explain much going into the movie in shall we i dunno. Can i start getting into my mom when i thought about the movie. Save it for now to know what we need to know how this film came to be for. We can talk about. How confused we gotcha. Okay so the story of the macintosh man starts with a writer named walter hill. Now are either of you familiar with walter hill. I am not okay scott. Okay so walter hill. Is i think at this point in the Twenty twenty one is when we record. This walter hill's probably best known as the writer director of forty-eight hours the warriors He's also a co writer and producer on the franchise. He co-wrote alien alien three. He had a story credit on aliens. He's definitely one of those very reliable writer. Directors who never quite had you know the massive fame but jonah fans really know him well he did like last man. Standing with bruce willis. He's kind of known for grittier. Action films heated Red heat with schwarzenegger so this early in his career. He's hot off the movie. The getaway which was the steve mcqueen thriller and he was dealing with a lawsuit. From warner brothers. Warner brothers was suing him for not delivering screenplay which was part of his deal. Now what are hill. Didn't really care. he was angry at warner brothers. Because they had sold a screenplay he'd written called hickey and boggs to united artists instead of producing it themselves that became in nineteen seventy-two thriller starring. Bill cosby and robert culp. It was a ice by reunion. Essentially more gritty thriller film by. That's what it became the fact that no one really is hickey and boggs since then tells me about you know how successful that movie was but needless to say walter hill annoyed so he was dealing with this lawsuit and basically they decided okay. He's got to write a screenplay he asked to do it pronto. They sent him a box of books told him to pick one and adapted and the idea would basically be like. I'll just grab a book adapted. I'm out good contract fulfilled later and he stumbled across a book. Called the freedom trap by desmond bagley. Now the book was sort of loosely. Inspired by a vm. And my six named george blake. Who was discovered in nineteen sixty one. Now he was sentenced to forty two years in jail but escaped in sixty six so after only about five years in prison and fled to the soviet union. Now as we'll talk about. What the mackintosh man. This isn't a one to one comparison but that was essentially the spring off point for the book the freedom trap and so walter hill wrote this screenplay Sounds like very quickly and he was genuinely shocked. When paul newman was lured in by warner brothers to do it. Paul newman at this. Point is one of the biggest stars in the world. one of the great american icons and for some reason. He was very excited about.

george blake walter hill robert culp forty two years paul newman six forty-eight hours desmond bruce willis Warner Carlos Paul newman Bill cosby sixty six schwarzenegger scott -two thriller steve mcqueen about five years one