3 Burst results for "1700 Families"

"1700 families" Discussed on The Larry Elder Show

The Larry Elder Show

05:00 min | 2 weeks ago

"1700 families" Discussed on The Larry Elder Show

"This week in the news. Newspapers Greek mythology, Africa, pop music of the 80s, mister McConnell, did you put the clue up there? Okay, this week in the news, newspapers, Greek mythology, Africa, and pop music of the 1980s, which will be an audio clue called right now. Get in right now. Triple 8 9 7 one 7 two four three did I mention the number? Triple 8 9 7 one? S a, G, E, this week in the news, newspapers, Greek mythology, Africa, and pop music of the 1980s which will be an audio clue. We're going to be playing that in just a few minutes, so I need you to call right now. By the by. The results of yesterday's zippo question have you watched the movie in a theater? In the last 5 years. 71% of you said yes, 29% said no. Have you watched a movie in the theater in the last two years? 20% said yes, 80% said, no, it's a real question about whether or not movies are going to come back. I just saw the latest James Bond movie online. I'm not quite sure what the plot was, but I think spectrum to bad guy. But. Daniel Craig had a love interest who looked like it could be his daughter, but you know, what are you going to do? Now, Kamala Harris is in Paris going BMW about the inequality gap. And remember the gentleman that I asked to come on my show to debate his assertion that the net worth slash income inequality income inequality between blacks and whites is due to slavery and Jim Crow, and of course he didn't come on. Offered me a list of books to read, refer to my show as a minstrel show. Mister ibram X kindy, whose given name was ibram Henry Rogers, but, you know, what are you gonna do? What's my name? What's my name? The idea that the net worth gap is because of slavery and Jim Crow, of course, is the whole basis for systemic racism and reparations. Only problem is not true, not saying that it didn't have an effect, but the effect of it was minor compared to the effect bad policies have had. Between 1940, 1960, the black poverty rate fell from 87% to 40%. And this is before any of the civil rights legislation was passed, any of the civil rights gains. The Japanese were heavily discriminated against. It became one of the highest earners in this country. And there was a survey of wealth in Boston in 2015, and it said the median black household had only $8 of wealth. Newsweek had this under the heading of racism in Boston. But the $8 figure did not pertain to black bostonians of Caribbean ancestry. They had $12,000 of wealth. Even though they had the same rates of college education, only slightly higher incomes, and also of course, both black. A 2003 study found that Jewish households had a 7 to one wealth advantage over conservative Protestant households, households despite the fact that Jews were discriminated against and protestants favored over much of American history. And then you have this notion that inherited wealth. Well, researched that brandeis followed a set of 1700 families from 1984 to 2003, measured their wealth over their period. They concluded that inherited wealth and length of all home ownership accounted for only 5% and 27% respectively of the racial disparity in gains. And even if they're 32% could be ascribed historical racism which in my opinion, that was still the 68% that can not be explained. And then you look at spending. Nielsen, one of the world's leading market firms keeps records on American consumer consumer behavior broken down demographically. A 2017 Nielsen report found that compared to white women, black women were more than 14% more likely to own a luxury vehicle. 16% were likely to consume purchase costume, jewelry, 9% more likely to purchase fine jewelry. And a similar Nielsen report from 2013 found that while only 62% of all Americans own a smartphone, 71% of blacks did. Now, to what extent do poor spinning habits explain the percentage of the wealth gap? Well economists at University of Chicago and Penn asked this question after analyzing 16 years of data they found that blacks, with carbo incomes to whites, spent 17% less on education, 32% more on visible goods defined as cars, jewelry and clothes, and after controlling the so called visible spinning, they concluded that the wealth gap between blacks and whites declined by 50%. To be clear, it doesn't pertain to total wealth gap, but the upshot is black's been more on cars, jewelry and clothing than whites do. Now, Milton Freeman talked about economic systems, Hong Kong used to be a rock and was poor compared.

mister McConnell Africa Jim Crow Mister ibram X kindy Henry Rogers Kamala Harris Daniel Craig James Bond Boston Nielsen
"1700 families" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

08:15 min | 6 months ago

"1700 families" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Thank you. Sponsor. Yes, Thank you. Okay. So, of course, perhaps Obviously the idea of people who are not farmers by trade growing small, edible gardens at home to supplement the food they buy from people who are farmers. That's not new. That's not a new shiny idea. Germany, for example, started a movement of gardens for the poor. In the 18 sixties, the burgeoning industrialization and urbanization without the proper like agricultural infrastructure had created this, this lack of access to good fresh food in these growing urban areas. Um, these are still around today. They're sometimes called Schreiber Garden for physician Moritz Traber, who campaigned for them also sometimes called allotment gardens. Some of the first widespread urban gardening for sustenance movements in the United States, though, happened, starting in 18 93 with the coming of the panic, which was this massive Economic depression. Lots of folks, especially in big cities were unemployed and we're hungry. Over in Detroit, then Mayor Hayes in Ping Gry. Didn't look it up. But that's a great name. Hazan Pingree started what he called a potato patch program where in the city allocated vacant land, two families for growing food. Than three years, 1700 families have covered 400 acres with food gardens. It helped that a lot of the unemployed were recent immigrants who have been farmers over in central Europe. Other cities picked up the Detroit plan to like New York City and Philly. There were also school gardens that sprung up during the progressive era. That's 80 93 1920, though. Yeah, they really got started after the turn of the 20th century, And these were these thieves, gardening programs for urban kids. And these gardens were thought to build strong world character. Keep kids out of trouble. Improved health make areas more beautiful and also Americanized immigrants. In the US when we say Victory Garden what we typically are referring to what we're thinking of our public and private gardens planted during World War one and World War two. Some historian specifically pinpoint one businessman in particular, Charles a Land trip pack. Your portly got the idea before the war, suggesting it as a way to lessen stress on American food ways. After riots broke out in New York due to food shortages, Yeah, 1916 was ah, year of crop shortages around the world. And and so a lot of a lot of folks again, especially in urban areas were hurting. Once World War One was underway. Pack organized the National War Garden Commission, though they were not officially affiliated with the U. S government and the government was not a fan of this impact believe that media messaging was the way to accomplish more widespread gardening. He allegedly came up with the idea to call these gardens Victory Gardens himself. Yeah, And that was as the war was coming to an end. They were called War Gardens or Liberty Gardens through through the end of World War one. War garden sounds so much more intense garden Garden of War, tomato of blight. That's like what it is. Ah, I'm imagining to, uh How neighbors opposing neighbors comparing their gardens to throwing some shade like what you got growing over there. Either I know is popular in some games to garden competitively, so no sure. Yeah. More garden would really up to it if we called it that So these victory gardens went up everywhere. Churches, parks, playgrounds, backyards, as the name suggests, they served not only as a way to relieve stress put on the food supply, but as a way to rev up patriotism and support for the war effort. It was a way to make people at home feel like they were doing their part. Soldiers of the soil was a popular phrase. Mm hmm. People they really got into it. Yeah, yeah. President Woodrow Wilson appointed Herbert Hoover to head the U. S. Food Administration during World War one and this position made him responsible for exporting importing, purchasing and storing food. So in 1917 just after the U. S entered World War one. Whoever helped launch the U. S School Garden Army on a national program that lauded of God in for every child and every child in a garden, um and on And this is where that soldiers of the soil thing came in that this was marketing. To youth, encouraging them to grow their munitions plants there. Oh, my God. They're gardens everywhere, producing as much ammunition or food as possible. Like garden furrows were called trenches. It was a whole thing. Um and, uh It was successful. There were 1300 school Gardens just in Los Angeles. Wow, urban and suburban communities like Got into it. Some 2.5 million kids were involved all told. Saying, And it wasn't just kids. Some three million families planted food gardens in 1917, and that number rose to over five million by 1918 there there was just a lot of propaganda. Um, uh, tear in your reserves and preserves. Uh, every kitchen, a canning factory and Back up the cannon with a canner. Uh, yeah, yeah, I got an L O l o home. Production of food was worth some $525 million, though, So all of that good, good pun writing was come coming in handy. Well, it is so funny to me that and I'm not immune to it at all. You get a good name. You turn it into like a game for kids, which trenches and get your munitions play it. It's amazing to me how effective that is. Yeah, and yeah, and and on everyone, not just Children. Just Yeah, yeah. Like, Oh, munitions plants. That's clever. Get me the tomatoes. Yeah. Yeah, I would have been in there and through strong messaging. Do the American people around consuming last while producing more rations were pretty much avoided during World War one. This whole consume. Less idea was nicknamed who've arising And was promoted by entities like the National War Garden Commission. Said commission tried to keep the spirit alive. Postwar. One pamphlet from 1919 said Prevention of widespread starvation is the peace time obligation of the United States. The war garden of 1918 must become the victory Garden of 1919. But but farm production on D economy where we're pretty good for a couple years after, and so, so home gardening like this dropped off a bit. Rights. But then World War two was a different story because America was recovering from the Great Depression. Soon after the U. S joined World War two, the U. S Agriculture secretary started espousing the benefits of Victory Gardens, although there was some federal resistance to it at first, especially early days, like, um the thought being novice gardeners would waste valuable resource is However, people were so into they remembered war one. They remembered this call to participate and the interest was just there. People really, really wanted to do their part or feel like they were doing their part and Victory Gardens were part of that. And you know, as we set the messaging was so It works so well, remembered it. So even if you have government officials being like, actually don't do that. Well, yeah, but I remember what we once had my trenches and my munitions.

Moritz Traber United States Los Angeles New York Hazan Pingree Herbert Hoover New York City National War Garden Commission World War one U. S School Garden Army World War One 400 acres 1919 U. S. Food Administration Detroit Philly World War two 18 93 US 1918
"1700 families" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

07:25 min | 6 months ago

"1700 families" Discussed on WTVN

"For growing food. Than three years, 1700 families have covered 400 acres with food gardens. It helped that a lot of the unemployed were recent immigrants who have been farmers over in central Europe. Other cities picked up the Detroit plan to like New York City and Philly. There were also school gardens that sprung up during the progressive era. That's 80 93 1920, though the Yeah they really got started after the turn of the 20th century, And these were these thieves gardening programs for urban kids. And these gardens were thoughts. You build strong world character. Keep kids out of trouble. Improved health make areas more beautiful and also Americanized immigrants. In the US when we say Victory Garden what we typically are referring to what we're thinking of our public and private gardens planted during World War one and World War two. Some historian specifically pinpoint one businessman in particular Charles a land trip pack. He reportedly got the idea before the war, suggesting it as a way to lessen stress on American food ways. After riots broke out in New York due to food shortages, Yeah, 1916 was ah, year of crop shortages around the world. Old and so ah, lot of a lot of folks again, especially in urban areas were hurting. Once World War One was underway Pack organized the National War Garden Commission, though they were not officially affiliated with the U. S government. The government was not a fan of this impact believe that media messaging was the way to accomplish more widespread gardening. He allegedly came up with the idea to call these gardens Victory Gardens himself. Yeah, And that was as the war was coming to an end. They were called War Gardens or Liberty Gardens through through the end of World War one. War garden sounds so much more intense garden Garden of War, tomato of light. That's like what it is. Ah, I'm imagining to, uh How neighbors opposing neighbors comparing their gardens to throwing some shade like what you got growing over there. Or either I know is popular in some games to garden competitively, so no sure. Yeah. More garden would really up to it if we called it that So these victory gardens went up everywhere. Churches, parks, playgrounds, backyards, as the name suggests, they served not only as a way to relieve stress put on the food supply, but as a way to rev up patriotism and support for the war effort. It was a way to make people at home feel like they were doing their part. Soldiers of the soil was a popular phrase. On people. They really got into it. Yeah, yeah. President Woodrow Wilson appointed Herbert Hoover to head the U. S Food Administration during World War One. And this position made him responsible for exporting importing, purchasing and storing food. So in 1917 just after the U. S entered World War one, whoever helped launch the U. S School Garden Army, a national program. Lauded. Ah garden for every child and every child in a garden on dis is where that soldiers of the soil thing came in that this was marketing to youth, encouraging them to grow their munitions plants there. Oh, my God. They're gardens everywhere, producing as much ammunition or food. As possible. Like garden furrows were called trenches. It was a whole thing. Um and, uh, it was successful. There were 1300 school gardens. Just in Los Angeles. Wow, urban and suburban communities like Got into it. Some 2.5 million kids were involved all told. Saying, And it wasn't just kids. Some three million families planted food gardens in 1917, and that number rose to over five million by 1918 there there was just a lot of propaganda. Um, uh, turn your reserves and preserves. Uh, every kitchen, a canning factory and Back up the cannon with the canner. Mm hmm. Yeah, yeah, I got an L O l o home. Production of food was worth some $525 million, though, So all of that good. Good pun writing was come coming in handy. Well, it is so funny to me that and I'm not immune to it at all. You get a good name. You turn it into like a game for kids or trenches and get your munitions play it. It's amazing to me how effective that is. Yeah, and again and on everyone, not just Children. Just Yeah, we're like, oh munitions plants. That's clever. Get me the tomatoes. Yeah, I would have been in there, uh, on through strong messaging. Do the American people around consuming last while producing more rations were pretty much avoided during World War one. This whole consume. Less idea was nicknamed who've arising and was promoted by entities like the National War Garden. Commission. Said commission tried to keep the spirit alive. Postwar. One pamphlet from 1919 said Prevention of widespread starvation is the peace time obligation of the United States. The war garden of 1918 must become the victory Garden of 1919. But but farm production on D economy where we're pretty good for a couple years after, and so, so home gardening like this dropped off a bit. Rights. But then World War two was a different story because America was recovering from the Great Depression. Soon after the U. S joined World War two U, the U. S Agriculture secretary started espousing the benefits of Victory Gardens, although there was some federal resistance to it at first, especially early days, like, um the thought being novice gardeners would waste valuable resource is However, people were so into they remembered war one. They remembered this call to participate and the interest was just there. People really, really wanted to do their part or feel like they were doing their part and Victory Gardens were part of that. And you know, as we set the messaging was so It works so well, remembered it. So even if you have government officials being like, actually don't do that. Well, yeah, but I remember what it was. I had my trenches and my munitions players, I would help out Oh, I heart radio is the number one destination for podcast Discovery. Find this show and more on the free I heart radio app. Use traffic and weather for Columbus Use radio 6 10 W.

Herbert Hoover New York City U. S School Garden Army Los Angeles New York U. S Food Administration Philly World War One 400 acres 1919 National War Garden Commission 1918 World War one US $525 million 1917 World War two 1300 school gardens U. S government 1700 families