35 Burst results for "19 Sixties"

"19 sixties" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:32 min | 9 months ago

"19 sixties" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That happened in the late 19 sixties. A judge was convinced in 2003 hand. She was scaled back. So the NYPD could investigate a new group in its crosshairs Muslims even if there was no indication of wrongdoing. Muslim student associations and halal restaurants in the tri state area went under surveillance. Undercover cops were in mosques listening to what people were saying about violence in the Middle East. When the Associated Press revealed all of this in 2011, civil rights activists sued again. And in 2017, they want a settlement Underhand shoe that once again put restrictions on the N y p D. It was the first time since 9 11 that any intelligence agency or law enforcement agency. Had seen its power to spy on Muslims and Muslim communities restricted in any way, shape or form. Ramzi Kassem is a law professor at CUNY and director of the Clear clinic, which represented Muslims. Surveilled by the N y p D. Under the new version of hand Shoe, the city appointed a civilian representative who monitors the use of undercover officers and informants. Who are investigating religious and political activity. He collects data on the number of such investigations and how long they're going on, so they're not just fishing expeditions, and he can blow the whistle to a judge of hand. She was violated. So three years later. Has the problem been solved basically, and the answer is no. The three public reports so far issued by the civilian representative Stephen Robinson, showed that fewer investigations of First Amendment related activity have been initiated and those that have been or ending faster. But the reports are not rich with details and given the racial justice protests in the summer of 2020 Qassam wonders who the NYPD is now investigating. There are plenty of indications that there remains a lot of work to be done. Both with respect to the continuing over policing of Muslims by the NYPD Is Intelligence Bureau as well as you know, with respect to what they're doing regarding You know, black activists, Muslim and non Qasem wants to read the next report that will cover the period last summer when the NYPD sometimes violently suppressed and aggressively interrogated. Black lives matter. Protesters. Custom has spoken to those interrogated by the FBI and NYPD questions they were asked questions about, you know. Well, okay. Who's in your organizing circle? How do you all communicate? What messaging apps do you use? Where do you meet? Where do you get money? His concerns about whether those interactions complied with the hand shoe guidelines and whether the cops are now seeking to disrupt the Black lives matter movement. Just as they disrupted Muslim organizations in the aftermath of 9 11 and just as they attempted to disrupt the Black Panthers so many years ago. We're just seeing the tools that were kind of like refined and redefined and honed. Post 9 11 being brought to bear more fully on black organisers. Black lives matter. Organizers In ways that you know we're all too predictable. Carson wants to know whether the NYPD is keeping files on the online activity of black lives matter Protesters just as it once collected names from the websites of Muslim student groups. NYPD Deputy Commissioner John Miller told W. N Y C that whether it's investigating Al Qaeda or neo Nazis or black lives matter, activists allegedly firebombing in NYPD van the police abide by the hand shoe guidelines. Part of the discussion is people want these guidelines to apply double or triple to the people they disagree with, and not at all to the people. They agree with it. We don't take that position. The guidelines are the guidelines. Miller doesn't deny Muslim fears after 9 11, he says there was a level of paranoia where Muslims felt spied upon. But he says as part of the New Hampshire agreement, the NYPD did not admit wrongdoing after 9 11 because the NYPD did not commit wrongdoing. Now the hand shoes civilian representative, sits in on classified meetings about investigations and can read all records and has found police are totally compliant. We've kind of seen a turning of the corner from Rumors and suspicions to more transparency. Um more independent vetting of our programs and how they work by places outside the NYPD. And I think we're in a much better place. The next hand shoe report might shed light on that contention with possible insight into whether the police followed the rules during the Black lives matter protests this examination of police operations this legal protection of civil liberties. Is only possible because of a black Panthers fight 50 years ago. Matt Katz w N. Y. C news next hour we hear the story of a Muslim charity in Brooklyn that sued after it was infiltrated by the NYPD. W N. Y. C is supported by Geico offering motorcycle and RV insurance. More information on motorcycle and RV insurance is available at 1 809 47 Auto, This is W. N. Y c. 93.9 FM and AM a 20. NPR News and the New York conversation. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Dave Mattingly. President Biden will be in New York and New Jersey this afternoon to get a look at the damage.

Stephen Robinson FBI Ramzi Kassem 2017 NYPD Dave Mattingly 2011 Matt Katz 2003 Brooklyn Al Qaeda Middle East Associated Press Geico Carson President Biden New Jersey Washington 1 809 47 NPR
"19 sixties" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

02:25 min | 9 months ago

"19 sixties" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"People loved it. Who had it. It was fun to drive. It accelerated 0 to 60 miles an hour in eight seconds, and it gave people the feeling of a jet plane taking off. Wally First began thinking about electric cars 30 years before the G M E V one Back when he was a student at Caltech University in California. It was the mid 19 sixties and the big issue of the day in Southern California wasn't climate change. It was AARP, a Lucian fumes from the millions of cars and Ella's roads were creating a thick blanket of toxic smog. What was it like? Well, it was bad enough that you would often be crying when nothing sad was happening. The air was so contaminated. And that's what got me to thinking about. Okay. What should we be doing Technically to deal with the smog problem, I learned that if all cars on the road were made electric, the total emissions would be cut dramatically. Fully didn't come up with the electric vehicle they were actually invented in the mid 19th century. But by the 19 sixties, the technology was still limited to small, slow machines. Think golf carts or milk flex. I wanted to learn about electric cars and see if I could contribute to the technology. And so I had an idea. I converted in 1959 VW bus to Electric drive. It had a range of about 40. Maybe 50 miles under ideal conditions. A top speed initially of about 35 40 Miles an hour. You say you converted it to electric drive like that's something that any undergraduate know how to do. I got surplus electric motors that had been used to power. The landing gear of airplanes took the seats out and where that large flat area was was the large battery in the car would accelerate kind of with jerks, but it did work well. He wanted to use his bus to get the brightest engineers interested in developing electric cars. He'd heard that some students at MIT Caltech East Coast rivals. We're working on new battery technology. So he called them up and challenge them to build an electric vehicle that could beat his bus in an epic race across America. Ready now. Yes, we're ready. Are you ready? Am it? Yeah, We're ready. It took place. Uh, starting in August 26th 1968.

August 26th 1968 Southern California 50 miles America 0 19 sixties California Caltech University VW eight seconds mid 19th century 1959 mid 19 sixties AARP 60 miles an hour about 40 millions of cars about 35 40 Miles an hour Lucian MIT Caltech East Coast
Gloria Richardson, Civil Rights Pioneer, Dies at 99

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | 10 months ago

Gloria Richardson, Civil Rights Pioneer, Dies at 99

"Her by name, but you may have seen a moving photo of her during the civil rights movement in the 19 sixties. Gloria Richardson was an influential yet largely on song, civil rights pioneer who was captured in a photograph as she pushed away the bayonet of a National Guardsmen. Well, Richardson has died at the age of 99. Her granddaughter says she died in her sleep Thursday in New York City. She was the first woman to lead a prolonged grassroots civil rights movement outside the Deep South. In 1962, she helped to organize and lead the Cambridge movement on Maryland's Eastern Shore with sit ins to desegregate restaurants, bowling alleys and movie theaters.

Gloria Richardson National Guardsmen Richardson New York City Deep South Cambridge Eastern Shore Maryland Bowling
"19 sixties" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

06:56 min | 11 months ago

"19 sixties" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Bezoza is about to go to space. Yeah. Richard Branson went a couple of days ago. So So Erin Branson one, the billionaire space race, but Bezos's go I've heard this Is there controversy over bezels going? Properties and people talk what There's always controversy surrounding Bezos, right, so probably care. And if he can afford it, this is his passion, His passions. The only thing I will say Is, uh, the Amazon is the sponsor of the new hockey arena Climate pledge Arena, and I'm guessing Space flight probably emits more carbon emissions, then probably you and I will use in a lifetime era. Yeah, but to be fair story, it's not Amazon. That is going on this mission. It is blue origin, Right? Right. I know. I know. But Amazon, you know, they've Amazon green now where you can just Go online and buy green. And I think all of this is fine. I just I just don't buy the sincerity of climate pledge and green everything if you're will. You know, it's like Jay Inslee flying everywhere in his private jet when he was running for prayers and just I don't know that I bought it when when Basil is going up. Gosh, I think it's next week. I want to say like next weekend at some point don't quote me on that. But I wish you would be during our show. I'd like to Like to do play by play of that. Find space flights. Very You're too young for this, Erin. But when I was a kid when the Apollo missions were going on, they wheel the old black and white TV into our elementary school classroom, And sometimes we'd watch a takeoff And then other times you'd watch the the landing in the ocean. It was very exciting. It was galvanizing, and that was one of the things about it is. It's something that we all seem to be able to. That's why I was asking if there is controversy about pays off because I couldn't care less guys got the money to do it. It's his passion. It's his dream. Go for it. But back then it seemed to be something that bonded us together is a national goal that we had set. Now, Uh, so if you can, if you can give a call over to the blue, What's it called? Blue origin? Yeah. Could you call them and ask them to schedule it during our show? Well, I just I just looked it up by the way it is actually a week from today, six o'clock am our time. I had to tell him to hold off for six hours for 6.5 hours. See what I can do? Okay. Thank you. Appreciate it all right? Uh, yeah, I mean, but you know, I was going into space us going to the moon, which we finally did in 1969. It was a great example of goal setting. I've talked about this often that I am such a believer in the power of goal setting. And after, uh, Japan was a great example of this. Japan was devastated by World War two by the atomic bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan was devastated. And as a nation, they are the model of what national goal setting can do, Uh, this nation that had to rise from ruins. And I didn't know I was going to talk about this, but but I will because I'm very passionate about goal, setting a nation that had to rise from the ruins as a as a country. Their leadership said You know what? By the end of the 19 fifties, we will be the world leader in textiles. 1959. They were because they had set this goal and they had set a plan on how they were going to achieve the school and in the 19 sixties. Japan is a nation said We're going to be the world leader in electronic six and sure enough by the end of the decade they were in the 19 seventies. Japan is a nation said. We are going to be the world leader in automobiles. And that was when you had Toyota and Dotson and all the Japanese automakers and by the end of the seventies, they were They were the world leader in automotives. And you know, the United States with the space program gave an example of that kind of national goal sending because you know when John Kennedy said by the end of this decade We will put a man on the moon, very sexist of him. By the way, those Democrats are the most sexist people I'll ever know. But he said, We will put a man on the moon by the end of the decade. Sure enough summer of 69 We did just that because we set a goal with laid out a plan for achieving that goal. And I talk about this lot in my my public speaking Back when we used to have public speaking but because I am such a believer in the power of goal setting It's a powerful force in our individual lives if we set a goal And if you internalize that goal, you write it down. You read it every night before you go to bed. I mean, it's amazing. We don't use that much of our brain. And it's amazing if you start internalizing your goals, how your brain can find pathways. Maybe even subconsciously, But you'll find pathways to achieving goals in life. And I think that the space program and everything that Japan did as a nation. I think those are examples found nations can achieve goals and we just we don't have anything that galvanises. Us anymore. We don't They think that everybody seems to be able to to gather around. You know, 9 11 Sadly, was the last time we seemed to be galvanized about anything and that was in tragedy. There just aren't very many joys. You know, on local level, You know things like the Seahawks, you know, go to the Super Bowl. Everybody's on board and it's great for a city and for a region, But there aren't too many things that galvanize us. Enjoy. So, uh, try. Try, try if you're not getting quite what you want life. Try the goal setting you want to book on it gets the 10 seeds of greatness. Book that's about 40 years old. But, uh, get that and, uh and that's great. Primer is a primer primer on on how to set goals and make that a powerful force in your life. Okay? I wasn't planning to talking about this at all, because we do have some breaking news that's coming.

Richard Branson Jay Inslee John Kennedy Erin Branson Toyota six hours 6.5 hours Amazon World War two Bezoza Seahawks Erin Nagasaki Hiroshima Super Bowl 1969 1959 next week Basil Bezos
Mudcat Grant, American League’s First Black 20-Game Winner, Dies at 85

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

Mudcat Grant, American League’s First Black 20-Game Winner, Dies at 85

"People have had Major league pitcher of the 19 sixties, has died. I'm Tom 40. His name was Jim Grand, but he was much better known as Mudcat during a near decade and a half long career in Major league Baseball grants. Best year by far was 1965 when he became the first black pitcher to win 20 games in the American League. In the process, he helped pitch the Minnesota Twins to their first pennant, after which he was a star, though in a losing effort in the World Series. In addition to the Twins, he pitched raw number of other teams, the longest for the cleavage. And Indians. Jim Mudcat Grant was 85 Tom

Jim Grand Mudcat Major League TOM Twins American League Baseball Jim Mudcat Grant
China Eases Birth Limits to Ease Demographic Crisis

BBC World Service

01:26 min | 1 year ago

China Eases Birth Limits to Ease Demographic Crisis

"Let's talk about big big news in China launched with great fanfare as well, and it's a Leading the news there, apparently lots of lots of happy cartoon images of Children on CCTV, the main broadcaster on the news agencies, and so on. This is because China has announced a major policy shift to the current limits on couples having Children. A member. A few years ago, the notorious one child policy became a two child policy. Well. Now families can have three. This is off the back of recent data showing an 18% decline in birth, which is the slowest population growth since the early 19 sixties. Which kind of suggests that the two child policy didn't really have any effect. So what effect is the three child policy? Gonna have someone who knows all about this has spent years researching The family policies of the Chinese government, is senior lecturer at King's College London doctor yet knew who joins us Now, first off what's the motivation for the government of doing this other worried about a demographic problem in the future? Absolutely the two child policy on announced really quickly as response to the seventh population. Sensor data just mentioned that China has the most dramatic drop in birth rate for 18%. Scenes 2019, So this is a really kind of desperate attempt to dress Demographic crisis in the years to come.

China Cctv Chinese Government King's College London
Gloria Henry, 'Dennis the Menace' Mom, Dies Age 98

Guy Gordon

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

Gloria Henry, 'Dennis the Menace' Mom, Dies Age 98

"Actress Gloria Henry has died. She's remembered most, perhaps as the mother of Dennis the menace from the 19 sixties TV show. Danny's Come here this instant. Why don't we go down have a bologna sandwich. Her career was a mixture of mostly B movies and TV guest parts. She added that Sonny domestic warmth as Dennis Mitchell's mom for four seasons until the show was canceled Glory. Henry died one day after her 98

Gloria Henry Dennis Danny Dennis Mitchell Sonny Henry
Dennis the Menace Actress Gloria Henry Dies

Frank Beckmann

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

Dennis the Menace Actress Gloria Henry Dies

"Of the mother of Dennis the menace. In the 19 sixties TV show. Dennis Come here this instant. Why don't we go down have a bologna sandwich. Her career was a mixture of B movies and TV guest parts, she added. The sunny domestic warmth is Dennis Mitchell's mom from four seasons until the show was canceled. Gloria Henry died one day after her 98 birthday. Want street Today. Stocks are still rallying. The Dow

Dennis Dennis Mitchell Gloria Henry
Black Actors Sweep the Sag Awards

AP 24 Hour News

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Black Actors Sweep the Sag Awards

"Actors Guild Awards are historic this year, says Our Oscar Wells. Gabriel got my time Come. History was made at the Screen Actors Guild Awards this year for the first time ever. Actors of color swept the individual awards in the movie category. For best male actor. It was Chadwick Boseman winning costume asleep for Ma Rainey's Black Bottom costar Viola Davis won for best female actor, Best supporting actor goes to Daniel Cholula for Judas and the Black Messiah, while best female Supporting actor went to young Young Eun for Minori. The award for best ensemble cast goes to Aaron Sorkin's 19 sixties courtroom drama. The trial of the Chicago Seven A Moscow Wells gave Rio

Actors Guild Awards Oscar Wells Chadwick Boseman Screen Actors Guild Awards Gabriel Daniel Cholula Ma Rainey Viola Davis Young Eun Judas Minori Aaron Sorkin Moscow Wells Chicago RIO
President Biden will unveil his $2 trillion infrastructure plan today

Bloomberg Daybreak

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

President Biden will unveil his $2 trillion infrastructure plan today

"Biden unveils his big infrastructure spending plan today, and Cates has a preview from our Bloomberg 99 1 newsroom in Washington. The White House says the proposal will be the most sweeping since investments in the 19 sixties space program and the interstate highway system in the 19 fifties. The president during his speech in Pittsburgh, will outline the four part eight year program, which provides $620 billion for transportation. Also allocates $650 billion for initiatives tied it improving quality of life, including clean water and high speed broadband $580 billion will go towards strengthening American manufacturing and $400 billion will be earmarked for improved care for the elderly and people with disabilities. In Washington and Cates Bloomberg Daybreak. All right,

Cates Biden Bloomberg White House Washington Pittsburgh Cates Bloomberg
Ten years after Fukushima, Japan remembers 'man-made' nuclear disaster

The World

06:52 min | 1 year ago

Ten years after Fukushima, Japan remembers 'man-made' nuclear disaster

"Japan then caused a nuclear power plant in Fukushima to go into meltdown. It was a traumatizing event, one that left the Japanese public and the world wanting guarantees that a nuclear disaster like that would never happen again. But can Japan make that promise? Some of Japan's most prominent earthquake, experts say. Not really the world's Patrick win has more. Okumura. Koji is a paleo seismologist. That means he studies earthquakes, old earthquakes that may have shaken the earth. When wooly mammoths were still around. It's like archaeology off course Quake. Archaeology of earthquakes. Sounds really nish on Lee. It's not. It's actually a matter of life and death because if they fault erupted even 10,000 years ago, that's a sign that it might erupt again in our lifetime, and you really shouldn't build a nuclear reactor anywhere near it. Because this could happen. In 2011 tsunami created by an undersea earthquake that squeaking noise, those air buildings crumbling in a torrent of water. And at the Fukushima nuclear plant. Waves pounded the power plant, causing a meltdown. It happened on March 11 and Japanese people still call it 3 11 shorthand for catastrophe now, Okumura. He is one of the top earthquake experts in Japan. And before 3 11. He was on a government safety panel as a caveat. He wants to say this. Nobody knew and nobody could have predicted kid. What he means is no one could have predicted this earthquake at this specific time. But Okumura and a few others were warning the nuclear industry that some of their reactors were sitting on potentially shaky ground. In those days, nuclear companies were almost regulating themselves. But after 3 11, Japan started over what they knew nuclear watchdog agency one with an unofficial motto, the new nuclear regulatory regime in Japan must be the world's strictest, which tracks with an acknowledgement that seismic risk in Japan is among the world's worst. Drew Richard is an author whose new book, Every Human Intention follows Scientists struggling to figure out how to prevent another Fukushima because that's what people want to hear. Alice that this will never happen again. Okamura, the seismologist says. That's almost an impossible request. We cannot tell when underwear a big Oscar eco cars, he can tell you this, like it or not. No nuclear problem. These profit pretty save Every nuclear power plant, he says, comes with risk, especially in Japan. Here's the deal. Japan just doesn't have much oil or gas. So starting in the 19 sixties, with lots of American help, it went heavy on nuclear to power, one of the world's biggest economies. And they did this. Knowing Japan as a lot of earthquakes again. Here's Drew Richard nearly all of Japan in nearly all the sites where nuclear reactors are built, our seismically hazardous. It's a nation that faces a level of seismic risk that's almost uniformly comparable to Seismically active areas of California on Lee, California has one nuclear plant. Japan was running 50 Woz after 3 11 that nuclear watchdog shut down all of them. It has since allowed only five to reopen. Watchdog is so strict that even experts who were advising the government before the disaster are effectively not allowed to join. That includes scientists like Okumura, Koji. And others who were warning the government, Okumura says. They just scrap the whole system for them, or the system was useless and I'm used to, and I'm useless to, he says. Other Japanese seismologists, who could join the watchdog agency won't because well, scientists don't want the spotlight the immense political pressure Okumura says. Right now, the agency actually does not have a solid team of earthquake specialist say Don't Tall, you know, professional scientists. Yes, it's a big laws. Drew Richard says. Most earthquake experts agree seismic safety is a real blind spot in a real weak spot for the current regulatory agency. And that's glaring because the Fukushima disaster was a seismic event. That's bad, Richard says. The current top seismic safety regulator isn't really an earthquake expert. He's more of a geologist, so it's a little bit like asking an influential kidney doctor to operate on your heart. Richard says most officials mean well, yet they face a traumatized public. Still looking to scientist for peace of mind the expertise of these earthquakes, scientists has been applied to Ah, fundamentally impossible question that question. Are any of those dozens of reactor sites absolutely safe from earthquakes. And as it turns out on the basis of the limits of human knowledge At this time, the answer is maybe we don't know. At this point half of all Japanese people just don't want nuclear power at all. Nuclear companies are pushing to reopen their reactors, but keep getting denied. Try again, Regulators say, Make it safer. Meanwhile, with most nuclear plants closed, Japan has had to import way more coal, dirty polluting coal warming the whole planet and people aren't happy with that, either. Just listen to these protesters. Follows at US. I'll call, you know, Call Japan. They're chanting, Okamoto says. There are no easy solutions here. He knows the public. Just want scientist to tell them their energy source is safe. What science can never be published again. It's the nature or not. You're Hauser. I admit he also admits that actually, he wants more nuclear plants to open up. That's coming from the scientist who foresaw Lay Fukushima like nuclear nightmare. Look, some of Japan's plans should clearly never open again, He says. They're just too close to fault lines. For others. The odds of another earthquake seem low enough that Japan should take the risk. He says. The country needs power. Yes, I'm afraid people against nuclear power may be hungry after me. Just try not to be too angry at me, Okumura says. He's just a guy who wanted to study prehistoric earthquakes, never imagining that pursuit could affect the fate of his country. And the entire planet. For the world. I'm Patrick Quinn.

Okumura Japan Drew Richard Undersea Earthquake Fukushima Nuclear Plant Koji Earthquake Okamura Fukushima Tsunami Patrick LEE California Oscar Earthquakes Alice Richard Okamoto Hauser
Oregon moves to ban display of nooses, a racist symbol

Noon Report with Rick Van Cise

01:06 min | 1 year ago

Oregon moves to ban display of nooses, a racist symbol

"Images of horrific lynchings linger in the memories of those who want to make the display of a news. Illegal come most. Corwin hate, explains Lynch Mobs terrorized Black American communities into the 19 sixties. Greg Evans wants the state of Oregon to ban public displays of nooses because, he says, they continue to serve as a symbol of racial hatred and intimidation. Recently, they've been placed in people's yards displayed in marches and even this year. Exhibited in front of the U. S. Capitol Building Heaven serves on the City council in Eugene, he says the news is a personal reminder of his own family's grief of over 100 years ago. That's when a lynch mob in South Carolina murdered his great uncle. He was killed, basting, cleave or offending a white man. It was hung by a noose. His body was riddled with bullets, and then he was set on fire. Oregon's proposed new law would make displaying a noose in public punishable by up to a year in prison and a $6000 fine Corwin Hey CO Moh

Greg Evans U. S. Capitol Building Heaven Corwin Lynch Oregon Eugene City Council South Carolina
Oregon moves to ban display of nooses, a racist symbol

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

Oregon moves to ban display of nooses, a racist symbol

"Lynch mobs terrorized black American communities into the 19 sixties. Greg Evans wants the state of Oregon to ban public displays of nooses because, he says, they continue to serve as a symbol of racial hatred and intimidation. Recently, they've been placed in people's yards displayed in marches and even this year. Exhibited in front of the U. S. Capitol Building Heaven serves on the City council in Eugene, he says the news is a personal reminder of his own family's grief of over 100 years ago. That's when a lynch mob in South Carolina murdered his great uncle. He was killed, basting, cleave or offending a white man. It was hung by a noose. His body was riddled with bullets, and then he was set on fire. Oregon's proposed new law would make displaying a noose in public punishable by up to a year in prison and a $2000

Greg Evans U. S. Capitol Building Heaven Lynch Oregon Eugene City Council South Carolina
Lady Gaga's Dogs Are Stolen and Dog Walker Is Shot

America First with Sebastian Gorka

01:04 min | 1 year ago

Lady Gaga's Dogs Are Stolen and Dog Walker Is Shot

"Week. Lady Gaga is two canines made global headlines. The pair of pooches were stolen the dog walker shot in the chest. And a $500,000 reward offered for the return of the dogs. While this may seem unusual dog napping in the U. S, A is a lucrative scheme. Dating back decades. The first high profile case occurred in 1948, the editor of House and Garden magazine, at a puppy taken during a photo shoot. Covert later demanded a cash payment to return the dark. 19 fifties, Gangs of dog nappers were widely reported in the media Research laboratories would pay big dollars for bootleg dogs using the former pets for scientific studies and medical experiments. How horrendous In the 19 sixties, thieves were targeting dogs using Greyhound racing. Pooch named Hijo, valued by his owners of $15,000 was stolen from his kennel in London, England.

Garden Magazine Lady Gaga Walker U. Hijo London England
India's Farmer Protests: Why Are They So Angry?

Morning Edition

06:54 min | 1 year ago

India's Farmer Protests: Why Are They So Angry?

"Next on a protest movement movement in India. in India. It has drawn the It interest has drawn of pop the interest stars of pop and stars climate and activists climate activists and sent people and sent into the people streets into for the streets a cause. for a cause. What's fascinating What's fascinating about the cause about they're the cause fighting for, they're fighting for, is how is unfasten how unfasten ating ating it initially it seems, initially seems, farmers are protesting farmers are protesting over new rules over new for rules wholesale for wholesale markets. markets. One of those rules One matter of those rules so much. matter so much. The answer reveals The answer something reveals about something a giant about nation, a giant its nation, past its past and its possible and its future. possible future. NPR's Lauren NPR's Lauren Frayer begins at one of the markets in western India. Yeah, I like all day. So this is a wholesale market and sort of a dusty lot between looks like warehouses here. Yes, Yes. This is far. Good skunk. Oh, yeah, Wholesale agent, but this is all regulated by the government. Yes, they're appointed by the government. They're being market fees can vote How is showing me around his local wholesale market, one of thousands run by the government where Indian farmers sell their crops in auction. Takes bids for eggplants trucks disgorge bales of collie flower wave through waist high piles of green beans. These markets were set up in the 19 sixties in India's Green revolution. When the government started subsidizing pesticides and irrigation. It helped boost yields and made India self sufficient in food. It did not lift many farmers themselves out of poverty. My father has not much educated Lord Howe comes from a long line of grain farmers. The average Indian farm is about 2.5 acres. These are not big commercial farms like in the American West, and with climate change, mechanization and rampant development, not to mention the pandemic. Indian farmers are struggling load houses at our place. Water is not Copper supplies water. Not there. That's right. That's water as much as when you go. So exactly exactly exactly lot off problem is that the production costs off. Traditional farming is going higher day by day, so the help the Indian government passed three new laws last year they aimed to deregulate the way produces bought and sold. Wholesalers and grocery chains no longer have to buy it. These government run markets they could do deals directly with farms. Many farmers are not happy, though, because you know Agriculture prizes are subject to a lot of volatility. Economists seem a bad lawyer says farmers got used to selling of these government run markets, which guarantee them a minimum price. So it's a safety net for the farmers. When prices go down, the government says it will still set prices for certain crops, and it's not closing these markets just adding more options. But Sanjay Cohade is still worried. Ginger Allah Miggy. Eventually he's a middle man who buys from farmers here. He says he's worried big corporations will circumvent these markets and obliterate small traders like him. As we chat, another man interrupts. We have brought up Narendra Modi's. You will be the King of World nine innings, and this is basically what's happened with the farm laws. It's all devolved into political arguments. Agriculture reform has long been the third rail of Indian politics. Successive governments avoided it. Prime Minister Narendra Modi is trying to do it now on a national scale. The rules have always varied by state and by crop economist giant ego says mode. I made a mistake by not explaining this well. The amazing thing is that the more the government passed these laws in the middle of a pandemic. They just quickly passed it without any discussion. You could have gone to people talked about it Godfrey back because these are long term proposals proposals now laws that affect the approximately 800 million Indians who depend on farming for a living. There's been a lot of confusion. Farmers here in Western India don't have the same concerns as in the north of the country, but that didn what model? Is it? Me getting shit carry those air. The rich farmers from the north you see protest, Ng says a tomato farmer here named um, but a sun up. He's got nine family members to feed. He can't afford to take a day off to protest. The protests have been dominated by farmers from northern India, the country's bread basket. They grow mostly grain and rely on government markets. More than a tomato farmer like sun up who can sell out of the back of his truck. Northern farmers see these laws is the first step toward dismantling all the aid they've gotten since the Green Revolution. Including price guarantees for wheat, rice and 20 other crops. I'm your bony I mean about me, but not for my tomatoes. Sun up, says he's never been eligible for the price guarantees that wheat growers get a majority of India's farmers or not. Meanwhile, farmers in several states are already circumventing these government wholesale markets and have been for years well, These conveyor belts are moving quickly. This produce packing collective started more than a decade ago, when eight farmers banded together. Now it has a sprawling campus. It's co owned by more than 10,000 farmers. This is the man on I think Chambers Banana ripening chamber. This collective bypasses government wholesalers and sells directly to stores. The last Shin Dae is the founder. Market is ready to pay me back better place then I should capture that market is rapper Depending on government. He says he got fed up waiting decades for government reforms, so he took matters into his own hands and started this collective. For others, the pandemic has forced them to consider new ways of selling their produce. So these air your grapes here's yes. Yes, grandfather and then grape farmer Abby shake shall kisses. His harvest came right when government run wholesale markets closed last year because of Cove. It Actually long known there was opportunity. So he and his friends all farmers in their twenties who've gone to college, started selling on Twitter and got more for their produce. Abby Shake says his heart is with his fellow farmers who've been pro testing even if they don't share all the same concerns. His head, he says, is on how to solve some of the inefficiencies he sees in the way his forefathers have long done business and he doesn't really trust the government to do it when I'm just out to get the amulet and the mighty by it guys out the causal Calabrese. I think our generation is going to have to try to figure this out, he says. Lauren Frayer NPR news in Nash IQ. Maharashtra, India

India Lauren Frayer NPR Lord Howe Sanjay Cohade Ginger Allah Miggy Prime Minister Narendra Modi Western India American West Indian Government Narendra Modi Godfrey Northern India Shin Dae NG Confusion Government Abby Shake Abby
India's Farmer Protests: Why Are They So Angry?

Morning Edition

06:54 min | 1 year ago

India's Farmer Protests: Why Are They So Angry?

"Next on a protest movement in India. It has drawn the interest of pop stars and climate activists and sent people into the streets for a cause. What's fascinating about the cause they're fighting for, is how unfasten ating it initially seems, farmers are protesting over new rules for wholesale markets. One of those rules matter so much. The answer reveals something about a giant nation, its past and its possible future. NPR's Lauren Frayer begins at one of the markets in western India. Yeah, I like. Okay, So this is a wholesale market and sort of a dusty lot between looks like warehouses here. Yes. Yes. This is good, Skunk. Oh, yeah, Wholesale agent, but this is all regulated by the government. Yes, they're appointed by the government. They're paying market fees can vote How is showing me around his local wholesale market, one of thousands run by the government where Indian farmers sell their crops Auction. Takes bids for eggplants trucks disgorge bales of collie flower wave through waist high piles of green beans. These markets were set up in the 19 sixties in India's Green revolution. When the government started subsidizing pesticides and irrigation. It helped boost yields and made India self sufficient in food. But it did not lift many farmers themselves out of poverty. My father has not much educated Lord Howe comes from a long line of grain farmers. The average Indian farm is about 2.5 acres. These are not big commercial farms like in the American West, and with climate change, mechanization and rampant development, not to mention the pandemic. Indian farmers are struggling load houses at our place. Water is not Report supplies water, Not there that much water as much as when you go. So exactly exactly exactly lot of problem is that the production cost off. Traditional farming is going higher day by day, so the help the Indian government passed three new laws last year they aimed to deregulate the way produces bought and sold. Wholesalers and grocery chains no longer have to buy it. These government run markets they could do deals directly with farms. Many farmers are not happy, though, because you know Agriculture prices are subject to a lot of volatility. Economists seem a bad lawyer says farmers got used to selling of these government run markets, which guarantee them a minimum price. So it's a safety net for the farmers. When prices go down, the government says it will still set prices for certain crops, and it's not closing these markets just adding more options. That son Jake Ohad is still worried. Ginger Allah Miggy. Eventually he's a middle man who buys from farmers here. Don't he says he's worried big corporations will circumvent these markets and obliterate small traders like him. As we chat. Another man interrupts. We're proud of you will be the King of World Niners, and this is basically what's happened with the farm laws. It's all devolved into political arguments. Agriculture reform has long been the third rail of Indian politics. Successive governments avoided it. Prime Minister Narendra Modi is trying to do it now on a national scale. The rules have always varied by state and by crop economist giant ego says mode. I made a mistake by not explaining this well. The amazing thing is that the more the government passed these laws in the middle of a pandemic. They just quickly passed it without any discussion. You could have gone to people talked about it Godfrey back because these are long term proposals proposals now laws that affect the approximately 800 million Indians who depend on farming for a living. There's been a lot of confusion. Farmers here in Western India don't have the same concerns as in the north of the country that they moved more delicious than me getting shit carry those air. The rich farmers from the north you see protest, Ng says a tomato farmer here named um, but a sun up. He's got nine family members to feed. He can't afford to take a day off to protest. The protests have been dominated by farmers from northern India, the country's bread basket. They grow mostly grain and rely on government markets. More than a tomato farmer like sun up who can sell out of the back of his truck. Northern farmers see these laws is the first step toward dismantling all the aid they've gotten since the Green Revolution. Including price guarantees for wheat, rice and 20 other crops. I'm your bony I mean, bony, but not for my tomatoes. Sun Up, says he's never been eligible for the price guarantees that wheat growers get a majority of India's farmers or not. Meanwhile, farmers in several states are already circumventing these government wholesale markets and have been for years well, These conveyor belts are moving quickly. This produce packing collective started more than a decade ago, when eight farmers banded together. Now it has a sprawling campus. It's co owned by more than 10,000 farmers. This is the banana, I think Chambers Banana ripening chamber. This collective bypasses government wholesalers and sells directly to stores. Villas. Shin Dae is the founder market is ready to pay me back. Better place then I should capture that market is Roper. Depending on government. He says he got fed up waiting decades for government reforms, so he took matters into his own hands and started this collective. For others, the pandemic has forced them to consider new ways of selling their produce. So these air your grapes Here's yes. If grandfather and great farmer Abby shake shall kisses. His harvest came right when government run wholesale markets closed last year because of Cove, it actually opportunity, so he and his friends all farmers in their twenties who'd gone to college, started selling on Twitter and got more for their produce. Bobby Shake, says his heart is with his fellow farmers who've been protesting even if they don't share all the same concerns. His head, he says, is on how to solve some of the inefficiencies he sees in the way his forefathers have long done business and he doesn't really trust the government to do it. When I'm just out to get the amulet and no I did buy it guys off the coast of Calabrese. I think our generation is going to have to try to figure this out, he says. Lauren Frayer NPR news in Nash IQ. Maharashtra, India

India Lauren Frayer Lord Howe Jake Ohad Ginger Allah Miggy Prime Minister Narendra Modi NPR Western India American West Indian Government Niners Godfrey Northern India Shin Dae NG Confusion Government Roper Bobby Shake
Long-serving Saudi oil minister Ahmed Zaki Yamani dies at 90

Hugh Hewitt

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Long-serving Saudi oil minister Ahmed Zaki Yamani dies at 90

"Long time. Saudi oil minister Shake Zaki Yamani He led the kingdom through the 1973 oil crisis, has died in London at the age of 90 food in Mecca. You money had been appointed Saudi oil minister during the 19 sixties as the wealth that oil brought to Saudi Arabia was starting to pour in. He was instrumental in setting up the oil producers organization. OPEC Throughout his long career, he remained a voice of moderation in OPEC, but by 1973 Arab demands for oil to be used as a weapon in the Israeli Palestinian conflict could no longer be denied. 1975 and OPEC meeting in Vienna was infiltrated by the international terrorist Carlos The Jackal Shake your money had been marked for assassination on was only reprieve when last minute concessions were made. To BBC Sebastian Usher the

Saudi Shake Zaki Yamani Opec Mecca London Vienna Sebastian Usher BBC
The Lucas Bros, Using Humor 'To Shake Folk Woke'

90.3 KAZU Programming

05:28 min | 1 year ago

The Lucas Bros, Using Humor 'To Shake Folk Woke'

"Kenny and Keith Lucas are stand up comedians and identical twins. People don't have to react when I see twins. No. Okay, they go crazy like we were in the supermarket looking for some Jell O. Yeah. And we're just about to pick it out. And then some dude came out of nowhere. It was like, you know, you guys have a stick of Doublemint gum. That's from their 2017. Netflix special Lucas brothers were having a moment right now they're writing and starring in a remake of Revenge of the Nerds, But they also wrote the story for the new movie Judas and the Black Messiah. The film premieres today in theaters and on HBO. Max NPR's Elizabeth Blair has this profile. The Lucas brothers are best known for a kind of stoner humor. And here's a rule of thumb You should never do. Shrooms wouldn't do Who looks like you, man. I'm telling you. But underneath the jokes, there's a serious side that draws heavily on their childhood in the housing projects of Newark, New Jersey, called the Garden spires is you always, you know, broken elevators infested with rats and rotten Drug dealing violence everywhere, But you know, there's a community that is people that there's families is my family When they were six years old there, Dad went to prison. My father actually is out of prison. He's not in prison anymore, and it sucks that he's out. I wish he was still there. Oh, yeah. I wanted to go back because all he wants to do is father's sight. Don't like do we pay rent? Now it's over. The Lucas Brothers connection to Newark got the attention of New Jersey Senator Cory Booker in 1999, then a Newark City councilman, Booker went on a hunger strike in front of the Garden spires. He also served as the city's mayor. Here's Booker talking to the Lucas brothers on his instagram. I love your insightful, hard hitting humor and the sort of the Eddie Murphy and S O. My great heroes Coming up, you know, were uncompromising how they used humor to shake folks woke like book arm. Keith and Kenny Lucas went to law school and why you and Duke, But unlike Booker, they dropped out. It was weird Tonto Study law and and kind of be poor and black because it's like, Oh, I see what The consequences of policy and law are like on a daily basis, and especially when it in relation to African Americans and the notion of criminality and how it's projected onto blacks and I see that process. I found myself sort of disengaged very early. I always said, you know what I want to do something that has a direct impact on people. From an emotional standpoint, Judas and the Black Messiah is very emotional. Lucas brothers were in college when they first learned about Fred Hampton, the charismatic leader of the Illinois Black Panther Party in the 19 sixties in the movie he's played by Daniel Cholula, Mother Liberating You can't Murder Liberation is another revolutionary, but you can't murder a revolution for murder Freedom fighter, but you get amount of freedom. He's the Black Messiah. Judas is William O'Neal, an African American who was arrested for interstate car theft and Impersonating a federal officer in the movie. We see how the FBI recruited O'Neill to avoid jail time and earn some money. He was instructed to infiltrate the Black Panther Party. And provide the FBI with information about Hampton O'Neill is played by like Keith Stanfield Target You Like some good information, some nobody else No. Is it some kind of bonuses? I'm I'm counting on it. Bill O'Neill became so much of a Panther insider. He was put in charge of security. He provided the FBI with a floor plan of Hampton's apartment in 1969. The Chicago police raided the apartment and killed two Black Panther leaders, including Hampton for the Lucas Brothers. It was essential to tell the story of how the FBI recruited informants in the black community. I think it's important to see just how insidious The system has been in turning young African Americans against one another. Now they Essentially used poor black people against poor black people to execute their goals of minimizing the threat of black messiah is like we just felt it was important to see both sides of the coin. Whether it's a historical drama or its stand up comedy for the Lucas Brothers. It all comes from the same source in a big thing about our act is that we we always try to ground it and stuff that we've gone through, and it's always been Important for us to talk about these systemic issues and a variety of ways. Now they're writing and will star in Seth McFarland reimagining of 1980 four's Revenge of the Nerds Practice a bunch after school. They called US nerds. So one cool. The Lucas brothers promise that their movie will be almost nothing like the original because times have changed. It's like the juxtaposition of being a bully and a nerd is so different from what it was like in the eighties, where you had this one, a stark dichotomy between what it was bullying what it was to be a nerd. Now that's been fused together, and I think That's why the time is right to make a story about that. The Lucas brothers say it's hard to watch the original revenge of the nerds. Even though the movie was a childhood staple. They're excited to give it an update and to make it personal. Elizabeth Blair. NPR news

Lucas Lucas Brothers Keith Lucas Booker Elizabeth Blair Max Npr Senator Cory Booker Newark City Newark Kenny Lucas Revenge Of The Nerds FBI New Jersey Illinois Black Panther Party Daniel Cholula Judas William O'neal Kenny Netflix HBO
Finding the Judas in Judas and the Black Messiah

Morning Edition

07:02 min | 1 year ago

Finding the Judas in Judas and the Black Messiah

"The 19 sixties, Fred Hampton was chairman of the Illinois Black Panther Party. He was a rising leader, organizing disparate multi racial groups in Chicago. Until police shot and killed him and another Black Panther member in an early morning raid. There's a new movie about Fred Hampton out this week, it is called Judas and the Black Messiah. It's not a question of ball. It's a non violence is a question of resistance to fascism or non existence within fascism Film got rave reviews after its premiere at the Sundance Film Festival last week. It's the second feature from director Shaka King who, until this project came along, was on the verge of giving up making feature films altogether. MPR's Andrew Lyne bonked takes it from here. Yes, Judas and the Black Messiah is about Fred Hampton and how he led the Black Panthers in Chicago. But it's also about William O'Neill, the man who infiltrated the Black Panthers in spied on Hampton on behalf of the FBI. Shaka King told me that the Lucas Brothers who co wrote the story, sold the idea to him like this. Their pitch that they laid out was we want to make a movie about Fred Hampton and William O'Neal. That's kind of like the departed the 2006 Martin Scorsese movie Inside the World of Cointelpro, or Counterintelligence program, the 19 sixties project where the FBI infiltrated and disrupted groups like the Black Panthers, and I was like I see it. I'm done. I'm in Judas is a tight, intense movie. Yes, like the departed and other Scorsese type crime movies. It's a long way, though, from King's first feature film newly weeds from 2013. So what you got here? Newly weeds tells the story of a young couple in Brooklyn who smoke a lot of weed where Judas is loud and fast. Really? Weeds is quiet and tender. I'm done. I'm done online. Won't want Wanna hang out. We hang up. Yeah. How are we supposed to go to the Galapagos? If you mind the bag every two minutes. It hits similar beats as movies by other indie darling directors like Joe Swanberg or the Duplass Brothers. The film Independent Spirit Awards even gave King the Someone to watch award after it came out, which came with a $25,000 grant. Not bad for someone fresh out of N Y. U film school. But after that initial fanfare, I was so depressed after making newly weeds and my expectations for the release just not coming to fruition. The movie didn't get much attention outside the festival circuit from agents and distributors, largely because it was a movie with black actors who no one knew on at that time that was deemed worthless. The film's release in 2013 wasn't that long ago, but it was just before what a friend of Kings jokingly dubbed. The Black Excellence Industrial Complex. You're Selma's and Moon Lights and Black Panthers when movie studios realized they could make a lot of money by releasing films by and starring black people. Nearly weeds. Loss of momentum burnt king out on the idea of making another feature film, But he did have an idea for a short rolling around in his head. It was kind of silly kind of outrageous, sweetheart. Lips. Excuse me, miss. It's called Moon Yang's after the Italian slur for black people want heard on the streets of Brooklyn in it, King and two others play these three black guys who talk like they're in the mom movies. King has such a fondness for It was somewhat inspired by King's experience growing up in a mostly black part of Brooklyn, but going to high school in South Brooklyn, where everyone the Irish Americans, Greek Americans, Asian Americans, Jewish Americans, all talks like the Italian American kids, and those kids were Hilarious. They were profane. They were quick witted, and we were not friends put like I could appreciate their sense of humor. The movie is a concise examination of race, gender gentrification. As King's character gets into an argument with his sister over a MetroCard, you did not have a dime. Put 1000 until the white guy comes by and says hi to the sister. Hi. How you doing? How are you? You guys just don't know what both outta here. Oh, Polluted the movie is fun and poignant, and the process reminded King how much he loved making movies. That movie saved me. You saved me. I didn't see that or know that about Shaka. But I could understand, and I could see how that could happen. Charles de King, no relation to director Shocking is the CEO and founder of Macro which since its founding in 2015 has produced movies and TV shows featuring non white people, including Judas and the Black Messiah. It was before the oscarssowhite moment. Of 2015. There's a lot that's happened since then. There is much more of an openness and I think an understanding of the business opportunity there. Which brings us to King today, making a movie about an anti capitalist black radical at a very capitalist Hollywood studio without watering down the politics. The deal is to respect the authenticity. Fred Hampton Jr is the current chairman of the Black Panther Party, Cubs and son of Fred Hampton. He says he and the other Panthers had their guards up when they were approached about this film. The Panthers have long been subjected to propaganda campaigns and misrepresentations. But he says King and the rest of the cast and crew definitely navigated the crossroads between their creative goals and the Panthers. Political ones. Well enough, anyway. Revolutionaries never satisfied. You know, I wish there was more political cartoon. We could've pushed. In a certain point, However, I'll put the people's need before before my needs my wants and desires. For instance, the relationship between Fred Hampton and his partner, Deborah Johnson, was a tricky thing to get right. The poet.

Fred Hampton Shaka King Black Panthers Illinois Black Panther Party Andrew Lyne William O'neill Lucas Brothers King William O'neal FBI Joe Swanberg Duplass Brothers Film Independent Spirit Awards Brooklyn Chicago Black Excellence Industrial Co Sundance Film Festival Moon Yang Martin Scorsese
"19 sixties" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"19 sixties" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Far as I think we have to go with job creation stalling, the president says the country needs a big, bold response to deal with the financial and health crises. Greg Clugston Washington, Alabama Republican Senator Richard Shelby, reportedly indicating to friends he would may not run for re election next year. But some Republicans already urging him to reconsider. Also a town hall dot com. Republican senators seeking As potential for presidential candidates in 2024 are taking aim at China list includes GOP senators Tom Cotton, Josh Holly, Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio, as well as a few others in debate over the federal budget. Each marked out their own territory, yet all had one theme in common between them. They filed at least 16 amendments related to China in debate on that budget. Senator Cotton proposing holding China accountable for the origins of covert 19 Marco Rubio proposing an amendment to restrict what way technologies but Magna reporting Super Bowl Sunday right around the corner. Kansas City Chiefs in Tampa Bay Buccaneers, marking the biggest day of sports broadcasting for the networks, Oscar winning actor Christopher Plummer has died. He was 91 Hall of Fame songwriter Jim Weatherly is dead. Weatherly wrote many of the great hits for Gladys Knight and the Pips Back in the 19 sixties and early seventies. He was 77 more on these stories, a town hall dot com. Tell me why really factor is so successful in lowering or eliminating pain? I'm often asked that question. Beatings have child. But the father and son, founders of.

Senator Richard Shelby Jim Weatherly Marco Rubio China Senator Cotton Christopher Plummer Greg Clugston Washington president Gladys Knight Alabama Kansas City Chiefs Tampa Bay Buccaneers GOP Ted Cruz Josh Holly Oscar
"19 sixties" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"19 sixties" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Release plan. White House correspondent Greg Clugston reports. The president argues that time is of the essence when it comes to passing a covert stimulus measure, So I'm going to act. I'm gonna act fast. Mr Biden says he prefers to have the support of Republicans, but they're just not willing to go. As far as I think we have to go with job creation stalling, the president says the country needs a big, bold response to deal with the financial and health crises. Greg Clugston Washington, Alabama Republican Senator Richard Shelby, reportedly indicating to friends he would may not run for re election next year. But some Republicans already urging him to reconsider. Also a town hall dot com. Republican senators seeking As potential for presidential candidates in 2024 are taking aim at China list includes GOP senators Tom Cotton, Josh Holly, Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio, as well as a few others in debate over the federal budget. Each marked out their own territory, yet all had one theme in common between them. They filed at least 16 amendments related to China in debate on that budget. Senator Cotton proposing holding China accountable for the origins of covert 19 Marco Rubio proposing an amendment to restrict what way technologies but Magna reporting Super Bowl Sunday right around the corner. Kansas City Chiefs in Tampa Bay Buccaneers, marking the biggest day of sports broadcasting for the networks, Oscar winning actor Christopher Plummer has died. He was 91 Hall of Fame songwriter Jim Weatherly is dead. Weatherly wrote many of the great hits for Gladys Knight and the Pips Back in the 19 sixties and early seventies..

Senator Richard Shelby Greg Clugston Marco Rubio Jim Weatherly China Greg Clugston Washington president Senator Cotton Christopher Plummer Mr Biden White House correspondent Gladys Knight Kansas City Chiefs Tampa Bay Buccaneers GOP Alabama Ted Cruz Oscar Josh Holly
Hilton Valentine, founding Animals guitarist, dies at 77

Wealth Creator Radio

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

Hilton Valentine, founding Animals guitarist, dies at 77

"Hilton Valentine has passed away the founding guitarist of the English rock and Roll band the Animals credited with coming up with one of those famous opening riffs in the 19 sixties. He was 77 years old. Valentine took up the guitar 13 in his hometown of North Shields in northeast England, subsequently getting into the skiffle craze kind of a fusion of American folk music and other

Hilton Valentine North Shields Valentine England
Hilton Valentine, founding Animals guitarist, dies at 77

America First with Sebastian Gorka

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

Hilton Valentine, founding Animals guitarist, dies at 77

"John Scott reporting Hilton Valentine, the founding guitarist of English rock and Roll band. The Animals, who is credited with coming up with one of the most famous opening riffs in the 19 sixties has passed away was 77 years old. Valentine took up the guitar and 13 is hometown of North Shields and Northeast England. Subsequently getting involved in the skiffle craze kind of fusion of American folk

Hilton Valentine John Scott Northeast England North Shields Valentine
"19 sixties" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"19 sixties" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Back in the 19 sixties and seventies, he wrote, Every great cause begins is a movement becomes a business and eventually degenerates into a racket. Yep. Yep, And you know what There's there's a little addition that could be made, Theoretically okay, that that little edition could be that the amount of time it takes to get from point A to point C right there. That would be from from a cause for racket tells you about the greatness of the cause. Meaning if it if it was a really great cause. It takes a while to go from being a cause to being a racket because people are actually motivated to make serious substantive change. A racket is just about making the box right, Colin Kaepernick. Making the money and doing docuseries about himself the most Narcissistic, solipsistic nonsense in the entire world. The quickness with which movement goes from being a movement to being a racket demonstrates the seriousness of the of the business of the cause in the first place. Yes, And I do love the fact that capitalism has now decided, has figured out a way to churn out America's hellscape nonsense for profit like good for capitalism. Capitalism is great at this. It does demonstrate also that corporations it's so funny. People think corporations are right wing corporations. They're all conservative. They're so conservative. And the reason that you know that corporations are conservative is because they make money, except for the fact that You don't have to be conservative to make money. In fact, if you are interested only in making money Well, one of the things that you can do is you can just turn out stuff for the left. And that's exactly what is happening here. So everybody is happy to make a buck off of Colin Kaepernick. And I say good for them. I say You know what? As long as we're gonna be stuck in this morass of stupidity, somebody ought to make some money. And why not? Colin Kaepernick hero to the masses. Man who I mean, really, What a martyr. He is. How much has he sacrificed? He has sacrificed a backup slot on the San Francisco 40 Niners where he wasn't playing it down because he sucked so much. The Blaine Gabbert was putting ahead of him. He sacrificed that rich, rewarding career. For the For the awfulness of having to trot around America talking about how evil America is to the cheers of the Any unnatural and the unadulterated ruling of the media. A new overall deal with Disney, one of the biggest companies on planet Earth. As well as millions of dollars from Nike to Neil. I mean what? What a martyr. We'll get right back into the special best of episode of the Ben.

Colin Kaepernick America Blaine Gabbert Nike Disney San Francisco
"19 sixties" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"19 sixties" Discussed on WTOP

"62 degrees in south riding. We have 59 degrees in Damascus and 62 degrees in Georgetown D. C at 2 52. New information suggests U. S. Diplomats were sickened in Cuba and China by microwave attacks with Russia under suspicion as the possible culprit for years, U. S intelligence officials have expressed almost certainty that the symptoms were caused by a microwave type weapon. This is not, you know, individuals in these code words, making things up. Former CIA operative Mark Polly miraculously ought to know because he got sick with the same symptoms around the same time, Just as we sat down for dinner at a fancy restaurant Moscow I started experiencing the same kind of distant Listen and nausea that to him, and numerous other intelligence experts is the key. It was Moscow, not Cuba or China. There's this historic reporting and evidence that the Russians actually do have this weapon and they may have been using it for decades. JJ Green w T O P News 51. Years later, a 340 characters cipher sent to the San Francisco Chronicle by the Zodiac killer has been solved. One of those involved in the solving of the cipher was Samuel Blake. The chances of solving this off to 50 years was next to next to zero. And so being able to play a role in this is fantastic. You know, I hope this decryption may lead to better narrowing down who this person is, but I guess we'll have to wait and see. Another code breaker, told the paper that it reads in part, the cipher does. I hope you're having a lot lots of fun trying to catch me and that the Zodiac killer also wrote he's not afraid of the gas chamber. The FBI confirmed the cipher was solved but isn't commenting. Maura on it. The killer who was never con murdered five people and stabbings and shootings in San Francisco Bay Area and the late 19 sixties. It is 2 53. It's the weekend and here's Brendan Hazleton's of beer. The week I am with Greg Anger Fear director for the neighborhood restaurant group. What is on tap this week? This'll Week we have living the Dream. A brand new 5.2% pale ale from DC Brau Brewing Company, delicious beer and appropriate for the ninth anniversary of beer of the week absolutely appropriate for us and to celebrate the life of Ben Tolkien. One of our friends who sadly passed away and was an amazing impact on the D. C brewing industry. It's delicious. What would you pair it with? I love this beer with chocolate desserts..

Russia Cuba Mark Polly China Moscow San Francisco Chronicle Damascus DC Brau Brewing Company San Francisco Bay Area CIA Georgetown Samuel Blake Brendan Hazleton FBI Maura U. S Greg Anger Ben Tolkien D. C director
"19 sixties" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:48 min | 1 year ago

"19 sixties" Discussed on KTOK

"Is it I think probably because we have lots of reasons to believe in conspiracy. Think about all the things that we've been told by major institutions in this country. Only to discover That we were being deceived. On September 13th 2016. NPR reported that in the 19 sixties, the sugar industry quietly paid Influence scientific studies by Harvard linking sugar consumption to coronary heart disease. And as a result, the study implicated fat consumption as the cause of heart disease instead of sugar. As soon as you take fat out of your food. You have to add sugar to make it days. Good. So not only was the sugar industry able to unlike sugar from major health issues, it was also able to massively increase sugar consumption. This is a conspiracy of monumental proportions. Our entire food industry promoted low fat foods, which in turn Required increasing amounts of sugar and so What happened as a result well And, uh, 1961. 1% of our U. S population would just diagnosed as diabetic. Today. That number's over 7%. According to the CDC. Wow. The question is, Can you believe what you're being told by major establishments in this country? Just the phrase conspiracy theory makes you think it's a story fabricated by some nut case, But we have seen over and over again that there are very powerful people in organizations that have no Problem profiting through deception. I'm not a nutritionist. So I find out about conspiracies that impact our health the same way you do through someone who's living Healthy lifestyle. That doesn't have a motive to deceive me. And probably just like you. I find out that I've been eating the wrong things way too late. Wouldn't it be great to know the correct information about what to eat? Early in life. But bad food may be risky when you're young, but it's deadly when you're older. And what's true for your health is also true for your finances. Maybe you had too much risk in your financial diet when you were young. When we're young, we can handle all the false promises of those empty calories because we have time to recover. But when we get older Those extra calories can kill us. When it comes to your financial health, knowing the correct information and avoiding false promises as early as possible is critical..

NPR CDC U. S
"19 sixties" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"19 sixties" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"To the 19 sixties seventies and eighties before the Boy Scouts adopted criminal background checks and abuse prevention, training, cross staff and volunteers. Under the terms of the case, no more claims can be filed. But attorneys representing more than 1000 claimants says new claims can still be fun. I'll begin some local councils in states with victim friendly statute of limitation laws such as New Jersey. Chad Robinson, New Jersey one on 1.5 news time. A New Jersey's first news 5 24. Lawmakers have unanimously approved spending more than 87 million of our dollars on 38 public library construction projects in 16 Jersey counties. Comfortable margin by which the spending past belies the lengthy journey. It is taken from the ideas introduction nearly six years ago toe approval in 2017 referendum to have drawn out process of getting rules for the program in place. Roselle Library director Jean Marie Ryan wouldn't say it was frustrating, but says the sense of release and excitement among life especially Lucky libraries that we're actually awarded money through this Graham more than 129 applications were reviewed and 38 got grants. A second round of awards is expected to be an Aston early 2021 half the State House Michael Simon's New Jersey one a 1.5 news. Time of New Jersey's first news, 5 25 When a driver and a quick stop in Bergen County saw his pick up truck rolling forward, he jumped into the moving vehicle and try to hit the brake. You hit the gas instead, and the truck plowed through the front ending up inside the store. Fortunately, nobody was hurt, but it made quite a mess, police told NJ dot com It appears the driver failed to put the truck. And Park when he got out. Somebody. Jersey's first news.

New Jersey Chad Robinson Boy Scouts Roselle Library Aston Jean Marie Ryan Bergen County director Michael Simon Graham State House
"19 sixties" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:11 min | 1 year ago

"19 sixties" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"With Dennis Prager show. Glad you are. I have a lot to say. A reminder with regard to pure talk, which I couldn't believe the rate was so low $20 a month for unlimited text and unlimited talk and to two gigs of data. So I actually got a phone and signed up. It's indistinguishable from my more expensive service. That's at the pound to 50 say, Dennis Prager, pure talk simply smarter Wireless. Count to 50 Dennis Prager. Amy Cockney. Barrett is said to be Confirmed to the Supreme Court today. Actually could I just thought the ruling on case is as of next Tuesday. Senator Angus King votes independent in Maine. The votes with the Democrats in someone of a joke. She's a Democrat. Said. This about the Republicans. They expect that they're going to be able to break the rules with impunity. And when the shoe may be his only other foot Nothing's going to happen. Talking about packing the court. Lot of Democrats talking about that, because if they don't get their way they simply smash the institution. That's the way it works. You don't get your way in the electoral college. You smashed the electoral college. You get your way on the court. You packed the court with More than nine people. That's the way that's that's the attitude rules don't apply. I don't know what rules she's referring to. They broke the rules. There's no rule. Because the because the country is prepared to vote. They're for the party in power is not not allowed to. Ah, point. Judge So they have the Supreme Court since the 19 sixties. So for the last 60 years been liberal. Not left. Finally, there's a chance it might be conservative. And this is unacceptable. Anything that left doesn't control. Must be smashed like through college. Not to mention what's been done to the universities and journalism. So I was telling you about something that's going on under the radar because the press has no desire to Reported. The truth is Donald Trump deserves the Nobel Peace Prize. Frankly, If he got it, I would help you to reject it. Is that the prize has become a joke. They gave it to Barack Obama Sumas. He was elected. Even he was embarrassed to have done anything. Left the tents to control that, too. Some Nobel peace prizes were appropriate, but the long time ago Like the Soviet dissidents. Very long time ago. Again. Walter Russell Mead in the The Wall Street Journal. Palestinians have lost their position at the center of Middle East politics. And it is Turkey and Iran, not Israel that Arab rulers are most concerned to oppose. President Trump's peace plan, which many longtime Middle East experts dismissed. Of course, experts suicide here experts I assume something stupid will be reported. I do. I kid you not Unfortunately, I wish you weren't so President Trump's peace plan, which many longtime Middle East experts dismissed is a ghastly blunder and would destroy the American role in Middle East peace negotiations. Has turned out to be relatively popular on the Arab Street. Zogby survey found majorities in favor of the deal of the century. Quote unquote in Egypt, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. Asked to identify which countries Had most increased their influence in the Arab world over the past five years. More young Arabs in the survey mein the US than any other country. Why I just go. Wait a minute. I thought that America was in a low point in world opinion. Not in the Arab world. Isn't that interesting? 56% considered America an ally of their country, up from a low of 35% in 2018. Amazing. It was Turkey even more than Iran that keeps some Arab leaders awake a night. President Erdogan has aligned himself closely. With the Muslim Brotherhood..

Supreme Court President Trump Dennis Prager Middle East Turkey Iran Senator Angus King United Arab Emirates America President Erdogan Barack Obama Amy Cockney Muslim Brotherhood Walter Russell Mead Maine Barrett Nobel US The Wall Street Journal
"19 sixties" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"19 sixties" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Journalist Kevin Blackistone, also a professor at the University of Maryland. Welcome back. Thank you. How if it all that Gale Sayers change the game in the 19 sixties and seventies? Well, he was a combination of speed and guile that the NFL had never seen. You know, Previously running backs were basically bruisers. They were strong. They ran over whatever was in front of them and then into the end zone. And then came this speedster from Kansas. The comet who not only could outrun everybody on the field, but would also make people look silly. He'd stick his leg out. You go to grab it, he'd move it. He'd be gone. Hey, was a beautiful thing to watch. But there's an irony that I want to talk about. He's still quick. He's not a bruiser. He's avoiding the tackles, and yet one does get tackled in football. He had a brutal career. It seemed like the Chicago Bears ran him into the ground over used him, and he only lasted a few seasons before injuries ended his career. Yeah, it was, ah, a very short career. It really only lasted five seasons. He had a horrible new knee injury against the San Francisco 40 Niners. Miraculously, he came back and still was pretty good. And then the next year he injured his other knee. And then an ankle. And so for the last two years that he was in the NFL, we only play for football games. Did he suffer from head injuries? Head trauma of the kind we focus on now, But people didn't pay attention to. Then it seems, yeah, his. His widow said that she started to notice the change in gale back in about 2009 or 2010. That he just he wasn't himself, And she believes it's certainly by 2013 that he had really began to suffer the ravages and CT, which eventually took his life. And so he joins a long, long list now of stars in this league who have suffered from this and of course, those who have suffered from it who have taken their own lives like most infamously, maybe, junior say on the linebacker for the Chargers. So it is a it is a is a sad demise. But, you know, you know Steve when his story appeared in that 1971 made for TV movie Brian's song About his teammate Brian Piccolo, who was his white teammate, White roommate the first interracial roommates in the NFL who was dying of terminal cancer. And that brought tears to me as a kid. And so to me. Gale Sayers was the first football player who really humanized football players. You had catharsis for his injury. You saw his tears in this movie and hear it The end he dies from from CT on DH. That's what really strikes me about His his are Kevin Blackistone on Gale Sayers, Mr Blackistone. Always a pleasure. Thank you. Thank you. See, it's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm Noelle King is coming up on 7 50 on Kiki Dee. Let's get a traffic.

Kevin Blackistone Gale Sayers NFL football Steve Inskeep University of Maryland NPR News Chicago Bears San Francisco professor Brian Piccolo Kiki Dee Kansas Chargers Noelle King
"19 sixties" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"19 sixties" Discussed on KQED Radio

"As you know, the age of 87. There's been an outpouring of recognition for her work fighting for justice in many corners of American society. We want to look at a period of her life spent outside the U. S. In the early 19 sixties, Ginsberg travel to Sweden and learn Swedish. By the way to work on a law project with a Swedish scholar. It helped to shape her views on gender equality on the law. Cara Maria Brasilia's is a former Norwegian Supreme Court justice. She's also the daughter of unders. Brasilia's the sweetest scholar Ginsburg worked with in the 19 sixties. Judge Brasilia's I'd like to start with your reaction to the news. Of Ruth Bader Ginsberg is death. What have you been feeling? Well, I've been fingering a lot of sadness. I had a great admiration for her, and she has played a very important part in the My family's life right in the early 19 sixties, Ruth Bader Ginsburg traveled to Sweden to work on a research project with Your father, Anders Brasilia's explain what that project was about. What were they researching at Columbia University they had undertaken to present the rules on civil procedure in several European countries and Ruth and my father were asked to undertake the Swedish part of the project. Do you have any memories of her from that time? My memory is of a person which was very serious who was very eager to do the work. And who was very interested in the way we in Sweden arranged the way that women could work. Interestingly, Ruth Bader Ginsburg spoke some years later and said that Her eyes were opened up in Sweden for the first time. She saw a law school class is where a quarter of the students were women. So coming from the US just how surprising would that have been? Do you think two young Ruth Bader Ginsburg? It was very surprising. I mean, if you look at her background and her her experiences from Harward, Colombia, women were minority and there was a fighting minorities. I was studying law in Sweden at that time, and then There were not very many equality questions involved in studying law. Also, the society was very different degree arranged so that women could marry and continue this that is they all these rules had had to fight for, and also to have Children and then were kindergartens are childcare centers where the kids What taken care Roof put a child into one of those during her stay in learned and she was very, very pleased with the facilities that we offered. What are the things about the climate around gender politics at that time in Sweden, Do you think influenced Ruth Bader Ginsburg thinking? I think that the state to a very large extent engaged itself in facilitating that women are treated equally and many more aspect on the worm, United States. And talks when my mother was a feminist, very early feminist and talks in Stockholm with a Swedish author that was called removed and who wrote about the gender issues at that time. Also gave a lot of food for thought. Diggins Berg have influence on your own career in the law. Karen I studied law in New York in the 1968 69. We discussed the more off the issues of women's rights and the she got me to write an article on the situation in Norway a couple of years later. Of course, her seriousness and her belief in law as possible tool to obtain girls was transmitted to me, too. Yes, she did have an impact. Karen Maria Brazil is a former Norwegian Supreme Court justice who is now at the Scandinavian Institute of Maritime Law at the University of Oslo. Thank you very much for speaking with us. In Greece. Authorities have now relocated nearly 12,000 displaced migrants and refugees on the island of Lesbos. They had to move after the camp was destroyed by fire. The world's Lydia Amanda Lee do is on Lesbos, where she met the last of the people leaving for the new camp. Since the fire that engulfed Maria almost two weeks ago. More than 500 of the displaced migrants have been taking shelter here at the centre run by a nonprofit organization called.

Ruth Bader Ginsberg Sweden Cara Maria Brasilia Anders Brasilia United States Norwegian Supreme Court Lydia Amanda Lee Maria Columbia University Greece Scandinavian Institute of Mari Karen Maria Brazil Stockholm Diggins Berg Harward Norway Karen I Colombia University of Oslo
"19 sixties" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"19 sixties" Discussed on WDRC

"The early 19 sixties. On suspense and yours truly Johnny Dollar. This was a late arrival 1956 to 1957 will have the conclusion plus this month in music history when we come back from this short break here on Hollywood, 3 60 stick around. And now back to Hollywood. 3 60 with Carla Mari. Welcome back to Hollywood..

"19 sixties" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"19 sixties" Discussed on KOMO

"Was bused across Berkeley, California for school in the 19 sixties. She graduated from Howard University and the University of California. She was the first black woman to be elected district attorney in San Francisco and the first woman to serve as California's attorney general. Take. She became a senator in 2016. Known for her prosecutorial style. It's Senate hearings today. She's also the first black woman, the first Asian American woman. On a presidential ticket. A little more than two hours from now. Joe Biden will make his first campaign appearance with Camilla Harris. The former rivals will appear at a high school near Biden's Delaware home to discuss their shared vision for how to defeat Donald Trump and then lead the country through a pandemic and the economic fallout. Harrison Biden are planning to sit down together for an online fundraiser designed to let even small donors get a fresh glimpse of what the Democratic presidential ticket will look like. The president is voicing his displeasure about Joe Biden's pick. As we hear from a B. C's and as delicate Terra President Trump Tuesday on the attack, claiming Harris is one of the most liberal senators and calling out her performance during the Brett Kavanaugh hearings. Can you think of any laws that give government the power to make decisions about the male body? She was nasty to a level that was just The horrible thing the way she was records show before he was president. Trump actually contributed to harass his campaigns in California, the Trump campaign responding this morning, saying the fact that the president donated to Harris, his campaigns in the past shows he's not a racist, and some of his critics have claimed. Other stories this morning in New Jersey school District has committed to remote learning. Despite calls for in person learning on Ly Elizabeth, New Jersey, one of the state's largest school districts, is going 100% remote learning this fall. That's due to 375 teachers refusing to return to the classroom even if some students want to go back almost like the safe option. But I don't like it was like.

Camilla Harris Donald Trump Joe Biden senator California Harrison Biden New Jersey school District Berkeley Senate University of California Brett Kavanaugh Ly Elizabeth New Jersey Howard University San Francisco Delaware
"19 sixties" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"19 sixties" Discussed on WTOP

"Either of the 19 sixties movement for civil right. His older brother, Freddie, the one who advised Jonah's he left home don't get into trouble delivered a heartfelt farewell. I am so on the job with my brother. And you will live forever. In all our horse. I love you, brother. Grace home. And I will see you again one day. Sunday promises a poignant moment of final crossing of the Edmund Pettus Bridge, where Alabama troopers and notoriously busted up the 1965 march to Montgomery. CBS News correspondent Michelle Miller. Later memorials to John Lewis will be held at the Georgia State Capitol and the U. S Capitol in Washington. He was one of the most familiar faces on television for decades. Regis Philbin, who's national fame followed local talk shows in San Diego, Los Angeles in New York. He has died at age 88. What was Regis Philbin? Secret toe hosting a good talk show? If you tell them enough? About your life so that it duplicates what they're doing in their lives all of a sudden, Yes, they do. Get interested. Add to that his trademark banter with his co host way have no idea where we're going. Who we are, where we've been. No wonder audiences loved Regis, Quickest host of everything. I want to come back my next life. I want his job. Careful. Regis Philbin only made the job seem easy. Hardly cards, CBS News and Warm or Obituary of Note Got musician Peter Green, the blues guitarist of the original Fleetwood Mac. Peter Green was 73 with fears of Corona virus complications. They're serious weather tonight in the Gulf region of Texas and the threat of it in Hawaii, the first name hurricane of the Atlantic season. Hannah hit land twice, actually south of Corpus Christi and his dumping rain Texas Governor Greg Abbott heavy flooding in many regions, most of all in the Rio Grande Valley area where People should expect to experience flash flooding and severe high level flooding while far out in the Pacific. 13 hurricane shelters will open soon on the island of Oahu was Hurricane Douglas Bears down on Hawaii as Congress.

Regis Philbin Peter Green Edmund Pettus Bridge Jonah John Lewis CBS Hawaii Hurricane Douglas CBS News Texas Freddie Michelle Miller Corpus Christi Rio Grande Valley Grace Gulf Greg Abbott Fleetwood Washington
"19 sixties" Discussed on AP News

AP News

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"19 sixties" Discussed on AP News

"Battle grounds of the 19 sixties to the halls of Congress, has died at the age of 80. Washington Correspondent Soccer Mahogany has more AH young Louis says his life changed after meeting Martin Luther King Jr and Rosa Parks in spite me. To find a way to get in the way to get in trouble. I got in trouble trouble, he marched in Washington and Selma, Alabama. There were dozens of arrests and brutal beatings. We had dreams. Somehow, I instantly The change in 2018. Lewis said America had made progress toward racial equality but worried about new forces trying to take it back Word trying to take us So, Doc a time he urged the nation to unite. We all live in the same house. American House. I'm soccer Megane and another prominent leader of the civil rights movement. The Reverend C. T. Vivian, has died at the age of 95. Barack Obama honored Vivian with the presidential Medal of Freedom in 2013 at early and key adviser to the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr Obama remembered Vivian as always one of the first in the action. Then. Thomas. AP News Congressman John Lewis, a lion of the civil rights movement, whose bloody beating by Alabama state troopers in 1965 helped galvanize opposition to racial segregation and who went on to a long and celebrated political career, has died. He was 80. Lewis died of pancreatic cancer in a statement, his family says. He was honored and respected as the conscience of the U. S Congress and an icon of American history, But we knew him as a loving father and brother. He was a stalwart champion in the ongoing struggle to demand respect. For the dignity and worth of every human being. He dedicated his entire life to nonviolent activism and was an outspoken advocate in the struggle for equal justice in America. He will be deeply missed. John Lewis dead at the age of 80. I'm Julie Walker Lewis died of pancreatic cancer. In a statement. His family says he was honored and respected as the conscience of the U. S Congress and an icon of American history, But we knew him as a loving father and brother. He was a stalwart champion in the ongoing struggle to demand respect for the dignity and worth of every human being. He dedicated his entire life to nonviolent activism and was an outspoken advocate in the struggle for equal justice in America. He will be deeply missed. John Lewis did at the age of 80. I'm Julie Walker. One London police officer has been suspended and another given restricted duties after video open arrest appeared to show an officer kneeling on a black man's neck. Footage of the rest in north London shows two officers holding down the handcuffed man At the beginning of the two minutes and 22nd clip. One of the officers appears to be applying pressure to the man's neck with his knee. Office's hand is on the head off the man who's on the payment lying on his side. The incident was referred to the independent Office for Police conduct, which obviously is complaints involving the police forces in England and Wales. The police Department said in a statement that the two officers were responding to a report of a fight. Syria. Shockley, London Corona virus Update. I'm Te Maguire over than AP NEWS MINUTE The nation's top infectious disease expert, Dr Anthony Fauci, tells the U. S Chamber of commerce. He is cautiously optimistic that the nation will overcome the Corona virus pandemic as long as people and governments follow the safety guidelines. I believe we can This will end But I want to do it sooner rather than later. The Trump Administration continues to insist teachers and Children be in school classrooms his fall, but a number of states and local districts are barking. Texas has new guidelines in which schools could hold only online instructions for the 1st 8 weeks of the year, pushing the return to campus in some cities, including Houston and Dallas to November. Atlanta Mayor Qi Xi. Lance BOTTOM, says Governor Brian Kemp filed suit against the city's mass coordinates after President Trump's visit Wednesday. She tells CBS this morning Kemp acted after she pointed out Trump violated the order when he didn't wear a mask. I'm Tim Maguire. AP News I'm to McGuire in Iowa Meth dealer is the third federal inmate executed this week Dustin Hunk and died by lethal injection in Indiana. It was a chemistry.

John Lewis America pancreatic cancer Martin Luther King Jr Julie Walker Lewis Martin Luther King Jr Obama Alabama Reverend C. T. Vivian Tim Maguire Congress U. S Congress President Trump Governor Brian Kemp soccer Washington London police Department Rosa Parks Dr Anthony Fauci
"19 sixties" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:10 min | 2 years ago

"19 sixties" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A house that was built by slaves on and I watch My daughters. Beautiful, intelligent black young women playing with their dogs on the White House lawn slaves that worked there were well fed and had decent lodgings provided by the government. Which it is preposterous to believe that you saw on slavery like in the Holocaust. You can only speak about it in unequivocal damnation can't stop talking about slavery. And largely in a context of Hey, You know what? It isn't settled. We haven't fixed it yet, And I think that's a no win situation. I hear people talking about the civil rights movement, and it's starting to sound like a three day carnival. On day one. Rosa Parks didn't give a proceed on a bus on day two. Dr. King led the march on Washington and on day three. We passed. These laws and racism was over, and I wish that were our history. But there was tremendous resistance to civil rights are elected officials said. Segregation forever and they've never repudiated that narrative. We created an educational system that now Is every bit as segregated as it Wass in the 19 sixties, and so we haven't done a very good job of confronting them. And I knew we were in trouble when I saw state tourism agencies taking out ads and civil rights memorial books. Saying things like In 1963 Dr Martin Luther King partnered with the people of Alabama to create a better future, literally the language that is used You think polio is just like a cold, then you're not committed to creating a polio vaccination. Most Americans would say that if they were alive during the 19th century, they would, of course, be trying to end slavery. Would say that if they were alive in the 19 twenties and thirties, they would do whatever they can to stop lynching. Everybody would claim to be on the side of the civil rights marchers and wanting to end Segregation. And I don't think you can claim to have been an abolitionist on anti lynching crusader or a civil rights protester. If you're living in a society where evidence of horrific racial bias characterizes our criminal justice system, and you say nothing, you do nothing. And that legacy is part of what we want people to confront. We want them to wrestle with the fact that the state of Alabama still prohibits black and white kids from going to school together in our state constitution. And we can't get it out because the majority of people keep voting to keep it and we want them to wrestle with the fact that we throw Children away that we don't seem to respond to constraint on voting rights for African Americans. And then we want to pose the question. Are we willing to say never again? Are we sufficiently moved by an understanding of this history that we're now prepared to make that commitment? Because if we make that commitment A lot of things will have to change. We're not going to be able to accept the kind of police shootings of unarmed black people that we've accepted. We're not going to be able to tolerate restrictions on voting rights and communities of color. We're not going to be able to Ignore these disparities and suspension and expulsion rates and schools. We're gonna have to think differently about confronting the legacy of this history. So what happens when a nation does commit itself to the task of confronting its history? Brian returns again and again to the German experience. But what's the impact on Germans who have no personal memory of the Nazis or or even of the Berlin Wall? Peter Weissenberger is 30 years old, an editor for the Society and Media section with TOPS newspaper in Berlin. He seemed to be someone I could ask. Do you think that exposure to these monuments Growing up changed you? I mean, as I grew up in the countryside, I didn't see a lot of monuments. What I saw was television productions movies about what happened, Documentaries. Are also monuments, right? Did it change me? Definitely. I mean it was ever present. For me. Being German is mostly about that. Right wing people tend to say that there's this like originality to what Germans are. That's not true. Most of what defines being German is to deal with a kind of history and not to forget. There are a lot of people who say that until we deal with Slavery and its legacy, which may be our defining feature. Will never progress. Possibly Controversial things about it that once you start, you're never going to be done, so there's no such thing as dealing with it and then finally having dealt with it, And I think that's what makes people so afraid to start dealing with history at all. There's no point in which we can say Okay, we're done now. This is always going to be what happened. There's always gonna have been millions of people that were killed in a fascist races, killing machinery and ah hold society of bystanders. And it's much easier to sort of compartmentalize it and be outraged. As somebody puts a large monument right in the middle of your capital. I mean, right wing people now are addressing it as a wound of shame. That's in the middle of our capital Holocaust, The Holocaust Memorial because they want history, especially history of Germany to be something where there's this thing that happened. But that's in the past. We strayed off our path there. But I believe it's more important to acknowledge that This part of your history makes up the organism off your society and something that is always going to be tearing on you. And this is what a lot of people Feel like I can't be asked of them. I always feel like there's something internally wrong with the way that their society was created. On. What do you think? I mean, what are you going to do? This is our starting point. This is the starting point of the way that our Constitution is written. It wouldn't have been written that way if it wasn't for fascism. The way that our media work the way that our parliamentary system works, and it's the way that now a lot of people are looking at immigration and racism and refugees. Positioning themselves when it comes to those issues. It has to do with the past. And how are you going to compartmentalize that? Are you going to say? This has nothing to do with what we are now. In terms of slavery. Certainly the founding documents were made in such a way so that slavery could continue in order to create A unified A nation or a nation that could live with itself. Course it just put off the problem for 80 years. I mean to be fair, Germany hod, the allies who came there and who decided what the narrative was going to be. Kind of concensus, quote unquote that we have now that Is this the horrible thing that happened and this is the way we have to deal with it that did not emerge organically. There were outside forces. I'm not saying that you can't have that. But I don't think we have the illusion that this is something that can come out ofthe society without any conflict. There's going to be people that are emotionally invested in the narrative that they have now that the civil War was fought over state's rights. Yeah, and that's some ancestor. Died in the civil war for what he thought was right. And you don't want anybody to come and tell you that he died for the wrong idea. That's a pretty harsh thing to wrap your head around. I'm not saying that you can't and you shouldn't There's other parts ofthe decided is saying, but, yeah, we have to do with it. You can just like make excuses because there's like some great great grandfather who died there. This is all right to have that kind of injustice addressed. There's going to be a lot of fighting around this. And so it has been. Do you ever resolve it? Obstinate in an outside power. Probably easiest to do away with the idea of resolution. In the case of the United States, at least To deal with it constantly and to try and make progress and institute mechanisms that make it possible for ah future generations to engage with the issue in a new way. But not to believe that everybody can come to the conclusion that we now have a consensus on what happened and how we have to go from here. Well, thanks, Peter. You're very welcome..

Society and Media Alabama Dr Martin Luther King Germany Peter Weissenberger polio Rosa Parks White House Berlin Wall Wass Washington United States Brian Berlin editor