35 Burst results for "19 Eighties"

"19 eighties" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

KHVH 830AM

05:42 min | 9 months ago

"19 eighties" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

"This sounds like it is from a 19 eighties science fiction movie. Like a futuristic science fiction movie that back in the eighties. Whoever said, Oh, my God, That's horrible. That sounds Really listen to this. I'm going to pop this up here and then I got to work my own board here. I'm going to pop this up. Listen, this is this is a real news report. From a Sydney television station. You know, Australia is way lockdown because they're pretty much on that covid zero path, right? That's what they want. Covid zero everybody lockdown. Stay in place. Don't do anything. Listen. Or or or let me see here. Oh, I see Why. Okay, listen. 123. It's those doing the wrong thing. Driving our record case numbers among the most concerning cases of covid patient whose tonight on the run from a hotspot, police and health authorities have issued an urgent appeal. Anthony Carom knows he's covid positive when he steps into this public lift, already breaking so many rules, he doesn't bother to cover his mouth as he sneezes and splutters. 27 year old is still infectious, but has gone missing from his Wentworth Point apartment warrant now issued for his arrest award this 27 year old chap. Who apparently has expressed the view that he doesn't care less whether he spreads the virus. Is one example of the worst of the worst. There's little sympathy for anyone ignoring the health orders. Even this group of teenagers caught partying after dark at the bottom of the North Bondi Cliffs. Heard it to higher ground by Polly's spotlight and speaker. The eight boys were placed in handcuffs left to explain $1000 Fine, too, Mom. 681 penalty infringement notices issued in the last 24 hours more than 400 of those notices were again for people being outside of their home. Without a reasonable excuse. Sidelined. Sharks player Josh Dugan denies lying to police when he was found a long way from Sydney. The city one year old stopped at 11 30 last night in Lythgoe, where he allegedly told officers he was moving to the area and fading animals before admitting to visiting a friend. He in the passenger turned back to Sydney. Only to be pulled over a second time traveling in the wrong direction. The NRL is investigating and criminal charges could be light. It's getting harder and harder to hide. It's about it keeps going on here with all these different things, but handcuffs for eight kids with $1000 fine. A a guy who Did he was traveling and he visited a friend and he's facing criminal charges may get thrown out of their national Rugby league. This is what's going on in Australia right now. And did that front Did that first line sound familiar? It's people doing the wrong things that are doing this to us. Sounds mighty like a former mayor of ours, doesn't it? Without the accent. Yeah, well, depends on how how. How many beers he has, but still It's um It's frightening. What is going on just an eight hour flight to ourselves. Well, we're on the advent of Ah, making it mandatory. But if you want to live if you want to enjoy if you want to socialize if you want to explore if you want to leave the confines of your individual lies space. That you will require a pass papers, please. Here we go. And as John mentioned the information that that day was coming. That day is virtually here. We'll get your thoughts coming up at 5 to 1 83 83, Are we Aussie bound here at home? Well, I'll tell you for one thing. We are definitely going to be bound at home unless you have your papers. Your reactions after this K h v h traffic. Just starting to get busy for this Monday morning. I'm TC from the Kerber collision Traffic center first off for that drive in from the West side. Already the brake lights on the H one freeway approaching Kenya and the H one h two merge all the way to Malu and you got more in a little freeway pretty much seeing red on our whole flow map from the jalape emerged into the Middle Street merge where we do have that congestion backing up on the buy it up as well. East Wahoo packet in through kinda key to get towards the university. Notice. So good to finally see my bay Bridge Coast spokes bird again spied you saw me every day on video calls this We've got to hit the road and Beach Bay Bridge traffic to the beach. Every bird gets the worm. I'm no early birds Spike. I'm more of a night out Well, staying later is another way to avoid traffic on the bridge. Businesses on the eastern Shore are thrilled to have you back. Go early and stay late. Get a bridge Traffic updates at the Vita on twitter or bay bridge dot com. When you hear that hunger calling your name and you need to get some boom. Gotta find yourself a books weather. Put it up. Whether cookin something good Listen. There's something for my machine ain't no halfway in between. Gotta give me something I ate before.

Josh Dugan Anthony Carom John $1000 Malu Lythgoe Kenya North Bondi Cliffs eighties eight hour 19 eighties twitter Middle Street eight kids Beach Bay Bridge Polly tonight Sydney eight boys more than 400
Sen. Tim Scott Doesn't Want to Come on Mark Levin Show

Mark Levin

01:38 min | 10 months ago

Sen. Tim Scott Doesn't Want to Come on Mark Levin Show

"So it makes me wonder. What exactly does Tim Scott stand for now, if he wants to talk about school choice I told you earlier in the program unrelated to Tim Scott. The organization of which I was president. Now I'm Chairman. We have a great president. They're now Pete Hutchison. We were involved. And paving the way for school choice legally and constitutionally. Starting in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, which is where it started in the 19 eighties. We represented a number of black families. Against the NBA against the other. Organizations that were opposed to school choice Now, Tim Scott says his first school choice. Does he understand that? But for the work of a number of conservative and libertarian legal groups, including landmark legal foundation, it wouldn't even be an option. So in some ways we have things in common. Now I'm not begging to talk to Tim Scott. I'm raising this with you. If a politician doesn't want to come on this program, I could care less. I probably have less politicians on this program. Then any talk radio host probably less guests than any talk radio host. It's not. It's not an ideological thing for me. If I think a guest is going to contribute, I want the guest on. If I don't, then I'm not going to bring people just bring them through like a conga line. But Tim Scott, interestingly enough, Does not want to come on this program.

Tim Scott Pete Hutchison Landmark Legal Foundation Milwaukee Wisconsin NBA
Richard Donner, Director of Superman and Goonies, Dies Aged 91

BBC Newsday

00:53 sec | 11 months ago

Richard Donner, Director of Superman and Goonies, Dies Aged 91

"The American film director Richard Donner, whose box office hits included Superman and the Woman has died. He was 91. The Warner Brothers studio described him as a pioneer of the modern superhero horror and action genres. The BBC's Adam Porter looks back at his life. Richard Donna began his career as an actor before becoming a TV director. After directing the Omen in 1976. He found international acclaim for his work on Superman. With Christopher Reeve, often regarded as the first modern superhero film. His hits in the 19 eighties included the Goonies and the Lethal Weapon series starring Mel Gibson and Danny Glover. Gibson said. Richard Donner had a huge chunk of humility, referring to himself as merely a traffic cop, while Steven Spielberg said Donna was like a favorite coach, smartest professor and

Richard Donner Adam Porter Richard Donna Warner Brothers Christopher Reeve BBC Danny Glover Mel Gibson Gibson Steven Spielberg Donna
"19 eighties" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:32 min | 11 months ago

"19 eighties" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"In the 19 eighties. It's a magical city, but back then it was a town in turmoil. Written overwhelmed by economic and social change, in which the north of England rotted away the coal mines. The steel mills, the cotton industry fella, Paul in Liverpool, unemployment double the national level. There are some parts of the city where 18% of the people are out of work, and it felt like you could stand on the street corner of Liverpool, which had massive unemployment, No real hope a heroin epidemic. Witnessed the city decomposing before your very eyes and a survived by making believe I was an American trapped in an Englishman's body By inhaling everything, American. I could lay my hands on. The love thing soon will be making him in Mormon run Fantasy Island, Miami, Vice music, forks, clothes and occasional pair of knockoff three bands. Which made the United States might a light in the darkness in my imagination. She can't go remain my family spiritual hope So in the NFL started to be broadcast in England in the early eighties and a remote channel it became a cult hit. On Sunday night. New York Jets nil Los Angeles Raiders 31. The Raiders trampled all over Jets quarterback Ken O'Brien, where ran.

Ken O'Brien Los Angeles Raiders Sunday night United States Liverpool Jets England New York Jets 19 eighties early eighties 31 American double north of England Mormon NFL 18% of Miami three bands Raiders
Scientists Were Wrong About Climate Change Then and Are Still Wrong

Mark Levin

02:05 min | 11 months ago

Scientists Were Wrong About Climate Change Then and Are Still Wrong

"Dot com Mr Producer This goes back to April. 22nd 2009 and I dug this up. Birthday predictions of 1970. This may have been on Instapundit actually. The reason you shouldn't believe Earth Day predictions of 2000 and nine And they point out even back then, 12 years ago. For the next 24 hours. The media wall saw this with tales of imminent disaster that always accompany the annual Earth Day Doom and gloom extravaganza. Oh, it's only gotten worse. Ignore them. They'll be wrong. We're confident in saying that because they've always been wrong and always will be need proof. Here's some of the hilarious, spectacularly wrong predictions made on the occasion of Earth Day 1970. That's when it was founded. We have about five more years at the outside to do something, Kenneth what Ecologists. Civilization will end within 15, or 30 years unless immediate action is taken against problems facing mankind. George Wald, Harvard biologist. We're in an environmental crisis, which threatens the survival of this nation and the world as a suitable place of human habitation. Barry Commoner. Remember him? Washington University biologist Man must stop pollution and conservatives resources not merely to enhance existence but to save the race from intolerable deterioration of possible extinction. New York Times editorial the day after the first birthday. Population will inevitably and completely outstripped whatever small increases in food supplies. We make that death rate will increase until at least 1 to 200 million people per year will be starving to death during the next 10 years. Paul Ehrlich, Stanford University biologist. 1975. Some experts feel that food shortages will have escalated the present level of world hunger and starvation in the famines of unbelievable proportions. Other experts more optimistic. The ultimate phone population collision will not occur until the decade of the 19 eighties. Paul Ehrlich,

Mr Producer George Wald Barry Commoner Kenneth Washington University Harvard New York Times Paul Ehrlich Stanford University
"19 eighties" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"19 eighties" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Buffalo. But in the 19 eighties, after he moved back to New York City, he began spiraling downward drugs, drinking and unpredictable behavior. Feminine from 1974 is Eastman in his prime, he stitches a colorful quilt out of just a two note melody that begins in the vibraphone. That theme merrily chugs along throughout the entire piece, a Perfect foundation, which the wild up musicians build out a few solos along the way. Taking liberties with Eastman score like this one for flugelhorn Eastman, I think would love this performance, Its exuberant a bit in your face, sometimes capricious and always surprising near the end. There's a curve ball. Emerging from the roiling ensemble. Eastman weaves in the him to be thou my vision. Julius Eastman was ahead of his time and not just with his startling music long before we use terms like gender Queer Eastman performed feminine and address. There's also a companion piece masculine, but it's lost, perhaps one of the many scores dumped on the streets of Greenwich Village when Eastman was evicted. Eastman said his life's mission was to be black, gay and a musician each to the fullest. In this vibrant rendition of feminine You hear it loud and clear, and there's more to come Wild up plans a series.

New York City 1974 Julius Eastman Greenwich Village Eastman two note 19 eighties one Buffalo each
The Danger Of Inflation

The Dan Bongino Show

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

The Danger Of Inflation

"Folks. We have a really, really dangerous, destructive threat looking at us in the face, and we're doing very, very little to stop it right now. And that is the threat of inflation. I know I get it. I know it's not the sexiest topic in the world inflation people like inflation, Smith elation like Who cares? Well, we should care. And for those of us who are my age or our little bit older, you know me, Jim Mike roll around the same age. We remember the 19 eighties. Early 19 eighties, where inflation was so bad If you want to go get a mortgage on a house. The interest rate was 10 12 14%, and that's if you had really good credit. You had bad credit. It was probably closer to the twenties. If you've got anything at all. The economy was crushed. We had the could Jimmy Carter Malays. Inflation is terrible for a very simple reason. You're working for generally the same amount of money and the same amount of money is buying less

Jim Mike Smith Jimmy Carter
"19 eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"19 eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Of 7 19 eighties and eight are on. Also tonight, too. Don't forget about that. But if you go to Sonny, one of 79 dot com, you get to see my pal J. Ross, trying to read a story to granddaughter Little Nora. Outside. It's called Dragon's left tacos. I literally get through halfway the first page and she goes that I'll see you later. She got something she walks away. I would listen to that. Well, it's a great little story. So just watch it. It takes a couple of minutes. Answer a little question at the end, and you could win a family for a pack of tickets to the Rapids Water Park. Thank you to the Children Service, a council of Palm Beach County, Sonny, one of 79 traffic. Traffic brought to buy off lease. Only dot com shop more than 4000 of the nicest 2017 to 2020 vehicles. All price thousands below retail right now at off lease, only dot com Call 561222 Cars 561222 cars off, please only dot com wrapping up the rush hour. We've gotta crash now south on 95 before Indian Town Road also reported accident North bound 95 at 45th Street. It's not blocking any lanes. Couple of crashes south on 95 1. It won't break Road in Boynton Beach. The other one beyond that South on 95 at Yamato Road in Boca, this traffic report brought to you by massage envy. I'm Karen Curtis for Sonny. One of 79. Everyone loves shopping online. Well, I'm gonna tell you what I tell my golf buddies when they buy clubs Stop searching for coupon codes. Download Capital one shopping to your computer. Capital One shopping instantly searches for available coupon codes and automatically applies them a check out.

J. Ross Karen Curtis Yamato Road tonight 561222 2017 2020 Indian Town Road first page Palm Beach County Capital One Boynton Beach eight 95 more than 4000 95 1 thousands 45th Street Rapids Water Park Capital one
Business Economists More Optimistic About US Growth

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Business Economists More Optimistic About US Growth

"A difference a year could make. While to many of the challenges of the covert 19 pandemic remains, the economic outlook has brightened considerably, and that improvement should help lift the prospects for many Americans and their personal finances between trillions of dollars in federal spending vaccinations gaining traction and Americans essentially emerging from lockdown, US growth this year is expected to be the strongest in decades. It's yes, decades. This comes after one of the most dramatic and devastating economic retrenchments in history going back to March and April of last year, when 22 million jobs were shed. Economists look for growth this year of more than 6%, the most since the 19 eighties. Keep in mind that growth over the long term in the U. S. Has averaged less than 2%. There's not a single quarter this year with the consensus among economists suggests annualized growth of less than 10%. I'm Mark Emmerich.

United States Mark Emmerich
A Gay Teen Struggles to Exist in 'Moffie'

Fresh Air

01:53 min | 1 year ago

A Gay Teen Struggles to Exist in 'Moffie'

"This is fresh air. Our film critic Justin Chang recently caught up with the new movie Mafi, which tells the story of a white South African teenager hiding his sexuality as a young soldier under apartheid in the early 19 eighties. You can stream it now on many major platforms. Here's Justin's review the brutal and mesmerizing new film Muffy takes place in South Africa in 1981 when white teenage boys are conscripted to fight in the country's border wars. Story follows a group of these young men as they endure the rigors of basic training and are sent to fight communist forces from neighboring Angola. The conflict that most concerns The movie, adapted from Andre Carl Vandermeer Vase autobiographical novel is the one raging inside. It's 16 year old protagonist, Nicholas He's coming to grips with his homosexuality in an environment that couldn't be more hostile to it. Nicholas, played by a quietly magnetic newcomer named Kai Luke Brummer feels like an outsider from the start, and not just because of his forbidden desires. He was born in England, as anyone can tell from his accent and gets hazed by some of his more loudest comrades early on. That's nothing compared with the verbal and physical abuse dished out by their commanding officers who make our Lee Ermey in full metal jacket look downright cuddly. Nicholas makes connections, too. Befriends another young man, Michael, who was quick to defend him against bullies. Nicholas Forge is a much more dangerous bond in secret one rainy night when the young men are forced to dig trenches and sleep in them. Seeing Nicholas Shiver miserably in the cold. Another soldier, Dylan gently persuades him to curl up next to him for warmth. What happens next is fairly tame. As movie seductions go, nothing more explicit, it suggested than a few tender caresses and piercing glances. It has a

Justin Chang Mafi Andre Carl Vandermeer Nicholas Muffy Kai Luke Brummer Angola Justin Lee Ermey South Africa Nicholas Forge Nicholas Shiver England Dylan Gently Michael
Shortage Leaves Many Wondering When Tapioca Will Return

All Things Considered

02:24 min | 1 year ago

Shortage Leaves Many Wondering When Tapioca Will Return

"There is a national shortage of Boba. The dark, chewy pearls of tapioca typically found in bubble TV, which Is a milk tea or a fruit tea. Then you have these beautiful toppings, and they range from your typical pearls and red bean to really funky stuff like chia seeds and fruit that is Denise Giraldo Gordon in Brooklyn. As soon as she found out about the shortage, she ran to her closest tea shop to preview Bob Ellis future I got my first Boba tea without pearls. For the first time in my life. I never even considered not getting pearls and had a moment of like, Let me just see what this feels like. Bubble tea originated in Taiwan in the 19 eighties. It first came to the US through Asian American communities. But now tea shops and Boba fans are everywhere. But a lover Yoon is a vice president for the distributor Boba direct, He says The current scarcity is due to logistics issues affecting many industries. Too many shipments from Asia Not enough processing capacity in the U. S. What I hear from fray four orders and The trucking industry is we all need help. We need additional workers in the past month. Every week. We have to worry about Hey, where we're running out of this flavor. This tap Yoko, where one out of These items, even down to the straw that's abdomen, Sharif and owner of the Chai Tea Shop in a Chicago suburb. His store opened on Lee eight months ago. Every week. We have to take a flavor off of our menu because we just don't have it, and we're not gonna have it. For 23 weeks now going without Boba might not be everyone's cup of tea, but you can add in other toppings. There's Coconut jellies. There's popping Boba as Crystal ball was different Talk is deck and some of it For the time being. And for Denise Giraldo Gordon, No. Bobo was ultimately no problem and it was great. I didn't miss it at all. I just needed to prepare mentally. She may have to prepare mentally for awhile. Oliver use best guest is the Boba backlog will clear around midsummer.

Denise Giraldo Gordon Boba Direct Bob Ellis Chia Yoon Chai Tea Shop Brooklyn Taiwan Yoko Sharif Asia United States No. Bobo LEE Chicago Oliver
Older Millennials Are Closing the Wealth Gap With Their Parents

Financial Exchange with Barry Armstrong

01:12 min | 1 year ago

Older Millennials Are Closing the Wealth Gap With Their Parents

"Wealth gap with their parents. Coming for you Boomers were coming. The ones that have an education or a skill are are doing that. Well, let's let's talk about the numbers here, and I talked about numbers. I'm gonna slow it down because numbers on radio kind of kind of suck Somebody just slow things down for a minute here and talk about it so back in 2016. This study looked at the millennial generation was born in the 19 eighties. So the older group of Millennials and found that the gap in wealth between Millennials of that age versus where boomer baby boomer parents were at the same age was 40%, so there's a 40% difference in inflation adjusted wealth. Based on that age group. And I think pretty easy to understand that college education costs have increased that something like four times the rate of inflation you've seen. You're putting off home purchases. Because of that. I just a lot of things got delayed and you know, some costs were higher and then also, that generation entered the workforce in one of one of the worst labor markets in modern history of the great recession. That was all the

Iran Inaugurates New Underground Missile Facility

Nightside with Dan Rea

03:39 min | 1 year ago

Iran Inaugurates New Underground Missile Facility

"News story out of Iran is that the Revolutionary Guard. They've inaugurated a new underground missile facility that was intended designated for missile storage reported by state TV. I mean, so there are transparent to that extent. On by the commander of the Revolutionary Guard who we first met when I say we, the United States first met with the embassy takeover. In November of 1979. He said the cruise and ballistic missiles will empower the forces Navy even more. They had a TV report that showed footage of scores of missiles in an enclosed space resembling an underground corridor. And they claimed that these missiles contractual 2000 kilometers, which is 1200 miles Um, placing much of the Middle East, including Israel within range, and I'm not mistaken. There was a bit of a dust up today. I think that Iranian forces Struck a U. S military base in Syria. And I think there was a little bit of a problem over the weekend with with an oil tanker in the strait of her moves. It just seems that they're just spoiling for a fight. Even even again. You know, a few weeks after we've have have resumed participation in these talks. Am I missing something? When the the Washington has, uh has had talks to try and re enter the J C P away, but it has not yet done so on. It is requesting certain focus and understanding from Iran before doing so we'll have to see Where Iran takes it. But yes, Iran's the military prowess has always been very, very important in the region in the world. The Iranian military power when the molars took over in Tehran that you mentioned 1979 when they did take over is the Iranian army was the world's largest army. Andre the always been a very, very strong military force in the region. They fought a decade long war with their neighbor Iraq at the time in the 19 eighties on into the 19 nineties. On But But yes, one would. One would hope that the world does understand as I mentioned in the beginning when you live closer to to a country like that. I think you understand it better. It's all very well to live tens of thousands of miles away from from Iran. But if you don't have to deal with what they're doing, and they're undermining Off the Middle East on bits all over the Middle East, their connections in Lebanon and in Syria and in Iraq and in the Yemen on their meddling in affairs in governments all over the Middle East. When one begins to understand. I think Iran and what it's focusing in on and it's revolutionary. God are incredibly problematic. And Ruth that group lists, of course, know, Della,

Revolutionary Guard Iran Forces Navy Middle East Iranian Army Syria U. United States Israel Tehran Washington Andre Iraq Lebanon Yemen Ruth Della
The number of twins in the world is the highest it has ever been

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

The number of twins in the world is the highest it has ever been

"Double these days. CBS is Michael George. A new study in the journal Human Reproduction finds more twins or being born in the world than ever before. Since the 19 eighties. More than a million twins have been born each year globally due in part to IVF, artificial insemination and delays in childbearing S and P futures are down.

Michael George CBS
Australian AG Porter denies rape accusation, won't resign

BTV Simulcast

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Australian AG Porter denies rape accusation, won't resign

"Attorney General Christian Porter has identified himself as the Cabinet member accused of raping a teenage girl in the 19 eighties and strongly protested his innocence. It comes after police said yesterday that they won't be pursuing the case due to insufficient invisible evidence. Where over the last few months of a whispering campaign. Had the accusation ever been put to me before they were printed. Would have at least been able to say the only thing that I can say Likely the only thing that I'm ever going to be I able to side It's the truth. That is that nothing in the allegations that have been printed ever happened.

Attorney General Christian Por Cabinet
California's infamous 'I-5 Strangler' Roger Kibbe found dead in prison cell

Terry Meiners and Company

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

California's infamous 'I-5 Strangler' Roger Kibbe found dead in prison cell

"California known as the Eye Five Strangler has died. Officials at a state prison near Sacramento are investigating the death of the 81 year old Roger Kibby as a homicide. He was found in his cell Sunday morning. His cell mate was found standing over his body. Tibby was serving life in prison for kidnapping, rape and several murders in the mid 19 eighties through the early nineties. The Louisville man's

Roger Kibby Tibby Sacramento California Louisville
Merrick Garland Confirmation Hearing For AG

Morning Edition

06:35 min | 1 year ago

Merrick Garland Confirmation Hearing For AG

"But today is all about Merrick Garland. He'll appear before the Senate to take questions from lawmakers for the position of attorney general. Most people know Merrick Garland's name because of something that didn't happen. Garland never got a hearing after President Obama nominated him to serve on the Supreme Court five years ago. Here's NPR justice correspondent Carrie Johnson. Merrick Garland has devoted nearly 45 years to the law. But he didn't start out that way is, he told Professor Martha Minnow at Harvard Law School in 2016. Why don't you go to law school in the first place? Chemistry, well chemistry and math. Garland had planned to become a doctor. He wanted to help people one on one, but his collision with the hard sciences spun him toward the law, where he's looked for that sort of direct connection ever since. In the mid 19 eighties. At his law firm in Washington, Garland became a rising star. He made time for a young college graduate who worked in the copy center to Randy Thompson says Garland reviewed one of his papers, photocopied it and rearrange the paragraphs. That was the beginning of In essence and becoming a riding coach. For me, it was just extraordinary experience and became my coach. Eventually, my mentor and 30 something years later, a friend. Eventually Garland Road, MMA reference for law school and has kept in touch ever since, Thompson says garlands Still a little old school still humble, still looking to help. The only thing that really has changed about him, And I guess me as well is the color of hair. I don't know, well respected judge as attorney general. Help get the department under the quagmire of partisan politics that many people think it devolved to under President Trump and Attorney General Bar That's Georgetown law professor Paul Butler. He says the DOJ has been reeling from political scandals and racing to confront the threat from homegrown extremists. Merrick Garland has faced both before. After clerking on the Supreme Court. Garland took a job as an advisor in President Jimmy Carter's Justice Department. In those years after Watergate, DOJ struggled to separate partisan influence from law enforcement and establish new boundaries for the FBI. Garland also played a bit part in some of the biggest investigations of that era from political corruption to national security that Garland says later turned into hit movies. American Hustle about the Abscam case. Argo about the ex filtration of hostages in Iran and the most important the miracle on ice. Which was about the Lake Placid Olympics, where I did work on the security for the Olympics By the 19 nineties, Garland was prosecuting a violent gang that terrorized people in a public housing project. And helping build a case against DC's mayor Marion Barry. On drug charges Back inside Justice Department headquarters, Garland became the man to see for the hardest problems. The car bomb exploded outside of a large federal building in downtown Oklahoma City, Garland would soon travel to the site of the most deadly domestic terror plot in American history. 168 people died in that bombing in Oklahoma. Former deputy Attorney General Jamie Go Relic remembers watching that day with Garland by her side, he basically said while watching Children being pulled out of the wreckage. That he had to go. He really wanted to go. We both had young Children at the time and What we saw on those screens was so affecting. Garland oversaw the search warrants protected the chain of evidence and insisted that reporters have access to court proceedings. We wanted somebody Who could make sure that the investigation was done by the book. And that any indictment was bulletproof. Prosecutors later convicted Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols for their role in that bombing. Former prosecutor Beth Wilkinson says Garland played an important role in other confrontations with extremists in those years, including a standoff with the heavily armed Montana free Men. One of the examples I can think of is sometimes and there were these stand downs where there would be, you know, arrest warrants for someone, or there would be some kind of controversy between people who were challenging the federal government. America's first instinct wasn't to go in and arrest everyone. It was to try and along with the FBI to see if there's a dispute could be resolved. Wilkinson says. The FBI went on to arrest those men later. She credited garlands, quick thinking and cool head that may have prevented a tragic outcome. Just about the only criticism Garland's nomination has drawn is in the area of civil rights. Garland is a moderate, so I don't see him as the bold and visionary leader or racial justice that some people were hoping for again. Georgetown law professor Paul Butler that he's not an ideologue is both discerning for people who want an attorney general. To meet this moment of national reckoning inspired by the movement for Black lives and the killing of George Floyd Butler says he thinks girls just from the White House long time civil rights advocate Wade Henderson says Garland is up to the task. But Henderson says it's a big one. The next attorney general, for example, has to do everything In his or her power to fight for voting rights. Police reform Criminal justice reform and LGBT Q equality. For the past 23 years, Garland has been a federal appeals court judge in that role, he doesn't have much of a chance to share his personal views. Carolyn Lerner, the chief mediator at the courthouse, says Garland took an early, an important lead to update policies that protect workers from sexual harassment and other misconduct. I think it's very clear that Judge Garland cares a lot about these issues, and he really wants employees to be happy and comfortable in the workplace, and when he was chief judge, he took his responsibility. To these employees very seriously, she says. Garland wants to continue another of his projects at the Justice Department tutoring sessions with a young public school student. This year. The judge is working with an 11 year old boy and his twin sister. Your mom is Andrea Tucker. He makes this so interactive for them and so much fun and they can't get enough of it. It's the kind of public service that Garland has always wanted to

Garland Merrick Garland Justice Department Carrie Johnson Professor Martha Minnow Randy Thompson President Trump Paul Butler Supreme Court FBI Harvard Law School Jamie Go Olympics Georgetown NPR Beth Wilkinson President Obama Marion Barry Senate Jimmy Carter
The Fat Boys’ Prince Markie Dee Dead at 52

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

The Fat Boys’ Prince Markie Dee Dead at 52

"What's key, but beatbox providing the BTO rapper Prince Markie Dee dead at age 50 to his longtime friend of Louis Gregory shared the news on Twitter. He was a member of the iconic 19 eighties hip hop trio fat boys and also had his own I Heart radio show. He co starred in a pair of movies with the Fat Boys before taking up a solo music career. He will be missed. Mornings at

Prince Markie Dee Louis Gregory Twitter
Cuba is working on a homegrown COVID-19 vaccine program

BBC Newshour

04:21 min | 1 year ago

Cuba is working on a homegrown COVID-19 vaccine program

"Cuba. The Communist run Caribbean island is soon to launch the third phase of clinical trials on its own Corona virus vaccine produced by government scientists. Government hopes the vaccine will not only end Cuba's cove in 19 crisis but become an important source of revenue for the cash strapped nation. Austria. Cuba had largely contained the outbreak. But after the country reopened to tourism, the number of daily infections and Corona virus related deaths rose to its highest point. So far from Havana will grant reports Some of the equipment Havana's Finley Institute, maybe a little outdated, but the science itself is cutting edge. This hundreds of vials passed through a sorting machine. They're part of Cuba's greatest hope for a solution to its Corona virus crisis. So but on a DOS Cuba's domestically produced cove in 19 vaccine made entirely in Cuba by Cuban researchers, so banana dos is a conjugal vaccine, meaning and androgynous fused to a carrier molecule to bolster the vaccine, stability and effectiveness. The island has much experience in this field. Having developed the meningitis B vaccine in the late 19 eighties with the same approach. Certainly the Communist run government his confidence so, but Anna dos is. The solution is already in phase two clinical trials and they aimed to vaccinate everyone on the island by the end of the year. In fact, says the director of the Finley Institute doctor, they sent their various Bencomo. There are ambitious plans to export it to the rest of Latin America commercial for what we're trying to have. In the order of $100 million during 2021. And totally will dedicate report of part of these doses to the full immunization of the country. That to happen, it will need the help of other nations. Doctor very says it's too early in the relationship with the Biden administration for the US to play a role just yet. Our make Europe Canada, So we have people participating in our drama from Italy and France. Fortunately, not today with the U. S. We hope that in the next fishery will be possible. We moved to a next step off rotation collaboration. And after, and Vasa pride, Barcelona Open son I don't know what for many Cubans, the vaccine can't come soon enough. The outbreak in Cuba was largely contained by the middle of last year after the government imposed strict measures from a curfew in Havana to daughter door health checks and an aggressive track and trace program. Anyone merely showing symptoms was placed into state run quarantine centers as well as anyone returning from abroad. Almost all flights were halted and tourism, the lifeblood of the island's economy, ground to a halt. However, eventually the economic picture became so bleak the government had to re open. Now visitors must take an obligatory PCR test at the airport and least in theory remain in home Quarantine for a day's Since the re opening, though the transmission figures in Corona virus related deaths in Cuba have crept up to their worst point since the pandemic began, one of the other girl, all those rebel in the government's daily televised updates, the covert 19 statistics have steadily risen to more than 1000 cases a day tiny in comparison to some nations like Mexico, Brazil or the U. S. It's still more than is comfortable for Cuba's overstretched health service has the island simply can't afford to buy millions of doses of an internationally produced vaccine, even from allies like Russia or China? The pressure is on the scientists working on sobered Anna dos. As Cuba's economic slump worsens. There are long queues outside most stores as people search for scarce basic goods. The recent coronavirus spike prompted the government to close down the tourism sector. Once again without millions of free spending visitors in the hotels, bars and restaurants, Cuba is hurting economically more now than at any other time since the end of the Cold War. So Madonna means sovereignty in Spanish and the government hopes the vaccine bearing that name will not only alleviate the island's health crisis, but its economic one,

Cuba Finley Institute Havana Anna Dos Meningitis B Caribbean Island Biden Administration Austria Vasa Latin America Barcelona Italy France Europe Canada Corona United States U. Brazil
"19 eighties" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"19 eighties" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"The town of Hartmann University Book Club Today we're reading from Medea Benjamin's new book, Kingdom of the Unjust Behind the U. S Saudi Connection. This is from the introduction. Where the women led Peace organization code Pink, which I co founded with Jodie Evans after the 9 11 attacks. I spent much of the last decade standing up against the U. S military intervention in the Middle East. Supporting local democracy activists traveled many times to the region, listening to human rights activists marching with them in the streets, dodging tear gas and bullets and getting beaten up, beaten up and deported by government thugs. I've seen firsthand the deadly effects of U. S foreign policies. The 2003 U. S invasion of Iraq destroyed the lives of millions, including many of my dear friends and unleash the sectarian hatred that lead later gave birth to the Islamic state. Recall a conversation with my Iraqi colleague Yanar Mohammed, daughter of Shiite father and a Sunni mother and founder of the Organization of Women's Freedom in Iraq. I asked her what was the most notable legacy of the U. S invasion of her country? Gave the chilling response We Sunnis and Shia learned who hate each other. In another part of the Middle East. U. S military support for Israel has re tabac on the lives of Palestinians and aroused the ire of people throughout the region. Continuous U. S military inventions interventions. Drone warfare and Yemen overthrowing Moammar Khadafy in Libya, the funnel in an endless stream of weapons into the region of unleased new levels of violence. The United States is not the only nation is massive footprint has been trampling on the lives of people in the Middle East. Other nation is Saudi Arabia and oppressive monarchy that denies human rights to its own people and exports extremism around the world. Also happens to be the closest U. S ally in the Arab world. In the 19 eighties and 19 nineties, I met intolerant and violent young man in Pakistan and Afghanistan who are trained to hate Westerners in Saudi schools. In 2001. I saw my own nation convulsed by an attack on September, 11th was perpetrated mostly by Saudis. Hard to connect the dots behind the spread of the solid Saudi intolerant ideology of Wahhabism, the creation of Al Qaeda and the Islamic state and the attacks in New York, Paris, Brussels in San Bernadino. You can also connect the dots between Saudi Arabia and the failure of some of the historic uprisings associated with the Arab spring since the Saudi monarchy did not want calls for democracy. Grip it to threaten its own grip on power. Was in Bahrain after Saudi tanks crushed the inspiring grassroots encampment and Pearl Square pretends of thousands have gathered day after day to demand democracy. I will never forget the excitement of being in Tahrir Square during the Egyptian revolution and watching a gasp. Gassed as a military coup backed by the Saudis, but some 40,000 activists behind bars In Yemen, the Saudis took a direct military role in that nation's internal conflict with the ruthless bombing campaign. Travel overseas people people often ask me why Saudi Arabia, a country that is so repressive internally and overseas. Such a close ally to the United States. Iranian friends want to know why the U. S government is so out, spoken about human rights violations in Iran but silent about the worst abuses in the Saudi kingdom. Amenities on ask why my government supplies weapons to the very nation Saudi Arabia that bombed their schools and hospitals. Saudi women ask why the United States which professors great democratic values props up the regime that treats women as second class citizens. Easy answer is oil, weapons sales and other business interests. Oil has formed the basis for US Saudi ties, The kingdom has become the largest purchaser of American weapons in the world. Hundreds of billions of Saudi petrodollars help shore up the U. S economy. There's another reason perhaps more critical than any of the others. American people have not demanded an end to this dysfunctional, toxic relationship. Why In part because the American people know so little about it. Even Americans who consider themselves parts of a peace movement. Know virtually nothing about the kingdom. Saudi presses muzzled Oren Journalists are strictly monitored and only tourists visiting for religious purposes are allowed into the country. Add to that a Saudi lobby the lines, the pockets of us think think tanks such as the Middle East Institute, Ivy League universities such as Harvard and Yale and influential institutions from the Clinton Foundation to the Carter Center. Checkbook diplomacy helps put a happy face on the abusive monarchy and silences its critics. We have a lot to uncover. Book is meant to be a primary, giving readers of basic understanding of how the kingdom holds onto power internally and tries to influence the outside world. It looks at the founding of the Saudi state. Treatment of dissidents, religious minorities, women and migrant workers spread of Wahhabism kingdoms relationship with the West and its role in the region. What the future might hold. As we delve into the inner workings of this dystopian regime don't mistake criticism of Saudi Arabia for Islamophobia. Book is not a critique of Islam, but critics could critique of three intertwining factors that have shaped the Saudi nation. Extremist interpretation of Sunni Islam known as Wahhabism. Appropriation of the Saudi state by one family and Western support for this dynasty. Criticizing Saudi Arabia should not be equated with support for Saudis. Nemesis Iran. Iranian government is guilty of some of the same abuses is the Saudis. Would.

Saudi Arabia U. S Saudi Connection Middle East United States U. S Wahhabism Yemen Iran Iraq Jodie Evans Medea Benjamin Hartmann University Book Club Yanar Mohammed Iranian government I co Moammar Khadafy Tahrir Square
'Sisters With Transistors': Pioneers Of Electronic Music

All Things Considered

05:27 min | 1 year ago

'Sisters With Transistors': Pioneers Of Electronic Music

"Musical instruments that produce sound by using electronic circuitry bore the names of male inventors, and they were popularized by male artists. It is Allyson McCabe reports. Women were and still are at the forefront with a new documentary. They're finally getting their due in the 19 twenties, the Russian physicist Leon Thurman, debuted and electronic instrument that could be played without any physical contact. Musician stood in front of a box and wave their hands over antennas summoning otherworldly sounds seemingly from thin air. Experiment might have been a passing novelty, if not for the late Clara Rock quarry Ah, virtuoso who, well concert hall audiences and helped refine the instruments design music. It was not suspected, as she recalled in the 1992 interview with public radio station W Q. X are there was no way of breaking the sound. You couldn't make the cut that you couldn't make separation. All I had to do is inspire him that I needed. Frogmore is just one in a long line of women who change the shape and sound of modern music, says filmmaker Lisa Robin er. When most people think of electronic music in most cases, they'll picture men pushing the buttons knobs in the boundaries. So one of the things that really drew me to the story was that this was a story of women being enabled by new technology robbers. New documentary sisters with transistors celebrates their achievements spotlighting pioneers such as Daphne or, UM, who was hired as a studio engineer by the BBC in the 19 forties, while men were off fighting in the war after hours or, um, began recording and manipulating sounds on magnetic tape. Man. Her experiments led to the co founding of the BBC's Radio Franek Workshop, which also provided a platform for Delia Derbyshire. She crafted sounds for hundreds of BBC programs, including the iconic theme music for the TV side by Syria's doctor who which debuted in 1963. Five years later, Wendy Carlos took the first commercially available keyboard base of the Sizer to the general public. She introduced the instrument she helped Robert Mode design on her album switched on Bach, which sold more than a million copies. At the same time, female composers continued working on their own music. Juilliard trained Laurie Spiegel says Elektronik Instruments helped them bypass creative and professional obstacles and give voice to their compositions themselves. It was like looking the way a painter or a writer works. You were working on the actual work itself. You were being a piece of music out of sound that you could then play for somebody else. Instead of just having a piece of paper that you then needed someone else to go and perform. As a researcher at Bell Labs in the 19 seventies, Spiegel made music using experimental computer systems and complex algorithms to generate entirely new sounds. 1977 Spiegel's work was included on the Voyager golden record launched into space to represent all of humankind. That, she says the achievements of women have often gone on recognized early computer programmers very often where women because it was considered clerical. Then when they began to be called computer science, then it was suddenly totally men, and it was for gotten their women involved in your early days of computers. History of women has been a story of silence. Of breaking through the silence. We shall not be rubbed any longer. It's beautiful noise. Sisters with transistors is narrated by Laurie Anderson in 1977. Anderson debuted the tape Bow Violin, which allowed her to create her own performance art. In the 19 eighties, Anderson modified her Elektronik Trump set turning her body into an instrument. We gotta Lynn Drum machine and it was broken. And so I took it apart. And I thought, Well, what if you sold it into a suit? You know on your views to the various drum pads, specially For today's pioneers. Electronic music isn't just music. It's also a tool to break down barriers, says composer Yvette Janine Jackson. My creative journey with electronic music.

Allyson Mccabe Leon Thurman Clara Rock Lisa Robin BBC Delia Derbyshire Robert Mode Laurie Spiegel Elektronik Instruments Wendy Carlos Daphne Sizer Juilliard Syria Bell Labs Spiegel Elektronik Trump Anderson Laurie Anderson Lynn Drum
"19 eighties" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:26 min | 1 year ago

"19 eighties" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh Air 19 eighties San Francisco is having quite a moment. The January 11th issue of The New Yorker had a vivid essay by Rachel Kushner called the hard crowd. About female coming of age in that city in that decade is the title essay of Kushner's forthcoming collection. And now there's Vendela Vida's new novel, We Run The Tides, which Our book critic Maureen Corrigan says is extraordinary. Here's her review. Years, probably too young to make this kind of pronouncement, but the new novel I know I'm going to be re reading in the coming months and spending a lot of time thinking about is Vendela Vida's. We Run the Tides. It's a tough and exquisite sliver of a short novel whose world I want to remain lost in and at the same time and relieved to have outgrown. We run. The tides is set in the mid 19 eighties in the Seacliff neighborhood of San Francisco, which is perched as its name suggests on the very edge of the Pacific with views of the Golden Gate Bridge. In the next decade. That neighborhood will be out of reach for everyone but multi multi millionaires. But in the eighties, some weathered funky old houses remain. The 13 year old girls at the center of this story. A squad of four are like Seacliff perched on the very edge to the edge of sexual activity, for sure, but also the recognition that some things they do or say now are for keeps and will change who they become as adults. Our spectacular narrator and main character is named You'll be her family like Vendela Vida Zone is part Swedish. Ugh. Lapis voice is as distinctive as her name. She's the kind of adolescent who reads Milan Kundera in her down time, And yet she's also a goof. Here's a passage early in the novel Where you love Be soaring, self regard and dough Penis collide. We know the high school boy who lives next door to me. The boy often has a group of his high school friends over to watch football in his living room. From my garden. I can see when they're watching a game. There's a 3 ft gap between the edge of our property and his house. And sometimes I leap through his window and land on the floor of his living room. I am that daring. I am a daring enigma. I fantasize that one of them will invite me to the prom. And then one afternoon, one of the boys grabs the waistband of my guess jeans. I try to get away and I run in place like a cartoon character. The boys will laugh. I'm upset for days. I know that this gesture and their laughter mean that they think of me as a little girl and not as a perspective, prom date. After that their window is kept closed. You'll be speaks to us in present tense, which makes her voice coming to us from the dim reaches of 1984 more poignant because even as we're listening to her, we know that yearning girl doesn't exist anymore. She's grown up. You'll be his best friend and the Queen Bee of the Friend Quartet is named Maria Fabio Ola and in this novel about transformations of place and identity. Maria, Fabulous herself is in the midst of a rare change. She's maturing into a great beauty. Here's Ula be recalling a morning when, as usual, she and Maria Fabulous stop it! The house of another friend for the walk to school. Julia's mom opens the door and smiles at me and then it Maria Fabiola. I have an idea, she says, as Julia comes to the door Let's take a photo of you girls. She retrieves her camera and the three of us line up. Maria Fabiola is in the middle. Julia and I stared each other as the shutter closes. We both know Maria. Fabulous Recent transformation from ordinary toe otherworldly beauty inspires everyone toe want to capture it. You girls look great, Julius. Mom says not looking at me. One other thing about Maria Fabulous as her name suggests. She's a fabulous a teller of elaborate lies. But some of the lies she generates will rupture the friend group ostracized ng, you'll be Shortly afterwards, Maria Fabulous disappears the victim of an apparent kidnapping. There's so many moods and story currents running through this wonder of a novel whose striking title comes from the fact that you will be and Maria Fabiola know how to read the tides so that when the ocean starts to inhale, they can scramble over the rocky prom in Torrey that juts out between China Beach and Baker Beach in Sea Cliff. Anyone who doesn't time that scramble just right risks being sucked out into the Pacific. Female adolescence in this novel feels like being sucked out to sea. It's overwhelming, absurd and dangerous, and even the best adults can't help. You'll be in her friends have to figure out how to swim back to shore all on their own. Maureen Corrigan teaches literature Georgetown University She reviewed We run the tides by Vendela Vida. Tomorrow on fresh air. Our guests will be Pulitzer Prize winning environmental writer Elizabeth Colbert. She'll talk about efforts to reverse some of the harm humans have done to the natural world. I'm saving Carl reefs and endangered species to building machines that pull carbon dioxide out of the air to slow global warming. She's written a new book called Under a White sky. I Hope You'll Join us. Huh? Fresh air's executive producer is Danny Miller, Our technical director and engineer is Audrey Bentham. Our interviews and reviews are produced and edited by Amy Salit, Phyllis Myers, Sam Birger, Lauren Krenzel, Heidi Saman, Theresa Madden and rebuild a nado Theater Challender, Seth Kelly and Kayla Lattimore. Our associate producer of digital media is Molly CV Nest for Roberta Shaw Rock directs the show. I'm Terry Gross..

Maria Fabulous Maria Fabiola San Francisco Vendela Vida Maria Maureen Corrigan Rachel Kushner Julia Pacific Vendela Vida Zone Maria Fabio Ola Milan Kundera Fabulous Terry Gross book critic Golden Gate Bridge The New Yorker Pulitzer Prize
Journalist In Myanmar Recounts Ongoing Military Coup

Morning Edition

04:53 min | 1 year ago

Journalist In Myanmar Recounts Ongoing Military Coup

"No one quite expected them to do it. That's what a journalist says in Myanmar after a military coup. The armed forces have never been fully out of power in that country. But in 2015, they allow democratic elections won by the party of Aung San Souci. She had received a Nobel Prize for her decades long fight for democracy, including years under arrest. The military's partial retreat allowed me and Marta and its global isolation. Then this week, the military retook full power and on sans Souci is detained again. Parts of the Internet are blocked and Myanmar but we reached journalist Amen Thon and Yangon, which is a city of some five million. There's a curfew union go on at 8 P.m.. Every night, People have been going on to the bathroom ease or outside to the front of their homes and banging pots and pans. It's a traditional Berman's ritual to get rid of evil spirits in your house every night. It's been getting louder and longer, and you could just hear the sound echoing through the city. We should remind people that the coup was over and election result in November and had been feared for some time. Was there a great deal of suspense in recent months? Not really. But it wasn't a complete surprise, but no one quite expected them to do it. People assume that that this was, you know, posturing and threats. But you know, leading up to the last couple days before the coup. There were some really alarming pictures of a tank in London, as well as unusual movements by the military near military installations throughout man lost Even then, people didn't really think they would actually do a real coup. What did you hear from people when it became clear that it really was a co was quite a lot of despair. I think, especially for people of my parent's generation, so people the fifties and sixties and older, I think they just didn't expect it. You know, they worshiped essentially insensitivity all their lives, and I think they had a really difficult time really coming to terms that they hadn't won after all in 2015. I'd like you to explain that perspective because some Americans who follow events from Myanmar maybe only know Aung San Souci as a civilian leader who failed to condemn Genocide of Ranga in Myanmar. What was it that she has done over the last decades that made her someone that they would feel so strongly about? Sure, if you're just having a conversation here, and someone talks about a May your mother They're often talking about her. I grew up in the US, but our house is covered with pictures apparently had annual calendars that have her picture in it. Ah, lot of people breathing really admire her. They see her. Someone who wants she was young woman came back to me in life, despite the fact that she was living a perfectly lovely life in the U. K to take care of her ailing mother. And then stepped up when she could have left in order to fight for the Burmese people. And then decided instead of being with her family to stay in your more and you know people respect that. You're referring to the period after she won an earlier election in the 19 eighties, and it was not accepted by the military, which kept her In prison or in house arrest for many years. Yeah, for 15 years. She basically was in a position where the military said If you want to leave, you can leave. But if you want to be here, you won't be free. Other than climbing the pots and pans at eight o'clock each evening. What are people doing about the coup? There's been a lot of online organizing. There's a couple hashtags feeling around hash tag, civil disobedience movement as well as hashtag justice from you more But part of the civil disobedience movement is doctors and teachers, the majority of whom here work for government institutions essentially going on the strike doctors, especially since Cove, it Still providing medical care, but they just simply choosing not to do it. Government institutions. If I may, there could be some severe consequences for that. Yes, definitely. I don't think we're talking enough about this yet, but It's quite likely that we're going to see a spike in cold cases. What do you expect Ng over the next few days? I'm expecting just more of a reaction to the growing protest movement. There's been what seems to be Very clearly this information campaigns that are intended to kind of paralyzed people through fear and the lack of knowledge, But we're also starting to see more and more people going out into Streets to protest. Amen. Thon is a journalist who is in Yangon. Thank you. Okay.

Myanmar Party Of Aung San Souci Amen Thon Souci Aung San Souci Yangon Marta Nobel Prize Berman London U. United States NG Thon
Hall of Fame Temple coach Chaney dies at 89

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:15 sec | 1 year ago

Hall of Fame Temple coach Chaney dies at 89

"Basketball Hall of Fame coach John Chaney passes away at the age of 89. He built temple into a perennial Atlantic 10. Our and N C. A. A tournament contender along with the late John Thompson. Chaney was part of the first wave of African American coaches in men's Division One hoops in the 19 eighties.

John Chaney Basketball Atlantic John Thompson Chaney
"19 eighties" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"19 eighties" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"His full out in the 19 eighties full page ad in the 19 eighties, calling for a group of black and brown teenagers to be put to death for the For a gang rape they didn't commit, Trump managed to work his way into popular mainstream mainstream popular culture. Early on. He was a tabloid friendly rogue and celebrity hanger on and later the king of the B list stars who jockeyed for his approval on celebrity apprentice that he not signed on to the racist Birther conspiracy, claiming that America's first black president Barack Obama was not born in the United States. And plunged headfirst into the morass of anti immigrant xenophobia that helped him win the presidency. The old Donald Trump might have carried on May have remained a cultural dad fly that peculiar brand of celebrity whose views on everything from geopolitics to the Oscars are sat out, sought out for no particular reason. Other than that he is famous. And quotable. But Donald Trump did become president. And so here we are. As a candidate. Trump offered Republicans the taste of the celebrity status that Ronald Reagan and given them something normally reserved for Democrats. That's what attracted Sam Nunberg 38 year old political advisor who toiled on Trump's warm up attempts at a president at presidential runs and on the real presidential deal until he lost a war with Trump campaign manager Corey Corey Lewandowski and was fired in the summer of 2015. Nunberg says Lewandowski saw to it that old racist posts on his Facebook page surfaced. He later apologized for those posts, and the numbered readily says that Trump screwed him. Claims he'd vote for him again in 2020, because Trump has delivered on Republican policies and judicial nominations. I knew our campaign wasn't doing well when I went into a restaurant after he announced, Nunberg said. It was doing well. Excuse me. The TV was on CNN and he was on and people were watching. These were people who normally wouldn't give Ah s word, but they were watching him. Trump wasn't just another politician doing a TV hit. He was an American mogul and entertainer. Nunberg said he wasn't rich from making microchips or selling stocks. It was from building construction..

Donald Trump Sam Nunberg Corey Corey Lewandowski president Barack Obama rape United States Ronald Reagan Facebook CNN America political advisor
"19 eighties" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"19 eighties" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From the 19 eighties on is the tax burden of the top 1%. Has decreased in terms of what they actually made on DH, and the bottom has gotten much worse. And so over time. What we're seeing is that There's an inequality in terms of taxes. We can't forget the huge corporate tax cut that happened two years ago, right? I mean, that's some some of faded into the background. And so what it means is the amount of income the government has, at a moment in which the government needs to spend. A lot of money has just shrunk and Trump's Tax returns or just the evidence that you know, we need to really rethink the way in which tax structures have happened. I mean, taxes are not like some burden that we have to do. It is what pays for our society. We've been spending a fair amount on the stimulus. It's not been necessarily replacing what people had before. But do you foresee a time line? Where we just say, Well, we have to tighten the belt. And then if so, what happens? It really depends on what is goingto happen when we actually have control over this pandemic. And what is the long term economic impact of this pandemic and one of things that that I have been looking at in the last few days? Is, you know the recovery at the very top of the income bracket post pandemic or during this pandemic, the recovery has gotten better for that. The top 1% The group that is really going to get affected is the bottom right? I mean, the unemployment rates in terms of of of who's losing their jobs and who's applying for unemployment are at the bottom of the income bracket. And for I'm not sure what it's like, Where you live. I live in Harlem. The level of poverty and homelessness is just visually on the streets. You know, I've lived here 20 years. I've never seen something like this. If there's ever been a moment in history in recent history, at least my lifetime where we have to ask this question, which is what's the economy for? We've kind of decided that the economy was floor the market and you know, the stock market is the economy, which had slot and the work I've been doing for the last few years is saying, OK, what if we say the fulfillment of rights is the purpose of the comment? You know Well being is the purpose of the economy. How do we shift the way we think about the economy of The right to help the right to education. The rightto work was the purpose of the economy, and what we always do is kind of scramble floor. Can we get the little piece of something so that the poor don't go hungry rather than saying, Let's just shift the way this system works because obviously the system is not working. Professor.

Trump Harlem Professor
"19 eighties" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"19 eighties" Discussed on KCRW

"So that's dozens of Trump supporters dressed in Trump gear waving flags chanting They weren't directly blocking access to the polling place. And I guess you could argue they were exercising their First Amendment rights, but Is that considered voter intimidation? Well, first, I should say that most states have laws that prevent election earing arguing for or against candidates at polling places. The reason this activity didn't fall under that category is that this was a long line for early voting. It was far from the polling place, and lots of state laws that define electioneering don't include lines that go around the block there, just including the Building site where the voting is taking place. Whether this crosses lining to intimidation. I think that you know that becomes a question for prosecutors. I don't think the chanting four more years is necessarily intimidating. You could imagine if they're standing out there. With guns or pitchforks that that could be intimidating. The line between these things can sometimes be murky. But there also, I think easier cases on especially I think, and this goes back to that consent agree. Sending armed people near polling places I think is very intimidating, especially if you're talking about as the Republican Party did in the early 19 eighties, sending armed off duty law enforcement officers. To polling places in minority voting areas that I think easily is on the line of intimidation. Well, can you go back in time and explain why this consent decree was put into place in the first place? So back in the early 19 eighties, the Democratic National Committee sued the Republican National Committee and said that they were engaged in acts of voter intimidation and violation of the voting Rights Act in violation of the Constitution. And one of the things that they did was send those off duty armed Law enforcement officers in minority voting areas. In response to all of this, what we saw was rather than litigate over whether the party actually violated the law. They agreed to settle the case. Usually you wouldn't settle a case like this. If you didn't think that the other side had a pretty strong case when they settled it. They settled it in what's called the consent decree, which means that it's not just a private settlement agreement between the parties, but it's backed by the court power of contempt, and over the next three decades. Each time the concentric ray was going to expire, Democrats went back into court, they said. Look at what they're doing in Louisiana now trying to kick minority voters off voting rolls without any good reason. Look at these acts of intimidation, and it kept getting extended. It finally was set to expire in 2016. Democrats came in and said, Look what Trump saying now about going to the polling place and watching, and ultimately, the court decided we're going. Tio let the consent decree expire because even though Trump might have engaged in acts of voter suppression, he wasn't doing it with the cooperation of the Republican National Committee, and they were the ones who are bound by this court order. So now we're in this parade where the RNC is under Trump's control. It's no longer under the consent decree, and everyone's watching to see if they're actually going to organize some effort to intimidate minority voters. If so, I expect Democrats in voting rights groups to run back to court and try and get a new court order put in place. But what would that organization look like? I mean, you can have President Trump say from the debate stage. Oh, I encourage my voters to go to pulling places or my supporters to Goto polling places. That's not necessarily telling them to go intimidate voters. So how would a court determine What? In fact he was intending right? So I think the question is, Is there a realistic threat that there's going to be? Intimidation of the Poles is their organization, You know. So, for example, if you can find evidence that there's organizations That are planning things that would be relevant to a court order that says You can't do these things. We saw something like this back in 2016 in Nevada, when Roger Stone had a group called Stop the Steel That was suggesting that they were going to engage in this kind of voter intimidation. These kinds of activities and what ended up happening is in the course of the litigation. You had promises made to the judge. We're not going to do this. Don't worry. And then the judge didn't issue in order. But that was almost as good as getting in order. So I think Getting the RNC in the Trump campaign on record, saying We're not going to intimidate voters saying that's what federal judge in sworn testimony. I think that would help a lot and I would expect we're going to see something like that in the coming weeks. So what do you think? In the meantime, Democrats should be looking for Polling places. I think it's not just Democrats. I think it's election officials I've heard from election officials around the country that they're worried about peace at polling places, and so there needs to be a plan in place in the event that there is an attempt to intimidate voters. That everyone understands what the rules are, and that there are procedures in place to make sure that access to polling places is guaranteed. Look, I think a lot of this is bluster. Ah, lot of this is an attempt to try to fundraise. You collect names, and then you start hitting people up for money. I don't expect that The Trump campaign is actually going to engage in this kind of organized intimidation. I think it'll be more of this freelancing activity, But it's something that still has to be prepared for. And you know, maybe one of the main reasons that is happening Besides, fundraising is as an attempt To try to depress turnout. Like why should I show up and vote? If I might face a hassle? Why should I try and vote if I might face violence, So I think you know, even the threat of this Khun B suppressive and Khun B demobilizing. That's why you heard what Biden's response was on the debate was, you know he didn't really engage on the peaceful transition of power issue quickly said he'll go He said. You need to vote. You need to vote vote vote, And I think that's the message of mobilization of empowerment that Democrats are trying to push in the last month or so before the election. Kason teaches law at UC Irvine. His latest book is called Election.

Trump Republican National Committee Republican Party Khun B Democratic National Committee Louisiana Biden Kason President Roger Stone UC Irvine
"19 eighties" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

07:04 min | 1 year ago

"19 eighties" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"A heat dome that impacted the entire West Coast. We are dealing with the reality of some 14,000 lightning strikes over 72 hour period. Trust me. That did not occur last year that had previously occurred in the late 19 eighties, and the Sacramento Bee reports that this round of wildfires could further exacerbate the state's fire insurance crisis. In which many homeowners have seen their premiums rise to as much as $1000 a month or more. Coming up in half an hour to experts put on their prognostication hats to give us a preview of 2021 Steven back to you. Thanks, Bill. And now we begin our and depth coverage of the fall market. A real estate market like no other ever. As home sales skyrocket, prices skyrocket and millions of Americans are accelerating their plans to buy for two main reasons. One to find a better place to live during the pandemic, and after And two to get in on today's record low mortgage interest rates. Talk about a wild market. Let's discuss the fall market now and what it means to you with gel. Slesin Jer, the Emmy nominated business analyst for CBS News. Jill, of course, is a regular on the CBS Evening News, CBS this morning and more. She's also the host of the daily Podcast and website. Jill on money, Jill. Welcome back to realestate today. Thanks for having a go so nice to chat with you. I feel like it's been forever has been so long, and I hope you're doing well. I am. I am Thanks so much. You're very welcome. So Jill this year with the pandemic, the big spring realestate mark. It never really happened. And as we all know, the economy has been hit hard by record unemployment and massive Bankruptcies on the retail level. And yet realestate is doing great. So why is that in the very beginning of the pandemic. It was really scary. And I think that it was impossible for Realtors to figure out how to manage this process. But that's changed pretty quickly. And as we settled in, what really did occur is an acceleration of all of the trends that we're already in place. And so what were those trends? One? They were just not a lot of houses for sale, so that inventory was really low and that created ah, lot of buying opportunity to interest rates were low and mortgage rates were low. But after the pandemic, we dropped two all time, low levels for mortgage rates. And you know if you look at some of the numbers just released. Black Knight is mortgage data firm. They say that lenders issued $1.1 trillion in home loans between April and June. The biggest quarter in the company's records. Obviously, this is very much connected to the fact that interest rates for mortgages stubble of 3% for the first time this summer. Okay, So look Glyndon Torrey Low mortgage rates, But then we have this extra added twist. And that is the pandemic has actually meant That many people can look beyond wherever they thought they were going to live forever and say Wait, I might be able to move somewhere else and work remotely, and this has opened up a ton of opportunity in other markets that had been cheaper, frankly and it has really driven a lot of the activity outside of the major cities, which were so unaffordable into some of the suburbs and excerpts, so it's a trend that is actually occurring as we speak. We just don't know whether it's going to be Long lasting or not. That's a really good point show because after all right now, Some economists are describing this as a new economy in which millions of people are relocating to places they believe are safer or upsizing for a bigger house because they're working from home and they might need to home offices. Or moving up their plans, as you say, accelerating their plans to buy so they can get those low mortgage interest rates. I guess the big question is, is this new economy Ah, one off or will it continue beyond the end of the pandemic, right? We don't know. I mean, there's always been this idea that when these very seismic events occur That we try to interpret whatever the near term trend is, and we extrapolated out right? And that's why one of the reasons that the stock market happens to be doing so well is that even though the economy overall is still struggling, and we've got tons of small businesses going out and got retailers under pressure, But the stock market is really a bet on who survives and what the longer term trend will be right. And I think that's sort of the similar aspect of the real estate market. I remember after 9 11 people were just fleeing places like Washington, D C and New York City and saying like I wouldn't want to be in the city. But then time passes and everyone came back so we don't know what's gonna happen. We do know that certainly that commercial real estate is under tremendous pressure in a lot of these cities. And we don't know whether or not those big empty buildings will get filled up again. And if they don't get filled up with business is what will be the replacement. They're not going to sit empty. They just are not. I wanted to ask you a question about exactly that. A lot of people left the big cities and relocated to homes far, far away. And right now they're working from home and that's great. But once the pandemic is over and done with what if those employers say Okay, now come on back to the office are millions of Americans going to be kind of stranded? Out in the countryside. I don't know. It's a very interesting idea, because have we now discovered that many more people can work from home. I know one organization that's starting to look at its physical footprint and saying Well, we don't need as many physical locations. We can tell people that they can come in one or two days a week, and we will really make work from home more robust. No one's gonna have a dedicated office. They called hoteling. You just come in. You pick a desk in that state. You don't get to put your pictures up every day. Whatever. And those are the kinds of places where you wonder. Like, Well, okay. If I only have to go in one or two days a week, could I actually live with a longer commute? Could I stay out in the burbs for awhile? Could I go even farther away? You know, these are big decisions, guys. So you're going to run the numbers and you're gonna make sure you do. It's right for you and your family. Jill, we still have a lot more to talk about. Can you join us again in the next hour of real estate today? Happy to do that? Thank you. Jo.

Jill Glyndon Torrey Low Sacramento CBS Evening News West Coast Steven CBS CBS News Emmy Slesin Jer business analyst Black Knight New York City Jo
"19 eighties" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"19 eighties" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Stewart did it in the 19 eighties. We're saluting the eighties eighties Labor Day weekend on New Jersey 101.5 and from the very early eighties Diana Ross. New meat coming out bravely positive. I think this time around. Do it, You make it And all my abilities. There's so much of me somehow make them I understand I got there is no need to be.

"19 eighties" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"19 eighties" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Open on Wall Street. Tesla has gained more than 70% since Ed announced its plan to split that stock back on August 11th. Tesla's shares closed that 498 bucks today. The Sunday night lane. Closures on federal Boulevard in Denver are working so Denver police say they will continue them until further notice. One line of federal it's closed Sunday nights from sixth after Evans to allow access for emergency vehicles. And of course, we're hearing more about legendary Georgetown coach John Thompson Jr He died today. Thompson was the first black head coach to win and double a championship more from ESPN stabilised. He was just a tremendous, tremendous coach on and off the floor and never got enough credit in the 19 eighties, he almost went to the final four in 1980. And in fact, lost Iowa 81 80. I think the score was in the elite eight, and Lute Olson went to his first Final four. And we lost little son a few days ago. So a very, very difficult week for college basketball. John Thompson Jr was 78 aren't accepted. Five I'm Cathy Walker on K Away News radio 8:50 A.m. and 94 check on traffic with John Morrison. Yes, Monday Drive downtown. Pretty heavy between high 70 Santa Fe in both directions to Texas Drive. Start load up now on. I 25 really heavy on that ramp to to to five Parker Road and Arapaho both pretty busy. You're seeing me for 70 Drive. Look good upon the high up on the north side Looks like Highway seven at I 25 eastbound. You've got an accident that's causing some backups. Fox.

John Thompson Jr Tesla Texas Drive Thompson Denver Lute Olson John Morrison Ed Cathy Walker basketball Evans Iowa Fox ESPN
"19 eighties" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"19 eighties" Discussed on KGO 810

"The 19 eighties, I never earned less than 11 and 3/4 percent, many times 15.5% tax free. Then, in the 19 nineties, people got all excited about the market. And then what happened 1 2009 11 the worst decade since the Great Depression, where most people lost 40% of the value of their diaries of for one case twice in that decade. People using the laser fund didn't lose a dime in 2001 to 2003. In fact, by 2007 when most people finally we're back to the break even point the 1,000,000 Let's say they had in the year 2000 was finally back to a 1,000,000 again seven years later. Our clients. Many of them had doubled their money in that seven year period. But then in 2008 many people felt like they lost their future a second time because they saw those retirement nest eggs in the market dropped 40% again a 1,000,000 down to 600,000 and it took until 2012 to make back what they lost. We call it the lost decade. It was actually 12 years before people who have their money in the market basically got back to where they were 12 years earlier in that period, many people using the strategies that we teach on our educational webinars had tripled their money, a million's worth three million Now those are achieved by average returns of 6789 10%. There are some years like 19 4008. I didn't make anything but I didn't lose anything. And the 1st 90 days of 2009. Most people following our strategies locked in games that year of 16% tax free after not losing a penny, and so you know, it's interesting in the financial services industry. A lot of whole life insurance companies. They have sort of promoted. Hey, we We've got illustrate things at a rate of return that is frankly down around where they're crediting their whole life policies. And so these are now going to be called the A G 49 illustrated rates and they're going to affect this fall. A G stands for the actuarial guidelines, and so they could only illustrate maybe 55.6% maybe up to 6.5%. They can't show you actual historical performance where in the lost decade I averaged 10.7 net. I actually earned 11.17% average. But the fact of the matter is that there are periods of time like 2017. Many of our clients who followed the strategies that we teach in our books and webinars locked in gains of 16% and 25%. I would love for you to learn about what you could do better with your retirement funds. And so we are teaching a free 90 minute educational webinar this coming Wednesday. We're going to follow it up after 90 minutes or so with 20 or 30 minutes of live Q and a hundred's a register and attend. I don't want you left out. We will start.

"19 eighties" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:49 min | 1 year ago

"19 eighties" Discussed on WTOP

"Get a ton of rain. I'm storm Team four meteorologist Chuck Bell for W. T O P right now 79 degrees in Friendship Heights. It's 9 11 We have another opportunity to weigh in on the controversial plan to widen I to 70 and the Beltway and the toll lanes that could be part of that package in several upcoming meetings, the state and the Federal Highway Administration. We'll hear from you virtually about the plans. Normally, this is done in a public auditorium with display boards and Q and a sessions but due to Cove in 19 you'll need to chime in online. You can do that by submitting your comments are signing up to speak it online hearings. They will happen on August, the 18th 20th 25th and September, the third. O w t o p dot com and search toll lanes to find out more Burrows project would involve a public private partnership that will build and manage the lanes and into reports being reviewed. There are several variations of the project being considered Mike Murillo w T o P News Three people are missing after falling off a boat in the Potomac River near southwest DC The three did not resurface after falling into the water yesterday afternoon. DC Fire and E. M S is now treating the incident as a recovery operation Police have identified the three missing man is 26 year old Mustafa Heidar, 23 year old Omid Rabbani. 28 year old Ahmad Nuri. And in Virginia, the Louisa County share were. Louisa County Sheriff's Office is investigating the apparent drowning death off Patrick Burns from Vienna on Saturday evening. Burns is said to have been a strong swimmer. He and friends were swimming in water off old Mill road. He was last seen swimming out to a floating chair about 20 feet from the end of a dock. His body was eventually found by the Spotsylvania County Dive team and was taken to the medical examiner's office. This was the second drowning there in less than a month. Across the country from Maine to California. The Corona virus is encouraging more people to find solace on the open water at Maine's biggest boat dealer. Customer enquiries are up 400% at the California yacht Company Sales have increased 50%. Owner Steve current credits Covert 19 for customer interest. They're trying to adjust to this new lifestyle, isolation and an ability to travel. Just searching for May be doing something different and stock is dwindling. We have 55 votes in March. Another 25. Now we're making a big push to try to get more. Stephan Kaufman, CBS News A sports book opens later this morning inside the capital, one arena box office. The opening of the temporary location comes amid the return of professional sports following the pandemic induced hiatus. A temporary sports book will operate until a permanent sports book opens inside the arena in the fall. Business Hours are 11 a.m. to 11 PM seven days a week. If you remember how Georgetown was. In the 19 eighties.

Patrick Burns Federal Highway Administration Maine Louisa County Spotsylvania County Dive team California storm Team Chuck Bell Potomac River Friendship Heights Mike Murillo Mustafa Heidar Georgetown Burrows Cove Sheriff's Office Stephan Kaufman Virginia Steve current
"19 eighties" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"19 eighties" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Really been in the mid 19 eighties. That's a pretty big fall, and how can we were cover when there's a crisis of care? There is a rock that's at the core of women's employment right now, and that's childcare and elder care and how women are going to maintain their place in the labor force. Then, in a world of fake news, we've found an unlikely hero Wikipedia. It's gone from Wikipedia, the sketchy amateur encyclopaedia too. Wikipedia. Please save us from the misinformation in our ecosystem. That's all coming up next on innovation hub. Live from NPR news on Giles Snyder, a pro Trump Super PAC says it has given back a donation it received from a white nationalist who's racist Web posts were linked to the mass shooting at a Charleston, South Carolina church in 2015. NPR's Tamara Keith reports, a group returned the money after NPR asked about it. In June, Earl hold donated $1000 to the committee to defend the president. Holt leads a white nationalist group called the Council of Conservative Citizens in 2015 Republican candidates race to return his donations after Dylan roof killed nine black parishioners at a church in Charleston cited Holt's writings when alerted to the donation by NPR. Dan Backer. An attorney for the committee to defend the president responded rapidly. Saying in a statement quote with hundreds of thousands of contributors. We were not aware of who this one Wass, my client has already re funded his contribution. The Superpac has been running ads accusing former Vice President Joe Biden of being racist. Tamara Keith NPR news federal law enforcement officers again used tear gas to disperse protesters outside the federal courthouse in Portland, Oregon. Last night. Thousands turned down for this latest demonstration after a federal judge. Denied Oregon's request to restrict the activities of federal officers. Nearly a week after a violent standoff between police and protesters in Chicago's Grant Park Mayor Lori Lightfoot has taken down the Christopher Columbus statue at the center of the Clash. Life. What says the removal is temporary is Carrie Shepherd reports from member station W be easy. Friday morning at the downtown Park City Workers put.

NPR Tamara Keith NPR president Charleston Oregon Tamara Keith Wikipedia Holt Vice President Mayor Lori Lightfoot Council of Conservative Citize Grant Park Dan Backer Joe Biden Carrie Shepherd Giles Snyder Wass Park City
"19 eighties" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"19 eighties" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"The 19 eighties full page ad in the 19 eighties, calling for a group of black and brown teenagers should be put to death for the For a gang rape they didn't commit, Trump managed to work his way into popular mainstream mainstream popular culture. Early on. He was a tabloid friendly rogue and celebrity hanger on and later the king of the B list stars who jockeyed for his approval on Celebrity apprentice, and he not signed on to the racist Birther conspiracy, claiming that America's first black president Barack Obama was not born in the United States. And plunged headfirst into the morass of anti immigrant xenophobia that helped him win the presidency. Il Donald Trump might have carried on May have remained a cultural dad fly that peculiar brand of celebrity whose views on everything from geopolitics to the Oscars are sat out, sought out for no particular reason. Other than that he is famous. And quotable. But Donald Trump did become president. And so here we are. As a candidate. Trump offered Republicans the taste of the celebrity status that Ronald Reagan and given them something normally reserved for Democrats. That's what attracted Sam Nunberg, 38 year old political advisor who toiled on Trump's warm up attempts at a president at presidential runs and on the real presidential deal until he lost a war with Trump campaign manager Corey Corey Lewandowski and was fired in the summer of 2015. Nunberg says Lewandowski saw to it that old racist posts on his Facebook page surfaced later apologized for those posts, and the numbered readily says that Trump screwed him. Eclipsing vote for him again in 2020 because Trump has delivered on Republican policies and judicial nominations. I knew our campaign wasn't doing well when I went into a restaurant after he announced, Nunberg said. Or was doing well. Excuse me. The TV was on CNN and he was on and people were watching. These were people who normally wouldn't give Ah s word, but they were watching him. Trump wasn't just another politician doing a TV hit. He was an American mogul and entertainer. Nunberg said he wasn't rich from making microchips or selling stocks. It was from building construction. It was this image of success of him being rich, and he can make you rich. We were the W W E fox news version of the Obama campaign in the beginning, and I mean that is a compliment. It was aspirational. It was we can fight the system. Nunberg was raised on the Upper East Side of Manhattan been nurtured on conservative talk radio, strident support for Israel and suspicion of The Middle East. After volunteering for Mitt Romney's 2008 campaign. He worked for right wing lawyer J. Secolo during the 2010 fight to prevent the construction of a mosque near Ground zero, a site of 9 11 Mrs. Trump wrote a B s letter at the time offering to buy the land where the mosque was to be built. But the offer was just a PR stunt numbers. Parents were lawyers, and so he became one too. Is father had worked for a law firm that Trump and his father had used her real estate deals. Nunberg didn't meet Trump in person until he was introduced to him in 2010 by yet another Gotham City character, Roger Stone, the villain with Richard Nixon tattoo on his back. I wanted to win a national election and thought Trump could win, Nunberg says of his eagerness to sign on. I thought it was cool that Obama went in the late night shows. I thought the John McCain ad showing Obama, speaking of millions of people is showing Paris Hilton slamming him as a Hollywood celebrity was the dumbest effing thing I'd ever seen. Hey, all but screamed at the time. You just want him millions of votes. Nunberg thought his party was living in the 19 fifties, and the Trump was his own version of the Madman era. Nunberg. He was a madman. For the 21st century. He and Trump shared a sensibility. He likened store retired New York City firefighter or cop who main lines, Fox News, Plus Rush Limbaugh and Michael Irvin on talk radio and thinks to himself. This country's going.

Donald Trump Sam Nunberg Barack Obama president Corey Corey Lewandowski rape Mitt Romney Ronald Reagan United States CNN America Middle East Facebook Fox News Michael Irvin New York City W W E Manhattan Richard Nixon
"19 eighties" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"19 eighties" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"19 eighties full page ad in the 19 eighties, calling for a group of black and brown teenagers to be put to death for the For a gang rape they didn't commit, Trump managed to work his way into popular mainstream mainstream popular culture. Early on. He was a tabloid friendly rogue and celebrity hanger on and later the king of the B list stars who jockeyed for his approval on celebrity apprentice that he not signed on to the racist Birther conspiracy, claiming that America's first black president Barack Obama, Is not born in the United States and plunged headfirst into the morass of anti immigrant xenophobia that helped him win the presidency. The old Donald Trump might have carried on May have remained a cultural gadflies. That peculiar brand of celebrity whose views on everything from geopolitics to the Oscars are sat out, sought out for no particular reason. Other than that he is famous. And quotable. But Donald Trump did become president. And so here we are. As a candidate. Trump offered Republicans the taste of the celebrity status that Ronald Reagan and given them something normally reserved for Democrats. That's what attracted Sam Nunberg, 38 year old political advisor who toiled on Trump's warm up attempts at a president at presidential runs and on the real presidential deal until he lost a war with Trump campaign manager Corey Corey Lewandowski and was fired in the summer of 2015. Nunberg says Lewandowski saw to it that old racist posts on his Facebook page surfaced later apologized for those posts, and the numbered readily says that Trump screwed him. Eclipsing vote for him again in 2020 because Trump has delivered on Republican policies and judicial nominations. I knew our campaign wasn't doing well when I went into a restaurant after he announced, Nunberg said. Or was doing well. Excuse me. The TV was on CNN and he was on and people were watching. These were people who normally wouldn't give Ah s word, but they were watching him. Trump wasn't just another politician doing a TV hit. He was an American mogul and entertainer. Nunberg said he wasn't rich from making microchips or selling stocks. It was from building construction. It was this image of success of him being rich, and he can make you rich. We were the W W E fox news version of the Obama campaign in the beginning, and I mean that is a compliment. It was aspirational. It was we can fight the system. Nunberg was raised on the Upper East Side of an had been nurtured on conservative talk radio, strident support for Israel and suspicion of The Middle East. After volunteering for Mitt Romney's 2008 campaign. He worked for right wing lawyer J. Secolo during the 2010 fight to prevent the construction of a mosque near Ground zero. The sight of 9 11 Mrs. Trump wrote a B s letter at the time offering to buy the land where the mosque was to be built. But the offer was just a PR stunt numbers. Parents were lawyers, and so he became one too. Is father had worked for a law firm that Trump and his father had used her real estate deals. Nunberg didn't meet Trump in person until he was introduced to him in 2010 by yet another Gotham City character, Roger Stone, the villain with Richard Nixon tattoo on his back. I wanted to win a national election and thought Trump could win on, Berg says of his eagerness to sign on. I thought it was cool that Obama went on the late night shows. I thought the John McCain ad showing Obama speaking of millions of people in showing Paris Hilton slamming him is a Hollywood celebrity was the dumbest effing thing I'd ever seen. Hey, all but screamed at the time. You just want him millions of votes. Nunberg thought his party was living in the 19 fifties, and the Trump was his own version of the Madman era. Nunberg. He was a madman. For the 21st century. He and Trump shared a sensibility. He likened store retired New York City firefighter or cop who main lines, Fox News, Plus Rush Limbaugh and Michael Irvin on talk radio and thinks to himself. This.

Donald Trump Sam Nunberg Barack Obama president Corey Corey Lewandowski rape Mitt Romney Ronald Reagan United States CNN America Middle East Facebook Fox News Michael Irvin New York City W W E Israel Richard Nixon