18 Burst results for "18 86"

"18 86" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:33 min | 2 weeks ago

"18 86" Discussed on WTVN

"So by 18 86 labour organizations in Chicago and elsewhere in the U. S. Had been working to shorten the workday for decades, and in theory, they had some success. On May 1st 18 67, Illinois Governor, Richard James Oglesby signed a law establishing an eight hour day for workers in Illinois on June 25th 18 68 Congress passed an act doing the same for some federal workers. Other governments passed similar laws as well. But our focus here is Illinois. So that federal law only applied to laborers, workmen and mechanics who were being paid by the federal government. So that was not everyone by any stretch, and the Illinois law contains some really big loopholes. It applied only quote where no special contract exists. And that meant employers could just completely get around it by getting their workers to sign special contracts. Employers threatened to close if their employees didn't agree to work longer shifts. Or they made new job offers contingent on the worker signing a waiver that just required that person to accept longer working hours. Labour activists in Illinois didn't think this law was good enough for obvious reasons. So they organized a statewide strike to begin on May 1st 18 67 this strike partially nearly shut down the city of Chicago, and it lasted for about a week. But the strike eventually crumbled and the eight hour law, which was already full of holes wasn't really enforced after that. Yeah, I found conflicting accounts about whether the city of Chicago was just totally brought to a standstill or if it was more like specific sectors of Chicago grounds to a halt. For the next two decades, though activists and organizers in Chicago and in the rest of the US kept working toward an eight hour work day, even though these two laws were already supposedly guaranteeing that for at least some people. Aside from this focus on an eight hour day, though, a lot of these people who were doing this work did not share the same political perspective. You're listening to one of the featured I heart radio podcasts of the week Find this and more on the free I heard Radio app Now number one for podcasting Columbus News.

Chicago May 1st 18 67 Congress Illinois June 25th 18 68 two laws US eight hour Richard James Oglesby U. S. about a week decades eight hour law labour organizations one next two decades number one Illinois Governor Columbus News federal government
"18 86" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

02:04 min | 2 weeks ago

"18 86" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"By 18 86 labour organizations in Chicago and elsewhere in the U. S. Had been working to shorten the workday for decades, and in theory, they had some success. On May 1st 18 67, Illinois Governor, Richard James Oglesby signed a law establishing an eight hour day for workers in Illinois on June 25th 18 68 Congress passed an act doing the same for some federal workers. Other governments passed similar laws as well. But our focus here is Illinois. So that federal law only applied to laborers, workmen and mechanics who were being paid by the federal government. So that was not everyone by any stretch, and the Illinois law contains some really big loopholes. It applied only quote where no special contract exists. And that meant employers could just completely get around it by getting their workers to sign special contracts. Employers threatened to close if their employees didn't agree to work longer shifts. Or they made new job offers contingent on the worker signing a waiver that just required that person to accept longer working hours. Labour activists in Illinois didn't think this law was good enough for obvious reasons. So they organized a statewide strike to begin on May 1st 18 67 this strike partially merely shut down the city of Chicago, and it lasted for about a week. But the strike eventually crumbled and the eight hour law, which was already full of holes wasn't really enforced after that. Yeah, I found conflicting accounts about whether the city of Chicago was just totally brought to a standstill or if it was more like specific sectors of Chicago grounds to a halt. For the next two decades, though activists and organizers in Chicago and in the rest of the US kept working toward an eight hour work day, even though these two laws were already supposedly guaranteeing that for at least some people. Aside from this focus on an eight hour day, though, a lot of these people who were doing this work did not share the same.

Chicago May 1st 18 67 Congress Illinois June 25th 18 68 two laws eight hour US Richard James Oglesby U. S. labour organizations decades about a week eight hour law next two decades Illinois Governor 18 86 federal government
"18 86" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:01 min | 3 weeks ago

"18 86" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"A highway and a ban. Uh, that was the project Colorado. That was the That was the I 25 project, The T. Rex Project. That's before you've moved here. Um All right. Are we ready for us to move on here? Mm hmm. Clue. Number one patented by Alexander Graham Bell in 18 86. Definitely Alfred. That's definitely Alfred. Coover telephone recorder. Kathy No, No, no, no, not get to go now. Write your name was second. He was He was second in We will let that happen. Alfred. What you got, Uh, tape recorder four. Kathy, wait, Wait, wait, wait, wait. What'd you say? Tape recorder. Oh, who knew they had taped back then I thank you for the answer Earlier. Coover should have guessed that instead of your crappy answer, guys. Hey, stop! Stop your whining. Alexander Glass, Just the one the initial number one RTR born March 30th. 1990 in Nashville, Tennessee. Oh, Yeah. 18. Maybe a young book Clue number two began playing drums in junior high. Clue. Number three Cathy Thomas Rhett, really, we're tied again. Clue. Number one. These people date back.

Alexander Glass Cathy Thomas Rhett 18 86 Nashville, Tennessee March 30th. Alfred Alexander Graham Bell Kathy Number three Colorado second I 25 Number one RTR Clue number two T. Rex Project 1990 number one Coover one
"18 86" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

02:07 min | 3 weeks ago

"18 86" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"So delighted. You think so? Because no, it was actually Aristotle knees. Wow. The clouds. A student flips off Socrates. I never in my life could have imagined myself even in a group of friends where someone said No. I'm sorry. It was Stephanie's Excuse me. I have to leave forever and never see her dad. Oh, are you still have two more chances? This is not a problem. The first documented appearance in America of someone flipping the bird was in 18 86. When what happened, a Republican Orville H. Platt gave the finger to Democrat Zebulon B. Vance on the Senate floor. B picture old Haas Rad Burn, the Boston Bean eaters was photographed flipping off the New York Giants. See former president US Grant ran into Robert E. Lee in the street in Washington. Guys be Yes, it's B Thank you. Oh, Haas Rad burn. It's a picture of it. If you want to see it now, the middle finger has a long history in baseball. In 1988 San Diego Padres President Chub Feeney had to resign after he flipped off fans at a baseball game. Why was the whole thing such a big deal? A. The fans all gave him the finger back setting the Guinness world record for most birds flipped simultaneously. Be a player looked over to see what the big deal was Mr. Pop up and lost the game O or C. It was fan appreciation night. Uh, for this game, they sound like a C crowd. I think so. I'm going to go with C and they're all right up. And as it turns out, The fans did not appreciate it jokey. How did Jane Kaczmarek do on our quiz? With a little help from Western Massachusetts? Jane got to write and is a winner. Kaczmarek is an Emmy and Golden Globe.

Robert E. Lee Jane Kaczmarek Aristotle Washington Zebulon B. Vance Western Massachusetts Kaczmarek Stephanie Jane Orville H. Platt San Diego Padres America 1988 18 86 President Democrat two more chances New York Giants Golden Globe Socrates
"18 86" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

01:30 min | 3 weeks ago

"18 86" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Group of young people on a cat boat. Yeah, They're adults on a cat boat. Sort of healing over with the tide. They're probably pretty close to shore. They are transfixed by a storm buoy, which is right near the boat and the diagonals that they are both at with The the marvelous waves that are just beginning to form passing them and then breaking on shore. Uh, other than that, you don't see any shoreline at all. Just open C and then maybe three quarters. The painting this incredible blue sky would streak sort of like Stratus clouds high up. It is a wonderful painting 1939 and of course, that that type of a bill was used as a warning for bad weather. And I think Hopper put it in because World War two he could tell something was big was happening now. September of 1939, Germany invades Poland. Everything was changing, and I think that's why he put that in. So it gives you a warning. Not only what's going on in Europe, but how the repercussions are going to come to America. Uh and it's a marvelous painting very, very timely. In a beautiful Seascape just you know its own merits of groundswell. Others. Just Winslow Homer, for instance, to the rescue. A favorite painting of mine at the Phillips Collection in Washington, D. C from 18 86. This painting is kind of like a snapshot where.

Europe Washington, D. C America September of 1939 18 86 World War two 1939 Phillips Collection Germany Hopper both three quarters Poland Winslow Homer
"18 86" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

02:06 min | 3 weeks ago

"18 86" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"I'm so delighted. You think so? Because no, it was actually Aristophanes. Wow of the clouds. A student flips off Socrates. I never in my life could have imagined myself even in a group of friends where someone said No, I'm sorry. It was Stephanie's Excuse me. I have to leave forever and never see her. Yeah. Are you still have two more chances? This is not a problem. The first documented appearance in America of someone flipping the bird was in 18 86. When what happened, a Republican Orville H. Platt gave the finger to Democrat Zebulon B. Vance on the Senate floor. B picture Old Horse Rad Burn, The Boston Bean eaters was photographed flipping off the New York Giants. See former president US Grant ran into Robert E. Lee in the street in Washington. Guys be Yes, it's B Thank you all. Haas Rad burn. The picture of it if you want to see it now, the middle finger has a long history in baseball. 1988 San Diego Padres President Chub Feeney had to resign after he flipped off fans at a baseball game. Why was the whole thing such a big deal? A. The fans all gave him the finger back setting the Guinness world record for most birds flipped simultaneously. Be a player looked over to see what the big deal was Mr. Pop up and lost the game O or C. It was fan appreciation night. Uh, They sound like a C crowd. I think so. I'm going to go with C and they're all right. You come And as it turns out, The fans did not appreciate it jokey. How did Jane Kaczmarek do on our quiz? With a little help from Western Massachusetts? Jane got to write and is a winner. Jane.

Jane Kaczmarek Robert E. Lee Western Massachusetts Zebulon B. Vance Washington New York Giants Jane Stephanie President Aristophanes Orville H. Platt America two more chances 1988 18 86 Democrat Republican Socrates San Diego Padres US Grant
"18 86" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

1170 The Answer

09:28 min | 4 months ago

"18 86" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

"You're just joining us. I've been talking about the background of the great musical work pictures at an exhibition and end of the last seven explained that it was Nicholas Rimsky Korsakov, who prepared the works of Mode Isthmus Orcs Key for publication, remembers works. We're not really published until after his death, so Course of cops edited version off pictures and exhibition was published in 18 86. And then a second edition was also added later. But it wouldn't be until 1939 when Mussorgsky's unaltered version of pictures and exhibition was actually published. Now it's also important note that even though the work was finished in 18 74, there is no record of a public performance of the peace during the storks keys Lifetime. As a matter of fact, the only known performance of the piece was in England of dissent. For 1914. Now. Another important detail about the pictures and exhibition is a fact that for most of us, probably for you also to who are listening. Our introduction to this piece is usually heard as an orchestral piece. It's not comedy here this as a solo piano work, However, that is how miss socks he wrote it. The Serbs. He never wrote or created an orchestration of this piece. So the question is. Where did the orchestral version come from? That we tend to be exposed to? Well, I'm glad you asked. You see? And our last s O s radio program of 2019. I highlighted a particular composer whose birthday just happened to be on that day. His name was remains Maurice Ravel. Many in our listening audience, of course, know who that is, Well, Marie's rebel along with clubbed A. B, C and Eric Sock T, among others, were the leading French composers of turn of the century and rebel was commissioned by the Russian composer Sergei Koussevitzky. To create an orchestration off pictures and exhibition and this do orchestrated version was published in 1922. Now what's so everything is the fact that after rebel orchestrated this work, many other composers decided to do the same thing. There are at least 26 other composers who have taken their hand and orchestrating pictures and exhibition. Did you know there's another 36 other musicians who have also orchestrated an arranged the work for all kinds of ensembles. Weatherby jazz guitar, the oven guard that electronic Progressive rock and you won't believe this. There's even a heavy metal. Heavy metal arrangement this piece now I hope this gives you a better understanding of how influential pictures and exhibition is now having said all of this, it turns out the rebels orchestral arrangement is still considered. The best is by far the most performed version and, most likely the version that introduced you to the work. Not for me. Oh, I should say before you even say that, I will say also everything that pictures an exhibition has passed the test of time. This coming June Pictures. An exhibition will be celebrating its 147th birthday, and there's no sign of it, losing its interest and influence. Now. There's another important point that I want to bring up I mentioned earlier is a member. The five that is, as Mussorgsky was a member of the five he was designed to find an authenticity and his views. In other words, he was looking to find a truly Russian voice. This music and this fact alone became a very important influence on other composers outside of Russia. You see at the time in the late 19th century, most composers throughout Europe, including most Russian composers were big influence by the German school most physically by the sound of Ricard Wagner. If you know who Rikard Wagner is, you will know. That he took over the opera world. He expanded the orchestra and immersed himself in the sound of Chromatis ism, and every composer was trying to compete in this new musical sound world. You could even say this new musical soundscape, and it turns out that Ms or ski was a contrarian. He didn't buy into this new vision. And this attitude ended up liberating. Ah, whole country from its musical Malays, and I'm not referring to Russia when I say that When the French composer Eric Sati heard the music of Mussorgsky, he had an epiphany. He recognized the liberation in Mussorgsky's minimalism. In other words, Mr Lipsky's music represented the concept of less ISMM or this was the key and elevating the burdens of German influence Among the French composers. Santi was influential. And through his influence, using the source key music using his art as a starting point. He told the French composers, all his peers this listen carefully quote our music needs to have less sauerkraut on it, Unquote. And he pointed in the source key as the key to the future, the model to follow and guess what it worked. Club ABC moved away from the bog, marrying influence and began to create his own immensely incredible soundscapes. And this led rebel to follow suit. And so Miss Stork ski after his death was in one respect responsible for the French musical Impressionism that came from France, beginning at the end of the 19th sent Three and leading through the turn of the 20th century. Now what an amazing legacy that is. Now. That legacy carried over into my life. You see, pictures and exhibition has been for me a very influential work. My first exposure to this work was not through an orchestra performance, or even through the piano. It actually came from the world of drum Corps and in the previous or future s O s episode, I'll be talking more about my drum Corps world experience and how that music came into my purview, but many years later, is a private instructor music I was able to showcase Major portions of pictures, an exhibition and every subtle that I hosted for my students way back in 2007 and then later in 2016, my wife and I, with a current and former student, saw a performance off the great American pianist Gerrick ALS and performing the work on piano, and this was an incredible performance and experience at that time. I did not realize the profound effect that it would have on both my current student at the time and my former student, the effect was so great on both. You were there with us that they decided on their own to learn the whole work. My former student. Christie, who at the time had already learned or had earned her bachelor's of music and piano performance, was also considering to pursue a master's degree. And so for two years after that performance she worked on that never told anyone about it. I never knew was like a secret of surprise, and not until long before her. Master's degree performance. And that was your final project in getting her degree in the spring of 2019. My current student at the time, who is also with us at the Garrick holds performance. Her name was Paige and she decided on her own during the peace. And so I I had the honor of working through the whole work with her piece by piece, beginning in 2018 until her high school graduation in 2019. Just since carried all that I've taught her to college, where she is now currently majoring in piano performance. Her professor is now currently preparing her to perform the whole work sometime in the very near future, so you can see there's our only my personal involvement with this work, whether in performance or in teaching, but also, ah, legacy off. Very, very talented. Give the students who have caught the love for this work and I decided to learn it. I don't think I want to mention we're the timeless elements about this piece as I experienced. It is the fact that for some reason, I always felt that there was a spiritual aspect to this piece. And when I say spiritually, I'm not referring to some ambiguous, non tangible spirituality. Referring to a very specific Christian aspect. You see the pictures and exhibition are really soundscapes. They represent a sense of realism first inspired by the artwork of Victor Hartman, but musically envisioned through the eyes of Mussorgsky. As you listen, each piece from the beginning you you get the idea that there are separate individual pieces on Lee glued together by a theme called a prom in odd, But as we move further into the peace, we find the pieces connecting together closer. Their natures of saying they're they're feeling is the same. And yet the same time it actually ends up getting darker and more moody or moving us into darker territory. And this is what's really happening. The peace, Mr Keyes Move..

Sergei Koussevitzky Rikard Wagner Victor Hartman Maurice Ravel Ricard Wagner Eric Sati 2018 Europe 1922 Mussorgsky Russia Nicholas Rimsky Korsakov 2007 1939 Paige 1914 18 74 Lee 18 86 Gerrick ALS
"18 86" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:51 min | 6 months ago

"18 86" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Treat. Some people who got vaccinated at the Riverside University Health System site have received an Easter egg along with their shot. The eggs are the official wouldn't Easter egg used at the annual Easter egg roll at the White House. But since the pandemic forced the role to be canceled this year, the White House decided to ship the eggs off the vaccine sites around the U. S. The Riverside University health system, got two boxes and gave the eggs out along with the shots yesterday. Until they were gone. Amy King K F. I knew a commercial building in downtown L. A has been damaged by fire. The fire started yesterday on South Crocker Street. The building apparently was home to a marijuana grow operation. The son of civil rights leader Dr Martin Luther King Jr says the governor of Georgia has made a mistake by implementing a new restrictive voting law. But ultimately if economics come into play, and more and more companies decided to pull out of Georgia, and companies that made you were gonna come here, decide they're not going to to relocate here to create jobs. Then the governor and the Legislature has to rethink its position. Martin Luther King, the third, says Major League Baseball pulling the 2021 All Star game out of Atlanta is one step, King says. This is the kind of Pressure elected officials should receive Georgia Republican Governor Brian Kim signed legislation on Thursday limiting voting rights in the state, which Democrats say will affect mostly people of color. Today marks 53 years since Martin Luther King Jr was assassinated. Michigan family found history under their feet, Eric earn Horn and his wife discovered a perfectly preserved letter from 18 86, hidden under the floorboards of their home. The urn horns were renovating a house they'd purchased in 2017 when they found the letter addressed to my dead Spencer. It was written by Charles Warren, who asked Spencer to consider purchasing his land. 160 acre parcel described as having trout filled streams running through it and good timber. Bill Seward Kay if I knew Jalen Suggs hit one of the most dramatic shots and NC double a tournament history banking home a three pointer from just inside the half court line as the buzzer to end overtime sounded lifting. Top seeded Gonzaga over 11. CTU see a late 93 to 90 in the Final four in Indianapolis. Bulldogs head coach Mark, Few says it helps to have a special player like Jalen sucks. It was quite a chess match going on out there, and we had the last possession and like I said, we're lucky enough to get a 50 footer. So is that it helps when you have a magical special Guy like Jalen, especially at the end of games. Drew Timmy had a team high 25 points for the Bulldogs and also drew the charge That forced overtime Sucks. Finished with 16 points. The sacks will face Baylor on Monday in the national championship game with a chance to secure its perfect season. Johnny Zuzang had a game high 29 points for the Bruins. I hope I said Johnny's name, correct. Did I go on? Way have a crash.

Charles Warren Drew Timmy Johnny Zuzang Jalen Suggs 2017 Major League Baseball Martin Luther King Spencer Johnny 16 points Jalen Riverside University Health Sy South Crocker Street Thursday 18 86 Amy King K F. 25 points Monday 29 points 160 acre
"18 86" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:32 min | 6 months ago

"18 86" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Time for an update. That's why Facebook supports updated Internet regulations to set clear guidelines for addressing today's toughest challenges like protecting privacy. Fighting misinformation. Reforming section 2 30 more See our progress on key issues. And what's next at about that? F b dot com slash regulations. Everyone knows Beverly is home to the famous original Rainbow Cone. But there is so much more Beverly is home to Chicago's only Castle built in 18 86. Givens. Castle. Sightsee landmark homes by Frank Lloyd Wright or enjoy an I P a at one of their breweries, taking the culture at the Beverly Arts Center or enjoy the time in the forest Preserve Beverly home to an abundance of restaurants and retail shops, too. Beverly, where nostalgia meets contemporary to learn more Go to be a P A That, or GBI AP a dad or Beverly Love where you live, 10 minutes before seven on and it's time to talk about what's in your wallet or not in your wallet. The best things in life out free, But you can people by the best down these now give me my whole multi on the line. Senior VP of Kings View Wealth management Paul and very glad you're on because I'm reading about global stock markets rising today as investors shake.

"18 86" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:24 min | 6 months ago

"18 86" Discussed on KQED Radio

"As they immigrated to these shores. This is one of the ways in which American racism works. Asian Americans have been identified as foreigners rather than citizens. Erika Lee is director of the Immigration History Research Center at the University of Minnesota. It's the history of the expulsion of all of Seattle's Chinese and Chinese American residents in 18 86. It's the story of how hundreds of people were intimidated and then forced under armed guard to leave their homes and businesses. Herded together and forced to board a steamship out of town in 18 86. This episode is hardly ever taught in our history books, It's almost impossible. To find any monument or recognition or plaque or any historical marker. Related to this brutal history in Seattle, a city known for its progressiveness, a city that in the early 20th century marketed itself as a gateway to the Orient. This is nothing to bash on Seattle. It's just a reflection of the violence and then a racer that exists and that continues to endure. Relationship to Asian American history. The injustice, she says, particularly marginalized women, the stereotypes in the media images that permeate American popular culture. From the 19th century up through the present either focus on the Asian Dragon Lady, the madam who runs the whorehouse or the degraded Asian female prostitute or the submissive geisha who finds fulfillment in serving typically a white male. Partner or customer, or the well meaning Vietnamese prostitute from the Vietnam War era films. Stereotypes firmly cemented, Lee says. With the expansion of the American Empire, we have had such a long term heavy presence of U. S military and Okinawa in South Korea, the Philippines and the resulting sex, trade and sex work that has exploited Asian women. It's part of that culture of that military experience of the culture of US empire. Not only did American culture fetishize Asian women here and abroad U. S policies meted out collective punishment based on ethnic stereotypes and nothing more. We have not just excluded Asian immigrants, but the very first group that we actually barred from the United States were Asian immigrant women. Because of this idea that they were either prostitutes or potential prostitutes. This is the 18 75 Page Act, which was our first federal immigration law passed in the U. S. But if we're discussing the paradox of both exploiting and punishing Asian Americans for the same supposed sins Wrap your head around this. The same immigrant group excoriated by society was later embraced as a shining example for all ethnic groups of how to successfully integrate into the dominant white economy and culture. Jason Oliver Chang is associate professor of history as well as Asian and Asian American studies at the University of Connecticut. He says that a half century ago, Asian Americans were dubiously characterized as model immigrants. When the 1965 heart seller Act was signed into law, by Lyndon B. Johnson Heart Seller Act established a new system. Governing U. S immigration by establishing a merit based approach that gave preferences to certain categories of people and eliminating the country quota numbers. And this dramatically opened up immigration to new flows of immigrants from Latin America and Asia and then became the preferred mode of immigration for a number of companies from agribusiness to high tech companies. These flows of highly skilled immigrants fueled a dominant image of who Asian Americans were in this period of rapid growth for Asian migration. There's this immigrant cohort that on one hand, is welcomed with open arms. And yet simultaneously subject to discrimination and violence. Violence, which Didn't even register in the national psyche. One of the challenging things among many with the idea of the model minority is that by recognizing discrimination, you're being targeted for violence. It disrupts a national narrative about success about civil rights progress. And it disrupts a convenient story about how Asian Americans fit into a liberal progressive society. And so in some ways, the erasure of their experiences is required to maintain that image of Asian Americans as the diligent worker as the person who won't rock the boat. Is that eraser? Is it more like the failure to connect dots? Erika Lee spoke to us about the expulsion of Seattle's Chinese residents in 18 86. There was another sort of program in the 18 seventies in L A. Can you tell me about that? In 18 71 October 24. There was a conflict between Chinese people that led to the killing of a cop and another white resident. And that led to a majority of the residents threw around 500 people to descend onto the Chinatown where they killed between 17 and 20 people. I was able to read some first person testimony and just the gruesome details behind it just demonstrated a wholesale cleansing of a neighborhood grabbing Anyone at their disposal and lynching them in the streets on the premise that they were clearing out the impurities and making Los Angeles a safe place. Just gets back to that notion of eraser or at least of malignant indifference. This is a country that kind of savers. It's massacres. We all know about the ST Valentine's Day Massacre in Chicago. We know about Custer's last stand and the lynchings in the Jim Crow South. The Chinese massacre of 18 71. I'm embarrassed to say it's news to me. How does it come to pass that an entire society if I'm speaking for it? Fails to notice a crime so grave I think part of that comes from a deeply ingrained sense that Asians don't belong and that their history no matter how consequential important or Their contributions. However great they may have been are irrelevant to the understanding of the development of the United States. That master was 150 years ago. In the eighties, however, they were two other ghastly crimes. One the murder of Vincent Chin. In 1982 2 white men be chin to death a few days before his wedding Chin was Chinese, but he was blamed for the rise of Japan's auto industry at a time when America was losing manufacturing jobs. His killers essentially got away with it. They receive probation and the $3000 fine and a school shooting in Stockton, California, where all the victims were Southeast Asian refugees in 1989, a mass shooting at an elementary school in Stockton was the worst the nation had ever seen. Five Children were killed. 30 students and teachers wounded. These two events put together demonstrate that there is a sense of no consequence for practicing violence against Asians. It's really difficult to paint a detailed image of who Asian Americans are in a society which knows very little about why they're here. And so in that absence, atrocities and the attacks on Asian Americans appear random, chaotic and episodic. If part of the problem is invisibility. You have a plan, at least for your home state. What is it? That's right. We need.

Erika Lee Latin America Jason Oliver Chang 1982 Asia 1989 Los Angeles 18 75 Page Act Stockton Seattle 18 86 Vincent Chin $3000 19th century Chin South Korea United States Vietnam War 30 students early 20th century
"18 86" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:30 min | 6 months ago

"18 86" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To the past 140 years in American history of committing violence against Asians. Almost as soon as they immigrated to these shores. This is one of the ways in which American racism works. Asian Americans have been identified as foreigners rather than citizens. Erika Lee is director of the Immigration History Research Center at the University of Minnesota. It's the history of The expulsion of all of Seattle's Chinese and Chinese American residents in 18 86. It's the story of how hundreds of people were intimidated and then forced under armed guard to leave their homes and businesses. Herded together and forced to board a steamship out of town in 18 86. This episode is hardly ever taught. In our history books, it's almost impossible to find any monument or recognition or plaque or any historical marker. Related to this brutal history in Seattle, a city known for its progressiveness, a city that in the early 20th century. Marketed itself as a gateway to the Orient. This is nothing to bash on Seattle. It's just a reflection of the violence and then a racer. That exists then that continues to endure in relationship to Asian American history. The injustice, she says, particularly marginalized women, the stereotypes in the media images that permeate American popular culture. From the 19th century up through the present either focus on the Asian Dragon Lady, the madam who runs the whorehouse or the degraded Asian female prostitute or the submissive geisha who finds fulfillment in serving typically a white male. Partner or customer, or the well meaning Vietnamese prostitute from the Vietnam War era films. The stereotypes firmly cemented, Lee says. With the expansion of the American Empire, we have had such a long term heavy presence of U. S military and Okinawa and South Korea, the Philippines and the resulting sex, trade and sex work that has exploited Asian women. It's part of that culture of that military experience of the culture of US empire. Not only did American culture fetishize Asian women here and abroad U. S policies meted out collective punishment based on ethnic stereotypes and nothing more. We have not just Excluded Asian immigrants. But the very first group that we actually barred from the United States were Asian immigrant women because of this idea that they were either Prostitutes or potential prostitutes. This is the 18 75 Page Act, which was our first federal immigration law passed in the U. S. But if we're discussing the paradox of both exploiting and punishing Asian Americans for the same supposed sins Wrap your head around this. The same immigrant group excoriated by society was later embraced as a shining example for all ethnic groups of how to successfully integrate into the dominant white economy and culture. Jason Oliver Chang is associate professor of history as well as Asian and Asian American studies at the University of Connecticut. He says that a half century ago, Asian Americans were dubiously characterized as model immigrants. When the 1965 heart seller Act was signed into law by Lyndon B. Johnson, the heart seller act established a new system. Governing U. S immigration by establishing a merit based approach that gave preferences to certain categories of people and eliminating the country quota numbers. And this dramatically opened up immigration to new flows of immigrants from Latin America and Asia and then became the preferred mode of immigration for a number of companies from agribusiness to high tech companies. These flows of highly skilled immigrants fueled a dominant image of who Asian Americans were in this period of rapid growth for Asian migration. There's this immigrant cohort that on one hand, is welcomed with open arms. And yet simultaneously subject to discrimination and violence. Violence, which Didn't even register in the national psyche. One of the challenging things among many with the idea of the model minority is that by recognizing discrimination, you're being targeted for violence. It disrupts a national narrative about success about civil rights progress. And it disrupts a convenient story about how Asian Americans fit into a liberal progressive society. And so in some ways, the erasure of their experiences is required to maintain that image of Asian Americans as the diligent worker as the person who won't rock the boat. Is that a racialism or like the failure to connect dots? Erika Lee spoke to us about the expulsion of Seattle's Chinese residents in 18 86. There was another sort of program in the 18 seventies in L A. Can you tell me about that? In 18 71 October 24. There was a conflict between Chinese people that led to the killing of a cop and another white resident. And that led to a majority of the residents who've around 500 people to descend onto the Chinatown where they killed between 17 and 20 people. I was able to read some first person testimony and just the gruesome details behind. It just demonstrated a wholesale cleansing of a neighborhood grabbing Anyone at their disposal and lynching them in the streets on the premise that they were clearing out the impurities and making Los Angeles a safe place. Just gets back to that notion of eraser or at least of malignant indifference. This is a country that kind of savers. It's massacres. We all know about the ST Valentine's Day Massacre in Chicago. We know about Custer's last stand and the lynchings in the Jim Crow South. The Chinese massacre of 18 71. I'm embarrassed to say it's news to me. How does it come to pass that an entire society if I'm speaking for it? Fails to notice a crime so grave I think part of that comes from a deeply ingrained sense that Asians don't belong and that their history no matter how consequential important or Their contributions. However great they may have then are irrelevant to the understanding of the development of the United States. That massacre was 150 years ago. In the eighties, however, they were two other ghastly crimes. One the murder of Vincent Chin. In 1982 2 white men be chin to death a few days before his wedding Chin was Chinese, but he was blamed for the rise of Japan's auto industry. At a time when America was losing manufacturing jobs. His killers essentially got away with it. They receive probation and the $3000 fine, and a school shooting in Stockton, California were all the victims were Southeast Asian refugees. 1989, a mass shooting at an elementary school in Stockton was the worst the nation had ever seen. Five Children were killed 30 students and teachers wounded these two events put together demonstrate that there is a sense of no consequence for practicing violence against Asians. It's really difficult to paint a detailed image of who Asian Americans are in a society which knows very little about why they're here. And so in that absence, atrocities and the attacks on Asian Americans appear random, chaotic and episodic. If part of the problem is invisibility. You have a plan, at least for your home state. What is it? That's right. We need.

Lyndon B. Johnson Jason Oliver Chang Erika Lee Latin America 19th century Chin Asia 1982 18 86 Stockton Seattle 30 students 18 75 Page Act $3000 Immigration History Research C United States Vincent Chin early 20th century ST Valentine's Day Massacre Lee
"18 86" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:19 min | 6 months ago

"18 86" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Ways in which American racism works. Asian Americans have been identified as foreigners rather than citizens. Erika Lee is director of the Immigration History Research Center at the University of Minnesota. It's the history of The expulsion of all of Seattle's Chinese and Chinese American residents in 18 86. It's the story of how hundreds of people were intimidated and then forced under armed guard to leave their homes and businesses. Herded together and forced to board a steamship out of town in 18 86. This episode is hardly ever taught. In our history books, it's almost impossible to find any monument or recognition or plaque or any historical marker. Related to this brutal history in Seattle, a city known for its progressiveness, a city that in the early 20th century. Marketed itself as a gateway to the Orient. This is nothing to bash on Seattle. It's just a reflection of the violence and then a racer. That exists then that continues to endure in relationship to Asian American history. The injustice, she says, particularly marginalized women, the stereotypes in the media images that permeate American popular culture. From the 19th century up through the present either focus on the Asian Dragon Lady. The madam who Runs the whorehouse or the degraded Asian female prostitute or the submissive Geisha, who Finds fulfillment in serving typically a white male partner or customer, or the well meaning Vietnamese prostitute from the Vietnam War era films. Stereotypes firmly cemented, Lee says with the expansion of the American Empire. We have had such a long term heavy presence of U. S. Military and Okinawa and South Korea, the Philippines and the resulting sex, trade and sex work that has exploited Asian women. It's part of that culture of that. Military experience of the culture of US empire. Not only did American culture fetishize Asian women here and abroad U. S policies made it out collective punishment based on Ethnic stereotypes and nothing more. We have not just Excluded Asian immigrants. But the very first group that we actually barred from the United States were Asian immigrant women because of this idea that they were either Prostitutes or potential prostitutes. This is the 18 75 Page Act, which was our first federal immigration law passed in the U. S. But if we're discussing the paradox of both exploiting and punishing Asian Americans for the same supposed sins Wrap your head around this. The same immigrant group excoriated by society was later embraced as a shining example for all ethnic groups of how to successfully integrate into the dominant white economy and culture. Jason Oliver Chang is associate professor of history as well as Asian and Asian American studies at the University of Connecticut. He says that a half century ago, Asian Americans were dubiously characterized as model immigrants. When the 1965 Hearts seller Act was signed into law, by Lyndon B. Johnson Heart Seller Act established a new system. Governing U. S immigration by establishing a merit based approach that gave preferences to certain categories of people and eliminating the country quota numbers. And this dramatically opened up immigration to new flows of immigrants from Latin America and Asia and then became the preferred mode of immigration for a number of companies from agribusiness to high tech companies. These flows of highly skilled immigrants fueled a dominant image of who Asian Americans were in this period of rapid growth for Asian migration. There's this immigrant cohort that on one hand, is welcomed with open arms. And yet simultaneously subject to discrimination and violence. Violence, which Didn't even register in the national psyche. One of the challenging things among many with the idea of the model minority is that by recognizing discrimination, you're being targeted for violence. It disrupts a national narrative about success about civil rights progress. And it disrupts a convenient story about how Asian Americans fit into a liberal progressive society. And so in some ways, the erasure of their experiences is required to maintain that image of Asian Americans as the diligent worker as the person who won't rock the boat. Is that a racialism or like the failure to connect dots? Erika Lee spoke to us about the expulsion of Seattle's Chinese residents in 18 86. There was another sort of program in the 18 seventies in the lake, and you tell me about that. In 18 71 October 24. There was a conflict between Chinese people that led to the killing of a cop and another white resident. And that led to a majority of the residents around 500 people to descend onto the Chinatown where they killed between 17 and 20 people. I was able to read some first person testimony and just the gruesome details behind it just demonstrated a wholesale cleansing of a neighborhood grabbing Anyone at their disposal and lynching them in the streets on the premise that they were clearing out the impurities and making Los Angeles a safe place. Just gets back to that notion of eraser or at least of malignant indifference. This is a country that kind of savers. It's massacres. We all know about the ST Valentine's Day Massacre in Chicago. We know about Custer's last stand and the lynchings in the Jim Crow South. The Chinese massacre of 18 71. I'm embarrassed to say it's news to me. How does it come to pass that an entire society if I'm speaking for it? Fails to notice a crime so grave I think part of that comes from a deeply ingrained sense that Asians don't belong and that their history no matter how consequential important or Their contributions. However great they may have been are irrelevant to the understanding of the development of the United States. That massacre was 150 years ago. In the eighties, however, they were two other ghastly crimes. One the murder of Vincent Chin. In 1982 2. White men beat Chin to death a few days before his wedding Chin was Chinese, but he was blamed for the rise of Japan's auto industry. At a time when America was losing manufacturing jobs. His killers essentially got away with it. They receive probation and a $3000 fine and a school shooting in Stockton, California were all the victims were Southeast Asian refugees. 1989, a mass shooting at an elementary school in Stockton was the worst the nation had ever seen. Five Children were killed 30 students and teachers wounded these two events put together demonstrate that there is a sense of no consequence for practicing violence against Asians. It's really difficult to paint a detailed image of who Asian Americans are in a society which knows very little about why they're here. And so in that absence, atrocities and the attacks on Asian Americans appear random, chaotic and episodic. If part of the problem is invisibility. You have a plan, at least for your home state. What is it? That's right. We need.

Erika Lee Latin America 18 75 Page Act Vincent Chin Jason Oliver Chang 1982 Asia Stockton 19th century Seattle Los Angeles $3000 1989 18 86 17 Lee Immigration History Research C early 20th century Vietnam War ST Valentine's Day Massacre
"18 86" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:31 min | 6 months ago

"18 86" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Headlines to the past 140 years in American history of committing violence against Asians almost as soon as they immigrated to these shores. This is one of the ways in which American racism works. Asian Americans have been identified as foreigners rather than citizens. Erika Lee is director of the Immigration History Research Center at the University of Minnesota. It's the history of the expulsion of all of Seattle's Chinese and Chinese American residents in 18 86. It's the story of how hundreds of people were intimidated and then forced under armed guard to leave their homes and businesses. Herded together and forced to board a steamship out of town in 18 86. This episode is hardly ever taught. In our history books, it's almost impossible to find any monument or recognition or plaque or any historical marker. Related to this brutal history in Seattle, a city known for its progressiveness, a city that in the early 20th century. Marketed itself as a gateway to the Orient. This is nothing to bash on Seattle. It's just a reflection of the violence and then a racer. That exists then that continues to endure in relationship to Asian American history. The injustice, she says, particularly marginalized women, the stereotypes in the media images that permeate American popular culture. From the 19th century up through the present either focus on the Asian Dragon Lady, The madam who runs the whorehouse or The degraded Asian female prostitute or the submissive geisha who finds fulfillment in serving typically a white male. Partner or customer, or the well meaning Vietnamese prostitute from the Vietnam War era films. The stereotypes firmly cemented, Lee says. With the expansion of the American Empire, we have had such a long term heavy presence of U. S military and Okinawa and South Korea, the Philippines and the resulting sex, trade and sex work that has exploited Asian women. It's part of that culture of that. Military experience of the culture of US empire. Not only did American culture fetishize Asian women here and abroad U. S policies made it out collective punishment based on Ethnic stereotypes and nothing more. We have not just Excluded Asian immigrants. But the very first group that we actually barred from the United States were Asian immigrant women because of this idea that they were either Prostitutes or potential prostitutes. This is the 18 75 Page Act, which was our first federal immigration law passed in the U. S. But if we're discussing the paradox of both exploiting and punishing Asian Americans for the same supposed sins Wrap your head around this. The same immigrant group excoriated by society was later embraced as a shining example for all ethnic groups of how to successfully integrate into the dominant white economy and culture. Jason Oliver Chang is associate professor of history as well as Asian and Asian American studies at the University of Connecticut. He says that a half century ago, Asian Americans were dubiously characterized as model immigrants. When the 1965 heart seller Act was signed into law by Lyndon B. Johnson, the heart seller act established a new system. Governing U. S immigration by establishing a merit based approach that gave preferences to certain categories of people and eliminating the country quota numbers. And this dramatically opened up immigration to new flows of immigrants from Latin America and Asia and then became the preferred mode of immigration for a number of companies from agribusiness to high tech companies. These flows of highly skilled immigrants fueled a dominant image of who Asian Americans were in this period of rapid growth for Asian migration. There's this immigrant cohort that on one hand, is welcomed with open arms. And yet simultaneously subject to discrimination and violence. Violence, which Didn't even register in the national psyche. One of the challenging things among many with the idea of the model minority is that by recognizing discrimination, you're being targeted for violence. It disrupts a national narrative about success about civil rights progress. And it disrupts a convenient story about how Asian Americans fit into a liberal progressive society. And so in some ways, the erasure of their experiences is required to maintain that image of Asian Americans as the diligent worker as the person who won't rock the boat. Is that a racialism or like the failure to connect dots? Erika Lee spoke to us about the expulsion of Seattle's Chinese residents in 18 86. There was another sort of program in the 18 seventies in L A. Can you tell me about that? In 18 71 October 24. There was a conflict between Chinese people that led to the killing of a cop and another white resident. And that led to a majority of the residents around 500 people to descend onto the Chinatown where they killed between 17 and 20 people. I was able to read some first person testimony and just the gruesome details behind it just demonstrated a wholesale cleansing of a neighborhood grabbing Anyone at their disposal and lynching them in the streets on the premise that they were clearing out the impurities and making Los Angeles a safe place. Just gets back to that notion of eraser or at least of malignant indifference. This is a country that kind of savers. It's massacres. We all know about the ST Valentine's Day Massacre in Chicago. We know about Custer's last stand and the lynchings in the Jim Crow South. The Chinese massacre of 18 71. I'm embarrassed to say it's news to me. How does it come to pass that an entire society if I'm speaking for it? Fails to notice a crime so grave I think part of that comes from a deeply ingrained sense that Asians don't belong and that their history no matter how consequential important or Their contributions. However great they may have then are irrelevant to the understanding of the development of the United States. That massacre was 150 years ago. In the eighties, however, they were two other ghastly crimes. One the murder of Vincent Chin. In 1982 2 white men be chin to death a few days before his wedding Chin was Chinese, but he was blamed for the rise of Japan's auto industry. At a time when America was losing manufacturing jobs. His killers essentially got away with it. They receive probation and the $3000 fine, and a school shooting in Stockton, California were all the victims were Southeast Asian refugees. 1989, a mass shooting at an elementary school in Stockton was the worst the nation had ever seen. Five Children were killed 30 students and teachers wounded these two events put together demonstrate that there is a sense of no consequence for practicing violence against Asians. It's really difficult to paint a detailed image of who Asian Americans are in a society which knows very little about why they're here. And so in that absence, atrocities and the attacks on Asian Americans appear random, chaotic and episodic. If part of the problem is invisibility. You have a plan, at least for your home state. What is it? That's right. We need.

Lyndon B. Johnson Jason Oliver Chang Erika Lee Latin America Asia Chin Stockton 19th century 18 86 18 75 Page Act Seattle 1982 $3000 Vincent Chin Los Angeles Immigration History Research C 30 students ST Valentine's Day Massacre early 20th century United States
"18 86" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

06:44 min | 7 months ago

"18 86" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"At Jimbo. Talks is we're joined out by the media director. Or the Federation for American Immigration Reform. Ira Mehlman, their website is fair US dot or gets f a. I r us dot or Kyra? Good evening. Good evening. Good to do with you. Good to have you on tonight. And it turns out that Joe Biden wasn't kidding. When he was talking about making some major changes on immigration and border security policy, was he No, he was not. And he was not. The changes he were intended to make are ones that utterly destroyed border security in basically forgo all public interests when it comes to immigration policy, and that's what's playing out now. You know, I understand people who just disagree with me. They would just come out and admit what they stand for. Then you can have an honest debate if you're for open borders. Please just say so. And then we'll talk about the merits and demerits of such an idea. But to pretend that you're for border security, two strikes me is inherently dishonest. Well, you know, the thing is the bill that he sent to Congress last week. Actually, just it forgets about border security and all that other stuff you know, least in the past. We've had amnesty bills that came up during the Obama administration during the during the George W. Bush administration. Hey, at least pretended like they were going to be serious that forcing our borders and preventing illegal immigration of the future. The bill that President Biden sent to Congress last week doesn't even make the pretense of doing anything to stop future legal immigration. The closest he comes is to say that we're going to address the root causes of migration in Central America. You know, Basically, that means we have to solve their problems for them. We have to end corruption, poverty, crime in Central America, and then we can prevent people from coming into the United States. But that that is the sum total of what he is offering the American public. It is all about amnesty for the people who broke our laws, more cheap labor for business interests and absolutely nothing at all for the American public. That is interesting, of course, that there is and always has been this unholy alliance on the subject between those of the far left. You really believe that we should be the international flophouse and y'all come and and, of course, American business, many of whom are in in some ways that rather conservative in their viewpoints. But boy, they do love what amounts to semi slave labor people that is to say. Who have a problem complaining about pay or ours, or benefits or other such things. As long as they're here in an illegal capacity, And I'm wondering, Does this make it more difficult now for these these workers to to be, shall we say? Exploited. Are they going to be here? Legally enough now that they can actually raise up their voices and say, Hey, we're no longer gonna be this semi slave type of of labor in this country. Well, you know, since there is no pretense of stopping future, really good look, immigration. The employers consistently say you know what? You're demanding more wages. We don't need you We can take the people were coming across the board right now. Which is exactly what happened in 1986. When Ronald Reagan signed an amnesty bill back then, uh, a lot of the employers within hiring illegal aliens decided. You know what? We're not going to pay better wages. And so they just replaced the newly amnestied illegal aliens back in 18 86 with the next wave of illegal aliens coming across the border, so it's not going to solve anything. It just kicks the can down the road. And what it does also is undermined job opportunities and wage opportunities for American workers. And we're talking now, you know, in the middle of the covert crisis, which also has a huge unemployment component. We have millions of Americans who've been put out of work over the past year. They're looking to get back in the labor market and what they're going to do explode the labor market with lots of people who could have amnesty. And also increases in the number of workers and family members who could come to the United States illegally. So you know, American workers are not only getting nothing out of it. They're actually just taken it on the chin here. Now In the past, we had seen a serious of occasions in which there have been new immigration laws and most of us who think like I do it like you do. We're never happy with those. Those particular plans because it went like this. Okay, We're gonna grant some new amnesty. And this time we're really going to enforce this. And of course after you're bitten three or four times, you realize no, They're not gonna really enforce it. But at least there was that pretense. I guess we've gone past the notion of this time. We're really going to enforce anything. Right this time. They're not even going to lie to us. I mean, I guess we can give him some credit for being honest that they have no intention of enforcing the laws because in addition to the bill, you know, you look at the Syrians of executive orders and policies that the president has put out the month He's been in office. Hey, wants to suspend all deportations for 100 days. Hey, is crashing be treated that we had with next, not treaties, agreements that we have with Mexico and Central America that where they were actually helping us prevent mass migration to the United States. He's getting rid of that. He's basically said that we're going back to catching release. You come across the border. We will process you and send you on your way. Give you a hearing. You know, several years down the road, you probably not gonna show up for it. So you know the combination of the bill that he sent to Congress and the policies he has implemented since becoming president makes it very clear that if you can get to the United States illegally, you are here to stay. Wait, wait. Not not exactly. I don't buy both my uncle before he passed away and his son My cousin were lifelong Border patrol agents. And, uh, they got to the point where they knew people certain way they'd be arresting some guy. They Hey, Uh, Pablo, how's Maria and the kids? Whatever. They knew who they were, and and the whole thing was along the lines of well talk to you. Next time they both knew that they would be running into each other again. The next time that I don't think that ever made my My uncle or my cousin or their colleagues less diligent, but it had to sap a certain amount of their morale. There's simply no about the fact that they weren't being backed up from on high Sure Look, anybody who has a job once do it professionally. These air trained law enforcement officers. They want to enforce the laws and when they're being prevented T o from doing their jobs when they're actually being told by their superiors in Washington..

Joe Biden Ronald Reagan United States Ira Mehlman Central America Maria 1986 100 days last week Pablo Federation for American Immigr three Kyra Congress tonight 18 86 George W. Bush Washington both four times
UGA face Cincinnati in Chick-Fil-A Peach Bowl matchup

Murph and Mac

01:30 min | 9 months ago

UGA face Cincinnati in Chick-Fil-A Peach Bowl matchup

"The Chick fil a Peach Bowl, Cincinnati and Georgia. The bear Cats are trying to finish their first undefeated season in program history. As long as you don't count the wonder no market 18 87 of the two unknown market 18 86. They're also trying to join you. CFTC you Boise State and Utah is the only non power five teams to complete perfect seasons. Since 2000 and four She stayed in Utah did it twice with the call of the Chick fil A Peach Bowl with Michael like junior Here's Dave O'Brien. Kevin. Thank you very much Great Tabby with us. Happy New Year, everybody. It's a real pleasure to be alongside Mike Golic Jr as we await the Chick fil A Peach Bowl kickoff between Cincinnati and Georgia, Cincinnati is Kevin mentioned. This may surprise many fans around the country undefeated at nine and no winning the American. I thought a conference and earning the right to play in a New Year's Day, six bowl. Up against Georgia. Bulldogs of Kirby Smart was 7 to 2 losses to then number two Alabama that was in Tuscaloosa and two number eight Florida 44 to 28. The Bulldogs are making their 24th. Consecutive bowl appearance. Like that is the longest active streak in America. Maybe down some starters, particularly on the defensive side, with five guys opting out, but it's a very deep team, and they expect to play a really good football team today. They

Cincinnati Boise State Dave O'brien Georgia Utah Mike Golic Jr Cftc Kevin Kirby Smart Bulldogs Michael Tuscaloosa Alabama Florida America Football
"18 86" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

01:55 min | 11 months ago

"18 86" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Good winters and breadwinners, and we're seeing longer, harsher winters in the last Say, 10 years I don't know That'll ever be as bad is the blizzard of 18 86. This truly like was one of those stories were 80% of those things that were living in a town got wiped out from the blizzard, but I'll leave it up to you. Adrian's ink to tell that story. Well, one of the deadly blizzards in Kansas history with in January of 18 86. No. They're heavy snows on seizing prairie Wind dropped 30 degrees below zero. This is one of those classic late 18 Hundreds blizzards that where there is, you know, 6 Ft of snow drifts. Stranding people. Trains everywhere. Many people froze it up outside of the home. Do the white out conditions, you know, like at that time, you know if you were gonna walk to your outhouse or something, you had better have a rope. Connecting that to your house. You're going to lose your Way back and just freeze to death. A lot of people died and from really constructed homes that were inflated enough cattle died by the thousands. Sheep pigs, you know, from some county? Yeah. 80% of the livestock died, But there were all kinds of stories of people found frozen. You know, the next day, there is In Minneola, Kansas to young ladies and their mother left their house, which is filling with snow to head to their brother's home to ride out the storm there found frozen to death. Some people had frostbitten feet and you got out alive, but you know damage from that. But there is there is all kinds of cases they think may be 100. People across the state froze to death in that storm. It's similar to this same another thing with one from North Dakota, where a surprise brother came out of nowhere as school is getting out, and a lot of Children froze across the state that they're trying to get home. But yeah, very tragic, but.

Kansas Adrian North Dakota Minneola
"18 86" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

01:55 min | 11 months ago

"18 86" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"I replace cycles through good winters and breadwinners, and we're seeing longer, harsher winters in the last Say, 10 years I don't know that'll ever be as bad as the blizzard of 18 86. This truly like was one of those stories were 80% of those things that were living in a town got wiped out from the blizzard, but I'll leave it up to you. Adrian's ink to tell that story. Well, one of the deadliest blizzards in Kansas history with in January of 18 86. No. They're heavy snows on seizing prey when they dropped 30 degrees below zero. This is one of those classic late 18 hundreds blizzards that where there is, you know, 6 Ft of Snow drifts. Branding people trains everywhere. Many people froze it up outside the homes do the white out conditions, you know, like at that time, you know if you were going to walk to your outhouse or something, you had better have a rope. Connecting that to your house. You're going to lose your Way back and just freeze to death. A lot of people died and from really constructed homes that were inflated enough cattle died by the thousands. Sheep pigs, You know from some county they ate senator Livestock died, but there were all kinds of stories of people. Found frozen. You know, the next day there is in Minneola, Kansas to young ladies and their mother left their house, which is filling with snow it ahead to their brothers homes around the storm there found frozen to death. Some people had frostbitten feet. You got out alive, but you know damage from that. But there is there is all kinds of cases they think may be 100. People across the state froze to death in that storm. It's similar to this same another famous one from North Dakota, where a surprise brother came out of nowhere as school was getting out and a lot of Children from across the state that they're trying to get home. But yeah, very tragic, but.

Kansas senator Livestock North Dakota Adrian Minneola
"18 86" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

07:55 min | 1 year ago

"18 86" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"To work. We go by the way, did you an equivalent of about a four minute research on teak floors and showers? And Ah, yes, she can. But there's a way to do it and ah to address some of the things that I was concerned about. So I took under the assumption and maybe I'm wrong. That he had some teak wood and he was Ah, ready to go put this glue this right to the Um, tile. Ah, on the shower. Now you can have a teak wood floor in a shower. But You're just not going to glue boards onto the town, which is kind of what I said. You just can't glue boards on no town expected work. But if you just Google in the teak floors, it took me to several websites. One was ah. Pinterest, which, by the way, they have this one thing with teak, which is really cool. I gotta check this out. But anyway, what they have is they have They have all kinds of things. They have teak tiles that snap together. So you could create a floor that just literally sits on top of the tile. They also have been the ones I like. There's a lot of teak. Bath mats. Uh, I didn't know that. But apparently it's a pretty out thing. Ah, but a teak Batman, Beth Matt is an option. There's also Ah, I would say, maybe looking at an inch and 1/2 by foot long. Ah teak strips that snap together. They're in panels. There's ones that built like almost like a wood crate with teak that can actually be made in cut the size. That will sit over the floor. Water will penetrate through the Teke. It won't be slippery and Italy use the existing drain, which is what I really like. It doesn't look like there's a whole lot of stuff to configure there. But anyway if you google that if they got you Interested in like, Yeah, That's a really good idea. I knew a lot about teak. And I knew how it could handle that environment. But Lo and behold, there are a lot of teak floor mats and also kids. To devise a teak shower floor. So there you go, and that's after about four minutes, so there's a lot more. I need to learn about that. John welcome. Yes. Are you good? I have a house that was built in 18 86 toe workhouse. And what I'm worried about, and the House inspector told me this ever all its involved out a little bit facing Wall. And he said this happened because there was no rain gutters. Up on the roof. Uh, okay when I bought this place 22 years ago. A couple months later, I went up and put fingers on and pretty much forgot about even looking at the wall anymore. It's moving its pleasure speed. Right this bulge. I guess it is bulging out a little bit. The only thing I'm noticing now is some of the grout is disappeared course route over 100 years old. Yeah, I'm not sure the bulge is a thing to do. It's kind of coinciding. But there's About missing really all over the house. And I saw I've seen repair. I think that's done another house right near here. What they did is they took a big metal plate. Two of them actually pulling on both sides of the house and ran it. Between the two Suck it together. Yeah, Just pull it back. Is that right? What is there a space between that brick in the house or is a right next to whatever. The other substrate is I don't I couldn't tell you whether it was or not. It looks take awhile part to see that, I guess but try been told The way they build brick houses these days is they put up a frame wood frame first, then the bricks are just a veneer, right? There's ties that go back and there's a space. Um So, Yeah, We've got to find out a little bit more. What's going on back there in terms of repair, And you also think it's one of those things. You're not gonna be able to ignore it because if you're missing The mortar in between those bricks. In bricks for a house in 18 86. The bricks very well could have been made on site. And they could be soft bricks also, and there is actually If you get a book on historic home repair. You'll find there's different types of mortar. That could be used on older homes. So it's a um, gonna have to do you're gonna have to either get some help and figure out what's going on and then some structural help on how to pull that back. But, yes, it's going to be The fix will be to pull that back. And there's also some restraint, ties and again. I don't know if that could be decree was times you said, Yeah, where you could actually Go through the brick wall into the substrate on the other side where you can literally Pull that. Push that brick back with a smaller plates rather than using the larger plates that the other folks had. Um, but the solution is to pull it back. Yes. Okay, but the biggest issues then repairing all that. Mortar. And using the right mortar. When I see it. Haven't A lot of people was old brick houses paint him. Paint the brick. Ah, well, I didn't want to do that. I thought the brakes looked nice, but would that I mean, this is like, so I've had this house for 22 years. I can't see that. It's Anything could happen tomorrow at all. And I was thinking about putting all of you get some new mortar put condoms, Grouch bag saying and mortar, knitting and painting. And now with the paint being any restraint, well, probably with the newer acrylic paints. It could be done again. I think what's gonna happen? You know it only because of the age is this Um you know each thing that you do, you're just gonna have to make sure that it's going to You know properly it here if you were to paint a brick home And again, you know, I'm referencing Brick center within the last 40 50 years. To paint that you would clean it. Ah, you would put a primary on a called looks on Which is a huge born ING agent that allow the acrylic paints to grip to it, and I have no problem doing that. It will do a very goodjob now when you get into older bricks. And we're in the bricks that 150 years old. Um, you.

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