35 Burst results for "150 Years"

The Close and Curious Relationship Between Mules and Donkeys

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:22 min | 2 weeks ago

The Close and Curious Relationship Between Mules and Donkeys

"I thought I would talk today about mules and donkeys. And the relationship between the two. By the way, a relationship very closely established in the movie. Or to put it somewhat differently, the donkeys are deploying the mules. Now, by the way, some of you were like, what's a mule? And really, a mule is a cross between a horse and a donkey. That's how you get a mule. And but of course, the term has a different meaning, it's used commonly, of course, in drug trafficking. And sex trafficking human trafficking, so the mule is sort of the goal between the mule is the guy who sort of does the delivery. And Catherine engelbrecht, who is the founder of true. The vote had a kind of clever idea and her idea was, hey, we're talking about trafficking also. It's different kind of trafficking. So she applied this term mules to ballot trafficking. Now, what are the donkeys come into this? Well, that's kind of pretty obvious. And that is when you look at history, I just want to take a bit of a snapshot of history. The Democrats historically are, in fact, the party of voter fraud going back to the days of tammany hall. And if you read books about the tammany era, the Democrats figured out that their best target of opportunity. This is the point that in each era there's a vulnerability, a target of opportunity. Today, it is the privately funded mail in drop boxes. It's the sort of avalanche of ballots that go, well, in the tammany days, it was the immigrants. Because the immigrants at that time basically, you just have to show up in America and you were legal. There wasn't really a process you had to go through the country, of course, had large parts of it that were unsettled as yet. And so immigration was basically a kind of show up and you're here. And so as the immigrants came marching off the boat in the classic form, they were the Democrats waiting to meet them with, you know, ballot forms. Hey, you know what sign here? Don't worry about a thing. We'll take care of the rest of it. And by the way, here are some money to buy a bottle of liquor or go see my friend so and so he might give you a job on the dock for a few hours a day. So you see that the formula is being cultivated a 150 years

Catherine Engelbrecht Tammany Hall America
Truckers Unite: The Marxist Irony of a Genuine Worker-Led Revolt

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:53 min | 3 months ago

Truckers Unite: The Marxist Irony of a Genuine Worker-Led Revolt

"Karl Marx, who coined the slogan workers of the world unite. And Marx's point is that workers everywhere have a kind of common interest, and they are being exploited by the elites, and they need to rise up. Well, look at this trucker revolt that we're seeing started in Canada. It's now in the United States. And who are the truckers? Were there the working class? These are the blue collar guys who get it done and deliver merchandise and drive cross country and they are up in arms about, well, what they see as elite tyranny, a symbolized by vaccine mandates, shot downs and so on. So this is something that the left has waited for for a long time. Well, really, ever since Mark. So they've been waiting for this for a 150 years. And for a long time, there were socialists who said, well, the working class, they're not organized. They don't know how to do this revolt. The revolt has to be done for them. This was kind of Lenin. Who talked about a kind of proletarian Vanguard, a leadership elite that would sort of spearhead the revolution? Well, here with the truckers you don't have that kind of elite. This is not something that is being organized by a group of intellectuals or professors or lawyers. It's the truckers themselves. So this is a bottom up genuine working class revolt. And guess what? The left absolutely hates it. And so here we get to an insight that Mark seems to have missed completely, which is that the values of the left certainly the modern left today's left are thoroughly antagonistic to the values of the working class. From the left point of view, the working class is obsessed with religion, they're obsessed with guns. They're obsessed with patriotism. They want to be left alone. They want to be free. And of course, the elites don't want them to be free because they'll eat wannabe ruling over them.

Karl Marx Marx Mark Canada Lenin United States
James O'Keefe Tells Us About Himself and His New Book 'American Muckraker'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:32 min | 4 months ago

James O'Keefe Tells Us About Himself and His New Book 'American Muckraker'

"To get someone whom I have admired for a long time, a young man named James O'Keefe, you may know him from project veritas, extraordinary citizen journalism, James O'Keefe, my friend, a joy to see you and to have you on the program and congratulations on the book, American muckraker. Thank you, Eric. I'm excited to talk to you about philosophy and ethics and all these themes that are inherent in this. All that highbrow garbage, I don't you know I've moved on. I became a Trump supporter. I kicked all that intellectual, you know, gravity to the curb. Now I'm just a man of the people. In all seriousness, we have a lot to talk about. But I want for people tuning into this program who maybe haven't followed you, you haven't published a book before. So I'm excited because I want people to know you and I want people to buy your book. It's called American muckraker, tongue in cheek. But just tell us a little bit about yourself for people who aren't familiar with James O'Keeffe. Well, I haven't published a book like this before. I am a journalist. I've been doing this for about almost 1819 years since I was in college and I run an organization called project veritas Latin for truth. And we go undercover, we expose what's going on. We believe that the media is broken and I think what motivates people like me and the people I work with is a sense of justice. Maybe you could call it a justice complex that things out there are not what they seem and rarely as they ought to be. And reality is not really described accurately by journalists. In fact, media organizations seem to be in harmony with the people they're supposed to be investigating as evidenced by this recent thing that happened with me with the FBI and The New York Times and Pfizer, pharmaceutical. So we, the outsiders need to do something about it, our tagline is be brave, do something. We do a combination of undercover work and whistleblowing, take people from the inside and give them cameras to expose what's going on. Most recently last week we did a story on darpa, the Defense Department had documents, literally Pentagon papers, showing that Anthony Fauci may have lied under oath. So this is what we do. We've been doing it for a while and this book is about the struggle to sacrifice the ethics the privacy of the deception. Everything inherent in this form of journalism which used to happen a 150 years ago, and now it seems to have gone the way the dinosaurs. Well,

James O'keefe James O'keeffe Eric Pfizer FBI The New York Times Anthony Fauci Darpa Defense Department Pentagon
Archeologist Dr. Steven Notley Describes Exciting New Testament Dig

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:54 min | 5 months ago

Archeologist Dr. Steven Notley Describes Exciting New Testament Dig

"I was pretty excited when I learned that doctor Steve not lay could come into the studio why you're saying why Eric because he's an archeologist. He's a distinguished Professor of New Testament and Christian origins at niac college and he is at the center of a very, very, very exciting New Testament dig, doctor Steve, Natalie welcome. Thank you for having me here. You can tell I'm bursting with country fresh flavor over this issue. I just can't. Where do we start? Just tell my audience, the nutshell version of what you are privileged to be working on right now. I like to describe the site as the last lost city of the gospels. Most people don't realize they go to Israel, they visit there. They get off the bus. There's a sign, telling them their accessory, or mojito. They don't realize that almost all of these biblical sites got lost. They were destroyed, abandoned, forgotten. And we've been in a process for the last 150 years of rediscovery. Okay, so when you say got lost, you're saying over 2000 years, we lost track. So in the last 200 years, roughly, we have been finding the places we've read about. We've been showing that they exist that they're true. But you're telling me that the one that you're working on now is the last one. This is the one that we did not know where it was until recently. Exactly. There was an alternate site suggested about a mile and a half from where we are. They've been digging there since 1987. But it had problems. And there were a lot of hesitations people weren't willing to sign off on it being Bette, which is an important site. Apart from capernaum and the Galilee, it's the second most mentioned site in the

Niac College Steve Natalie Eric Israel Bette Galilee
Author Kurt Schlichter Describes His Family

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:42 min | 5 months ago

Author Kurt Schlichter Describes His Family

"Kurt Schneider. Welcome to one on one. Thanks for having me, doctor gorka. This is a subject you're a dear to my heart. I'm writing my new book fallen rise of America. And I'm writing about a lot of this stuff as we speak. A perfect perfect segue before we get to the fall and rise of America, the maga movement America first for those who are some strange reason aren't familiar with the good colonel his background where he hails from what he did before he became a media personality. Will you share in a nutshell your bio for us, please? What your parents did, what you did in uniform for the republic and what you do today. Well, let's go back to 150 years till my to my German family was kicked out of stutt by popular demand came over here to settle and Pennsylvania, some more Germans followed. There's also a house station in there, plus some Scott. My parents are both very quintessential pennsylvanians. And it's very interesting. Both of my grandparents were high school and college coaches in Pennsylvania, both of them joined the United States navy during World War II over age, both of them were sent to the Pacific where they both ran fighter pilot recreation camps in the Pacific. So that's kind of weird but kind of shows. I just stopped there for a second. I know the ilk of the fighter pilot Corey World War II running a recreational facility for them. That must have been quite interesting because there must be some interesting family

Kurt Schneider Gorka America Pennsylvania United States Navy Pacific Scott
Mark Levin: The Industrialized West Isn't as Strong as It Used to Be

Mark Levin

01:14 min | 5 months ago

Mark Levin: The Industrialized West Isn't as Strong as It Used to Be

"I mean this is getting way too obvious the pattern from the 1930s into World War II is becoming way too obvious The industrialized west is not nearly as strong as it used to be The people are much weaker They're much weaker I talked the other day about the psychology of the United States of the people of the United States As more and more of our greatest generation passes on and more and more of their children pass on and we embrace more and more of the American Marxist movement more and more of beating ourselves over the head Over what took place a 150 years ago more and more of denying the greatness of this country We have a huge problem What if we do institute a draft Do you think the people who are now looting these stores You think the people who are were involved in these gangs you think the people who are pushing drugs you think people who've had it easy We're being subsidized not the work do you think that they're going to even honor the draft

United States
Is Roe v. Wade on the Ropes?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:09 min | 6 months ago

Is Roe v. Wade on the Ropes?

"We did know that the abortion case was taken up by the United States Supreme Court, the third branch of government article three, 9 justice on the Supreme Court in that way for a 150 years, the current regime wants to change it. And they want so essentially the issue is this is that Mississippi has passed a law that outlaws abortion at 15 weeks. The Mississippi solicitor general has decided to take that law and defend it through court, the pro abortionists, the people that are on the side that it's not a human life, it's just something else called the cells, the center for reproductive rights, they're arguing out in front of the Supreme Court. Now, I'll be very honest. My expectations were low. I'm a very pro life individual. I speak out about the scourge of abortion. We've done that on many different occasions here on this program and on our podcast. In fact, I encourage you to check out the Seth Gruber conversation from this last weekend. Connor, what great timing that we posted Seth Gruber when we did? We were holding on to that sets of dear friend. He is one of the most articulate pro life activists. I encourage you to check out that podcast, the best case against abortion you will hear. And I did not expect to have much action. I expected the justices actually Alito and Thomas I expected to probably draw a line. I didn't expect some of the middle justices like Gorsuch or Kavanaugh or Amy Coney Barrett to start to signal that they were somewhat sympathetic with the Mississippi abortion law. Now we have a lot of sound that I want to get to here. We have a lot of different kind of cuts that I want to get and the name of the case because you're going to be hearing this time and time again is Dobbs versus Jackson's women's health organization. Dobbs V Jackson and it's looking like for just kind of a bystander that roe versus wade might be on the ropes.

Supreme Court Seth Gruber Mississippi Center For Reproductive Rights Gorsuch Amy Coney Barrett Connor Alito Kavanaugh Thomas Dobbs V Jackson Dobbs Jackson Wade
What Is Hammurabi's Code?

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:46 min | 7 months ago

What Is Hammurabi's Code?

"Is. What is hammer Robbie's code? This is a good question, I think. And what is a significance with the old test of it profits? Oh yeah, this is it's actually not the profits. It's earlier in the Old Testament. The bottom line is that when they discovered Hamilton's code, I think this was in shushan or susa, which they also discovered. Like this is, you know, the archeologists keep discovering things. They go, oh my goodness, we've discovered the city of shushan or susa, which is where the book of Esther takes place. Nobody knew did it really exist. Boom, they discover it. And while they're excavating it, this is in a 150 years ago, they discovered this steel or Stela, I never know how to pronounce it. With what we now call hammurabi's code. And it's a detailed law listing of laws, very detailed. And it lists, for example, the price of a slave at 20 shekels. And that and other things, which I won't go into because we don't have time. But we now have something from, you know, many, many centuries before Christ that corroborates something that never could have been corroborated before, which is intense little specifics of when Joseph is sold into slavery. In the early pages of genesis, how much money was paid for him? How many shekels? And you can trace it through the early pages of genesis. So here again, you have out of the sands of the desert of the Middle East. You're getting archeological historical corroboration of tiny details from the Bible,

Shushan Hammer Robbie Susa Hamilton Hammurabi Esther Joseph Middle East
"150 years" Discussed on Unexplainable

Unexplainable

02:22 min | 10 months ago

"150 years" Discussed on Unexplainable

"Not <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> <SpeakerChange> somebody <Speech_Music_Male> makes it to one fifty <Speech_Male> or not. I <Speech_Male> think is largely irrelevant. <Speech_Male> The <Speech_Male> purpose behind <Speech_Music_Male> the bet was to <Speech_Music_Male> really <Speech_Music_Male> emphasize and focus <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> on the importance <Speech_Music_Male> of aging science and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> aging biology. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> It's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> real science. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> It's happening in real <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> time. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> The only <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> been a few instances <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> like that in history. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We've had <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> some sort of breakthrough <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that has <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the potential to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> be as important <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> as the one <Speech_Music_Male> that we're talking about <Speech_Music_Male> here. <Speech_Music_Male> And the fact <Speech_Music_Male> that we can now say <Speech_Music_Male> with confidence <Speech_Music_Male> that <Speech_Music_Male> we will likely <Speech_Music_Male> influence the <Speech_Music_Male> aging of our species. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> His <Speech_Music_Male> revolutionary <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> jail shanansky <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is a professor of public <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> health at the university <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of illinois chicago. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Steve said is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a professor of biology. <Speech_Music_Male> At the university <Speech_Music_Male> of alabama at birmingham. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> They both still <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> totally think they're right. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> By the way <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and ferris jaber <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is a contributing writer <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for the new york times <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> magazine. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> This episode was produced <Speech_Music_Male> and scored by noam <Speech_Music_Male> hassenfeld <Speech_Music_Male> at its meredith. <Speech_Music_Male> Had not brian resnick <Speech_Music_Male> and jillian weinberger <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> mixing and sound design by <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> me krishna. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Yellow and fact <Speech_Music_Male> checking from anyone <Speech_Music_Male> and laura <Speech_Music_Male> bullard <Speech_Male> bird. Pinkerton has <Speech_Music_Male> an unexplainable love <Speech_Music_Male> for formula. One <Speech_Music_Male> learn cats <Speech_Music_Male> heads of her newsletter. <Speech_Music_Male> And liz kelly <Speech_Music_Male> nelson is the vp <Speech_Music_Male> of fox. Audio <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> can sign up for a newsletter. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We'd articles <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and find show transcripts <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> at. Vox <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> dot com slash <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> unexplainable <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> unexplainable is part <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of the. Vox media podcast <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> network <Speech_Music_Male> and we'll be back <SpeakerChange> in your feet <Speech_Music_Male> next <Music>

"150 years" Discussed on Unexplainable

Unexplainable

04:00 min | 10 months ago

"150 years" Discussed on Unexplainable

"Lot of writers and philosophers have worried that were we immortal would suffer. This malays eventually would just run out of meaningful experiences. We would just have done everything that the human brain can conceive of. This was actually. I recently watched all of the good place and they explore this in the final season as well. You do everything and then you're done but you still have infinity left. This place kills fun and passion and excitement and love till all. You have laughter. Milkshakes when i think about technological advances they often promise utopia and then they just take what we already do to more extreme places and when you look around and you see that there's already this longevity gap between rich and poor. There's already this quality of life gap between rich and poor. Should we be worried that any sort of life span. Increasing technology would just sort of perpetuate this inequality gap that. We already have right. And that's another major concern is that we clearly have not figured out how to have a quality on your planet of about eight billion and it's easy to imagine a world in which only the truly wealthy couldn't afford the best versions of them. It can get pretty apocalyptic when you think about all those possibilities. Yeah what do you make of the fact that there are all these scientists trying to extend the outer limits of the human life span when there are still so many people that don't even make it to any kind of old age you know or or people that just have really low quality of life at that point i think a lot of these interventions you know come out of really important basic biological research because there is a lot to be gained from understanding more deeply the mechanisms underlying aging to help with a lot of new medical treatments especially for things like cancer. You which are are so closely related to those types of processes so. I think that that research is very worthy. And i also think the most desirable outcome. This kind of research would be to dramatically improve people's well-being in the elderly years that they're already going to make it to. Yeah could there be a scenario where we're just extending type of old age. That just gets worse or harder. Yeah i mean. I think there is universal recognition in agreement amongst engevity. Scientists that simply prolonging number of years is not a worthy or desirable goal. Like you want people to live longer but also healthier right like a lot of longevity researchers get somewhat defensive about this and they say that we're not interested increasing lifespan. We're interested in adding life two years not years to life. That is there a preferred phrasing. There'd be one hundred and fifty year old person. There's going to have to be a life expectancy of around one hundred years and if it's just people staying alive that are frailer and frailer and frailer. That's bargain that nobody's interested in. We've created this scenario. We got thirty years of added. Life as a result of Reducing infant child and maternal mortality. We got exactly what we want. And in exchange we got heart disease cancer stroke alzheimer's and all the diseases that appear in older bodies. We brought this out ourselves. But now we've got a different faustian bargain. That's in front of us. Instead of adding decades of life two children were now proposing to add decades of life to older individuals but it has to be healthy life. The extension of life is going to be a side effect. But that's not a bad thing. The thing about addressing aging is that it doesn't just fix the brain doesn't just fix the heart of the muscles or the is you're going to be simultaneously fixing or prolonging the demise of all of these things whether or.

heart disease cancer stroke alzheimer cancer
"150 years" Discussed on Unexplainable

Unexplainable

07:13 min | 10 months ago

"150 years" Discussed on Unexplainable

"Unexplainable. We're back we've been hearing about what could end up. Being a billion dollar bet over whether someone alive today will live to one hundred fifty while the jury is still out on that question. Both sides agree that to get a truly significant bump in our lifespan. We're probably going to need to do some bioengineering and all that kind of technology might sound super futuristic. Science journalist ferris jaber says that a lot of it is about harnessing our bodies can already do as vertebrates. We do have the ability to renew and repair our tissues and cells. It's just that we mostly lose that ability as we get older. we all used to have superpowers. Children can actually completely regenerate their fingertips and we completely lose that ability wants be become adults and other mammals are even better at regeneration. There's a type of ground squirrel that has gone to extreme hibernation and so it's brain basically shrivels and then it just re sprouts when it comes out of hibernation like a forest coming back from a forest fire so it's not just immortal. Jellyfish or ancient tree colonies that have this potential. We have it too. You know we do. Have these inmates lurking. Abilities of generation and part of the idea of this research is to kind of tap into those ferre says that there are three main ways that scientists are trying to tap into our lurking. Superpowers their cellular molecular and genetic. We'll start with the ones that target cells. So james kirkland at the mayo clinic. I'm not particularly smart. I just happen to have smart people around me. He's shown that there are certain cocktails of drugs. Which will basically purge mice of their senescent cells. So these are the cells that have aged have stopped dividing. They probably evolved as a defense mechanism largely against cancer and a way of clearing dead and damaged tissues and he's shown in studies that if he gives mice and rodents these drugs. It gives them at least a month of extra healthy living as he likes to call it. So that's option one removing cells that come with aging option to gets more targeted focusing on actual molecules at the university of california berkeley. There's a pair of bio engineers who are married arena and michael convoy the ideas that they can dilutes blood to remove molecules that promote aging kind of -ssume that aging is going one direction. Believe it or not it go backward where are younger and according to their studies. It stimulates the kind of healing and rejuvenation. That is more typical in childhood option. Three goes even further. Rather than targeting cells molecules that promote aging. This final option works with actual jeans davidson. Clair at harvard has shown that if you tweak gene expression of aging mice you can at least partly restore vision loss and ola genes. That should be on when the young come back on and all the genes that should be off when they young gets shot off. He has this whole idea that a lot of aging is to do not with the jeans themselves but the ways that the genes are being expressed how genes are being turned on and off and how that expression changes over time. Can we slow this down. And can we reset the system. Is there a reboot. Is there a backup hard-drive of this early setup and he thinks that we could potentially research those patterns of gene expression to more youthful states and that this would allow us to preserve your thirty or forty year old self for another decade longer than you would have otherwise okay so are these all theoretical or these all. It seems like you're talking about experiments on a lot of mice. I mean how far are we from actual humans getting this type of treatment to like realistic solutions to aging. I think we're we're pretty far away especially from the kind of grand visions that researchers like david sinclair have. I do think it's possible that in the next few decades we could see some types of mild interventions. I mean maybe the kind of drugs that kirkland is working on are the most likely to actually become realized yet. His research seems simpler than messing with jeans or molecules right. Just removing the cells. That come with adrian right. Because he's working with drugs that are already in existence. They've already moved into human clinical trials but some of the other stuff like the genetic engineering. I think that's gonna take a lot more work to prove that it actually works in that. It's safe and figure out how it would actually deliver it to people what's really standing in the way here. Is it a lack of technology or is it. Safety concerns on on people. I think it has a lot to do with the biological understanding. You know when you're talking about rejuvenating tissues and cells. One of the major concerns always cancer because a lot of the genes that are involved are the same ones that tumors will take. advantage of. Tumors are immortal cells. That just keep going like crazy Some researchers telling. We're really playing with fire here. We have to be extremely careful with these types of changes zooming out here. Let's say we do get to a point where scientists have announced these workable life span extending technologies. Are we sure that's a good thing. So a lot of longevity researchers who are in favor of humans living for centuries they see any sort of intervention that prolongs life and adds to health as inherently goods. The hope is that how generations we'll be able to expect to live til ninety and play tennis and even make it to one hundred and still have a second third or fourth career. You could see your great great great great whatever. It might be grandchildren. You know you could have a lot more time to experience the world. So why wouldn't we work towards that. Yeah why why wouldn't we want to work towards that. Probably the biggest one is overpopulation. Why just fewer people dying more people around right. And then there's the problem of what would that mean for politics and society and culture if they're all these generations that live for multiple centuries. Some ethicists said well. There is a wisdom to the evolutionary process of letting the older generation disappear if the civil war generation were still alive. Do you really think that we would have civil rights in this country. Gay marriage there's also a kind of more psychological or philosophical arguments. You know which is there actually value to having life being five nights. I might say. I don't want this movie to end and i'm really sad when the credits roll. But that doesn't mean. I want to see movies that never have endings. And therefore no middle's all beginnings for then they wouldn't be movies. A.

ferris jaber james kirkland university of california berke ferre mayo clinic cancer david sinclair Clair davidson harvard kirkland michael adrian tumors tennis
"150 years" Discussed on Unexplainable

Unexplainable

02:52 min | 10 months ago

"150 years" Discussed on Unexplainable

"Right now. Scientists are targeting cells molecules and even our genes to stretch the outer edges of our lifespan even further. But what if that's.

"150 years" Discussed on Unexplainable

Unexplainable

09:57 min | 10 months ago

"150 years" Discussed on Unexplainable

"Her exact age it's likely she lived to one hundred twenty two but since then no one's even reached one hundred twenty. It's interesting you would think that with. Life expectancy going up so much that somebody would have surpassed sean collins record at this point but nobody has ferris. Jaber is a contributing writer for the new york times magazine. So life expectancy over the past century massively increased and at first that was because medicine technology culture dramatically reduce deaths in childhood. And then more recently. It's been because we've been able to extend people's lives in their more elderly years but life span. The maximum reported age at death. There's a huge debate about whether that is actually still increasing or not. This lifespan debate. It's not just huge. It's wide ranging. It includes everything from statistical analyses to bioengineering two fundamental questions. About why we even age at all you know. Each time life expectancy rises. It gets harder to raise it further. Remember only one person has to make this age. We're not saying that the life expectancy would come one hundred fifty but for one person to survive this long that strikes me as increasingly likely not decreasingly. Likely just going from one twenty two to one thirty as about a light year away going from one thirty to one fifty is about a universe away which is why it's not going to happen by the way so we've got this debate about whether humans have an upper limit to our lifespan before we get to the biology of it. What's the evidence right now that this upper limit does exist so when longevity researchers investigate this question they usually draw on these large data sets of lifespan statistics and so in some researchers do this they come out with graphs and conclusions showing. That lifespan has reached an effective limits. You know john come on. Was this outlier. Ams people really can't make much past one hundred fifteen to one hundred twenty. So that's the argument that the top edge of our life span can't be increased. What's the argument that we might be able to get even older so other longevity researchers when they also performed statistical analyses on mortality data they come out with graphs and conclusions showing that the risk of death in people's elderly years seems to plateau. So the idea is that the risk of dying is pretty much accelerating throughout your life but you have pretty much the same risk of dying from year to year once you've made it into old age and therefore they argue. There is no effective limit to lifespan. Because you could kind of just keep coasting right. That's sort of basically the idea of you know you can flip a coin and it's just a fifty fifty shot each time so maybe it's unlikely but it's possible you could get a bunch of heads or tails in a row right. Theoretically you could just get really lucky and keep getting heads. Keep getting life and just keep living But i think even the longevity experts who argue that there may not be a limited life span. I don't think they actually expect people to live for incredibly long time without some sort of serious intervention. It's just that they think that there's a lot of inherent elasticity to human life span and that you know theoretically we could keep pushing it a lot longer than we already have. What do you mean. We have inherent elasticity in our lifespan. Well when you start thinking about it. As far as i can tell there's nothing really in physics or biology that absolutely mandates that an organism has to age and die. You know Animals and plants and fungi and microbes. As long as they have a source of energy and away to continually repair themselves they theoretically could keep going so then. You know this really intriguing question. Why do we age and die in the first place like what is behind that what is causing that. Yeah why do we age in the first place. So most scientists agree that aging refers to this set of physical processes that ultimately result. In an organism's death cells. Stop dividing chromosomes will literally fracture and fragments Mutations will accumulate. your organs will start to fail over time. Your immune system doesn't work as well anymore. It's basically like a machine. That gradually accumulates a bunch of small defects. And eventually it can't keep going because there's too many little things that are wrong and it just doesn't function anymore. Just think of the body is a machine. And i argue that we're operating at beyond its biological warranty period right now so i think the machine analogy doesn't work. Living systems can almost be defined as systems that have the ability to repair themselves and machines. Typically don't you know we're trying as hard as we can to push the envelope or survival just by fixing body parts with bandits. But we can't replace them. All all of our bodily organs have some ability to repair themselves ultimately that fails. But that doesn't mean that we can't potentially incorporate those repair processes and extend them so if we were to start thinking of ourselves as these big machines is there a reason why are part. Start breaking down as we get older so in biology and evolutionary biology. There's always this instinct to try and figure out what you know. The adaptive function or purpose of a traits is and most scientists agree that aging probably is not adaptive that it did not evolve for an adaptive benefit. Some organisms are able to kind of circumvent or escape this fate but only a few. There's sort of a select class of organisms. That are sort of able to evade aging. And it's because they're very strange in some ways for example. There's a jellyfish called the immortal jellyfish and great name. Great name a perfect descriptive name and it's able to revert to its juvenile state. If it is stressed or injured and then recently Scientists pulled up microbes from beneath the bottom of the ocean. And they think that those microbes had been there in a metabolic active state for one hundred million years. Just living and growing much much more slowly than we are used to but still technically alive but it's also true of really complex organisms. Sometimes like trees are probably the best example trees can be immortal. They can certainly be extremely long. Lived so you know there's a colony of trees called panda colony athletes in utah and Scientists think it's probably been alive and sustaining itself for tens of thousands of years. At least possibly longer. Wow you're telling me that. There's all these different types of organisms from microbes to immortal jellyfish to even like a network of trees so that seems like a wide swath of types of things i mean. Why can't we do it. Why can't i be immortal. So we are complex vertebrates and we have evolved an incredible suites of adaptations that while they are extremely helpful to us. They are also incredibly costly. They just requires a lot of calories and effort to maintain them. So you know everything from are incredibly large and dense sprains to are ridiculously complex. Immune systems that we have not figured out at all. That's very different from being a little gelatinous blob in the ocean like jellyfish. You know that is objectively much more simple. It doesn't have nearly the kind of complex organs and tissues that we have and even though we do have molecular and cellular mechanisms to repair damage. Those systems themselves are complicated and also began to fail after a certain point. So i think there is pretty wide agreement that you know to truly have humans that are living for multiple centuries we would have to do some sort of serious bioengineering that could take the form of tweaking. Our genetics could be drugs. So we'd have to be some sort of fundamental change to our genetics or cells or molecules. This conversation with my daughter after we had the bet she goes. Well dad. i'm. I'm i might live to hundred fifty. I go if you live to one hundred and fifty you. Don't get anything. Steve's relatives get all the money so you know you wanna make it to one forty nine and a half and concern. I've had when jay tells me stories like this. is that in. Twenty one forty nine. When there are a dozen people ready to break the record that some of his descendants are going to be out there prowling with guns and the neighborhood. Thanks for the idea steve. I hadn't thought of that. But just guaranteed me.

new york times magazine sean collins Jaber ferris john utah Steve jay steve
Georgetown Law Professor Barnett Explains Why Court Packing Is Unconstitutional

Mark Levin

01:58 min | 10 months ago

Georgetown Law Professor Barnett Explains Why Court Packing Is Unconstitutional

"You in when we need you. Court packing is unconstitutional. This is a statement you gave to this. So called Presidential Commission on the Supreme Court, which is shocking to me in and of itself. I'm sure the Supreme Court justices are keeping an eye on this and it could well affect them and depending on how they feel about things. Tell us what you you said to the commission and which is not printed here in reason Magazine. Yeah, I testified orally, and I submitted written testimony, which I recommend that people take a look at because it's got a longer version of the article, and really mark. The argument is actually very simple. And that is that this Congress does have the power to set the number of justices at any number of wishes, and that number is varied from six on the low side to 10 on the high side. The last 150 years. It's been nine. But whenever Congress changes the law, it has to do so constitutionally that and you have to ask what power is it using to accept the number and change change the number? And it's the necessary and proper clause, which gives Congress the power to make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into execution, its powers, including and the powers of any other department, which is the judicial department. That's what it is, which means a law to change the number must be necessary. And it also must be proper. So we have to look and see what the meaning of necessary is and what the meaning. Alright, let's slow down because you make it very, very important point. This clause. Which is kind of tucked away necessary and proper clause. As the court recognized this as an important clause, absolutely, including in the affordable, including in the Affordable Care Act challenge in the Affordable Care Act Challenge. Five justices said that the individual insurance mandate Was not a proper exercise of Congress's power. Um they can't make you buy insurance under the commerce power that's improper under the necessary and proper clause. Mhm. So this is

Reason Magazine Supreme Court Presidential Commission Congress
"150 years" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

03:11 min | 10 months ago

"150 years" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Gorgeous. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> Tell us about <Speech_Female> the song. <Speech_Female> What's it called him what he's singing <Speech_Female> about. <Speech_Female> It's called <Speech_Female> out of the d. <Speech_Female> Which means a theme <Speech_Female> end of the day <Speech_Female> in welsh and <Speech_Female> i it in hiked <Speech_Female> it upon dynamic <Speech_Female> in the first week actually <Speech_Female> of lock down <Speech_Female> and i was looking on <Speech_Female> social media <Speech_Female> and it was just. It was <Speech_Female> quite a toxic place <Speech_Female> right at the start. <Speech_Female> There was a lot of <Speech_Female> worry and panic <Speech_Female> and people so vile <Speech_Female> in law <Speech_Female> and i decided then <Speech_Female> to put my feelings <Speech_Female> on paper. I <Speech_Female> always say like right infamy <Speech_Female> and writing music <Speech_Female> like diarrhea <Speech_Female> It's just <Speech_Female> it's what have you <Speech_Female> feeling you your safe <Speech_Female> players <Speech_Female> so a reality <Speech_Female> that just means love <Speech_Female> prevails at <Speech_Female> the end of the day. That's the <Speech_Female> key line of the <Speech_Female> song and if <Speech_Female> we look after each other <Speech_Female> through tough times then <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> everything will <SpeakerChange> get better <Speech_Female> sickly. And <Speech_Female> you've gone. You've crazy <Speech_Female> on social media. <Speech_Female> Take time you went viral <Speech_Female> with. Your welsh <Speech_Female> covers georgia's <Speech_Female> shotgun. <Speech_Female> And then you sang <Speech_Female> ed. The welsh national <Speech_Female> anthem. <Speech_Female> And your <Silence> mission <SpeakerChange> on you. <Speech_Female> Well <Speech_Female> i am you know. I stopped <Speech_Female> at the talks. 'cause <Speech_Female> while i <Speech_Female> hear that it was huge <Speech_Female> I join <Speech_Female> just to watch some funny <Speech_Female> videos of cats <Speech_Female> beyond brilliant. <Speech_Female> I <Speech_Female> really <Speech_Female> so. I decided <Speech_Female> to stop doing these <Speech_Female> toxin. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> I did the first one. <Speech_Female> I've always been <Speech_Female> singing welsh. I've always <Speech_Female> translated <Speech_Female> into welsh. Because <Speech_Female> i've played to audiences <Speech_Female> of people <Speech_Female> that you've not <Speech_Female> always all <Speech_Female> of them fluent <Speech_Female> semilunar. Some don't <Speech_Female> speak while shibale <Speech_Female> on. I felt <Speech_Female> that if i translated these <Speech_Female> famous pop songs. <Speech_Female> That sort of united <Speech_Female> everywhere. It didn't <Speech_Female> make anyone feel <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> Did <Speech_Female> so <Speech_Female> i thought. I put it up and then i <Speech_Female> thought while it's not <Speech_Female> good enough just put in a translation <Speech_Female> up. I wanna <Speech_Female> teach them how to <Speech_Female> sing because the best <Speech_Female> part of inclusion <Speech_Female> when it comes to a latin wages <Speech_Female> teaching people <Speech_Female> so <Speech_Female> i talked <Speech_Female> People housing <Speech_Female> shotgun in welsh <Speech_Female> on sort of just <Speech_Female> skyrocketed. The first <Speech_Female> day. I woke up the next <Speech_Female> day. And it <Speech_Female> you know hundred thousand <Speech_Female> votes on <Speech_Female> Talk and my <Speech_Female> fun. Based on their <Speech_Female> now he's now eighteen thousand <Speech_Female> people. Which <Speech_Female> if you think of that <Speech_Female> in a stadium is <Speech_Female> a bit scary. <SpeakerChange> Isn't it <Speech_Female> really <Speech_Female> be packing the stadiums <Speech_Female> at some point. <Speech_Female> No <SpeakerChange> doubt <Speech_Music_Female> that. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> Hey <Music> there <Music> <Music> come a long <Speech_Music_Female> way <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> from the coast <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> to your <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> that ben. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Still like <Music> the <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> through <Music> <Music> indifference skies <Music> <Music> <Music> now <Speech_Music_Female> after <Speech_Music_Female> saddam. <Speech_Music_Female> Just <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> your <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> your <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> no <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> odds. <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> That <Speech_Music_Female> was brahman lewis <Speech_Music_Female> with hanyu single <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> hearts. My home <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and her album is <Speech_Music_Female> called canvas. <Speech_Female> That's all from <Speech_Female> me today. Have a lovely <Speech_Female> rest of the weekend. <Speech_Female> Join chloe tilley <Speech_Female> on monday just <Speech_Female> after ten and if giving ago ditch the bra.

diarrhea georgia ben chloe tilley
"150 years" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:48 min | 10 months ago

"150 years" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Think there is some some crimes not many. Fortunately which offend public sentiment. Traumatized the community The rehabilitation isn't appropriate and the rape emerges of children don't lend was in my view once crime and i think remits is the pro bono to consider the gravity of the crimes and not just issues about the protection of the public. So you have that fair that you'll sister was talking about back in twenty fifteen about him being released. Well yes yes i. It's it's yes it's it's an event that was feared I suppose it was a risk of it coming down the track at some point in time. We've we've had in favor of that. We're conscious of the message. It sends a For me it says sex offenders and child killers they can commit heinous crimes was manageable in the knowledge that they may be able to resume their lives at some point. Even though is my sister was saying they've taken. They've deprived the victims of those their own lives. Which somehow it seems to offend a sense of justice it also says that the human rights of offenders trump those of the victims and their families to pick up on the point that you mentioned in amer about the risk issue it also sends a message that they'll services wedding to expose the children. The families can live way. Used to be routed relocated to an experiment as to their safety in. I appreciate the risk assessments a made but this is far from an exact science. As the cases of joe move was an zahedi eunice show. Both were assessed as Then mariscal the risk can be managed. Assessment was wrong. The yes and the government have also fought this. As part of the statement from the ministry of justice it says the lord chancellor has launched a root-and-branch review of the parole system which will report back later this year and we are changing. The law said that child. Murderers such as colin pitchfork. Face life in prison without the possibility of parole as the default sentence. What do you make that what i think. That's that's the right response to offenses of this nature. I'm surprised i have to read it. It might be speculation that have read the ad. he committed. defenses today in would've received a lifetime. It seems Curious to me that in ups more annointment times in terms of sentencing policy. He would get all she sentence now than he did then is a source of of immense frustration. Yes is rich decision. See uncle of tone. Ashworth philip martin. I'm now joined by david. Wilson amherst professor of criminology at birmingham birmingham city. University is a former prison governor. And belinda winder. A professor forensic psychology at nottingham trent university whose primary field is sexual offending. She's also the co founder and vice chair of the safer living foundation which is focused on reducing sexual offending andrea funding through rehabilitation and preventive initiatives. Dave i go to you first of all. What what what do you make of the parole board decision..

joe move zahedi eunice bono colin pitchfork ministry of justice Ashworth philip martin Wilson amherst birmingham city belinda winder safer living foundation nottingham trent university birmingham david andrea Dave
"150 years" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:45 min | 10 months ago

"150 years" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Relaxed for our should we say yes also so. In terms of sport there is just stop. Need isn't a for for you to be supported in certain scenarios. There really is yes so whilst lifestyles might have changed on a daily basis and we might be more static more sedentary working from home and and therefore we might choose to wear a softer bra. That doesn't provide as much. Uplift is much support but what we must remember is if we're then undertaking fiscal activity or moving around more than we've got the potential to stretch the supporting structures of the breast more so particularly in sporting scenarios is really important that we are still choosing a well. Fitting supportive are less olympics. Would something would wow. I can't imagine the viewing figures that as a professor of bio mechanics. Are you a fan of the scaffolding or are you allowing yourself. Go free or allowed to ask you that. I tend to sort of change between the two options. If i am more active than i'm going for support. I need that support. I'm a breast pain sufferer. So i've suffered from breast pain for practically half my life now and so wearing a well fitting supportive ball helps to reduce those symptoms of breast pain. But i've got to be honest. I'm at home. If i know i'm not going to be active. That might opt for something. That is less structured. Joanna wakefield scare that we got your e mails coming in off the back of this item. Pamela says no one mentioned my personal big. though many. i've spoken with have confirmed they suffer the same irritating aspects straps that continuously slip off the shoulder requiring you to dig into a t shirt neckline to recover a soft support with comfortable ribcage band would be heaven. Engine is designed satellites and traveled to the moon. It's a fail to design a comfortable bra. I feel they're approaching the matter from the wrong aspect. If you want to email the program go to our website you can go social media it's out. Bbc woman's our drop is a text during the show. Eight four eight four fourth now on tuesday. The government's challenge to a parole board decision to release colin. Pitchfork was rejected paving the way for the double child killer to be freed in the next two weeks sixty one year old colin pitchfork has served thirty three years in prison after being jailed for raping and murdering lindemann and dawn ashworth in the ats. A judge lead independent review rejected a bid by ministers to halt his. Release the details of the two motors make grim reading in november nineteen ninety-three colin pitchfork..

breast pain breast pain sufferer Joanna wakefield olympics dawn ashworth Pamela Pitchfork Bbc colin lindemann government motors
"150 years" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

03:46 min | 10 months ago

"150 years" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Have no muscles within the breast said breast is a lump of tissue essentially and it sits above the muscles on the chest wall. And it's only supported by two weeks structures and those are the skin and something called. The coop is ligaments. So the cooper's ligaments internal structures but really it's probably the skin that's providing most support to the breast and the problem with the skin is it can be stretched so if we stretch the skin too much we can actually start to cause damage we can actually start to. Trek changed the structure of the skin. Said it doesn't return to it's original position. And so julia was just describing man that she she's not worried if a if a bresca down to her belly button and actually there's no disease linked to a sagging of the breast or stretching of the skin of the breast but is a psychological consideration for some women. They don't want their breasts to sag so wearing appropriate support can help reduce the risk of stretching. The skin can help reduce the risk of causing damage to those supporting structures of the breast. I'd say there's a lot of people getting in touch to say for instance wendy's also saying along these lines you have. She has to wear them. She's taught heavy. She needs the support for her back. Yet we've set in the same that from many women who who wouldn't dream of ditching their bras but actually during lockdown we did a big survey with over four thousand women and we saw similar statistics that you just reported that women are making a shift from more structured padded. Push up bras to more comfortable and more flexible bras and their own suggesting that when restrictions ease and they returned to some more normal life activities that they'll they'll still be wearing those those more comfortable soft cup bras and that perhaps they won't be returning to those at padded push up bras and women suggesting that is one reason but also the suggesting now that they're less worried about their parents. Less concerned about the shape of their bryson will ever slip likes. It's quite empower. Still needs something but not necessarily the same scaffolding. If i could put it on that well. I think it really varies from women to women. So when somebody's skin will start to stretch is very individual. It's affected by your age. Your lifestyle affected by even things like some damage. And so it's very individual in terms of how much natural support you have in the breast and therefore how much support you need from abroa- so and it's not always precise related either. So for some women with smaller breasts. They could actually have less natural support in their breasts and therefore they need more external support. So it's a. It's a very individual thing i mean. I've mentioned about the potential to cause damage to the tissue of the breast but there's also embraced pains so half the female population in the uk experienced breast pain. And we that the bra the wealth fitting supportive bra is an effective remedy for women are experiencing clinical breast pain so abroad only helps to protect the breast protect the breast tissue from damage but it can also help to reduce the symptoms of clinical breast pain. So it really varies because you might have some women as jillian said who bothered about stretching of the tissue and those women might not experienced breast pain and so you know they might then choose not to wear a brawl to wear a more.

cooper julia wendy bryson breast pain clinical breast pain uk jillian
"150 years" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:16 min | 10 months ago

"150 years" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"The three job as they've called themselves set up a petition calling for racists to be banned for life from all football matches in england. This was in response to the shocking levels of racism that was directed towards marcus. Rochford jaden show and precare soccer on social media after their missed penalties resulted in england. Losing to italy in the euro twenty twenty final within forty eight hours schyster aziz. I'm not ability. And huda. Jared had over a million signatories and on wednesday. The prime minister announced he would ensure the football bunning regime was changed and the people guilty of online racist abuse towards players would be banned from football matches schyster. Aziz told me how she feels about what achieved so far. The credit goes to the one million plus people who have shown phila- our team. We are a collective of anti races. Now we want to build this movement so we give credit to them. We all three individual women who came together to stop. Stop this ball rolling. But they've run with it and we so incredibly proud of everyone involved a very grateful that they've shown to out. This is what we need up and down this country this petition. What's happening forty hour. Let's at the subsequent announcement shows what happens when we come together. Throughout history anti-racist movement civil rights movement civil rights holiday be built The very precarious situation in our country right now with sadly hated been fighting for too long and the fact that so many people have come together. We don't even know who these people don't know their name that extremely humble so we give credit to them big laws and thanks to that basically a hitter. What have people said to you directly. What's the response been people. A religious genuinely surprised at how quickly everything happen an They are they feel heard. You'll see a feel finally that something is being done. And just very grateful to be kind of be able to be heard and have and be mobilized so we're all so grateful for every single interview signed the petition cheese continue signing. We won't let the racist win and all is not only for the racist wall is ours and this is who we are. You know people of color women muslim women. Black and brown men and women agendas of all races and Will really keen to make sure the government anti companies and the fa follow through You mentioned you know the three of you all muslim women. I'm gonna talk about smashing stereotypes. the three of you are quite an image talking to this morning but the fact that you all the ones leading this and if set this up yeah how is..

Rochford jaden schyster aziz football schyster england huda Aziz marcus Jared soccer italy
"150 years" Discussed on Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

02:59 min | 11 months ago

"150 years" Discussed on Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

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Bill <Speech_Male> o'reilly dot com <Speech_Male> my tweet <Speech_Male> at <Speech_Male> bill o'reilly <SpeakerChange> back <Silence> with the final thought in the <Speech_Male> moment. <Speech_Male> Did you know that one. <Speech_Male> Out of three americans suffer <Silence> from nausea. <Speech_Male> If you can relate <Speech_Male> you've gotta check <Speech_Male> out relief <Speech_Male> band <Speech_Male> relief and is <Speech_Male> the number one. 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"150 years" Discussed on Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

06:06 min | 11 months ago

"150 years" Discussed on Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

"And went to l. a. Got hired by the sky to said. I need you to serve drinks and my poker game so i'm like okay. Great but then then affleck walks in the room and leers caprio and a politician. That was very well recognized. And i had this lightbulb moment. That i just need to control this game because it has this incredible over these people then the feds button involved and ten days later. I get a call in the middle of the night. You need to come out your hands up. I walk into my hallway when my is adjusted to the high beam flashlights. I saw seventeen. Fbi agents semiautomatic. Weapons pointed at me if you wanna learn more about building rapport and generating type of trust that molly bloom needed to run her multimillion dollar operation checkout episode one twenty of the jordan harbinger show usa mail. We got anne. Marie concierge remember again. She gets direct access to me. Yes here it is a state that costs twenty eight dollars. Six months ago is now forty. Four dollars i hope and pray that the people who voted for joe biden will wise up. Okay i don't buy the steaks anymore. they're just too. It's too crazy out there all right fishes better for you. Anyway and fishes get filet of soul now. Woke lists in. San francisco woke lewis efforts. This goes says gray. Column bill on jackson hole and san francisco. We're safer with the bears then in these radical left cities all right so the columnist entitled one nation. No longer on. Bill o'reilly dot com. I hope you read it jerry. I agree with you. Bill cities and become liberal havens of prime and homelessness and the people in those cities keep voting in the people who made this possible absolutely warren absolutely correct. The folks voted in and voted for democrat majorities in congress and they have no one to blame but them selves. George saying there's no evidence. Putin killed anyone in russia because it cannot be investigated reminded me of exactly why. There's no evidence in the election stolen from trump. But the you know georgia did. Investigate georgia did and they didn't find it now. Let's say it was an air. But there were investigations andrew bill. Do you think the debate among the catholic hierarchy regarding abortions predominantly about teaching truth and principal or about politics could it be the vatican is not anxious to alienate the undetermined number of donating parishioners. Look the catholic. Church is a political institution. No doubt about that. Abortion is a cornerstone of the sin theology. You're taking a human life according to catholic church but they're afraid no doubt. They're afraid go. After by linda. Scholtz naples florida daily surprising shocked bill. That your assessment of biden's european trip had no impact on us. He arrived with a bag of goodies and left with nothing. Not even a party favor. We don't ever get anything from them. Donald trump did get some nato money. But we don't ever get anything from europe ever. Why would you think you'd get anything from kevin burke estonia north carolina in your opinion is it conceivable donald trump and rhonda santa's would consider running on the same ticket in two thousand twenty four. Sure sense very powerful if you wanted to be a second for trump be a powerful ticket. Russell rensselaer new york bill. I hope donald trump does not run. I voted for him twice but he cannot overcome the election corruption and people who hear his name and go the other way. it's true. He has alienated a lot of independent voters. But he did a lot of good things so if the country goes down as it's heading now donald trump will become a more powerful presence. And i think you're gonna see that on the history tour robert rudd spanish fork utah bill. What the deuce deuce me. When i say has has no do sing idea. That is a substitute for a profanity. Mcgarity the villages florida. How can the whole capitol rioters without due process when no one is outraged. L. if somebody's being held without due process. I need to know about it. I don't know of anyone being held without due process in the capital situation. If you know something pass it on your concierge remember. Give it to me quick. I'll report it. Miriam bear lake california. Very nice place bill. While you're on vacation. I killing mob. Excellent riveting couldn't put it down the way it was written. Made me feel like i was right there but i'm glad i wasn't. Yeah so am. I not a good place to be killing. Still a number one selling book in the world that amazing now nonfiction book. I should get these crazy fiction books. But what number one nonfiction book in the world. Still seven weeks. My heavens thank you all catherine flemming. Gold river california almost finished killing them up all believe the reach that organized crime had everywhere and the evil portrayal is unbelievable. This people are evil doubt about it. Okay so we hope you get mob We hope you get the killing book summaries you know. Relax have fun learn stuff in the summer. That's what it's all about We have the ditch. The mast on the apron. Throw that right up.

Putin donald trump George trump Four dollars Donald trump kevin burke russia congress joe biden twenty eight dollars rhonda santa europe twice Russell rensselaer Six months ago linda seven weeks new york san francisco
"150 years" Discussed on Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

07:22 min | 11 months ago

"150 years" Discussed on Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

"Following the deaths of brianna taylor and george floyd sang hoping to root out systemic racism in the country Your thoughts on lead all white wealthy club again in this day and age You know should these clubs continue to exist. It's a long tradition in rhode island and there many of them. We just need to work our way through the issue thank you. Let's work our way through. I've only been there thirty years and still no black people can go because it's a long tradition that no black people are allowed at the beach. Love but i sheldon whitehouse. The big progressive liberal role who calls my country races. I consider say in a club for thirty years at the blacks membership. I can do that while we work through the issue. Maybe thirty years a long enough time to work through that issue right sheldon you big phony you hypocrite. I mean it is just outrageous. You give me enough time. All of these people including ocasio cortez. I can come up with this stuff. Nobody's perfect but thirty years sheldon thirty years still working through it. Okay all right a bowl monmouth university. This is their Poll background democrats. Thirty two republican twenty. Four right away you know the polls skewed independent forty four okay. So they asked in general. Do you support or oppose requiring voters to show photo. Id eighty percent of this modern foale which is bogus to begin with. Skewed left any percents Yeah yeah we want you to show an. Id when you vote but this is no because of voter id is voter suppression rotate. Do you believe that elections are essentially rigged. What i mean by raked is this. We have a right to vote in the united states that is afforded to eligible american citizens. But we have seen over the last twenty years a constriction on who has the right to use that right. we've seen it through voter. Id laws voter. Id laws constricts suppresses. According to stacey abrams so eighty percent american nine We really need to know if you're eligible votes. You gotta show that. I did not stacy and you're racist voter ideas. Good now okay. Another poll same outfit monmouth university. Do you believe joe biden won the two thousand twenty election fair and square sixty one percent say yes duda voter fraud. Thirty two percent okay. Biparti farren square republicans thirty six percent voter fraud. Fifty seven percent of republicans biden one because of voter fraud democrat farren. Square ninety predictable do voter fraud. Four percent or percent of democrats just front but independent. Here's a number fair and square fifty four voter fraud thirty eight. That's a big number for independent. Americans think there was fraud in the election. Still get a lot of male about that. And all i will tell you and members who can privately send me an email and i answered them and i tell them this. Look we embar. The attorney general said it was fraud. And i believe. That's true. Particularly in philadelphia milwaukee fulton county georgia but wasn't enough to overcome a ten million popular. Vote win for by. Was it enough to turn pennsylvania georgia around. Well it may have been but there's not been any evidence put forth. Not that would say that. And i think that's a fair statement so you can believe that was and obviously millions of people do but really you gotta have more and bar really never really produced anything. He said it was his opinion that it was voter fraud but he never really produced anything and then he got outta there pretty fast after election day okay. I'm not going to spend a lot of time on afghanistan. I will tell you that this is a country that cannot defend itself much like south vietnam and we would even have to stay there forever which we just can't it's wrong. We stayed there long enough. But the taliban is gonna pretty much is going to be a civil war. And maybe the non taliban afghans can hang on a cobble couple cities. but it's going to be an terrorist isis al-qaeda born right back. And that's what's going to happen North dakota state university okay. So they do a poll. Four hundred thousand college students surveyed four hundred big crew all right from thousand campuses in all fifty states and most of the kids that were canvas. We're liberal most college are liberal all right so the one of the questions was. Are you proud to be an american fifty. Seven percent of liberal students answered no seventy three percent of conservative answered. Yes fifty nine percent of independence answered. Yes the liberal students which dominate the campuses. They're not proud to be an american. I'm not surprised you surprise. I'm surprised i mean. Propaganda is huge at this day in history. June twenty second nineteen forty. Two congress formally recognizes the pledge of allegiance now. This is a very interesting story. So that was seventy nine years ago. It was basically put into law. It's a law. Call the flag code. The pledge of allegiance cannot be messed with on lest the president of the united states commands it all right so the pledge allegiance was first put forth in eighteen ninety two in the use companion magazine and then it kinda got its way up into the congressional view and they changed some words but the original words were that congress okay. I pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands one nation indivisible with liberty and justice for all know under god in one thousand nine hundred forty two but then dwight eisenhower in one thousand nine hundred forces putting the under god in there.

george floyd Seven percent brianna taylor rhode island Four percent Fifty seven percent thirty six percent joe biden thirty years Thirty two percent republicans stacey abrams philadelphia south vietnam seventy three percent first ten million eighty percent seventy nine years ago thirty eight
"150 years" Discussed on Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

07:54 min | 11 months ago

"150 years" Discussed on Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

"June twenty second. Two thousand twenty one stand up for your country so we have a little politics now. Not a lot of breaking news going on but there are some political stories. You'll hear nowhere else. But here that i think will engage your attention. At least i hope so. We have miss kimberly. a guilfoil. coming up She continues to work in politics. Got an interesting story to tell. I think so. That'll be coming up. In a few minutes we begin with joe biden schedule today not to half d. He had lunch with miss. Kamala gonna try to find out what the lunches. I'm sure it's very politically correct. Whatever it is. And then one forty five Mr biden met with a femur representative. That must have been thrilling meeting. I'm sorry i wasn't there and that's it you know he'll be in his jammies. Bhai seven pacing himself or his big address tomorrow on crime so we did a little investigating. Because we don't want you to waste your time. I get paid to watch mr biden. You're an option whether you want to watchmen so as everybody knows. Crime is overwhelming cities. run by democrats. I guess there are a few republicans but it's not nearly what it is on the left so because there are so many bodies in the streets. Joe biden can't deny it's happening like he denies inflation the border intrusion. He denies all that. You can't deny dead bodies industry and they're there we have to deal with it but he's really not going to deal with it gonna talk about gun control now. We learned that. Maybe maybe switch it. But it's going to be about guns. Not murderers using guns. Just got i the approval rating for biden. His fifty two percent and about forty six percent disapprove according to rasmussen today. Same numbers come down on american research group on that Polling place a. r. g. Biden's down five points in a month. I don't really know what's driving up. Probably higher food in gas prices. But i'm not quite sure are so before we get to joe biden's crime profile. I want to tell you about what's really happening in this country and it's very very disturbing at least so when mr biden talks at the white house tomorrow. We don't know what time joe is. We don't really know what it'll be after lunch said nice lunch but it'll be at the white house so he can't attack his own can't attack democratic governors and mayors as we have in california illinois and new york Where the crime is just shocking. So as you give me a few highlights all right. So here's what. Joe biden should talk about portland oregon murder rate up eight hundred percent. That's not a typo eight. Hundred percent year-to-year portland oregon chicago just last weekend. Father's day weekend seven. People murdered forty-five wounded one two day period. La homicides up by ninety five percent year to year ninety five percent. That's eric garcetti. Mayor san francisco may homicides up a hundred percent from last year. Hundred percent san francisco new york city shooting incidents have increased seventy three percent year year. Seventy three percent. That's the blasi philadelphia. Jim kenney the mayor alright homicides up thirty eight percent year to year baltimore fifty. Seven people have been murdered in the last fifty days in baltimore now. A lotta people live in baltimore. Fifty seven people murdered fifty days overwhelming number of them. African american as they are in all of these towns except portland washington. Dc that's muriel right. Homicides up twenty five percent. Minneapolis fifty six percent. Seattle highest number of homicides in seattle in twenty-six years all democratic run cities. most of them have democratic governors. Okay there was a mayoral. Primary in new york today will be a democrat. Mayor curtis leeward guardian angel guy. He's running a republican sides but it's overwhelmingly democrat in this town in new york city. Okay and you can't go on a subway here you can't. You can't walk in times square unless you want to be endanger okay. So biden has never been a problem solver. He's he's a career politician. You know that okay from delaware and he never ever been an innovative guy guy with new ideas. He's a party apparatus. Nick but when bill clinton was president it was tough on crime. Joe joe is toughest guy in town on the thugs and he even use at work he wanted to put those people away rotate. They will or portion of them will become the predators fifteen years from now and madam president. We have predators streets that society has in fact in part because of neglect created again. It does not need because we created them that we somehow forgive them or do not take them out of society to protect my family and yours from them. They are beyond the pale. Many of those people beyond the pale and it's a sad commentary on society. We have no choice but to take them out of society. And the truth is we don't very well know how to rehabilitate them at that point. That's the sad truth yeah Joe biden cake them out of society but now shows woke joe is virtuous. Joe has seen the light. Now we're not gonna take them anywhere we're gonna let them run while we're going to let them out with nobel we're going to knock out all mandatory sentencing for even the most heinous. Who can't be rehabilitated. Woke joe rip. Van widen biden. Walk up he's enlightened now so tomorrow and his address is not going to be that which you just sir. It's going to be these goods. The guns are what does it as i told you. Yesterday i was in wyoming all last everybody has a gun one of the lowest murder rates.

Joe biden bill clinton Jim kenney california Seven people eric garcetti fifty days Hundred percent Joe Minneapolis seattle five points joe twenty-six years new york Seventy three percent joe biden delaware today eight hundred percent
"150 years" Discussed on The Bible Recap

The Bible Recap

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"150 years" Discussed on The Bible Recap

"It's been awhile since we had an all songs. Day to debut. Launched out with someone thirty four. Which is the last of the psalms of ascent it's super short and i think it's so sweet of the lord to put this song in our reading plan on the exact day our crew lands in israel so i can literally say these words of the last verse from the same place. Gods people have been saying these words for three thousand years may the lord bless you from zion. He who made heaven and earth in psalm. One forty six. The psalmist reminds us not put our trust in people. This isn't a call to be cynical or suspicious of everyone. It's more along the lines of not expecting people to rescue us or fulfil us. We place on a human. The kind of workload only god can carry it. Crushes them and it disappoints us. Verse five says blessed is he. Who's hope is in the lord this person who puts their confidence in god not in what he can do for you or how he can make all your dreams come true but in god himself period will be blessed. This isn't saying if you hoping god that you'll get all those material blessings you're tempted to try to claim the word blessed era is often translated happy so it boils down to this when we trust god in all things it brings a freedom that doesn't exist elsewhere because of his sovereignty over all things. I don't have to panic. When i'm delayed in traffic or when i don't get the job i think imperfect for because i can trust him. I can open my hand. Loosen my grip. And because i know he's doing good things somehow. I can actually still live in that blessing despite at all. That's the blessing then in psalm. One forty seven. We see that. God is attentive to the heartbroken and to a whole list of other things as well even down to the blades of grass and feet but of all his creation. The thing he delights in most is humanity and specifically the humans who know and trust him. I eleven says it like this. The lord takes pleasure in those who fear him in those who hope in his steadfast love. He loves to be delighted in entrusted. Don't we all probably the two worst things you could say to someone are. I don't like you. And i don't trust you but to love god and to trust god invites his pleasure. If you struggle with either of those things blubbing him or trusting him. Ask him for help. I know you're probably not inclined to ask the person you don't trust to help you like them. But what have you got to lose next removed onto someone forty-eight which commands basically everything to praise god in verse fourteen. It says he has raised up a horn for his people. And i immediately had the visual image of god living at a show far the rams horn that serves as a trumpet because that has both meanings of horn right. But that's not exactly what's happening here. We touched on this on day. One thirty but it's worth repeating in scripture. The horn represents strength and victory in salvation and god has certainly raised that up for his people. I prefer that to a show for any day psalm. One forty nine opens with dancing and delight but then it takes a turn in the middle averse six where it says. Let the high praises of god being their throats and two edged swords in their hands to events and justice on the nation's and punishment on the people's we went from praised a killing really quickly there. This passage reminds me of judges. Three where the killed king eglin with a two edged sword the mention of vengeance here can be easy to misunderstand. This likely refers to god's vengeance me. Israel's vengeance remember how when god promised land. He told them that he wasn't giving it to them because of their righteousness but because of the unrighteousness of the canaanites who presently live there and he told israel he would use them. As a tool to execute his justice the end of this psalm seems to be recounting that idea. We end the day with the very short psalm. Fifty with all the instruments and everything that breathes praising god for who he is and what he does. What did you see about god. Today in our reading my god shot came from psalm. One forty six seven through nine. It says god is the one who executes justice for the oppressed who gives food to the hungry. The lord sets the prisoners free. The lord opens the eyes of the blind. The lord lifts up those who are bowed. The lord loves the righteous. The lord watches over the sojourner he the widow and the fatherless but the way of the wicked he brings to ruin as i read over that list of ten kinds of people. Almost every phrase immediately brings to mind someone. Jesus had a relationship within scripture. The oppressed the hungry. The imprisoned the blind the sorrowful the righteous the displaced the widow the orphan and even the wicked. Where do you find yourself in that list. How has he shown his love to you. In that place if you want to be more godly defense. Strating these characteristics of jesus. As one way to do that. I'll end today from zion with the verse that ends that psalm. The lord will reign forever your god to all generations. Praise the lord. He's wear the joy is can give you some show notes bro. Tips number one not all podcasts. Catcher apps show notes as an option. Unfortunately you can do a web search to find out if your app has them and if so how to find them number two if you're pass catcher doesn't have the option for show notes..

israel Jesus three thousand years Today forty-eight jesus eleven Fifty thirty four today Three two edged sword two edged swords ten kinds nine One two One thirty Verse five Israel
Episode 44  Live!  Lost Cities - Visiting Troy

Relentless Geekery

00:59 min | 1 year ago

Episode 44 Live! Lost Cities - Visiting Troy

"Dog. Ravenna which is 150 years, but if you took me to Troy and hey, here's what Pompeii was like, here's what Troy was like, here's what the you know that they really did kind of take you back to a Thursday. There are Gladiators, right the arena suddenly, there are you know, like the Senate is filled with Romans and togas debating the the issues of today. That would be an amazing amount and with the AI and getting 5G you could have interactive NPCs that you're talking with just like a video game and just thinking that if at first you thought it was only like your name. Is he going to say this you're watching and then suddenly the thing sort of interact with you. Some people would embrace it as simply would be well, yeah, you know telling ghost I don't want this. I don't want people talking that are real, right, you know, you mentioned Troy more than likely we'd get a spear through us then exactly any place where the word in the language for enemy is the same as for stranger.

Troy 5G AI Romans Ravenna Senate
Judge: New York lawsuit seeking NRA's dissolution can go forward

Mark Levin

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Judge: New York lawsuit seeking NRA's dissolution can go forward

"A request by the National Rifle Association to dismiss a lawsuit seeking to dissolve the gun rights. Crew. York State attorney general The T shirt James in her lawsuit against the National Rifle Association, and several top officials claims the group mismanaged funds violated state and federal laws and even violated its own by laws and policies. A state judge Thursday rejected the entire race request to move the lawsuit out of New York City and to issue a stay or dismiss the case out right. James, in a statement says the ruling reaffirms that the N R A does not get to dictate if and where they will answer for their actions. The nation's largest gun rights group filed for bankruptcy protection last week and announced plans to reincorporate in Texas after 150 years in New York. Steve

National Rifle Association York State James New York City Texas New York Steve
Trump skips inauguration ceremony, upending several traditions

John Howell

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Trump skips inauguration ceremony, upending several traditions

"More than 150 years to skip his successors swearing in instead. Trump held his own event, the side Air Force one before leaving for Florida. Let's get more from ABC is Jonathan Karl Donald Trump tried to put on one more show of his own as he walked out of the White House for the last time, he suggested we haven't seen the last of it for the last time as president, he summoned an adoring crowd. A military band on a 21 gun salute All All for for for one one one Last Last Last speech speech speech in in in front front front of of of air air air Force Force Force One One One wls wls wls news news news time time time 6 6 6

Side Air Force Jonathan Karl Donald Trump ABC Florida White House
Trump departs on final Air Force One flight

Gary and Shannon

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

Trump departs on final Air Force One flight

"Has flown to Florida on his last Air Force One ride, Trump spoke to some supporters at joint base Andrews in Maryland before heading back tomorrow, Lago will never say and a month when we're sitting in Florida, where not going to be looking at each other and saying, You know, if we only worked a little bit harder, you can't work harder. Trump is the first president and more than 150 years to skip his successors inauguration in his speech, Trump wish the next administration luck and said he's already set them up for success. The nation's

Joint Base Andrews Donald Trump Florida Lago Air Force Maryland
NRA is leaving 'toxic' New York, heading to Texas

Mark Levin

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

NRA is leaving 'toxic' New York, heading to Texas

"Rifle Association is filing for bankruptcy and moving to Texas, where they will restructure as a nonprofit in a statement, the gun rights group says this is a way for them to exit what they believe is a corrupt political and regulatory environment. In New York state, where they have been based for over 150 years,

Rifle Association Texas New York
National Rifle Association files for bankruptcy, gun-rights group will legally move from New York to Texas

Ben Shapiro

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

National Rifle Association files for bankruptcy, gun-rights group will legally move from New York to Texas

"Association is filing for bankruptcy and moving to Texas. The gun rights group has been in New York for 150 years, and it calls the Big Apple a corrupt political and regulatory environment. New York Attorney General Leticia James filed a lawsuit seeking to dissolve the Honora. She accuses its executives of using membersdues to fund a lavish lifestyle. Hey,

Attorney General Leticia James New York Texas Apple
Hurricane Iota upgraded to Category 5 storm as it nears Central America

Sean Hannity

00:17 sec | 1 year ago

Hurricane Iota upgraded to Category 5 storm as it nears Central America

"NASA's helping to track Hurricane Iota is the record breaking storm gets closer to Nicaragua and Honduras. It's predicted to make landfall tonight is a Category five, then weekend as across the Central America and this hurricane seasons already seen the most named storms and more than 150 years with two weeks still to go

Hurricane Iota Nasa Nicaragua Honduras Central America
Secret Societies

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:33 min | 1 year ago

Secret Societies

"Welcome to kids myths and Mysteries. I'm your host kept crumb today. I'm going to take a look at secret societies. I'll be examining how these societies have affected most major changes in American society how they've taken advantage of what is often referred to as the American go along attitude and high threshold for official misdeeds personality in 2004. George W. Bush was challenged through the election process by John Kerry despite the glaring differences in their politics. They were forever joined-at-the-hip off by a secret society both were and are members of the order of Skull and Bones Bush being a third-generation member father George HW Bush's secret name was Joe Sugg his grandfather Prescott shoulder Bush actually stole for the order one of their prized possessions. Geronimo's skull the Press caught onto the connection and they asked the cap. Dates about the Skull and Bones though as separately their answers were the same. It's a secret from the confines of the Tomb the name of the structure that houses the order that's calling bones may have come precedent Senators judges cabinet secretaries plenty of CIA field agents many of the members have been that tightens of finance and Industry Henry Luce founder of time-life Fortune and natural reviews William Buckley to name just to how are members chosen you might ask the selection procedure for new members hasn't changed since 1832 each year 15 new members are recruited over the past 150 years about 2,600 Yale graduates have been initiated at any given time around five hundred members are active and it's estimated from Fringe sources that about one-quarter of that number are actively working to carry out the objective. Of the order whatever that is, however, many lose interest and stop attending meetings and are referred to as silent dropouts at the beginning of this podcast. I said be examining how secret societies affected the American public aside from the judges and Senators that are members of skull and bones in shaping our laws. If we look back at the 2018 election of George W bush who defeated John Kerry the winner wasn't determined until the following day when Kerry decided not to dispute Bush's win in a Midwestern State of Ohio could carry stepping down have something to do with the fact that George W bush held more clout within the Skull and Bones was the decision an unspoken agreement between the two bones month Wednesday, but the Bohemian Club like the Skull and Bones in some ways yet older and more widespread across the United States there also a secret society job. There is so much speculation about Freemasons influence on American money there with that in mind take a closer. Look at the u.s. One dollar bill with a Jeweler's loupe examined the one on the front to the right of the bill. Now look closer at the top left corner or curve in the design that in cases the one there, you'll see an owl could there be a connection between the owl on the one dollar bill and the giant statue of an owl in the Bohemian clubs meeting place in California

George W. Bush George Hw Bush John Kerry Geronimo United States Henry Luce CIA California Bohemian Club Official Joe Sugg Yale William Buckley Ohio Founder Prescott
Biden says he's "not a fan" of Supreme Court packing

The Takeaway

04:42 min | 1 year ago

Biden says he's "not a fan" of Supreme Court packing

"Back to the takeaway. I'm tan Xena Vega and I'm speaking with slates Marc Joseph Stern about Amy Cockney. Barrett's confirmation hearings. Barrett's confirmation could tip the ideological balance of the Supreme Court into a firm, conservative majority. And now many Democrats are openly discussing changing the makeup of the court itself. Mark. I want to talk a little bit about this idea that's come up a couple times that to be fair, the Democrats, including Joe Biden and Kamala Harris. Have really deflected on answering the question about court packing. So can you explain what that is? Yes. So the Constitution does not actually set the number of seats on the Supreme Court. It's been nine for about 150 years, but it has been I throughout all of history as few as six and as many as 10 seats. So actually, Congress is the one that gets to decide how many seats there are on the Supreme Court. And if Congress wants to add seeds, then it's allowed Teo that pretty much everybody agrees. Those are the rules. So court packing simply means Congress passing a bill signed by the president. That odd seats to the Supreme Court and in this instance is we're talking about it today, it would be an effort to dilute the influence of conservative justices. Like Amy Cockney Barrett if she's confirmed by adding liberal justices who will be able to out vote her now let's be clear. I mean, the Republicans have honed in on the Supreme Court. Ah for decades now, as they're really strategy in terms of remaking on having more conservatives on the court, and they've been very successful in that President Trump has done that in lower courts in particular. So the fight for the seats in the Supreme Court has been Ah, difficult one, particularly after the nomination of Merrick, Garland and and the GOP sort of stepping in to prevent that nomination from moving forward, And I give that background because it feels like there is a lot of criticism that the Democrats may want to pack the courts if you will, But don't they have no other choice? I mean, hasn't gotten to the point where politically, this is just a really nasty fight. Yes, that's what a lot of Democrats are. Concluding. These is for a long time court Packing was kind of a third rail of politics. FDR infamously tried and failed to do it in the thirties. But I think the Democratic Party's looking out of a little differently these days because the choices here are not very good for them. I mean, they can, either. Try to expand the courts, you know, try to get their caucus together. If they win big in November and add seats, or they can suffer for decades under an extremely conservative court, and and let's be clear if Amy Cockney Barrett is confirmed the Supreme Court will be way more conservative than it has been for decades. Probably not since the early 19 thirties. This would be A really radical change in the makeup of the court, and that's in the makeup of really America and the laws that are allowed to exist here on DH. So I think that a lot of Democrats are saying, Look, if our only other option is having the boots of the Supreme Court stomping on our face for decades, we've got to take core expansion seriously because it's the only thing that will allow our democracy to survive. And, you know, we're hearing from Joe Biden specifically has said, and I'm quoting here. That I've already spoken on. I'm not a fan of court packing, but I don't want to get off on that whole issue. I want to keep focused. Why is Joe Biden sort of toeing the line here when it comes to the court? I mean, given everything that we just talked about? Well, Biden says he wants to focus on the fight at hand. And I believe him. I think he really doesn't want to distract from this Barrett confirmation battle by by changing the entire conversation about you know what he thinks of court packing, right? The goal for Democrats right now is to throw everything into the fight against Barrett, right, Leave it all on the fields. Leave all the blood and teeth on the floor is Elizabeth Warren used to say and really make it clear that they staunchly opposed this nominee that they view the whole thing is illegitimate. But that's probably going to fail. Republicans hold the Senate Republicans seemed to have the votes. And so what I think Democrats want to do is really work up a lot of productive anger and rage among the Democratic base. And then if Barrett is confirmed, have the conversation about court expansion later after the election when it's less of a political hot potato when Democrats know whether they've won or knocked, so I think Mine's obviously being evasive and elusive here, but he's doing it for a pretty smart strategic reasons. He wants everybody to be focusing on Barrett. Not the hypothetical possibility of Democrats retaliation If Barrett is confirmed

Supreme Court Amy Cockney Barrett Joe Biden Amy Cockney Congress Marc Joseph Stern President Trump TEO Democratic Party Senate FDR Kamala Harris Mark Elizabeth Warren GOP Donald Trump America Merrick Garland
"150 years" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"150 years" Discussed on The Science Show

"There's so much rubbish around finding a place where you've got material that you can rely on is important now. The big question is whether young people reduce well. It's in these big question of course young people read US differently. We know that different generations have different reading habits but but it's not just reading. I think the big question is how you acquire information of course reading is only one way of doing it and so what we do at nature is we. We tried to engage different audiences in different ways. We have a wonderful series of podcasts. We make videos all of which are deeply factual the justice rigorously checked as our written pieces and they appeal to different audiences and they may be audiences of different ages from different generations. They may also be audiences from different backgrounds so to give you an example. We know that our podcast bring scientific discoveries in context to an audience who actually read what we right because they don't themselves engaging research on a daily basis but they have an interest. They want to stay informed informed so I think that's important to keep that in mind. As long as we can inform our audiences in a reliable way then we feel satisfied that we doing our job if you like indeed because I saw a cover story of the New Statesman two weeks ago talking about the decline of standards in British universities and some figures getting terribly worrying saying that a first-class on this degree or an upper second or whatever it is not worth what it was voight food twenty thirty years ago and getting young people engage in a way that is important now in these difficult times is vital. Is it not absolutely so just a comment on what you said about comparing what a degree may be worth today as opposed to some time ago. We have to remember them many different and ways of measuring. What does it mean that something is worth the same or less or more than it was at some other point indeed young people learn differently today the study the AIDS available. I completely different of course what happens afterwards to them. In life is also a measure of how much the degree of education it was worth so so then we make these comments we have to keep the broadest context in mind but you absolutely right that we have to engage young audiences and I deliberately say the audience is not readers because as I said they may consume information in many different ways and for us it's a constant challenge and I mean that in a a positive way because we learned through it how to engage those young audiences in the most productive way and by engaging with them we all Selana ourselves we learn what they interested in what their own problems and issues are and how they want to find out answers to these these challenges and we want to work with them. I try so engaging audiences young own not-so-young is an important part of what we do final question. What what can we expect to see in the next hundred fifty first year coming up in nature we ourselves are becoming much more interested in sciences sciences which are outside of the traditional norms of natural sciences so I think what would you can look forward to and send you what I look forward to seeing in our pages juice increasingly interdisciplinary multidisciplinary papers and stories in the magazine part of Nature Research that engages engages both natural and social scientists for example a weaves together basic sciences and Applied Sciences. I think that is probably one one of the most exciting things to look forward research and certainly hope we will see that in our pages the editor in Chief of the journal Nature the first woman in history to hold that job Dr magdaline skipper at Nature Headquarters in London..

Nature Research Applied Sciences Nature Headquarters AIDS Dr magdaline Selana editor in Chief London twenty thirty years two weeks
"150 years" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"150 years" Discussed on The Science Show

"We're here we are in two thousand nineteen and you've got lots of different journals with different through titles genetics communication you name it climate change and so on and what you're doing in the front of the Journal is having a very lively and informative set of articles and I'm looking at some of your editorials recently. There's one that says in August time time to listen to climate advice the IPC has judge job now decision makers must do there's and the nascent youth movement is showing doing them how and then there's another one experts must demand to be heard now. What you're doing is calling out for action in a rather turbulent time politics and I think the sister magazine the journal Science in America is doing the same sort of thing. You're trying to grab people's attention in a way that seems rather different from the valve stayed. Ole Tradition of Nature Hunt You. Perhaps although in many ways will you referring to is an extension attention of nature tradition unlike most scientific publications nature has this jewel aspect to it so of course it has the part in which we publish original research but unlike most other publications we have this magazine part to the general and this is the place where we indeed ourselves in our editorial call out to the scientific community but not only we call out politicians themselves when it's pertinent we call it policy makers as well of course this is also a forum for publishing opinion from experts be they researchers or policymakers indeed politicians themselves jobs. It is a very important time for quite some time now a few years. There's been an unfortunate trend towards disregarding ex-pats. What's an expert opinion and you mentioned. IPC reporter goes in the context of climate change which is incredibly pressing issue as we all know some argue that actually we are too late to revert the changes that have come about but of course there are many other burning issues in the realm of off Biodiversity Protection of environment but also in the biomedical realm and the experts ought to be listened to they they have the information they have a systematic way of evaluating pros and cons of such decisions of certain way forward. They don't necessarily need to make the decisions for that indeed. We have policymakers in the politicians but they provide the context in which discussions must take place. That's why I see our role as being really crucial here providing that forum and pushing the right individuals to release it up and listen. I've been reading you for decades and I do so with relish because I trust you and I trust you because I know having talked to lots and lots of people infect someone last night one of the most experienced science writers in the country Tim Radford who actually does reviews for you and he says the amount that you check. It's almost second to none you know the fact checkers on the ideas checkers matches New Yorker and the new times. It's incredible well. I'm delighted to hear that it's recognized that is indeed something that I and my colleagues pride ourselves on is absolutely paramount that that what we publish we have confidence in and it's wonderful to hear that that is noticed and it translates into the trust of our readers such as yourself of cautiously also these days..

Tim Radford sister magazine Journal reporter America