35 Burst results for "1918"

Ken Blackwell Shares How to Restore Voter Integrity

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:16 min | 1 d ago

Ken Blackwell Shares How to Restore Voter Integrity

"Let's focus on how we can best address some of the issues regarding voter integrity of what happened in 2020. I still think we need to fix 2020 and the sense of fix what went wrong in 2020 from the mail in ballots to the signature verification issues. What is the status of the election integrity fight? What is going well and where do we need to dedicate some more work? Before we in fact prescribe a fix, we have to get a deeper understanding of what went wrong. So let me just say it to you this way. In 2020, we had the perfect storm for chaos and confusion. If you go back a hundred years in 1918, we had the Spanish flu, the 1929 we had major economic disruption in 1968. We had valid across the country and our major cities and in 1974, we had the impeachment process associated with Richard Nixon in 2020, we had all of those things. And the Democrats have never missed an opportunity of chaos to advance an agenda. So what they did in 2020 was that they under the guise of relaxing because of COVID, they did away with a lot of the verification policies and practices that helped us understand their voters or who they claim to be. They also loosened the chain of custody of ballots. So as we approach, as we approach 2021, we, in fact, have to fix those things. We have to tighten the chain of custody. And that means that we can't fall victim of mass unsolicited mail in ballots. We can't allow private dollars like Zuckerberg put in play in 2020 in with a half a $1 billion in selected and targeted areas that discriminated against some voters because it allowed voter valid curing by some and not by others. And so we have to go in and we have to fix those things and we have to rebuild voter confidence in the

Richard Nixon Confusion FLU Zuckerberg
COVID has killed about as many Americans as the 1918-19 flu

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 2 months ago

COVID has killed about as many Americans as the 1918-19 flu

"Cope with nineteen has now killed about as many Americans as what's considered the worst pandemic disease in human history the Spanish flu pandemic a century ago killed an estimated six hundred seventy five thousand Americans coated nineteen has now claimed roughly the same number the population then was about a third of what it is today meaning that pandemic took a much a bigger toll but researchers say covert nineteen stole we'll grow the university of Washington's influential model projects another one hundred thousand American deaths by January first they're averaging about nineteen hundred a day the highest level since early March about two thirds of the U. S. population has received at least one vaccine dose Sager made ani Washington

FLU University Of Washington U. Sager Ani Washington
"1918" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

02:03 min | 3 months ago

"1918" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Instructions from their contest. Running on w. C. P T. A 20 are open to Chicago and residents 18 and over complete rules that w c p t a 20 dot com. This is a W. CPT veteran minute captain Hugh Mel's ex Love for the Sea Start After he finished high school, he served the British suitors and in 1918 immigrated to the United States within two years of joining the Marines that turned his shipping master's certificate. The first African American to do so. 1921 Mosaic was promoted to the rank of Captain 1942, the SS Booker T. Washington, the first ship to be named after an African American Was created, and Balzac was offered the position of captain, but he turned it down at first as the Marines did not want to have an integrated crew. Mosaic stood firm in his belief stating under no circumstances like Commander Jim Crow and Balzac became the first African American captain of the first ever integrated crew. Under captain Balzac over 18,000 troops are sent to the European War front and ships carrying tanks, aircraft and ammunition. Tunis These troops in World War two. This has been a W C P t better in a minute. Check up on health with Chris Witting. A study from the National Safe Kids campaign defines what common sense tells us 45% of all child. Accidental deaths come between May and August, Angela Michaelides says, wheel sports Our prime concern they need to wear properly sitting helmets and other protective gear. Every time they write their bikes, scooters in line skates or skateboards. You need to be sure that you know the rules of the road and that you obey all the traffic laws. We recommend that kids under 10 not ride their bikes in the streets. But those 10 to 14 certainly can begin in their communities to be riding freely, and we also have to continue to work on passing, strengthening and enforcing Chelsea 50 laws. 45% of all child, accidental deaths come between May and August. Learn more from the safe kids Campaign at safe kids dot org.

Chris Witting Angela Michaelides United States 45% 1918 Chicago European War Jim Crow Hugh Mel 10 14 1921 World War two May August two years first ship 18 Tunis c p t a 20
"1918" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:54 min | 6 months ago

"1918" Discussed on KQED Radio

"June 1918 65 when enslaved people in Texas found out they were free more than two years after President Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation. Cloudy carrizalez NPR NEWS Washington A storm system in the Gulf of Mexico may develop into the first tropical storm to hit the U. S this year. National Weather Service has issued Tropical storm warnings from Louisiana to the Alabama Florida border. The governor of Louisiana has declared a state of emergency hurricane. Forecasters say heavy rain and gusty winds will strike the Gulf Coast later today. Many parts of the West remain under excessive heat warnings. NPR's Windsor Johnston reports that in California consumers are being urged to conserve electricity to ward off blackouts. Residents in California were asked to voluntarily turn up their thermostats and to avoid using major appliances after the state's electricity grid, warned of potential shortages this week. National Weather Service meteorologist Bob Oravec says it will be several days before many parts of the Southwest will get some relief from the heat. But as we get towards the end of the weekend in the beginning of next week, there is some reprieve for the Southwest is still going to be hot centuries well above 100 degrees as we go into the beginning of this week, but at least we'll be a little cooler temperatures a little closer to what is average for this time of year. California last August endured two consecutive nights of rolling blackouts as temperatures surpassed 110 degrees. He's Windsor Johnston. NPR NEWS LOS Angeles Authorities in three cities west of Phoenix arrested a man suspected of mass shootings in different sites on Thursday, including on freeways. One person was killed and three other people were wounded. Nine more people were hurt by gun shrapnel or broken glass. Sergeant Brandon Sheppard of the Peoria, Arizona Police Department. Says the shootings occurred in the cities of Peoria Surprise and Glendale. This person going.

California Texas Glendale Bob Oravec 110 degrees Thursday NPR Louisiana Gulf of Mexico National Weather Service Gulf Coast U. S Peoria Surprise last August Brandon Sheppard LOS Angeles One person Washington Phoenix June 1918 65
"1918" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:50 min | 7 months ago

"1918" Discussed on 710 WOR

"The he time to study. This is 1918. As you know, the 19 seventies were a period of accelerating inflation. On. It was a very serious problem that politicians could not deal with it all. And then in 1980 Reagan became a candidate for president. And he advocated returning to the gold standard in his manifesto. And that stopped the fall in the dollar dead. And it was continued to people continued to believe that Reagan might actually do this during his presidency, but he actually never did. But it didn't stop the acceleration of inflation. Very, very successful. So the price of gold was rising to a peak. And it was in February of 1980 that it peaked. $800 announcing those days was a very, very big deal wouldn't mean anything now. And then it started falling, and it felt pretty rapidly all the way through the 19 eighties into the nineties, So we had a huge inflation until 1980. And after that we had disinflation or even deflation in the price of gold or deflation. In general. In general, the price of gold is a leading indicator of what happens to all the other prices in the system. In practice prices have pushed up by labor costs and so they don't fall as much as the price of gold falls. But we had certainly disinflation in the general level of prices. From the 19 eighties through the 19 nineties, and even beyond. Fascinating. So, folks call us.

February of 1980 1980 Reagan $800 1918 19 seventies 19 nineties 19 eighties nineties
Alderman Brendan Reilly optimistic about Chicago's food industry

Bob Sirott

00:37 sec | 9 months ago

Alderman Brendan Reilly optimistic about Chicago's food industry

"Pandemic cost Chicago up to 20% of its restaurants, but Alderman Brendan Riley sees the light at the end of the tunnel for the food industry. He tells WGN's ended of losses. He sees an economic revival and possibly more think business. People are planning ahead and have done the research and they understand this is a good time to reinvest and try and start up a new business. We saw this happen. Turn of the century in the 19 hundreds after the major flu pandemic of 1918 you know the roaring twenties, the state will allow a capacity increase for businesses once it moves that bridge phase after Phase four.

Alderman Brendan Riley WGN Chicago FLU
2021 NBA All-Star Game Atlanta Draft Results

Bloomberg Daybreak

00:32 sec | 9 months ago

2021 NBA All-Star Game Atlanta Draft Results

"Far exceeding expectations and 1918 record, they beat Detroit of the guard 1 14 1 before they're all star Julius Randle again led the way. 27 points. 16 rebounds, seven assists. All five starters were in double figures They picked the squad's for Sunday's game in Atlanta, and Randall will play for team Kevin Durant. The Durant won't play to the injury. Not surprising. Durant also picked his Nets teammates Kyrie, Irving, James Harden, LeBron James. Like the other team will have the slam dunk competition at halftime On Sunday. Knicks rookie over Topping will be in it in their work Rangers all over the

Julius Randle Durant Detroit Kevin Durant Randall Atlanta Kyrie James Harden Nets Irving Lebron James Knicks Rangers
U.S. coronavirus death toll surpasses 500,000

Pat Walsh

00:32 sec | 10 months ago

U.S. coronavirus death toll surpasses 500,000

"S surpassing 500,000 covert 19 death Just 34 days since it passed 400,000. It took just 96 days for the US to double its death toll from 250,000 to today's 500. U. S death toll now about 3/4 of the number of recorded deaths from the 1918 influenza pandemic at the White House. We fighting this pandemic for so long, we have to resist becoming numb to the sorrow. President Biden, pausing to remember the losses, reminding Americans the stats. Represent real people in families.

President Biden Influenza White House United States
Europe's Oldest Person Survives COVID-19 Just Before 117th Birthday

Doug Stephan

01:24 min | 10 months ago

Europe's Oldest Person Survives COVID-19 Just Before 117th Birthday

"That is worth our time, I think is the story of the French. None. Have you seen this? This woman was alive. During the Spanish flu in 1918. All right, So let's just follow me here on this and and listen to the numbers. She was alive and got the flu and beat the flu. And now She has on her. She was 117 years old this week. Her name is Sister Andree. She was also attacked by the Corona virus. Remember, she's 117. He's had a retirement home in too long, which is one of the southern most cities in France. He was one of dozens people in the home who tested positive for the virus. But this week, sister Andre was declared recovered from the virus, allowing her to hold on to her title. As the oldest living European and second oldest person in the world. When she was 115, the pope said her a personal letter and blessed her. She's blind lives in a wheelchair or moves around of the real chair as she was in she witnessed both world wars. And today is here. 117th birthday.

FLU Sister Andree Andre France Pope
Myanmar's leader detained as military seizes control in apparent coup

All Things Considered

03:06 min | 10 months ago

Myanmar's leader detained as military seizes control in apparent coup

"Chang, the country of Myanmar is under military control again after a coup deposed the government of former democracy icon on San Souci. The military claims. Massive election fraud that sauce Ooh Cheese party went overwhelmingly in November's general election. Michael Sullivan reports. The military says it's state of emergency will only last a year. Mo Tosia of the Institute for Southeast Asian Studies in Singapore. Isn't buying. She has a long memory and recalls a similar promise made by the military. After a student led uprising. Decades ago, I go back to 1988 promise was to convene elections and hand over power to the party that won the elections, and we all know what happened to 1990. What happened then, she says, was that on some soup cheese party won convincingly. Victory. The military then refused to recognize. But today she insists things are different than they were 30 years ago. The global political and economic climate It will just be very unfavorable for military hunter seeking to justify his actions. I think That's assuming the military cares. I think that probably calculated that they've got friends in the world that will be disappointed in them, but will ultimately put their own self interests to the fore. And let them get away with it. David Matheson is a Youngun based analyst reached in Thailand. The endgame, I think is quite disturbing. I think it's them holding onto power. And definitely Mary Kelehan, a Myanmar scholar at the University of Washington, who is in the former capital, Yangon, isn't so sure. I don't even know if they have a plan. But, she says, even without a plan This crisis was inevitable, given the cohabitation that the 2008 Constitution imposed upon political and personal photos or enemies, So I'm not so shocked. To be honest. That arrangement she says, was created in part by the military drafted Constitution. That allowed it to retain control over several key ministries while guaranteeing the military a quarter of the seats in parliament effective veto power. Despite this on song suit, she went to the International Court of Justice in 2019 to refute allegations of genocide by Myanmar's military against the Muslim minority Rohingya. I think foreigners read too much into that, and that's what's being that's what we're hearing over and over. Which is that you know, she went to bat for the military, but she went about for her country. I mean, she saw this I C J case as an attack on her country and inevitable or not, Callahan says. This crisis couldn't have come at a worst time mammals facing its greatest health threat since the Spanish flu of 1918 There's new outbreaks of fighting in places where there had not been violent in a decade, and now it has a national political crisis when she says that will not turn out well for the people

Government Of Former Democracy San Souci Ooh Cheese Party Mo Tosia Institute For Southeast Asian Myanmar Michael Sullivan David Matheson Mary Kelehan Chang Singapore Yangon University Of Washington Thailand International Court Of Justice Callahan FLU
"1918" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

04:56 min | 11 months ago

"1918" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"15 59 to go down there in Tempe against Cal, and at the half it was tied at 19, New Mexico and Fresno State. New Mexico has the first bucket. It only took him two minutes and one second in the second half. To get that 21 to 19, New Mexico. 17 59 to go. The total is 1 29, which was bet up from 1 25.5. Andy. This would be one of the worst beats total wise in a long time. If this thing went like three or four overtimes, and then finally crawled over that total overtime don't like, stay under it was it was a Kansas TCU also a very low scoring first half very, very low scoring 1918 or something. Yeah, it was. I remember TCU got out of the gate up by seven points, and I just looked like a Man, This is definitely not the same type. You know, blue blood programs when we look at Kansas and Kentucky, Carolina? Yeah, he exactly. And then you look at teams like Arizona. I mean, just, uh you know, you're expecting him to win certain games and only just boy, you're better off just taking points. 25 blue ribbon coming into the season? Yeah. Where they started. They've been a major disappointment. No, it won't shock me if they end up blowing this game to cow that they lead by only three. Now. They had a nice lead out of the gate. New Mexico now 23 to 1916 53 to go second half. So Fresno State is not even scored on their home court in the first three minutes and seconds. Very unusual thing when it comes to let's let's hope Let's go with the expectation that next season in college football in college basketball, Colby's resemble what we're accustomed to season. There's a great question is how do you handle the results from this season? As far as you know, for those of us who keep databases and how do we want to incorporate this year's results Because of So many variables that are unique to this season of asshole. It'll at least let's hope they're unique to this season, especially when it comes to college basketball. Where I don't know what the percentages I'm guessing it's probably 50 50. Maybe maybe even higher where these teams were playing back to back games at the same venue. You know, For example, New Mexico played two games here at the UNLV. You're not going toe. I don't believe you're gonna have a return visit there, although I think New Mexico isn't even playing at home this year. But Utah State, for example, played Games here, and they're not gonna and they're playing back to back games sometimes back to back nights. How do you compensate for that when you're going forward, because this is a situation? It is great this year because they've been a lot of great things You could do handicapping these back to back games. And you almost wish that you know the answer. Double A wood would incorporate that going forward, but that's not likely to happen. But how would you interpret the results this year? When you're looking next year to see how these teams have done, you know. Well, maybe you might just I don't know that you could totally throw it out. But If the results this year are inconsistent with results from prior seasons, then you might just want to ignore it, or certainly greatly reduce the way that you give this season's results because of the unique characterization of this season, and you make a good point. Do you think that college just look at college basketball because, like you said, unique season, so you're having these back to back games, same venue. But if if there's If there are teams that are in close proximity, another concept conference game like, say, the Metro Atlantic. You've seen it for years because you're an Ivy League grad that the Ivy League on a Friday night would play one venue and then go to another venue on Saturday. Sometimes you will have a home and home just depending on how the scheduling works out. But do you think that The way that it's gone toe where teams are showing that they can compete back to back nights that we may see some of this down the line, not saying at the same venue because you're not going to see that too often. You're not gonna have the team's playing four times, you know, unless there's you know, just some quirky scheduling conflicts or whatnot, but I'm just wondering if it's going to maybe give different conference authorities. Ah, look to say you know what? We were able to do this back to back? We may not need, you know, 345 days of rest in between games. Maybe we can tighten things up might see And again. I think it depends. You might see, for example, you know, U C. L A and Southern Cal will play. Let's say that play one game in January and then will play the rematch in February. Yeah, you could have a situation where on one weekend on one weekend. Say on Thursday. They played U C L A. And on Saturday they play at USC maybe have something that with Wyoming and Colorado State, you know other programs that are within the same conference center within close proximity of one another, or even some of the nonconference games. Let's say you could have like a rice and they used to play back to back games at different venues because they're basically in the same city, so I think it's something that they could consider. But I still think you're going to have a situation where saved, for example in the non teams that are not in the same ring..

New Mexico basketball Fresno State Kansas TCU Andy Ivy League Cal Tempe Utah USC UNLV Arizona Metro Atlantic Colby football Colorado Wyoming Carolina Kentucky
The first record to sell over a million copies: 'Vesti la giubba' sung by the Italian opera singer Enrico Caruso

AT40

01:06 min | 11 months ago

The first record to sell over a million copies: 'Vesti la giubba' sung by the Italian opera singer Enrico Caruso

"When our founding host Casey Casey, highlighted the first song in history to sell a million copies. Right now, the story of the first recording ever to sell one million copies in the early years when the recording industry was just getting started recorded. Music was treated as anomaly, and most of the songs they recorded in those days were usually old standards. Well, one of the first songs to sell many copies was recorded by a famous female opera singer named Alma Gluck. Backed by a male chorus and orchestra. It was the state Song of Virginia, and it was released in 1911 with nothing on the flip side of the record. Then the same recording was re released in 1915 and by 1918, according to the music historian Joseph Morales. Carry me back toe over. Jenny had managed to sell a million copies at a time when they were barely a million record players in the whole world. And though it took about seven years, it became the first recording in history to sell a million copies, a distinction that can never be erased from the 18 40 Book of Records on now, Here's

Casey Casey Alma Gluck Joseph Morales Virginia Jenny
Santa returns to Rockport for Christmas

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

Santa returns to Rockport for Christmas

"A 122 year old Christmas tradition was alive and well in Rockport. This Christmas with a slightly different look. WBC's Kendall Buell was there to bring us the story. Very Christmas Christmas Tree Committee of Rockport has brought Santa Claus to town through two World Wars, the Great Depression and the last global pandemic in 1918. So, of course old Saint Nick was gonna be in town center this morning, posing for pictures with kids. I'll be at 8 ft. In the background committee chair, Buddy Wood says those happy kids didn't mind having to keep their distance. I know Santa was their farm and they're keeping their distance with the understanding that this is the way it has to be So, walking away really happy? Yeah, and walking away real happy. And did I mention this was all is the Christmas storm was really kicking up. It's the Christmas Tree Committee of Rock board has shown over 122 years. Some traditions can take whatever you throw at them

Kendall Buell Christmas Christmas Tree Commi Rockport Buddy Wood WBC Saint Nick Santa Claus Depression Santa Christmas Tree Committee Of Ro
U.S. COVID cases skyrocket as 2020 on track to become deadliest year ever due to pandemic

AP 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

U.S. COVID cases skyrocket as 2020 on track to become deadliest year ever due to pandemic

"From the CDC suggests the U. S. Is on track to see more than 3.2 million deaths this year. That's 400,000 more than in 2019 R. Darkest days in the battle against Cove. It Are ahead of us not behind us. Speaking in Delaware President elect Joe Biden expressed empathy with struggling families who are dealing with a covert 19 search that's casting a shadow over the Christmas holidays. This is been a The toughest years better faces a nation covert 19 has killed more than 318,000 Americans and counting. It's become the third leading cause of death behind heart disease and cancer. Annual fatalities rise every year. But in 2020, the numbers jumped about 15% and could go higher. It's the largest percentage jumps since World War one and the Spanish flu pandemic in 1918. Biden also

President Elect Joe Biden CDC Delaware Heart Disease Cancer FLU Biden
2020 turning out to be deadliest year ever in U.S.

The Mock 'N Rob Show

00:17 sec | 1 year ago

2020 turning out to be deadliest year ever in U.S.

"The deadliest year ever in the U. S Preliminary data show the U. S will top three million deaths this year for the first time on track for 400,000 more deaths than in 2019. That's well over 10%, which would be the biggest percentage increase since the 1918 flu pandemic. And considering

U. FLU
2020 turning out to be deadliest year ever in U.S.

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

2020 turning out to be deadliest year ever in U.S.

"Well, this is the deadliest year in U. S history. It'll take months for final mortality data to be collected. But at this point, the country is on pace to see more than 3.2 Million people die in 2020 more than ever before, and at least 400,000 more than last year. Comes out to about 15% increased from 2019 that increase, of course, mainly due to the pandemic. The last time we saw that big of an increase in deaths over a single year was 1918 when America was dealing with another pandemic as well as World war one.

U. America
How Spanish Flu Pandemic Changed Home Heat Radiators

All Things Considered

02:28 min | 1 year ago

How Spanish Flu Pandemic Changed Home Heat Radiators

"The northern Us, you might have had a steam radiator. That was way too hot, like so hot that you would actually throw your window wide open in the dead of winter, and it might have made a noise like this. Oh, so familiar. As it turns out radiators that worked too well are partly a result of the 1918 flu pandemic. You see, there was once something called the fresh Air movement called for people to be outside more and for there to be plenty of ventilation indoors. The fresh air movement had some prominent backers, says Dan Holla Han, He's author of the Lost Art of Steam Heating. Harriet Beecher Stowe teamed up with Louis leads who was running the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia. And they had this traveling show where they talked about the national poison, which was the vitiated air and closed rooms where there's people breathing and And they're saying that you know, you've got to have a lot of fresh air. So people took this to heart and opened their windows Not so good during the winter, so heating specialists said to themselves. We need to size the radiators and the boilers to eat the building on the coldest day of the year with the Windows open. That might mean a room is too hot at one end and too cold near the window. At that point, they moved the radiator from the interior wall to under the window to heat that areas is coming in. This design philosophy took off after the 1918 flu pandemic and its threat of airborne viruses. So these radiators were designed to heat a room on the coldest day of the year with the window wide open. And then these radiators got even hotter as people switched from cold. Other fuels See oil and natural gas can be burned in smaller boilers. But often technicians ignored that. The person doing the replacement rather than properly size, it is usually going toe look at the size that's there and give you the same thing, which is crazy. Suddenly you have a super powered steam heater, which is one reason they earned a bad reputation, says Dan Holla Han. He knows that some city dwellers still open their windows during the winter. I could tell you in Manhattan by standing across the street and looking at the windows. Of an apartment building. What kind of heat it has. I could tell that from the outside just by looking at the pattern of open windows mate seem wasteful today, but steam radiators were a response to a respiratory pandemic. Just like the one that we're in right now.

Dan Holla Han FLU Harriet Beecher Stowe Franklin Institute Philadelphia Louis Manhattan
"1918" Discussed on Five four two and the Blue

Five four two and the Blue

06:01 min | 1 year ago

"1918" Discussed on Five four two and the Blue

"Buy it. They did like the show though but they didn't buy the book four sentencing. Julia tried to plead insanity. Several doctors testified that was far from the case. She wasn't insane. She we just bad lady. In july of nineteen nineteen slip julia. The fake flu nurse sent the illinois state penitentiary for over ten years. Now there's some other issues that have come up in looking at crime and punishment during that time from an article on november eleventh nineteen eighteen posted in seattle daily times men who were wearing flu mouse wearing the regulation. Influenza mass to bandits held up a beacon street streetcar near the south terminus at twelve fifty. Three this morning and relieve the conductor. Mr donnelly of fifty two dollars and fifty five cents again doing currency exchange to modern dollar. Said be about nine hundred and seventy dollars now. There were no passengers on board and the robbers fled and were not caught. There was another incident about this same time. That occurred in san francisco. Were the flu. Investigator confronted a man for not wearing his mask on the street in san francisco. When the man shove the inspector and walked away the inspector pulled a gun and shoddy. They took wearing masks seriously back then. Apparently now local courts on the other hand had more flexibility in how they met with this crisis at that time in many cities judges either drastically reduced their case loads or simply close or quartz together for the duration of the epidemic. Some held outdoor sessions and surprisingly the impact of court. Closures turned out to be less severe than anticipated. They actually float a lot better. Seattle saw drastic. Drop off the number of marriage licenses during the epidemic. Although interestingly enough the number of divorce filings did increase chicago crime stats took a major dive during the epidemic. Some criminals were simply too ill to commit their crimes others found out that with the majority of chicago residents stuck at home generally in the evening due to the closure orders and no place to go opportunities for robbery. Some holdups and patty larcenies were. Were quite few in fact at that time. As opposed to what's happening today. Crime and chicago fell thirty five percent during the nineteen eighteen. Spanish flu epidemic period as compared with those same time the previous year violence during pandemics is not new but the type of violence that has prevailed of change based on the context of the disease and the thinking of the individuals involved during the black death. Thirteen forty to thirteen fifty three europeans increasingly attacked and massacred jewish communities accusing them of well poisoning and other attacks on non jewish populations just as in america some individuals secretly massacred and buried groups of irish immigrants during the eighteen thirty. Two cholera outbreak citizens feared. They had brought the cholera disease to their community and to the united states canada goes to show that the issues we are dealing with. Today are very similar to what occurred in the past and hopefully we can learn from our past so that we don't make the same mistakes today. Now that's shade of blue story for this week. Victorian i hope he founded some interest. We will be back here with another shade of blue story next saturday. At seven o'clock in the meantime try to be safe and secure. And if you have the opportunity to do so do something nicer. Constructive for somebody is the small things that come together to build big structures. Thank you for listening and victoria. We'll let you. We'll give you the website if you want to get in contact with with me the discussed this case i love hearing from you guys also. I love getting suggestions for future shades of blue stories so victoria go ahead and close us out in. You've got the control board. And like i said we'll talk to you guys next saturday. Thanks for listening. By y'all this is the five four to the blue podcast your host today. Scott lunceford retired police. Detective sergeant researcher and author of the ashville college mystery book series as well as the young person's series. The girls from gift goes investigating fantastic things for more information. Please go to five four two and the blue dot com or scotland's for doing dot com. Where you can contact scott. This is victoria producer and sound engineer. Thank you for listening to one and..

Julia flu chicago Seattle san francisco Scott lunceford ashville college Mr donnelly patty larcenies Investigator illinois robbery america researcher scotland united states producer canada engineer
Under Cover of Thanksgiving, Trump Administration Pushes to Relax Rules Protecting Birds

All Things Considered

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Under Cover of Thanksgiving, Trump Administration Pushes to Relax Rules Protecting Birds

"Step toward weakening legal protections for migrating birds. NPR's Martin cost reports, the administration says the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918 has been interpreted to broadly. The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service now says that companies should be penalized on Lee when they're quote, purposeful in killing birds in hazards such as waste oil pits. Sarah Greenberger of the Conservation group Autobahn says the administration is trying to make its current hands off attitude permanent. The final rule change would remove any obligation but any industry to implement any best management practices. Some companies say they'd try to protect birds anyway. Without the threat of penalties. The Trump Administration rule could be published in a month. The incoming Biden administration could reverse it, but that would take time. Martin cost NPR NEWS Wall Street The Dow was up 37

Martin Cost U. S. Fish And Wildlife Servic Sarah Greenberger NPR LEE Trump Administration Biden Martin
Trump administration moves ahead on gutting bird protections

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Trump administration moves ahead on gutting bird protections

"Rolling back protections for migratory birds. Tom Roberts has the story. The White House's reinterpreting the 1918 migratory birds statute, Trudy's penalties for companies and developers who inadvertently killed them. The policy put in place in the 19 seventies to find an illegal taking of a migratory bird as any action that caused the death of a protected species. Whether deliberate or accidental, environmentalists argue the change will give polluters carte blanche to kill. Birds, which is not just illegal. It's cruel. I'm Tom Roberts come on his

Tom Roberts Trudy White House
"1918" Discussed on Can We Health You?

Can We Health You?

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"1918" Discussed on Can We Health You?

"Right so then. He kept on working tyler. Tirelessly teaching his ideas about the body health and wellbeing. He was profiled in magazines newspapers and on television television throughout his career yet. His work remained confined to an elite group of loyal followers. So really didn't kind take off. It was more. I think people in the dance community and then people who maybe a new york maybe new york socialites. Or whoever Would you know kind of take his classes and ascribed to his worldview. Yeah so in. The nineteen fifties bodies began to grow bitter about what he saw as the medical communities. Myopic view of health care not focusing on preventive care and poor standards for proper physical conditioning. Which i mean for heaven's sakes sounds like today right absolutely our know. Our health system is all about treating the sick not preventing zik of serie. So what i wrote but all was not lost. Many dance studios began incorporating his mat exercises into their warm ups and his first generation teachers began taking his methods worldwide. So in nineteen sixty seven at the age of eighty three joseph pilates died of advance emphysema and his wife was smoking. He might have been all along. I don't know. I mean. I guess you don't have to smoke to get him but back then i feel like it's directly probably but you also have to think of back then. They didn't know that smoking was bad. I thought it was okay. Fashionable and cool totally cool. Yeah i'm in now. It's not an now in the nineties. Still very cool yeah. Absolutely dummies So his wife continued to work until she retired in nineteen seventy so just a few years after that. She kind of kept it going. So today pilates is taught in studios in gyms all over the world and joseph pilates dream. Conscientious living based on daily intentional. Practice towards one's health mental and physical is has been more realized So yes of course we all know that pilates as an exercise form took off and is still widely practiced today and of course it is something we can do at home during the pandemic and though there are those that would dispute pilates claim that his regimen prevented the contraction of the spanish flu There are those that would contradict that. They say mainly because the isle of man where he was interred in turn rather was fairly isolated and didn't see a whole lot of cases anyway. So maybe that's probably more likely why not necessarily but it could have been a combination of the two But regardless we know that starting from a healthy place that is exercising and eating right you are less likely to get sick and even if you do your symptoms can be less though not always nothing is one hundred percent effective So at least comes from a good start. Yeah yeah nutrition right taking care of yourself in getting enough sleep drinking.

new york emphysema
"1918" Discussed on Can We Health You?

Can We Health You?

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"1918" Discussed on Can We Health You?

"A little more. Notoriety and attention So he because of this notoriety. The german the german military took notice of him essentially and they wanted him to start training the military police but pilates became aware that the government was covertly attempting to rebuild its military which he was against. He opposed the prospect of another war which sheriff so many people thought because the world war one or the great war as they called it had just really it was so close by you know just barely in the rear view right so sure there was not a lot of people didn't want to go into another war so anyway so he was opposed to the prospect of another war so he immigrated to america in nineteen twenty six brought his neon and we got the benefit from it So he had a brother. Fred who already lived in saint louis missouri and together. They made several improvements to his original apparatus which included placing the frame closer to the ground and replacing the original. Wait stock with coil springs. He also added leather straps. Which could be used to imitate movements Which was a popular exercise at the time and he developed an extensive repertoire of exercises to be performed on the apparatus. He named the universal performer. Which i already mentioned And he called the program. Corrective exercise and leader branded. It control aji But we still of course no it s pilates today so he didn't call it pilates. Sure if eventually he did but initially it was called control allergy. So that's what he that's what he called it because you know you're trying at the science of control right so your. I'm not sure when it shifted to become known as pilates if it was later when he had opened up his gym and it was called because he called his gym pilates universal gymnasium. Oh wow And that opened in the fall of nineteen twenty nine. Save by them. Well let's see so twenty nine. He was born. What did i say. Eighteen eighty threes.

Fred saint louis missouri america
"1918" Discussed on Can We Health You?

Can We Health You?

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"1918" Discussed on Can We Health You?

"You know either or self defense trainer or circular So then along came world war one and of course he's living in england and which is of course nineteen fourteen like you mentioned is when it started and he along with other german nationals were placed in an internment camp on the isle of man because i guess they thought they were concerned he was a spy or whatever and we know we did that too right and world war two okay so he was assigned the position of nurse And one of his job duties included rehabilitation. So i guess people who were injured in the war would come to this place And he would help rehabilitate them. Well how does he was there. I know right so during this time. He refined the ideas. He'd already been kind of working with working on as a child and as he grew up And he trained other internees so the other people that were in turn with him in his system of exercise so what he would do as he would. Rick springs to hospital beds in this would enable the bedridden patients to exercise against a resistance so that spring provided persistence And that innovation led to his leader equipment designs what we know as reformer rain but not supposedly not a single one of joe's trainees died and he claimed that testified to the effectiveness of his exercise system that the movement was able to keep the body strong enough to fight off disease while so that was what he kind of attributed to flunk jeopardy so finally he was released and he was repatriated to germany in nineteen nineteen and he began working with medical practitioners in hamburg and berlin and it was during that time that he further developed his theories on fitness and conditioning So his thinking was shaped by his work with injured soldiers during the war was a big into fitness and sport and he benefited from this post war intellectual era in germany in which science literature philosophy and the arts flourished European holistic therapies such as hydrotherapy trigger point therapy and breath work also influenced pilates development as did meditation and modern dance while these things. It's not like they were kind of experiencing some sort of enlightening kind of phase during that time He invented an apparatus which improved upon the standard equipment of the time. Which could both address physical dysfunction or injury and condition the body Pilates prototype apparatus eventually became the universal reformer also. We all know that day or some of us who are taking those classes. yeah Which i enjoy those type of classes..

joe england Rick springs germany hamburg berlin
"1918" Discussed on Can We Health You?

Can We Health You?

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"1918" Discussed on Can We Health You?

"Trust your milk okay. Don't worry about it it's good food. Meanwhile which i don't think are very healthful foods Cereals were also being touted as a health healthy way to start your day right. Well thank you used to have to make their their. They'd have to get like three in the morning. Show get the oven warmed up. Yeah had to bring would start the funeral fire and grinder. Weet the bread and go collect the eggs or wrap the x. From where so yeah. It seems like crazy made change for. Somebody's day yeah. Whereas when i'm trying to get breakfast ready for my three kids which is waste employer than what they had to do. Something simple. sometimes it's just like oh of course. Yeah then. I feel lazy but all of so that that in a nutshell is the bland diet of the spanish flu. Pandemic very bland. Yeah well it's interesting interesting stuff. Think about you know help people even today like you're saying the brat diet right. I was trying to say my youngest got sick when he was an infant near like. Give him the diet. She was like an infant. Like you wouldn't even be doing that stuff anyway. But it was still something that was being touted. Even he's fourteen. So yeah now that's not that long ago. Not it's not something they're recommending needs days. I don't think right I don't know yeah i have not heard. It's not that. I think i think right immunity for ya or if you're ill you just keep hydrated absolutely and put down which can yeah and it might be bland like toast right absolutely. But yeah but being hydrated. When you're sick as is most important. I don't you think see anything. And he thinks about hydrates. Nothing about hedger's For movement.

Weet Pandemic
"1918" Discussed on Can We Health You?

Can We Health You?

04:57 min | 1 year ago

"1918" Discussed on Can We Health You?

"And then you get out of salt. You pour that mixture into pint of boiling water. Cook in a saucepan for thirty minutes. Strain added cup of milk and bring to boil. I have to tell you. I'm thankful you didn't make that for me to drink the drink much better. Yeah that sounds right. Lots of milk. Like malted milk buttermilk. They added citrus to milk products to make these kernels it right. That makes it prouder mill. I think in their mind it makes it okay to eat if the citrus is kinda into raw egg even like a preservative preserved acts as of So when so you know that's what they were eating. Yeah sounds delicious. When the patient's temperature would return to normal they increased A more the broths became soup With bigger chunks of meat our potato or care at okay. Potato soup boiled custard. Still lots of sugar Potato soup i so all sugars because that seems like the complete opposite of what you would need when in the twenties is when the sugar sugar was really becoming quite the thing to have k. And there were starting to preserve foods okay and overseas for the for the war So sugar sugar. Consumption was increasing rapidly. Interesting I wonder if there was a correlation with like weight gain during that time period. I think it took a couple of decades for a really start really because now it's like everything right or even everything so upsetting depressing labels it is. It is awful. So that's kind of all. I could find about food The kind of like soupy pale food right. That didn't that doesn't in my mind have that much nutritional value so it was more just to kind of keep them alive absolute things that they could keep down. Yeah certainly when you have the flu. I don't know. I mean you're not necessarily vomiting right now but it's bland brat diet the brat diet. Yeah that's no that we were. I think we were taught that yet. Arkan's just bland easy to digest foods absolutely kinda similar. Good new nutrients were lacking for sure. Sounds like it was nothing green because now they say of course you know you wanna have a colorful elite in front of me rate. That sounds like it's so monotone absolutely everything. Yeah yeah they were focused. More on like food handling was very important to them. Just like the social limitations. unwrapped bread. They were worried about That was carried home. They thought maybe the flu could be Transferrable into the home from holding the brad. Okay like it would pick it up. Pick it up. Yeah or fruits and vegetables. They were worried about the flu. Like attaching to the to the foods in a stand that you would see on the side of the road on the sidewalk. How they displayed food You know The made back then. There were many people that s worker house workers if she does not wash our hands and skuld the dishes properly Sickness may come into the house or if the cook taste in stirs with the same spoon. as this quote says she would be treacherous albeit intentioned person to have around readdress with good intentions neighboring. That of course ashamed. We're be doing that anyway. Should know they were. They said that the the milkman is honest and sanitary man. A lot of trust was placed on the milk delivery. Cain which is interesting to me. Because i feel like at the same time This is when the food giants began their Relation and serials were invented Everybody at home wanted fast. Quick breakfast us sure. So as the milk was coming to their house they had a brand new box of like cornflakes and boom there was breakfast around like the first convenience and even warnings were coming from the government saying that..

flu Cain Arkan
"1918" Discussed on Can We Health You?

Can We Health You?

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"1918" Discussed on Can We Health You?

"Say your nose. Not your mouth was made to breathe through Remember the three cs clean mouth clean skin and clean clothes okay. That's really one see. Just just clean cut. Okay point. they they said To your food. Well wash your hands before i ask. Why would that matter chewing. You're just thinking about digestion. Staying healthy that way all right. But when i get to some of the food that they recommending digestion doesn't really seem like it plays a part. Okay the doesn't necessarily like healthful. Okay with your hands before eating. Don't let the waste products of digestion. They were really concerned with like bowel movement. Bowel movement Thank avoid tight close tight shoes take gloves seek to make nature your ally not your prisoner. Yeah okay when the air is pure breed all of it you can read the deeply with pure air Maybe they're referring to like people in the denser population The smog error are habla lucien. And you think about the vehicles flowers are still very new xilai shocking. Yeah streets with all. They're like yeah you know so. Fresh air was harder. Exotic combi Maybe close relations right yeah. Urban areas people were getting the flu Yeah well yeah. I wonder if there was an exodus of people to the country. Like there is kind of now. Yeah people have been kind of getting out of the city right. They're coming to. Our county are are rural canada. Okay so food food during the pandemic so typical. It's called invalid. Cookery okay. the invalids were not people that were not valid but people that were sick sure they were cared for mostly by women. It was in food that they fed. The invalids was soft liquid easy to digest food so beef broth beef broth. Okay now be from. He's other meat offs. They had the right idea That immunity does come from good. Good healthy for your broths. okay But they also used a lot of milk-based puddings right eggs cooked cereals. Like farina that Serials were coming into the food system at this time for rena is like cream of wheat and okay oatmeal milk. Toast women so women care of these of the invalids and they mostly focused on Giving them all of these foods like in liquid form so for eggs. I may do this. It's called it's just a segue drink right at quite lemon juice and sugar ray. It's super super sweet name. Yeah it really. Did he say lemonade super and it was. It was pretty good but it was because of all the sugar l. The sugar for sure. The health of egg necessarily isn't in the white. It's in the yo so it was a white not total guoco so and it was raw. Am i going to get from this. No but i didn't. You brought me a nice egg. That's full of a beautiful farm fresh. I really appreciate that. Thank you so. The women fed the invalids. This egg drink. They also made oatmeal gruel which was oatmeal sugar salt Almost equal parts equal par parts..

flu canada farina rena Serials
"1918" Discussed on Can We Health You?

Can We Health You?

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"1918" Discussed on Can We Health You?

"And my name is lesley earned off and i am a registered yoga instructor today. We're gonna be talking about nutrition in the spanish flu era about nineteen eighteen but first pandemic that we had really to gain more modern history and more modern history. Others write true. Yes yes and we'll also talk about What people were doing as far as exercise during that time as well so Just a few facts to get us started about what was going on what people were doing in nineteen eighteen The president was woodrow wilson. If you were going to go to a movie it would cost you. Twenty seven cents Books that people were reading would have been metamorphosis by franz kafka a portrait of an artist as a young man by james joyce you might have been dancing to the tiger rag which was done by the original dixieland jazz band or rock. A bye your baby by owl jolson. So those are things that people were doing. Maybe prior to the horrible flu pandemic over in one thousand nine hundred eighty before they got sick and sad sick. So you're going to talk about What people were eating back then yet trends were happening yes. I'm super eager to hear. Okay going on all right so just for timeframe World war one was Nineteen fourteen to nineteen eighteen and then the spanish flu came around february nineteen eighteen. So it's thought to have first been identified and military personnel. Actually more soldiers died from the flu than the war. This crazy isn't it. Isn't that right and it was in kansas right Yup i yes emerged yes But the flu of nineteen eighteen was fatal for infants and healthy adults as well. Right adly Older people who were typically The first victims tend to have been spared because they may have developed immunity as young adults due to the exposure exposure from the russian flu. That was a russian influence which handwriting yep so. That was a pandemic as yeah. That was so. By the time it was nineteen eighteen they had perhaps developed residual bear. Uh-huh yeah so back back then There was no vaccine for the flu. That came around the The government focused instead on social remedies like isolation quarantining good personal hygiene use of disinfectants limitations of public gatherings. Which sounds exactly like what's happening today. Graphics and social right and masks as well like fabric it wasn't like they weren't really good. Right what i read that. They basically would hold up there like handkerchief that they had. Yeah remember like. Yeah but see handkerchief. rain They would hold those up on the subway instead or the trains or whatever instead of an actual like legit ma right So that's totally similar to today. I feel like even. Today people are talking. More about these social limitations. Instead of right attrition. absolutely nobody's talking about what you should be eating mine really and we're gonna talk about that. We are a bonus episode So the surgeon general's advice to avoid the influenza Continued to be more lifestyle of course than food like i just said they say to avoid needless crowding smother your costs and sneezes i think that the word usage interesting yes so minister..

influenza woodrow wilson franz kafka lesley owl jolson president james joyce instructor government kansas
Over a century ago, masks were controversial during the 1918 flu pandemic

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Over a century ago, masks were controversial during the 1918 flu pandemic

"Voting during a pandemic is something the U. S has done before during the midterm elections in 1918, when the Spanish flu pandemic was ravaging the country for historian. Nothing whatever unprecedented. Tom Ewing is a history professor at Virginia Tech, and he cites eerie similarities between now in 1918. Back then, some communities required masks for voters and large public gatherings had to be canceled. But the situation wasn't politicized in the way that it is now. When people disagreed with the policy, they didn't say. Was because someone so with a Democrat, a Republican, and the role of the federal government was much less significant. Voters listened mostly to state and local health officials and didn't turn to the president for leadership. That just was not the role of the president. Early 20th century That's one striking difference. Nikolai Nelly w T o P

President Trump Tom Ewing Nikolai Nelly Federal Government Virginia Tech Professor U. S
Over a century ago, masks were controversial during the 1918 flu pandemic

Kentuckiana's Saturday Morning News

04:03 min | 1 year ago

Over a century ago, masks were controversial during the 1918 flu pandemic

"CBS News is Anthony Mason took a look back recently at the way masks were handled more than a century ago. That, of course, during the 2018 flu pandemic, also in the fall and found many similarities to today. Fascinating look from Anthony. In the fall of 1918. As Americans across the country were celebrating victory in World War, One of the masks on returning troops showed we were losing another war against the so called Spanish flu even a century ago, masks were controversial. Yes, And for so many of the same reasons they are today. Nancy Toms is a history professor at the State University of New York at Stony Brook at its worst in 1918. How bad did the pandemic get really, really bad? He referred to it as the Big one among historians of medicine. 675,000 Americans would die nearly a third of them in a single month. The Red Cross spread the slogan Where a mask Save your Life. And nurses began to make them for the public way. We're looking at two masks God's masks that were used in the 1918 pandemic. Here in California, there in the collection of the Oakland Museum, Erin Dina Delgaudio is associate curator. That pretty transparent, right? It wasn't an ideal material, but it was definitely better than not wearing anything. Back in 1918. This was one of the centers in the fight against the pandemic. Yes, indeed. This is Henry Street settlement and its founder, Lillian Walk, played a critical role in organizing the pandemic response in New York City masks were never officially mandated on the East Coast, Nancy Tom says. But other health rules were often aggressively enforced. There were spitting raids, even though by Pelo Yes, there was a definite effort to up the ante in prosecuting. They called them sanitary infractions. The US outbreak had started on a Kansas Army base on the campaign to stop it. Was tied to the war effort. So wearing a mask became a patriotic just Yes. If you refused to wear a mask, you could be called a slacker. What did that mean? A slacker was not quite like a traitor. But it was someone who was dragging their patriotic feet. San Francisco was the first city to actually mandate masks. Yes. 10% of the population was infected between 1918 and 1919. In just a day, the San Francisco Chronicle reported. 100 people were charged with disturbing the peace or failing toe wear masks. Their sentence. 10 days in prison or a $5 fine about $80 today, and then here in San Francisco, there was an anti mask league that farmed in early January. So the chairman was this woman named Mrs Harrington. She was a suffragist. She was a lawyer. He put out a call in the the San San Francisco Francisco Chronicle Chronicle asking asking for for her her fellow fellow citizens citizens who who objected objected to to this this mass mass mandate mandate as as Really Really similar similar to to the the arguments arguments now. now. Actually, Actually, they they argue the ordinance was unconstitutional and that masks had not been proven effective. Some 2000 people turned out for a rally at the Dreamland skate rink. Other cities would mandate masks, including Denver, Seattle, Oakland, Sacramento and Phoenix. They were met with resistance to one major difference. It wasn't political. Then they're wass disagreement between the various politicians about which businesses should get closed down. But The decision to mask or not to mass never became identified with a specific political party.

Francisco Chronicle Chronicle San Francisco Anthony Mason Mrs Harrington Cbs News San San Francisco Dreamland Skate Rink Nancy Toms Oakland Museum United States California State University Of New York Erin Dina Delgaudio Stony Brook New York City Associate Curator Nancy Tom Lillian Walk Chairman
How the Supreme Court Operates

iHeartRadio Podcast Premiere

06:15 min | 1 year ago

How the Supreme Court Operates

"Professor of law at the University of Texas School of Law and executive director of just security and senior editor of the Law. Fair Blonde. He's here to talk about the U. S. Supreme Court from how the nation's high court operates to the confirmation process for Supreme Court. Justice is a process that will be front and center. Throughout the month of October. Steve thanks so much for the time and let's start At the very beginning, The founders set up this novel system of government involving three different branches, one being the judicial branch. What was the vision that they articulated an article three of the Constitution really, the core purpose of the judiciary. Yeah, I mean, the very fact that it's a separate article actually is the beginning of the story because in England, you know from which we were breakin the judiciary was not independent. The court was called the Katie's sketch on Go. The founder's put the courts in their own article entirely because the founders thought that a critical part of preserving our rights was to have an independent judiciary that could in appropriate circumstances after the checkup on potential charity of the majority, So from the start, the idea was that we would have Independent judges who were not politically accountable, who, in appropriate cases could have the power to do the obligation to strike down democratic laws. But democratic laws that were nevertheless in violation of the Constitution. Supreme Court always seems to be a hot button issue. These days, Some people cast their ballots in presidential races specifically because of the possibility a seat on the bench could open up. Has it always been that way? It really has been followed. I mean, I think you know there are periods in American history, where the court with a huge issue, I mean the dread Scott decision for the Supreme Court really goes out of its way to put its stamp on the institution of slavery in 18 57 became a galvanizing part of 1st 18 58 Senate race in the Lincoln Douglas debates and then the 18 50 presidential election. But I think what's different about today is that The court look so much like the rest of the country that you know the court really is divided and polarized into much of the same two camps as so many of us and that's why I think folks tend to see high profile cases before the court in such partisan terms and, you know debates over confirmation. Such partisan turns because increasingly looks like the court is just another institution divided into two parties based on who's in charge of the time. There've been some discussions. As of late over the amount of justice is that should be on the court or whether or not justice is should serve for life may be implementing term limits. How are those decisions made in the past and what flexibility does Congress have to potentially make changes to the court? Yeah, In the side of the court is perhaps the easier one Because there's just no question that the court is to some degree. It lied to Congress is controlling that that you know, Congress has overtime. Barry the size of the court at the Fountain, There are actually six justices. We had many of 10 for a short period of time in the sixties before settling in the current number of 1918 59. So you know there's nothing unconstitutional. I've got a statute that would say, added 234. C To the court. I think the tricky part is, you know, if you start down that road, then you Republicans the next time they're in charge at their own speed to the court, and what does that do for the court legitimacy in the long term, But at least it's a matter of pure constitutional law is up to Congress. As on there's at least one justice. How many more than one of the question of legislative grace On term limits that met here because we've actually never seen Congress, you know, try to do anything other than allow life tenure for justice is the Constitution doesn't say like tenure, it says, you know, the justices are allowed to hold their offices during quote, good behavior, unquote. But of course, you know that doesn't answer the question of what it means to hold their office. Could Congress give them different responsibilities? Good Congress keep paying them, but tell them to do nothing. These are questions that Supreme Court's never really had to answer because A question Congress hadn't really ever provoked. So you know, at least on that one. I think we're in a bit more of uncharted territory. The purpose behind the lifetime appointment to the Supreme Court. Why did the founders believe that was necessary? Yes, it was a big part of independence that you know when you have a judge, say who don't serve in the five or 10 year term, You know, here. She might be making decisions for reasons other than because they think they're the right decisions They might be, you know, looking over their shoulder at what their next job is gonna be there. They might be trying to sort of curry favour with whoever's in power tow. You perhaps be reappointed reporting to different position. So the founders thought that one of the ways of ensuring independence was job protection was making clear that You know, you don't have to worry about finding other jobs. You don't have to worry about having your paid diminished if you hand down unpopular decision as a way of just saying it, like the judges and justices would not be beholden to political pressures. Especially when Nick an unpopular decision, and one other area where Congress has control over the judiciary, including the Supreme Court is impeachment power. Certainly not something you see exercised very often, but the power's there, right Yeah, I mean, like any other federal officers, judges and justices there. Seven to impeachment. There's only been one impeachment of justice on the Supreme Court in all American history that you know five when the Jeffersonians tried to impeach arch Federalist Samuel Chase of and it failed, mostly because it was preceded. A political future is not a good one. But there are lower court judges who have been impeached fairly often for I think what we would all agree to it is clear misconduct. So you know there are checks on the court. And Peter did one of them. You know, Congress has at least some power over the jurisdiction of the federal courts decide which cases they got to hear. Congress control most of the budget of the federal court, So it's not that the court unaccountable that the accountability comes in different ways and not necessarily the ballot box. And that's part of how we ensure that courts are able to protect the rights of minorities, which is perhaps the most important function. I'm joined by Steve

U. S. Supreme Court Congress Supreme Court Steve University Of Texas School Of Professor Of Law England Senior Editor Executive Director Katie Founder Barry Peter Scott Samuel Chase Senate Nick Jeffersonians
"1918" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"1918" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"In the not so pleasant grove at the time, and I met great people like I, said like Mary Mary's hair. Salon and Floyd Floyd Catfish. Those who are neighbors you know. We were sandwiched between the two of them in the Strip center and I don't even think he's still alive, but he was an amazing, good black man, and Mary was a good, hard-working, black woman and I i. just wish people would open their minds a little bit and realize that we're all. All really at the end of the day like my friend I have a very dear friend who's a surgeon and he a lot of times. People think he's black. He's Indian okay, but he he kind of looks black and and he's he's. He's a very sensitive to it to as he should be but he says he's a very fine surgeon. He says when you cut him open the. They're all the same color inside. And so that's what we need to remember. And I love having you on the show today. Thank you so much for jumping on the air with us to one and you stay safe out there and Maybe you can jump on again next week to. This ma'am anytime you guys. Fatigue to fight, make was invisible visible. Absolutely love your man. You take care of yourself and I'll talk to you soon, okay? You later bye all right. You guys. You can find John Bennett at. PRESTON PLACE COUNSELING DOT COM. He's an amazing counselor by the way, and probably because he does have so much empathy. He's been through a lot himself. Stay tuned, everyone. We've got.

"1918" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"1918" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"Were almost solace. A. Row with the world. League! Cable away. Now..

"1918" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"1918" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Hey everybody we know that. So many people who listen to our show have been tried to find some ways to fill some unexpected time at home as pretty much. The whole country has gone into a more protective mood in the face of the current pandemic. So we wanted to help out and we came up with a list of shows. That are a little lighter in tone and maybe a little funny to help lift sue spirits and also just provide an escape from the things that are going on. This is something we are calling our offbeat history playlist. It is going to drop as ten episodes into our shows feed that is going to happen on Thursday march nineteenth they will all be labeled as our offbeat history playlists. So you'll know what that is when you see it so we hope that it helps you. Get through this crazy time and that you enjoy. Hey listeners. I have a new podcast to tell you about. It's called personality. Do you want to know what really made exceptional original and ingenious people take this new podcast called personality. We'll delve into the minds of famous historical figures and icons answer questions like was Harry. Houdini predestined to become the greatest escape artist of all time based on his own family's great escape season one analyzes the life and the minds of people like John Lennon. Frida Kahlo Martin Luther. King Abraham Lincoln and more. The host is Doctor Gail Saltz. Who's a psychiatrist psychoanalyst? And we'll be joined by amazing experts on every episode to understand both nature and nurture biology and life experiences. How all these factors changed figures character achievements and struggles personality episodes launch weekly every Monday. Listen to personality. Spelled P. E. R. S. O. N. O. L. O. G. Y. On the iheartradio APP on Apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts..

Doctor Gail Saltz Frida Kahlo Martin Luther Houdini King Abraham Lincoln John Lennon Apple Harry P. E. R. S. O. N. O. L. O. G.
"1918" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

09:14 min | 1 year ago

"1918" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"So back to exactly what happened when this disease made its debut. The first reports of flu in this pandemic came in May of nineteen eighteen in Europe and the first reports were among soldiers so large numbers of otherwise healthy young troops We're just becoming really ill with flu. Like symptoms so they were getting coughing and sneezing and body aches. Most of them were recovering within a few days and apart from the fact that this was disrupting. It was not a really big deal. But then the disease jumped from the military to civilians in Europe and from there it spread to most of the rest of the world over the course of just a couple of months It was still a relatively mild disease. Much like the seasonal flu. Most of us have had at one time or another in our lives. It wasn't pleasant but it was also not especially alarming. Disease faded away later in the summer but then in August it mutated and became really a lot more serious. This terrifying strain of the flu was reported in Boston. Massachusetts in the United States in Freetown Sierra Leone an and brest France and these were all port cities. So it's possible that the disease had spread between three of them on ships and this time along with the typical flu symptoms of coughing and sneezing and a sore throat and body aches. The disease caused very high. Fevers between one hundred and two and one hundred. Five degrees. Fahrenheit patients felt exhausted and there is became bloodshot and some even had severe nose bleeds or gastrointestinal problems. Even though this flu was a lot worse from the fluted spread earlier in the spring a lot of people still recovered but a pretty substantial portion of people developed a devastating. Pneumonia which was caused by. One of a number of bacteria was a secondary infection. That was like a complication of this flu. Their lungs filled up with fluid started hemorrhaging and death often came alarmingly fast with people going from sitting upright and talking to being dead within hours. See these are the stories that make me paranoid about the flu. This is this is why I read an article when I was working on this about that. Episode of the about the flu pandemic that was in the The Down Abby. Tv show. Yeah so spoiler alert for Downton Abbey. It's similarly Make some people in the household really really sick and it has one. There's one particular character who goes from being. She's sick she's has. She has the flu she goes from. I'm sick with the flu to. I'm dead in an episode which is not uncommon for TV but also was really how it worked so when doctors performed autopsies on these patients who had died. They found that their lungs in their spleens were just grotesquely swollen. So a description from a doctor who was stationed at Fort Devons outside Boston From that September. Here's what he had to say. This epidemic started about four weeks ago and has developed so rapidly that the camp is demoralized and all ordinary work is held up till it has passed. These men start with what appears to be an ordinary attack of League report or influenza and when brought to the hosp- so rebates for hospital. When brought to the hosp they very rapidly developed the most viscous type of pneumonia. That has ever been seen two hours. After admission they have the Mahogany spots over the cheekbones. And a few hours later you can begin to see the cyanosis extending from their ears and spreading all over the face until it is hard to distinguish the colored men from the white. It is only a matter of a few hours then until death comes and it is simply a struggle for air until they suffocate. It is horrible one can stand to see one two or twenty men die but you see these poor devils dropping like flies sort of gets on your nerves. We have been averaging about one hundred deaths per day and had and still keeping it up. There is no doubt in my mind. There is a new mixed infection here but what I don't know and from the port cities where this really started sort of blossoming outward. The disease spread really rapidly over the next couple of months. It's spread all over the world and then it to faded out although another mild wave of flu went on Around early nineteen nineteen. It's hard to pinpoint exactly how many people died during the pandemic medical records from the era. Were already kind of sketchy. Even before through a devastating pandemic into the mix to make things even more chaotic doctors. Often misdiagnosed milder forms of the fleet was common colds and sometimes they diagnosed this much more serious version as another disease entirely like cholera. The disease also moved so quickly that public health agencies could not accurately track what was happening so in the decade after the pandemic estimated global death toll was twenty million people but modern researchers who've gone back and tried to reconstruct things have marked the number as much higher between thirty million and fifty million people died worldwide. Said that sort of leaves us to wonder why this particular flu was so incredibly bad We know that the war often takes a giant share of the blame for the spread of the flu pandemic in it's definitely true that the flu followed the troops in that it spread like wildfire among soldiers in close quarters and that soldiers returning home from the war brought the disease with them battlefield. Injuries and other illnesses also made it harder for soldiers to fight off the flu so camps for the war. Were basically like flu incubators. It's also definitely true that the war meant that a lot of the medical personnel who were trained at the time had been tasked to help with the military and so they were not available to help the civilian population as the epidemic started to spread communities in more rural areas as their various government organizations to please send doctors and nurses to help them but often the few who weren't part of the war effort fell victim to the flu themselves while they were travelling to their patients. But it really wasn't just about the soldiers or the effects of the war even if the epidemic had happened during peacetime hospitals just wouldn't have been able to handle the influx of so many patients temporary hospitals had to be built in churches and schools and community centers and some hospitals even expand their capacity by housing their patients intense on hospital grounds in the way of life in the late. Nineteen teens also played a big role in the spread of the disease. Cars were in widespread use at this point in many larger cities around the world had developed extensive public transportation systems so that was bringing sick and healthy people into contact with each other on. Streetcars trolleys and on subways. In several parts of the world people were also travelling really extensively by train so for example in the United States train travel peaked in nineteen twenty just a year after the epidemic and these long trips in close quarters similarly fueled the spread of the disease some of the most popular leisure activities in nineteen eighteen and nineteen nineteen also drew big crowds. So movie theaters have become affordable. They were extremely popular and they were very widespread. They were everywhere. And that made them a hotbed of infection. there were also dance halls and amusement parks and in many places governments restricted activities or. Shut them down entirely to try to keep people. From gathering some towns even cancelled school and cancelled. Church services and universities suspended their operations in an effort to sort of stop. This spread that was going on everywhere. People gathered cities also shut down or restricted. Their public transportation systems that were at this point so popular and drivers either with their cities authority or acting on their own would refuse to carry passengers. Who weren't wearing masks or who? They suspected to be ill. And although all of these factors have been about industry. People in rural in developing areas were not spared in the least In the United States the ESKIMO population was disproportionately hit with the flu and enroll in developing areas. People were left with no medical care and very little reliable information about what was actually going on or what they could possibly do about it. The war which took so much of the blame for spreading the disease wound up ultimately killing sixteen million people but that number was just dwarfed by the total death toll from the flu so before we talk about the aftermath of this devastation. Let's take another brief moment and have a word from a sponsor working remotely can be a challenge especially for teams. That are new to it. How do you deal with your work? Environment being the same as home while staying connected and productive and then there's your newest co worker the cat well your friends at Trello have been powering remote teams globally for almost a decade at a time when teams must come together more than ever to solve big challenges..

flu United States Europe Pneumonia Fevers Massachusetts Downton Abbey Freetown Sierra Leone colds Boston Fort Devons cholera Trello brest France
"1918" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

12:19 min | 1 year ago

"1918" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Everybody over the last few weeks. We have understandably gotten several requests to talk about the Nineteen. Eighteen flu pandemic. That is the topic we covered back on May twelfth twenty fourteen. And we are re airing it today. WE GOTTA make a couple of clarifications in this episode. We say that public health officials recommended that people wear masks to protect them from contracting the disease and that this was completely ineffective that is true but we should note that if a person is ill the right mask worn correctly can help them from infecting other people also from time to time folks who find this old episode in the archive for Britain and to say that the pandemic starting point was in Fort Kansas. That is.

Fort Kansas flu Britain