35 Burst results for "15%"

Why Are More Than 90% of American Children in Public Schools?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:58 min | 9 hrs ago

Why Are More Than 90% of American Children in Public Schools?

"I've got to ask one naive question at the beginning. So I've been an educator for far too long, but at the advanced level, so I taught in a private college and then I taught in the Defense Department for almost a decade. What I don't understand is why are more than 90% of all students in America in public schools, because this is the richest nation in the world until recently, we're based upon free markets and choice, my expectation as an immigrant coming to this country. I thought, well, well, if people want good education, why isn't there a market there to provide it? It's what 6, 7% of private schools? Yes, very low. It's about 6 or 7, 8% of kids. And private schools was because if you want to exercise that exit option to attend a school that you're not residentially assigned to, you essentially have to pay twice. Just talk about explain that. So essentially, we're already paying over $15,000 per child per year through the tax system towards these government run schools that are quote unquote free, but we've poured more and more resources into the system year and year after year since 1960, the U.S. education system has poured about an increase of about 287% after adjusting for inflation in per people education spending in the government run school system and outcomes have been flat. Is there a number for the average student? How much you pay in America? The most recent data, which is before the pandemic, which is a whole nother story, was already about 15 to $16,000. It's obviously higher in some states over the other, but average private school tuition nationwide is only about ten or 11,000 or 12,000 paying more as a taxpayer for substandard product quote unquote, which you really have no control over because you're locked in via zip code.

Defense Department America
Internal Polling Shows Just How Much Trouble Democrats Are In

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:19 min | 23 hrs ago

Internal Polling Shows Just How Much Trouble Democrats Are In

"This one. Internal Democrat polling, Democrats are quote getting blown out in November. A new report reveals that the Democrats party internal polling shows them getting blown out in November's congressional elections. At a meeting with the D.C., the Democrat congressional campaign committee. Chair, Sean Patrick maloney, said Democrats who are on the bubble and the upcoming election were informed that in battleground districts, the generic Republican is beating the generic Democrat by a whopping 8 points. Biden plus 8 districts are now toss ups. CLF pulled 16 districts that Joe Biden won by an average of 8 points. In those districts, the generic ballot was tied and Joe Biden's approval was negative 8. In those seats 49% of voters say they want a Republican in Congress to provide a check on Biden. And so look, I'm a loyal and public, Donald Trump fan. With that being said, it is just being honest that there is 8 to 15% of the population that will vote Republican that refuse to vote for Donald Trump. Those people exist. I know a lot of those people. I know a lot of those people are Republican in their political perspective, but they are anti Trump in more ways than

Democrats Party Democrat Congressional Campaig Sean Patrick Maloney Joe Biden Biden CLF D.C. Donald Trump Congress
'How dare you!': Grief, anger from Buffalo victims' kin

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 23 hrs ago

'How dare you!': Grief, anger from Buffalo victims' kin

"A plea for the nation to end racial violence 86 year old Ruth whitfield was one of ten black people massacred in an attack on a supermarket in Buffalo New York her daughter Robin Harris during a Thursday news conference first shouted how dare you referring to accuse gunmen Peyton gendron before she called on people in this country to take action I need this Violence to stop We need to fix this And we need to fix it now Attorney Benjamin krupp says gun makers know what they are selling and who their customers are What did they think this 18 year old young man was going to do with an AR-15 that can shoot 70 rounds and 20 seconds Authorities are investigating the possibility of hate crime and terrorism charges against children who posted hundreds of pages of his plans before the shooting I'm Tim McGuire

Ruth Whitfield Peyton Gendron Robin Harris Attorney Benjamin Krupp Buffalo New York Tim Mcguire
Craig Long Shares American Success Story

The Officer Tatum Show

01:27 min | 2 d ago

Craig Long Shares American Success Story

"Down. Craig, I want you to talk to us a little bit about it. You know, you don't have to give all your business out there. But I want you to talk to the people about your experience as a black man in America and while you're not a victim. Yeah, no, first and foremost, I want everybody to know there is a lot of people that are just like me just like Brandon do not buy into this narrative. We don't view the world through that lens that a lot of the people that collective of what I would refer to them as we don't think and move and sound or talk or adopt any of the rhetoric that they push. We are our own individuals and we have our own values. You know, I'm someone that was raised in conservative values. I was raised in the church, and I stared away from me and I gravitated to living in the streets. You know, when my mother and father split, I gravitated to the streets and I got caught up out there in that destructive culture that I'm constantly talking about to where eventually my decisions led me into doing prison time. Someone had been in trouble since the age of 15 and didn't come home until I was 25. I went from juvenile detention center to jail straight to prison. I came home with absolutely nothing, but $25 to my name. And I had to start all over. And I did. I pulled myself up by the bootstraps, which something they do not like to hear us say in the same America that they say is so racist and that there's something on the 13th floor or some white supremacy dust that's here that's going to hold us back. I didn't do

Craig Brandon America
Doug Is Joined by Patrick Assalone of the Target Trading Academy

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:27 min | 2 d ago

Doug Is Joined by Patrick Assalone of the Target Trading Academy

"Talked a lot about the issues out there of economy and investments and where the inflation is going and how the Biden administration basically has zero clue to what they're doing. And it's become very obvious, but it also affects everyday life, whether it's your gas process, your food process. But how about your investments? How about the things in life that actually can make you money, you know, set you up in your retirement accounts, do the things that you want to do so that you have some independence and financial stability. Well, I'm going to tell you right now, if you're going out talking and looking out around the world for the get great schemes, the folks who are telling you how to do it and frankly, if you look into their background, they got no money either. Not the way to do it. And so today, I've come across a guy that I've got to know a like a lot. I love his attitude. You're going to just fall for his passion. Because just great to watch. Patrick Aslan is someone who's going to talk about teaching you and what his company does is teaching you about investments and how to trade. And he also has an interesting background as well. So this is going to be one of the fun episodes of the dot Collins podcast. Sit back strap in because you're going around. You're going to want to take notes on this one. Patrick for having me. Thanks for being a part of the college podcast. Patrick explained to people now and I'm going to let you do it because it's your baby, you do it better than anybody. Explain to me what where you're at right now in your life. What you're doing and how you training and I'll give you the clicking. Do do several things here. First and foremost, I have a trading education company target trading academy where we teach people how to trade in the futures market. Not the stock market, not options that stuff is way too rigged way too dangerous and absolutely not in the retail consumers favor. It's a rigged game. I can we can have a 5 hour show and I can go through a piece by piece on how it's written. The futures market on the other hand is a zero sum game and it runs roughly 24 hours a day. So for example, let's say when New York closes at four 15 5 o'clock in the afternoon, you're stuck in a position. You can't get out. Well, when you're in the futures market, you can protect yourself roughly 24 hours and I teach people how to do this, how not to be in the market, how not to have a position, how not to have exposure, how to manage your risk, where to get in and where to get out. It's a real simple prospect.

Biden Administration Patrick Aslan Patrick Collins New York
School Board Shuts Down Mom for Reading Daughter's Assignment Verbatim

Mark Levin

01:50 min | 3 d ago

School Board Shuts Down Mom for Reading Daughter's Assignment Verbatim

"Las Vegas Nevada Clark county school board meeting A mother gets up she says I want to read to you an assignment You gave my 15 year old daughter And it's so pornographic that the school board shuts her down Cut 15 hat tip libs liberals of TikTok Go I'm going to read you an assignment given to my 15 year old daughter at a local high school This will be horrifying for me to read to you but that will give you perspective on how she must have felt when her teacher required her to memorize this and to act it out in front of her entire class I don't love you It's not you It's just I don't like your case I cheated Joe I'm sorry This is the propaganda I don't thank you so much for your thank you for your comment forgive me We're not using profanity That's relevant Okay This required my daughter to read memorize this and read this pornographic material Excuse me please don't engage with the audience So please continue your public comment your time is you've got one minute and 19 seconds I ask you simply this is a public meeting I asked for decorum And I'm asking doctor jara thank you so much doctor jar If you don't want me to read it to you what was that like for my 15 year old daughter to have to memorize pornographic material and Memorize it and Butch

Nevada Clark County School Boa Las Vegas JOE Jara Butch
Dave Rubin: Red States Show a Willingness to Compromise

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:15 min | 3 d ago

Dave Rubin: Red States Show a Willingness to Compromise

"Don't even want to get into it. The disagreements of like, what is a conservator or not? What really matters though is like we believe in consent of the governed separation of powers, the constitution, freedom of speech, we believe there's something worth conserving and protecting, and then let's go defeat these degenerate woke people. Yes, like that's the mission statement. Yes, we can set aside whatever the differences are. So Newton is so irrelevant. Charlie, some people on the more libertarian side are going to want no taxes. Some conservatives want a little bit of taxes, but they don't want a lot of federal taxes. We could put all of that aside to save the country. To save the republic. Let's just save the republic. And then we can hash out our differences after. Right? We can. And by the way, you know, I mentioned this on the show last night at the live event that, you know, when it comes to this roe V wade thing, look, the pro life thing to conservatives, this is like the top of the thing. It's about life, conserving life. So this is the type of thing. But two interesting things happen. One of them, I didn't know until the show last night. So in Florida where I now live, a few weeks ago, they passed a 15 week ban on abortion. Now, 50 weeks, that's three and a half months. That's more, even though I have some willingness for a few weeks. That's further than I would go. I would go maybe to 12, okay? Now, I get what I purely get the pro life position on this. I'm not denying that when the sperm meets the egg, it's a life, all of that stuff. Okay, fine. But think about this. Florida, which is thought of as this red, right wing, Ron DeSantis state. They did a three and a half month abortion law, and nobody cared. I don't mean nobody cared in such a good way. And what I mean is they passed it and it was thought of as a compromise, and it wasn't controversial. It wasn't on the front page of The New York Times or Washington Post. It was like, oh, here's a compromise. So that shows you that red states are willing to compromise, because if it was a purely red state position, they'd have no abortion or it would have the most minor exclusions, right? So that's what Florida did. Someone told me this and you can confirm it for me last night. I didn't know this till after the show that Arizona I think did the exact same thing. Very similar. 15 weeks. So think about that. You've got two states, Arizona, I consider a red state. And I think it will get redder. I think you're going to be okay here. We got to fix it. I know you got some things to do, but I think you're going to be okay. But the point is that the red states are showing a willingness to compromise. It's the other side that's not

Ron Desantis Florida Newton Charlie Washington Post The New York Times Arizona
93: Find What Tickles the Soul - burst 03

How to Live A Fantastic Life

07:59 min | 3 d ago

93: Find What Tickles the Soul - burst 03

"I think a lot of I think a lot of the, you know, at a certain point, I think we reach a place where, you know, listen, I don't need any more character. Life can take it easy on me now. And so I think I had a lot of the grit again just rural Tennessee and especially rural Tennessee where I was, I mean, I wasn't in the absolute deep, deep, deep, deep, deep Woods, but in the 70s and Tennessee where I was out by Hendersonville and gallatin, not like it is today. There was not a whole lot around. So I had quite a bit of what we would call character building and grid just growing up in a single parent home. By the time I got to Los Angeles, the LA part was just trying to build a career in an exceedingly difficult profession where I didn't have I didn't have any nepotism. I didn't have anything, I didn't show up here with anything on my side for lack of a better phrase. Yeah. Well, national was a totally different city back then in the 70s than it is now. I mean now it's the home and hard of a lot of productions, both movies and radio and television. That was not happening way back then in the same way. Now it's Nash Vegas. First of all, it's the number one bachelorette weekend destination in the south. It's number one, even more so than Atlanta. And number two, I mean, yeah, my mother was a country singer, but there's a very famous train station Alan in Nashville called union station that actually country songs have been written about it. It's beautiful. They refurbished it. When I was in high school, it was boarded up in dilapidated. So yeah, you didn't go past, you didn't go past 20th or 21st street towards first street to downtown. When I was a kid or you were looking for trouble and that would be just past Vanderbilt. So it's a very different city now, yes. Yeah. As I say right now, I mean to Nashville and there are many areas that you would stay out of. I mean, it's a totally grown up city and it's safe. It's prosperous. It's really become uptown. Whereas it used to be a hole to begin with. You are correct. There were distinctly places you did not go. That is correct. And now it is. It's just, it's just blown up in the last 15, 20 years. Unbelievable. Yeah. For sure. So do you remember any stories along the way that you can tell the audience? About that journey? Several of them depends on which ones we can allow on air. No, I think we, when we tend to use the word journey, doctor leica, we, a lot of times, as a country that we're very result oriented and I respectfully understand that certainly as an athlete, your result oriented, taking tests where result oriented, and so when we look at journeys, sometimes we wind up just looking at the end of like, oh my gosh, that person is so and so they've gotten to it doesn't matter what industry it is. And so when I tend to look at some of those years, I tend to look back at some of the moments when I should have looked at myself and gone, what the hell are you doing? And one of the key ones for me would have been what I chose to go to Atlanta for two years. I won an event in New York. And I could have gone to New York, but similarly, New York back then, Manhattan back then is not the Manhattan you see today. I mean, people who have not seen Times Square from a perspective of the early 80s to where it is today, Times Square was a place after one or 2 o'clock in the morning, you would just get killed. And so I had been there and for this event and as a guy who grew up in the rural south and who also was a golfer, I didn't really see myself hanging out in Manhattan trying to haul my sticks on the subway somewhere to go play golf. So I chose Atlanta, but I also went to Atlanta with a very old car, $200 in my pocket, and the only person that knew I was coming was the gal who was to be my agent. So I had to I slept in my car for three days in this abandoned Sears parking lot. That is in really upscale Buckhead at the time. It was just this big abandoned building. And it was kind of downhill and there was behind the building thing and I thought, oh, that seems safe. And I literally slept in my car for three days, and then my agent had a client that was in the catering business. And she had a couple of kids that they had moved out. She was an empty nester. And she was kind of a whack a doodle. She might have been kind of a functioning alcoholic. She was funny. And she didn't live that far down peachtree. And I rented a room from her for $50 a week. For about 6 or 7 months and then one of her neighbors was a lawyer and he knew somebody who worked at this really fancy restaurant downtown and he helped get me a job. And once I had a job for 6 or 7 months, I had enough money to finally move out and get my own place. So that's the beginning of a journey right there. That is the beginning of a journey and how did you get motivated? A lot of things were stacked against you. You know, a lot of things, you know how many actors try and never meet their dreams. How did you stay motivated during that process? You know, that becomes the intriguing part about that question for me, which ironically, I've asked a number of people on my own myself. Is we get into the we go the direction in my opinion of nature versus nurture. And I'm someone who believes, I don't think that it's 50 50 personally as a guy who was almost a psychology double major. I do believe we're a little more nurture than we are in nature personally. I think our environment of how we grow up has a little bit longer lasting effect on us and maybe the nature part of us remains a little more a little more hidden, but not always. I think that the way I grew up with just a sister and a mother who was not home very much and was sort of a latchkey kid who learned a lot on his own and had to grow up pretty fast. I think there was just a nurtured part of me that quitting wasn't really in my vocabulary. I don't know if you want to put words to something like that such as stubborn or cocky or defiant or I don't know. It doesn't much really matter. Even just going to the event that I went to in New York that I won, we didn't have any money for me to go to that. I literally had to go around and raise the money to be able to even go on that trip and when I wanted and that's a trophy that sits right

Tennessee Hendersonville Gallatin Los Angeles LA Vegas Atlanta Nashville Alan Manhattan Times Square New York Vanderbilt Sears Golf
Jason Pye and Doug Chat About Alabama's Parole Board

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:28 min | 4 d ago

Jason Pye and Doug Chat About Alabama's Parole Board

"Board shot down every single case, denying relief to 28 eligible people. Including this man, Michael bettis, he said, he is serving. He has served, hear me, served 12 of 20 year sentence for marijuana possession and distribution. He served 12. He sat at a minimum security work center where they worked him for $2 a day. Turned him down. Now is costing you folks in just to let you know out there. Probably upwards of between 50. I mean, 15 and $30,000 to house him for a year. The older he gets, the more expensive that gets. Okay? This is the part that is really, I think if we emphasize this kind of. Now, I'm not going to go into because again, to get a 12 of 20, it's marijuana possession and distribution. You know how those chargers will work. But there's nothing else here that indicates that the 12 years is not more than sufficient to have him even on supervised probation, whatever it may be. But to get him out. But they turned out all 28 eligible, not a one. I mean, is this the case where honestly the headlines are affecting what should be non attributable boards. I don't know of a better way to put that. I don't want to say partisan because in a way they are, but are political boards. I mean, what would a call something like this? And again, they might come out that there's something you need to, but he wouldn't be now think about this folks. He wouldn't be eligible for parole. If they had to not satisfied everything else in his sentences, taken into his past to get the sentence that he's currently under. It's kind of mind boggling because I think I'm not trying to be mean here. I am from Georgia. But this is Alabama, which is, which is a notoriously tough state when it comes to when it comes to crime. But even Alabama has taken some steps in the right direction when it comes to prison reform. I mean, I remember there was a state I think state senator cam ward there who helped usher through Alabama's prison reforms back in, I don't know, 6, 7, 8 years ago. And that was at the time when DoJ had followed lawsuit over prison conditions in Alabama. But it's unfortunate. And it's frustrating because there had to be one person deserving of some sort of parole who they

Michael Bettis Chargers Alabama Senator Cam Ward Georgia DOJ
Joe Manchin Will Oppose Bill That Would Codify Roe v. Wade

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:44 min | 5 d ago

Joe Manchin Will Oppose Bill That Would Codify Roe v. Wade

"Mean, let me add just one other breaking news from today. Joe Manchin was pressed very hard yesterday on whether or not he would support the what they're calling the codification of roe V wade into federal law. It's this accessibility to abortion act or whatever it's called. And he had to call a press conference and come out and say, guys, this is not the codification of roe V wade. This is an expansion of abortion, roe V wade said you had a federal right to abortion. What this law wants to do is wipe out 500 state and local laws nationwide to basically force abortion availability via taxpayer dollars into every corner of the world that it's not currently at. And to your point, it's a zero sum game. If you give them a half an inch, they will take 6000 miles. And that's why we can't, we can't just sit back and say, it's okay for them to simply state their disagreement. No, every time that Jen Psaki has said stuff crazy in recent weeks from the press room, we've got to denounce it. We've got to call attention to it. We've got to say that is not true. We've got to force facts back into the conversation because these people do not have nerve endings that receive the normal receptor messages as to, oh, I shouldn't say that. It's blatantly not true. Well, they are, we're in a new world. And that's why people like Tim Keller and others who they're good people. But what they said 20 years ago, 15 years ago, the reason it no longer applies is because the world has changed and they refuse to see how dramatically things have changed so that they're anodyne platitudes, they no longer hold.

Roe V Wade Joe Manchin Jen Psaki Tim Keller
How the Addition of Finland and Sweden Would Change NATO

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:10 min | Last week

How the Addition of Finland and Sweden Would Change NATO

"NATO is about to expand to Finland and Sweden. You were the allied supreme commander of NATO. Are you going like this? Hooray, we got the fans in or are you saying, oh my God, the finished border with Russia expands my theater of operations by 50%. It is two thumbs up. And if I had other thumbs to offer, I would make them. We have got to get the fins in the Swedes in to NATO. That big border is a tactical and strategic advantage for NATO. It allows us to move our bases our troops are jets up into that northern Flank. It gives us real purchase into the Arctic. It is a very significant chunk of real estate. We want it. So geography matters. Number two, these are warfighting nations combined their defense budget is around 15 billion. That's about a fourth of the Russian defense budget. So we're adding real money and resources and then finally hue, the Finns have a big army. They have the largest number of artillery pieces in Europe.

Nato Finland Sweden Russia Arctic Finns Europe
"15%" Discussed on CounterClock

CounterClock

06:22 min | Last week

"15%" Discussed on CounterClock

"Saying it. Other family members who I think like it or not, considerably failed John, are skip and pat straighter. Regardless of their reasons why, they hid critical evidence and information from law enforcement investigators. In doing so, they thwarted the police's ability to investigate the crime scene, unmanipulated. The choices skip and pat made on the day John died and in the days after, crippled the authorities ability to do their job in some ways. As adults, the fact that they did not even attempt lifesaving measures on John when they found him face down in the water was a lack of action, I'm not sure I'll ever be able to understand or reconcile in my mind. The one person that I think didn't fail John was his best friend, Patrick scanner. A voice you've heard throughout this entire series. Patrick spoke with police willingly, every time they asked, he never wavered on his story, and he's been the only person to not run and hide when asked to discuss the intimate details of this case. He sat down with me, a total stranger, nearly 20 years after finding his friend dead in the water, and he didn't hold back. I believe Patrick sincerely wants to know what happened to John and is upset. He's never gotten clear answers. He genuinely still misses his best friend, and you can hear it in the way he talks about John. I would love for him to be able to meet my wife, meet my daughter. I don't have a lot of close friends and never have. He was one of my close friends. It would be nice to have someone like him, you know, I've got those things that come with. I don't want to leave this story open ended, but sometimes that's just the nature of this line of work. There's not a pretty bow to tie up everything with a happy ending. I'll tell you, though, that I feel this case is far from over, or at least there's a bit of light that I think is coming from a cracked door that will just take a bit of pushing to swing wide open. And possibly result in some big changes. Just a few months ago, doctor Russell Vega called Helen Hough. They spoke for half an hour, and afterwards, she called me. She said that Vega told her he was not an expert in the way firearms function. He solely depended on law enforcement's information when he changed John's manner of death in 2017. He said he didn't have enough expertise to know if the information that he was given was wrong. He specifically said that he did not consider John's death to be a true accident. He said he actually leans more toward it not being an accident. However, based on the info he got, he felt there was enough doubt raised that he changed the death certificate. He told Helen that he couldn't and wouldn't swear in court to John's death being a result of an accident. But what he needs is more information. He said he had no problem with FDL getting involved again if they chose to. He also said he'd be happy to speak with Ruger firearms as well. Whatever it took to give him cause to evaluate the case for a second time. Until he's provided new credible information from an official law enforcement source that contradicts what he was given in 2017, Vega unfortunately just won't be able to do anything with the case. So here's where I think you the listeners can help. If you believe that the criminal investigation into John's death needs to be reopened, then right, call, email, snail mail to Florida department of law enforcement's headquarters. You can also contact their Sebring Florida office, which is the office that handled John's case in the very beginning. You should also contact de Soto county sheriff's office. You can also reach out directly to the district 12 medical examiner's office in Sarasota. Contact information for all of those agencies is in the show notes and on our website, counterclock podcast dot com. This July is the 19th anniversary of John's death. If he were still here, he'd be 36 years old by now. Who knows? Maybe he'd have opened up that general store, he told his mom about. Maybe he'd have some kids. A family life better than his own. Maybe he'd be a business owner. Nobody will ever know what would have been. But he's not here. He never made it out of that pasture in July of 2003. The same land that to this day is heavily fenced and barbed wired off from visitors. After all the work I've put into investigating this case, I've realized that my initial assessment about all that security on the southeast hansel property might have been wrong. I don't think the barriers in signage are about keeping people out. I think they're there to keep something in. Something that may explain who took John wells future. Something that can only be uncovered by reexamining the past. I hope you all enjoyed listening to this season of counter clock and take action to contact the entities I told you about. If you like the show and want to see more behind the scenes videos and pictures of the people, places and evidence involved. Go to our website, counterclock podcast dot com. Like we've done with all of the seasons so far, executive producer Ashley flowers and I will be back in a few weeks with a bonus Q&A episode to answer your burning questions about season fours case. Be sure to email your questions to counterclock at audio chuck dot com. Only submissions to that official email account will be read and reviewed. Counterclock is an audio chuck original show. The executive producer is Ashley flowers, and all research reporting and writing is done by me. Your host, Delia de ambra. So what do you think, chuck? Do you approve?.

John pat straighter Patrick Russell Vega Helen Hough Vega de Soto county pat Florida department of law enfo Helen Sarasota Florida Ashley flowers John wells Delia de ambra chuck
"15%" Discussed on CounterClock

CounterClock

05:32 min | Last week

"15%" Discussed on CounterClock

"Writer and Patrick skinner. Upon completion of their interviews, their testimony was consistent with their original stories. I know memories fallible. Did you speak to him on the phone? I think so. What was his name? His name is detective James curdy. James curdy. I'm just out of county sheriff's office. I feel like my wife would know about that too because we were together in May, May of 2016. So that was a before I moved up here. Were you still in Arcadia? I was still in Arcadia. Do you ever remember a detective coming by, reinvestigating this case? I'm drawing a blank. If it was a quick phone call, I feel like I would remember now, just to be clear, I'm not saying James curdy lied in his report about interviewing Patrick. Maybe he did interview him, but I can't find the paper trail that proves that. The fact that Patrick doesn't even recognize James name or speaking with him at all, I think is devastating to the credibility of de Soto county's investigative process in 2016. And ultimately, the entire document James curtie submitted. I'm not here to cast judgment or say what's right or what's wrong, but this glaring discrepancy speaks volumes. I don't know why dcso has moved on from this case with no questions asked. I mentioned in the last episode that their motivation just being that they wanted to get an open homicide case off their books, just doesn't seem like a realistic reason to me. I mean, they still have plenty of unsolved murders in their jurisdiction. Some even date back further than John's. They've got open ended murder cases as far back as the 1980s on their roster. So why clear enclose John's case and not take any credit for it? Again, I think it comes down to a question of confidence. I would argue that the reason we are where we are is because mistakes were made and compounded, and perhaps covered up. Finding a way to conclude my investigation and really wrap my mind around this story has been tough. It's been emotionally draining. But I think where I've ultimately landed is that I believe John was murdered. If you're not convinced of that by now, that's fine. Maybe I'm in the minority here. But regardless of which conclusion you've come to, one thing I know for sure is that a lot of the people who knew John during the 17 years he was alive and the people tasked with finding out how he was killed failed him. For better or for worse, his family's nonstop infighting and their inability to get him to help he might have needed to deal with the behavioral and emotional problems he had, heard him. From everything I've learned about John, from the moment he was born, he was denied a chance at healthy, loving relationships that would have benefited him. And maybe even changed the course of his life. He was a young man with a big imagination and dreams. He liked animals. He liked the outdoors. You know, he talked about going to the coast guard. When he was little, it was so weird, he said, one day he wanted to own a general store, just sell everything, and I asked him, and I said, well, what's it going to be the name of that? He's just white cherries. I said, what? Yeah, white cherries. Don't sell lanterns and pickles and you start even weird stuff. I thought, well, that's good. John's actual family may have been scattered in tattered, but his close friends, people like Patrick skinner, considered him family, and still would, if he was around. I think we would have definitely still been friends. I imagine he would have kids by now..

James curdy Patrick skinner Arcadia de Soto county James curtie dcso John Patrick James coast guard
"15%" Discussed on CounterClock

CounterClock

05:18 min | Last week

"15%" Discussed on CounterClock

"Appreciate it. Hello everyone. My name is Delia dean bra and I'm an investigative journalist for audio check podcast network. For the last several months, I've been investigating the July 2003 death of a 17 year old man named John wells who died from a gunshot wound and drowning in Arcadia, Florida. On July 9th, 2003, John's death was ruled a homicide by doctor William Anderson of the district 12 medical examiner's office. Doctor Anderson is now in private practice, but at the time was employed by the 12th district. Two weeks after doctor Anderson concluded his initial findings, the 12th district Emmy's office requested a second position named doctor Daniel Spitz to consult on the case and conduct a second autopsy. Doctor smith's findings were the same as doctor Anderson's that John wells died as a result of being shot by another with a manner of death as homicide. 14 years later, in February of 2017, doctor Russell Vega, who is the current chief of the 12th district Emmy's office, met with de Soto county law enforcement investigators and agreed to review the case and reconsider John wells manner of death. On March 15th, 2017, doctor Vega amended the manner of death on John wells autopsy and his death certificate and changed it from being a homicide to undetermined, thus allowing law enforcement to close the criminal investigation into John's death. I have provided supporting public documents to Chad Lucas and the board on this matter, which includes doctor Vega's two page explanation of why he changed John's manner of death, despite expressing that he had doubts the victims wound trajectory and likely immediate incapacitation matched the theory that law enforcement could presented. Doctor William Anderson and doctor Daniel Spitz have stated on record that neither of them was contacted by doctor Vega prior to doctor Vega filing his amendment on the autopsy. Both physicians feel their input would have been helpful and necessary in order for doctor Vega to reasonably change the manner of death in this case. I am requesting Sammy C evaluate doctor Vegas actions and his autopsy addendum and determine if all Florida statutes were followed. Lastly, please consider this data taken directly from the MEC's annual workload reports dating back to 2003. On average, in the last 18 years, the number of deaths ruled as homicides by the district 12 medical examiner's office have been consistent between 35 and 40 homicides per year. In all of those years, with the exception of one year, the number of deaths ruled as undetermined average between 5 and 8. So significantly less undetermined deaths in homicides in that region. In 2017, the same year that the 12th district changed John wells manner of death from homicide to undetermined. That office ruled 17 deaths as undetermined. The highest number of undetermined death rule wings than any year prior. I would like the MEC to evaluate its own data and figure out why this anomaly occurred in the 12th district in 2017 and request that doctor Vega and his staff provide a reasonable explanation. As I speak before you today, I am four months pregnant with my first child. I hope that my child would live to see beyond their 17th birthday, which was not a luxury afforded to John wells. For the sake of surviving family and a general public, please consider this request an information and pursue it. Thank you. As I walked away from the podium, the room got quiet. I think everyone was digesting what I just laid out. Iconic glimpse of doctor Vega in one of his assistant Emmys near the back of the room, and knew that everything I just said had landed on them with a lot of weight. To be fair, though, I'd requested to speak with doctor Vega multiple times before that point, and I was also still waiting on his staff to fulfill public records requests. So it's not like there wasn't fair warning and due diligence on my part. By the time I sat back down in my seat, the chairman had quickly gotten things moving along again. And the next public commenter spoke for, I'm not kidding, 20 minutes. So yeah, that whole you only have 5 minutes thing, how to loose enforcement policy, I guess. The lady that spoke after me went well over her allotted time, but she did end up getting cut off. Not by the board, but by a really abrupt interruption. Somewhere in the hotel, someone had pulled a fire alarm. In a matter of seconds, the MEC meeting adjourned, and everyone started quickly scurrying from the ballroom. Can.

John wells Vega Daniel Spitz William Anderson Delia dean Doctor Anderson Doctor smith Russell Vega de Soto county Chad Lucas Anderson John Vega prior Sammy C MEC Arcadia Florida Emmy Vegas
"15%" Discussed on CounterClock

CounterClock

02:22 min | Last week

"15%" Discussed on CounterClock

"Every one of them came from various career fields, two medical examiners, a state attorney, a public defender, a sheriff, a funeral home director, another lawyer, and a county commissioner. Some of the seats were filled, some of them were vacant, but they were an assorted bunch for sure. After the members introduced themselves, everyone else in the room stood up one by one and said their names and titles too, which I'll be honest was really awkward considering there were like 50 or 60 people in attendance. Not wanting to be the only one who stayed silent, I didn't hesitate when it got to me. Investigative journalist. If up until that point, anyone had any doubt about why I was there. It became clear in that moment. I got some head turns and leaning over looks, but whatever, I'm used to it. After a few more people introduced themselves, I heard a man's voice from several rows behind me, say that he was doctor Russell Vega, the chief medical examiner of the 12th district. When I heard his voice, I felt my heart jump a little bit in my chest because this was the guy I'd be speaking about during my 5 minutes in public comment, and he was sitting just a few seats away from me. For the next 45 minutes,.

Russell Vega
"15%" Discussed on CounterClock

CounterClock

01:35 min | Last week

"15%" Discussed on CounterClock

"Shining girls now streaming on Apple TV plus. This is my story. People need to see this. Starring Emmy winner Elisabeth Moss. 6 years ago. I was assaulted by the same man. If you're trying to be a reporter, this is your story..

We Need to Move Away From Dense Rental Housing AKA Liberal Hotbeds

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:37 min | Last week

We Need to Move Away From Dense Rental Housing AKA Liberal Hotbeds

"So I went super viral yesterday. I don't have you guys know. I don't have Twitter. We can wait so great when you don't have Twitter and someone texts you that you're trending on Twitter. It's awesome. It's like, so I did something worthy of still trending on that godforsaken website at wasteland. It's so funny when they're tweeting at me on Twitter. I'm like, you realize I don't have like okay, sure. So I said something at CU boulder that's really true, which is that we want we should make it a goal to try to have more young people to own property and make it easier for young people to be able to own property, that we need to have less renters and more people that own property. And at times, there's an unexpected cost and this is a thought experiment, and it's proven through data. There's an unexpected cost to having development that prioritizes renting, especially development that goes over 5, ten, 15, 20 stories. In fact, when you have concentrated population density, those areas tend to be a lot more liberal than areas that would be more suburban or rural. Now, I said this and I said it in a way that really bothered people where I said that tall buildings can be a prerequisite towards a city all of a sudden taking a turn away from being a conservative city to a liberal city and they just like lost their mind like how dare you blame tall buildings. I was like, okay, well, obviously I'm not blaming the height of the building, right? I'm making an argument that population density and having people living on top of one another creates a couple of factors. Like the tragedy of the commons. When everyone owns something, nobody owns it. And so you're not actually responsible for the dog park, you're like one 100th responsible for it. And then all of a sudden, you might be using more public transportation than driving yourself so you're not as connected what gas prices might be. Or a car insurance payment. I'm not saying there's anything inherently wrong with those things, but they definitely foster an environment that makes you look at things more collectively and less individually or kind of less in a way of what are all these different factors. And you guys know this when you rent, there's a way to find out, but a lot of people pay rent without actually looking at their bill, you're usually immune, not immune but you're not totally dialed into what the property taxes are and to kind of what all the other factors are. You just kind of pay your rent and you move on. But when you own a home, you know what your property tax bill is. And you know whether or not property values are going up or not. And so I said this, they lost their mind. I totally stand by it. I don't know why that was just like such a triggering thing, but like we should try to encourage young people in particular to try to own homes and to try to actually be able to be in communities that are not as population dense as urban cities that I believe actually create liberal thinking habits and behavioral habits.

Twitter Boulder
Dr. Keith Rose Describes the 'Pfizer Docs'

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:03 min | Last week

Dr. Keith Rose Describes the 'Pfizer Docs'

"Doctor Keith rose, welcome back to the Charlie Kirk show. Thanks, Andrew. Yeah. Honored to have you as always my friend. You are a wealth of knowledge. You have been privately you and I have been chatting a lot about, let's just call it the Pfizer docs, all right? It was trending on Twitter as soon as that happened. You know, if you just Google Pfizer docs right now, all you will see is about 15 articles from Reuters, AP, newsweek, fact checking some of what they call the rumors on social media and conservative messaging boards. I think this is a really fascinating conversation. So I'm going to say like this, doctor rose. I don't know how to interpret all of this data. I'll be really honest. But we have pulled here on the show a lot of very interesting screen grabs, okay? So if the people have been pulling, they've been analyzing it this way and that. And I think it's completely fair game to talk about the Pfizer dogs. Now, for people who are uninitiated, doctor rose, tell us what the Pfizer docs are and how this became a news story to begin with. Well, my understanding is that Pfizer wanted the documents that are now in the public domain. Held for 75 years, I believe, is what they requested. And that in and of itself is bizarre. I mean, that's about the equivalent of taking the national security safes and putting it in your museum and locking them up for 5 years. You know, it doesn't make any sense when this kind of information should have been in the public realm. That was yeah, just referring to Obama taking up. Yeah, what was their justification for doing that? There wasn't a justification. And that's, I think that you have to look at things. We have a lot of content, but we also need to view that content and context. And that's what I think the liberals of progressives are very good is they corrupt the context of the content with quote fact

Pfizer Keith Rose Charlie Kirk Newsweek Andrew Reuters AP Twitter Google Barack Obama
The average U.S. price of regular-grade gasoline has jumped 15 cents over past two weeks to $4.38 per gallon

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | Last week

The average U.S. price of regular-grade gasoline has jumped 15 cents over past two weeks to $4.38 per gallon

"Just just just just in in in in time time time time for for for for the the the the start start start start of of of of the the the the warm warm warm warm weather weather weather weather holiday holiday holiday holiday season season season season gas gas gas gas prices prices prices prices have have have have spiked spiked spiked spiked up up up up in in in in the the the the last last last last two two two two weeks weeks weeks weeks as as as as people people people people are are are are making making making making plans plans plans plans for for for for their their their their Memorial Memorial Memorial Memorial Day Day Day Day getaways getaways getaways getaways at at at at the the the the end end end end of of of of the the the the month month month month they they they they might might might might be be be be factoring factoring factoring factoring in in in in the the the the higher higher higher higher cost cost cost cost of of of of gasoline gasoline gasoline gasoline the the the the average average average average price price price price of of of of regular regular regular regular grade grade grade grade as as as as accelerated accelerated accelerated accelerated fifteen fifteen fifteen fifteen cents cents cents cents a a a a gallon gallon gallon gallon in in in in the the the the past past past past two two two two weeks weeks weeks weeks two two two two four four four four thirty thirty thirty thirty eight eight eight eight and and and and diesel diesel diesel diesel is is is is five five five five dollars dollars dollars dollars fifty fifty fifty fifty eight eight eight eight cents cents cents cents a a a a gallon gallon gallon gallon since since since since fuel fuel fuel fuel industry industry industry industry analyst analyst analyst analyst trilby trilby trilby trilby Lundberg Lundberg Lundberg Lundberg she she she she says says says says this this this this reflects reflects reflects reflects turbulence turbulence turbulence turbulence in in in in the the the the global global global global fuel fuel fuel fuel market market market market very very very very sensitive sensitive sensitive sensitive to to to to world world world world events events events events and and and and events events events events that that that that affect affect affect affect supply supply supply supply of of of of refined refined refined refined products products products products and and and and those those those those are are are are shooting shooting shooting shooting up up up up so so so so chances chances chances chances are are are are we we we we will will will will have have have have further further further further price price price price hikes hikes hikes hikes the the the the highest highest highest highest gas gas gas gas prices prices prices prices in in in in the the the the US US US US right right right right now now now now are are are are found found found found in in in in San San San San Francisco Francisco Francisco Francisco with with with with an an an an average average average average of of of of five five five five eighty eighty eighty eighty five five five five a a a a gallon gallon gallon gallon in in in in Tulsa Tulsa Tulsa Tulsa Oklahoma Oklahoma Oklahoma Oklahoma three three three three dollars dollars dollars dollars eighty eighty eighty eighty cents cents cents cents I'm I'm I'm I'm Jackie Jackie Jackie Jackie Quinn Quinn Quinn Quinn

Memorial Memorial Memorial Mem Trilby Trilby Trilby Trilby Lu Lundberg Lundberg San San San San Francisco Francisco United States Tulsa Oklahoma Jackie Jackie Jackie Jackie Qu
Is There Any Hope for California?

The Charlie Kirk Show

00:59 sec | Last week

Is There Any Hope for California?

"I'm asked all the time. Charlie, do you think there's any hope for California? And my answer is always the same as we have to make our own hope happen. We have to obviously fast and pray for the nation and the land that we're in. But we also have to do things that actually make a substantial difference. No longer be a spectator, but be a participant in that. And in some ways, that is against where a lot of conservatism has been in the recent years where some people think that, hey, we just went a presidential election. I can kind of take it off. And I'm just going to kind of watch the rest on TV. The left is never thought that way. They've been in the trenches. They've been in the schools for a long time. And I'm starting to see a mindset shift. I really am. I'm starting to see after the initial shock that you're not going to get your country back in just 18 months. Now I see conservatives putting their work in boots on. Now I see people that are willing to get into the trenches into the grassroots and say, look, this might take 5, ten, 15, 20, 30, 40 years. But I'm willing to do that because my grandkids are worth it because liberty is worth fighting for.

Charlie California
John O'Neill Previews Co-Authored Book 'The Dancer and the Devil'

Mark Levin

02:00 min | 2 weeks ago

John O'Neill Previews Co-Authored Book 'The Dancer and the Devil'

"Well the one that really see it Mark I think your American Marxism which is a fabulous book Now we stop the Marcus Marxist from taking over And I think sadly the dancer and the devil is the story of the hell they create when they actually do take over in Stalin's period and Putin Russia and yeltsin's in chase China When we tried to write the book we wrote the book and I should tell you we had a incident We had the entire book on a computer all of a sudden the computer was opened at 4 o'clock in the morning That seems strange And my co author's website was hit probably 40 different places in China And then all the material on the cloud was all destroyed And we went to the they were looking for sources We went to the FBI They recommended a forensics expert We got the forensics expert in our book was hit Our manuscripts and our sources were hit from China They didn't get the sources Thank God that would relate directly to China And so this is a book they really didn't want people to read at all And it was funny The publishers in New York said we love the book We love the part about solid but you have to take out the part of that China And we said look sorry it's been around for a little while And it's either a full glass of water or no glass of water So people desperately want to know more 15 million people in the world have died a million Americans And they really want to know what on earth happened at Wuhan How did this virus come about And yet we're afraid to afraid to tell It's like a subject that people are afraid to discuss So that's how it's done That is sort of the endgame of the book

China Yeltsin Stalin Putin Russia Mark FBI New York Wuhan
Monthly Rents Skyrocket Amid Record Inflation

The Charlie Kirk Show

05:02 min | 2 weeks ago

Monthly Rents Skyrocket Amid Record Inflation

"Hey everybody, Tyler Charlie Kirk show. What are the new results out of Ohio mean for the midterms? Our Democrats favored to win anything at all, and also a new announcement from turning point, pack, TP pack dot com that is TP PAC dot com, or you guys can contribute some grassroots donations to help America first candidates across the country that's TP PAC dot com. We talk with Tyler Boyer about that and the need to reclaim the America first mantle from the ground up. Email me your thoughts is always freedom at Charlie Kirk dot com, get involved with turning point USA at TP USA dot com or email me your thoughts is always freedom at Charlie Kirk dot com. Buckle up everybody here. We go. Charlie, what you've done is incredible here. Maybe Charlie Kirk is on the college campus. I want you to know we are lucky to have Charlie Kirk. Charlie Kirk's running The White House folks. I want to thank Charlie. He's an incredible guy, his spirit, his love of this country. He's done an amazing job. Building one of the most powerful youth organizations ever created turning point USA. We will not embrace the ideas that have destroyed countries, destroyed lives, and we are going to fight for freedom on campuses across the country. That's why we are here. Brought to you by the loan experts I trust, Andrew and Todd at Sierra Pacific mortgage at Andrew and Todd dot com. I want to lead with this one thing. I have a friend of mine who's a wonderful American from Dallas, whose in real estate, probably one of the top private owners of apartment buildings in the country. And he just said, hey, Charlie, I want you to see these rent inflation crazy numbers. I'm not going to say his name just to, you know, for obvious reasons. But so this is the last 30 movements, okay? So Phoenix, for example, for the last 30, the average prior rent used to be 1325 a month for his and he owns apartment buildings all over Phoenix. Now it's 1693 a month. That means that rent has gone up 27.8% on average in Phoenix. It is last 30 movements. Austin, 23%, San Antonio 21%. Dallas Fort Worth, 18%. North Carolina, 16% Houston 15%. The real inflation rate, I said this the other day, and someone laughed at me, but when they laugh at us, that's how you know we're probably right. I said the real inflation rate is 35%. I said it's right near there. For working people, that's about where it is. If you count gas, you count food, you can't travel. You count all that other stuff. So Andrew and I were talking in the break, he says, I don't know, I don't know, have we peaked too early, Andrew said of Republicans, are we going to be able to sustain this the November? I said, look at these rent numbers. You're trying to tell me people are going to keep the people in charge over this. I don't know, but someone who does know is Richard barris, from the people's pundit, and he's wearing a tie just to make me look bad. Big data polls, Richard barris, Richard. Welcome back to the program. Hey, thanks for having me back. I appreciate it. So a lot to unpack here. Let's start with kind of what happened in Ohio. What does that message send? What is your polling show? How big of a deal is what just happened in Ohio? You know, it's a big deal, Charlie, for the future of the party. The direction of the party, you know, the Trump endorsed candidates outside of JD Vance even did great. There was the first congressional district in Indiana. She won, so, you know, I mean, oh, and by the way, Ohio 9. So that was a race the media definitely was watching and trying to take out, you know, take down the Trump endorsed candidate. He did pull it off and he did incredible in an outside of Toledo, which is where a lot of people thought that Gaborone would do better. You know, so in the end, if you look at where van specifically got his support from, the reason I think a lot of these polls messed up outside of Vance's 100% correct. Outside of Remington, which was pulling for another campaign, they were just wrong. Some of the other public polls didn't really catch Vance's full support because when a pollster does a likely voter model, I suspected this was happening and it did. Those new Trump accounts, they're not really Republicans, Ohio has a lot of them. And they'll tell you, I'm going to vote. I'm likely to vote or I'm certain to vote. But then the pollster will go back and look at vote history and in a primary. If they're not a two out of four voter, meaning they voted in at least two and the last four primaries, they'll get screened out. And because these voters are newly Republican and close primary, they didn't have much vote history and you could see it all over. Mahoning, Youngstown, trumbull, the election day and wood in the northwest, just south of Toledo. That was Trump vote. That is Trump vote. And then Vance did excellent, obviously. In Cleveland, Hamilton county and the suburbs around it. So at the end of the day, it sent a very clear message. The president saw a very strong grip on the Republican Party without a doubt.

Charlie Kirk Charlie Tyler Charlie Kirk Tyler Boyer Richard Barris Andrew Ohio USA Sierra Pacific Mortgage Phoenix Dallas Fort Worth Todd Jd Vance
Yoram Hazony on Foundations of the Conservative Movement in the 1960s

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:52 min | 2 weeks ago

Yoram Hazony on Foundations of the Conservative Movement in the 1960s

"Through kind of what we would consider to be kind of post World War II liberalism. If I were to be honest, in 2014 and 15, I was kind of naive enough to believe that real conservatives were actually small L liberals that we are the defenders of classical liberalism. You push back against this and you kind of also reject some of the fusionism of the 1960s and kind of some of the liberal movements post World War II. For some of our audience that isn't as well read into that. Give them a little bit of a taste of exactly what happened post World War II with this kind of quote unquote neoliberal orthodoxy that set in and how some even self described conservatives would play ball with that. Sure. I mean, the truth is that the conservative movement in the 1960s, which was put together the quarterback was, as you know, was William Buckley. But it was actually an alliance of liberals and conservatives, liberals, meaning people who are people are mostly concerned with individual freedoms and conservatives who are much more concerned with the question of how do we maintain and transmit things from one generation to the next. And the reason for the coalition, I mean, there's lots of times in places where liberals and conservatives were in different opposing political parties, opposing movements. But in the 1960s with the rise of socialism, you know, sort of across the board in America and Britain and other democracies. And the threat of communism, obviously, of the Soviet communism, which was expanding rapidly. So in that situation, the right was kind of reconstituted as an alliance between liberals and conservatives.

Alliance Of Liberals William Buckley Britain America
"15%" Discussed on Chats With Cats Podcast

Chats With Cats Podcast

02:49 min | 11 months ago

"15%" Discussed on Chats With Cats Podcast

"And i think this is one of the things where if you packed bed have always on the saying fucking park. Betty your wanka oliver. I've never had. I've never had sixty sane of cena on social media of saint people write them. I think people should be at a parking on input on the subject of had instagram. Never forget seven years. I got up because roy stampede. I thought i needed to have it. What am i. I ever photos was a photo where i was living of the worst part of assane. Dan put it on the screen now so the viewers that are actually watching us on youtube vice but will say this. That is the worst part. I've ever saying still today. It was an absolute disgrace and anyone just saw that. It is embarrassing or senate to after the show. Is it a good car. i think it was. It's a bad car but it's just horrible park. It's a disgraceful effort. Clear away on someone having one hundred thousand dollar car and parking in the middle of cowpox to protect big. No let all my gone. Another one insurance okay. Another one all right. So i was working at ashford hospital as an orderly. Maybe two thousand and thirteen four. And anyway i just bought a ford falcon acce- six love the cob and i didn't want to damage it. Lakonia was on the other side of the road ashford so i rocked up. The she started at three o'clock up quarter to three and it was very busy. The cornea was full. Saw two parks next to one another but the smallpox. So i thought now fuck this and i've talked with a lawyer did. Did i did so you took up to space. A took up through spices. And i genuinely thought nothing would happen. I went to work work. Three hours came back on my bryk. And i walked out to my car and there was a note on the car and the note read. Learn to park properly or have off for ties pups off love that good for you say no to denote is right there on the screen and also for toys ninety. Maybe he's right. Maybe i do need to learn how to park but not not just that like i parked like that. 'cause i thought i've i've an oscar. I don't want damaged. Nice cars at tony. Get them exactly deserve that..

two thousand Dan ninety seven years three o'clock Three hours two parks youtube today instagram one hundred thousand dollar ashford hospital ashford oscar assane smallpox Lakonia one of the things falcon acce- six love ford
"15%" Discussed on Chats With Cats Podcast

Chats With Cats Podcast

04:21 min | 11 months ago

"15%" Discussed on Chats With Cats Podcast

"A good co move on quickly. We didn't get to the bottom of that and is now onset. So i send in your onces. Girls tell us what. Tell us what needs to happen. First using fiction logo i because rick scott. The aced three creek dances and five seconds mark. Name three things. The chinese do very well Badminton swimming and water poa. A love swimming who soon young one person. Fifteen hundred meters steroids. But it doesn't matter he's you know he's grandma. Went into the blood testing lab and smashed. All the voyles with the ama- really. Yes you could add that as a question. Does that sort of might be migrants on guilty maths on yang's got to grandma's in just smashing lucky soon yang on his name three things rick you do in the middle of an earthquake none of us say. Make the fuck out. The first someone's resigned before the tom's run out. I've done that like three weeks ago. Yeah are your mark name three reasons. You may need to go to hospital over on an overseas holiday broken leg. Broken foot and huge migrants. I'm not love margaret chemist. Your fucking broken patella. Food poisoning touche drugged tissue. Give me three words in different languages. Need how clinton joel bongino. I can't even say on mark. Have you got one left. I like our as moscow gave me three tops of metal metal metal medal. If you can speak english have been over three types of the story that bow on say last won team nine three ways to listen to music on your iphone on bates pros interest boom speaker or at a concert. Would you say on a book. Speaking boom boom. How did you pronounce boom speaker going upstairs. But do you think this is not the judge. I'm making a vote on. go down. we done for all in that area should be on strike to what i think. We're gonna run out of time that so we're thirty minutes. We've we've got too many topics. Et's well i went to get a coffee the other day In at code lennox avenue. That's called upper blackwood coffee. Good spot lennox today. Sponsored like call probably. I probably should but trying to get a car park in that. Shopping complex is just terrible. So i've gone in and i've had to maneuver a couple of times to even get in this park and of parks lot perfectly in between the launch because got the full sixty cameron on i know with that. Show four three sixty camera on talking about this. Is this the one next to is this. The one extra yeah. That's a nightmare of akaba. My three six vision four three sixty sixty edge day. The signing that runs in your buddy living room but in all seriousness. It's a domino effect and it really. It's because some wanker pox skew and then every single poll other person parks following that is forced to park like at decayed. And it's probably not even in that catholic because this happens in any everything if someone's over the law and a little bit. Does it just continues along the lawn. You get in your space. Someone else's parked shit economy. Open your. so what do you do you park. Arkady kid yeah are high..

rick scott thirty minutes iphone Fifteen hundred meters today margaret chemist five seconds rick First three weeks ago english three reasons lennox Arkady one person avenue first clinton joel bongino three words tom
"15%" Discussed on Sprinkled with Hope

Sprinkled with Hope

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"15%" Discussed on Sprinkled with Hope

"Podcast sprinkle with hope and that's going to help get me on the path to listen to these cool guys and hear what they have to say. Yeah. I love love that. But I mean I'm a big fan of sprinkle of hope so some of my right but I like what you said cuz it kind of, you know, it reminds me of you know, sometimes some of us even have a hard time getting out of bed, right? Like that's that could be the simple goal is just having your alarm set and waking birth. Put that specific time that you have and just got out of get out of bed at the time. You say you're going to get out of bed. That could be a commitment right there. I mean some of us have a really difficult time waking up in the morning. And so, you know and then celebrate that Wednesday awesome. I got up this morning. It's amazing, right? Yeah, you know and so celebrate those little window. It doesn't have to be I'm going to go climb Mount Everest tomorrow or I'm going to go hike Mount Kilimanjaro, right? You know, it doesn't have to be that big you can really think about all these little small steps to get you just through your day right and make those your commitments. I think also, you know, we've often heard this thing called the comfort zone, right? What is that? is our comfort zone and we want to stay there. We just we don't want to leave that and sometimes it is okay to stay in the comfort zone. You know if it's going to hurt you in some way or it's going to affect you and it's going to be difficult. Maybe it is good to stay in your comfort zone. But our brain when it is challenged with new experiences and commitments that helps us to grow. So we need to try some new things. We need to help get ourselves out of that comfort zone. We know neurologically that our brain changes when we make and keep those commitments when our brain physically changes when we do those things and helps to build those neural Pathways as it becomes more alert and active.

Mount Everest Mount Kilimanjaro
"15%" Discussed on Conversations With Russ

Conversations With Russ

03:56 min | 3 years ago

"15%" Discussed on Conversations With Russ

"We may not find ourselves doing when we're on our own singing but there's power in our praise. Yeah and there's power in our worship. What's the spiritual significance of each element. would we come together and worship and sing and praise. Praise god it glorifies. The lord together at strengthens us right. It invokes the presence of the lord When we exalt his name mean the praise worship part of our service. The bible says this god inhabits the praises of his people. There's something powerful supernatural. When god's people come together and praise him and worship him. Yeah god just he touches us in ways that maybe we would not be touched outside of worship. Yeah so do you think then. It's safe to say that singing in church become so important because it reminds us of how great god really is the lyrics of the song exalt and praise the name of the lord It does it reminds of that. Yeah how important he is. How great he is. And and you want to let. Let's take a deeper than just singing because you can sing and not worship when you sing the new jonas brothers songs are you necessarily worshiping. I don't think so. They came out with two new songs. Their bangor's if you ask me. But that's been speaking pastor so singing. His part of worship worship so i like what's the spiritual significance of worship when we really are worshiping together. It glorifies god and he speaks to us and then that prepares our heart to hear the word of god. Yeah and we need to hear the word of god So why is the word of god. Some important that sermon part of what we talk about in church wise. That's important it builds us up. Yeah it corrects us. Good wrong every sermon. If every wherever church have every sermon leaves you feeling good might be in the wrong place. That's it might be in our own place. Because god never gave us his word. So we feel good right. We need it for instruction for correction right in righteousness so the it should step on our toes. Break our legs so we need that part. That's good and a communion. Yeah he's drinking. The cup always reminds us of the death and the resurrection of jesus we liaise elements in our life super good and if we don't want them we have to ask ourselves. Why super a to remind us of this is this. Our whole faith is based off of what jesus didn't across our whole trajectory of life is based off of what jesus didn't across and so having that moment of communion to symbolize His his blood that was out for us is broken body That that was that was broken for us. It's just a such a great reminder of what christ did for us and then brings us to this point where we can recognize. He gave it all for me. I can get my life back to him. He gave it all for me so we give back. Hey we're overtime. we're two minutes past. I'm sorry gel or jokes. Nari or station manager doesn't fire us something else place. We're so glad that you join us for conversations with us today. We really been touching on some great topics and and this importance of church. Importance of the body of christ really a great topic today. Hope you've been able to take one or two nuggets away and we look forward to seeing you next week. Thursday four o'clock conversations with russ. Let's good save everybody..

next week one today Thursday four o'clock Nari christ jesus two new songs each element two nuggets every sermon jonas new two minutes bible
"15%" Discussed on Conversations With Russ

Conversations With Russ

02:50 min | 3 years ago

"15%" Discussed on Conversations With Russ

"We're going to go when it's convenient and the devil will give a thousand reasons not to go and what happens is we're not going being fed and i guarantee this people that are not attending church regularly. I doubt are feeding very much. That's probably very true and we talked about this last week about scripture and why that's so important we can't base everything off of one meal a week right one meal of me. Getting fed on a sunday is not going to sustain me for monday. Tuesday wednesday always saturday. I need to feed myself daily or to sustain myself so when i don't prioritize my my my church family the body of christ when i don't prioritize that begin to drift And if i can't find ninety minutes on sunday to go. I doubt i'm finding much time through the week to sell feed. That's consistency matters. Not only not only once a week or a small group twice a week but not only is consistency with that. It matters but daily consistency in fronting myself. The bread of life daily consistency of worship. If we're going to be strong in the lord that's good and people that don't prioritize the relationship with god. The body of christ daily feeding. I guarantee you. There's a falling away and the further we drift from our relationship with christ the more things even sinful things can get in between us and the lord. That's going we find ourselves weaker and weaker and weaker in our faith matters daily. Weekly with christ. That's really good. All right we just a couple of minutes left here. And so i want to ask this last question And and this is this one's fund. And i think it's fun because you've got the answer already because i have the answer is no. I think this is fun. Because i think a lot of times when we're in the church for so long these things just become so normal to us that we forget how weird they can be to someone who doesn't know anything. So what's a question so the question is this. What's the spiritual significant of each elements of worship or each element of these church services. So what it comes down to singing when it comes down to the sermon. When it comes down to communion there's other parts of it too but let's ship fellowship. Let's at least talk about those three singing the sermon and then communion the singing part of the praise and the worship part even in the old testament or in the new testament. You find people doing together right okay. And there's something about being together when when we we may..

saturday ninety minutes monday each element last week once a week each elements three one meal twice a week Tuesday wednesday one meal a week christ sunday thousand reasons minutes
"15%" Discussed on Conversations With Russ

Conversations With Russ

03:49 min | 3 years ago

"15%" Discussed on Conversations With Russ

"Go onto the next level there. Why does consistency of going to church than matter. Why does consistency matter. You know what. It's just. Because i think when we do something regular it creates a healthy hab right now. It doesn't mean we go to church on a habit but just pick and choose wonder fouled gold this week or next week consists i think we we develop very healthy habit. I'm to. I'm going to assemble with the believers. I'm gonna assemble the believers. It just matters because because if you leave it up to a whim. I'll tell you what there will be something that comes up. Yeah no matter what. The kids got to go somewhere need to do the gardening of alone. There's always going to be something. That's going to compete on a sunday with gonna church. My dog looks to sad. So i don't want to leave him by himself. It matters it matters because it matters because we need each other. And don't anybody think for half a second that we don't need each other. Why does consistency matter. Because you know what. There's a scripture over look at ecclesiastes chapter four. I'll try talks about two or better than one. Yeah consistency matters. Because if we don't develop consistency there will always be something that gets in the way we need to come together with other believers to worship together. And it's not just for me to be encouraged but my being there might encourage you right. Consistency matters because we need to worship with the body of christ. We need to hear the word of the lord. What what's the scriptures are given for instruction in righteousness and to correct where we're out of lead to worship. We need to hear the word of god we need to fellowship with other believers and consistency matters because once we start neglecting that very vital part of our christian life. It's easy to follow away. Yeah yeah if i don't i don't have these things as a reminder. I don't have these people who are next to me to sharpen me then. It's easy for me to slow just like all right. Well you know any anything can come distract me and and be better than whatever know. Whatever i'm thinking of. I really feel like going to church because of x. y. and z. And those are easy to take over and it's creating the habit because you know it's the thing that god wants you to do to be able to to continue to walk the path. He's calling you on and we prioritized christ in our life this way. Yeah because christ cares about the body. Christ cares about the bride. Christ cares about the church and so by us being able to care about the things that he cares about We're aligning up with his. And what happens is when so many people are doing today. In american christianity is we compartmentalize. Not christ we compartmentalized church and it's on the circumference of our life. Yeah here i've got my job. I've got my family. I've got my career. I've got my school and there's church and in yours christ and we've compartmentalized it. When when instead of putting the body of christ on the circumference of her life it needs to be brought more to the center of our life. And so we need. We need this consistency because when we compartmentalize jesus and the body of christ..

next week jesus this week today half a second Christ christianity one christian chapter four american sunday two christ each
"15%" Discussed on Conversations With Russ

Conversations With Russ

03:08 min | 3 years ago

"15%" Discussed on Conversations With Russ

"I would say nine times out of ten. They've been hurt in some church and there's a there's an offense that they're holding onto will set up a rather be dealing with that thing that i'm facing i can just ignore it altogether or ignore situations that are similar to it all together by placing myself in the building. Let me just stay away and we talked about this earlier. I was talking with some of the some of our team here. An grieves me one of the things. That grieves me so terribly is that the church is a place where people should come and find healing and help and hope and yet to find hurt now now. Let's talk about levels of hurt. Because i mean somebody didn't shake my hand and i. I could be slightly offended but the hurt i'm talking about is a crushing type of a hurt right and there are people. I believe that love god. Today that are sitting home and refusal back into a church because of pastor hurt them an elder hurt them they were treated unfairly. But but so. That grieves me when the church should be a place of healing and hope and help becomes a place where people get hurt Terrible thing to go into a hospital and get sick. You know hospital to get better. Yeah so. I think the people that ask. That question are often often people who are who are hurting. And they just want to live in isolation. Yeah there was a quote. And i can't remember exactly what it is. But it's by tyler. Reagan who's in charge of catalysts right now and essentially go something along the lines of that. I seldom know anybody who's walked away from the faith. Because of jesus but i know plenty of people who walked away from the faith because of his followers so it's people who who said who had hurt these individuals and they've walked away from the faith or walked away from church because they don't want to deal with those people all over again so true so when when you look at the new testament can you be a christian and just sit home absolutely anytime anyone puts more qualifications on being a christian having faith in jesus and then we've we've got to be careful of that you can be a christian home. Is it natural. No all through the new testament. They were gathered together worship together. Broke bread together prayed together there. You will not find isolation in the new testament. Yeah anywhere we need each other and if there's anyone who's out there today listening and you've just experienced some real deep in the church and you're just doing life by yourself. Well i really. I really encourage really i pray for your healing today and get back connected to the body of christ. That's good that's good all right. So that's that's why it's important to come to church law..

ten Reagan christ Today jesus today nine times tyler one new testament god christian things
"15%" Discussed on Conversations With Russ

Conversations With Russ

03:29 min | 3 years ago

"15%" Discussed on Conversations With Russ

"So we'll talk about solid doctrine. I would want the church. I'd wanna feel welcomed. When i walked in i would want to sense the presence of the lord and worship and in the preaching of the word but beyond that i would look for opportunities to fellowship with other churches most are good at the big group setting but did they have a smaller group setting like we have life groups at where i could connect with a smaller group of people beyond that i would look for opportunities to serve. Yeah i've talked to people that said you know i've been going to this church but it seems like just seems like The same people do everything and they don't. They are not even interested in me. Helping right you know no no so i would look for opportunities to serve and was my gift or gifts welcomed there. Yeah so there's a lot of things to look at Beyond the denominational name on the door and they're welcoming. Am i sensing. The presence of god is the word alive get is there an opportunity to fellowship in a smaller group and is there an opportunity for me to serve. When all those dots connect could be could be a good place But let me. There are people now. Maybe looking for a church. Here's what i've suggested to people that they should come to the founder of life. Absolutely but but when you're looking for church don't ever judge a church on one visit. no. Pastor is as good as his best serving high or as bad as his worst. So i always suggest to people when you go and try out a church. Give it three sundays now. If i walk in and it's just like bad bad you may not go back. But but i don't think it's fair to judge anyone church on sunday maybe the usher at the door just died. I shouldn't say that you said it already listened dog about but maybe they had a really bad day and they didn't welcome you like they would have sunday any other day. Yeah yeah don't ever. I would encourage you. Don't ever judge anyone church on one service right. Maybe the key worship leader wasn't there. So i would. When i look at church. I would say go for three sundays. That's good because then you can kind of get an a better understanding of the wholeness of what the churches and then you know in your mental scorecard take an average versus saying this one. Sunday is the only representation that i'm going to have for this place. Yeah i never thought of it like that. Maybe we maybe getting a little more spiritual here and say pray about this. Maybe we should've started with that. We should have started with that one time but really you may walk new church. You may feel the holy spirit birthday. This is where i want. You know so. So we need to pray because i believe the scriptures say that the steps of the righteous are ordered of the lord. God we'll order your steps. If you see can you will find him and he will lead you in the right way. That's good all right so we talked bell all these different dominations or talked about how to go about selecting a the right church inappropriate appropriate church so then..

Sunday three sunday one service three sundays God one visit one
"15%" Discussed on Conversations With Russ

Conversations With Russ

05:29 min | 3 years ago

"15%" Discussed on Conversations With Russ

"You can't tyrians. You can't say you completely wasted your time with us today. Hopefully you wouldn't say that anyway. So that's a lot of the different denominations came from and that's where they were birth. Okay just today. Yeah so then. The follow up question is what should a christian look for in selecting appropriate church. We have all these different denominations. We have all these different interpretations of scripture. We have all of these different thoughts. That people have on what to do. So how should a christian. How should a follower of jesus go about selecting an appropriate church. Well i'll tell you how a lot of people do it. Well my grandfather was a baptist baptist by god. I'm about this. A lot of our choices in church. Come from a family history. I don't think so much anymore though. I think that was that. Was you know we moved into a new town. My parents were presbyterian so i'm going to be presbyterian. I don't think it's so that way anymore. I think that in today people are looking for church. That really helps meet their spiritual needs first of all. I think when we're looking at selecting an appropriate church it has to be doctrinal sound on an orthodox christianity Talking about the the virgin birth. Right the senlis. Life of jesus that he did miracles that he died substitution. Every death on the cross was buried and he rose again from the dead sent his holy spirit to us and he's coming again that's orthodox christianity or simply orthodoxy is death burial resurrection of jesus. There you go so that's got to be there. Come on if that's not their crossing the list right if somebody says anything other than jesus christ as the only way to get to heaven if they're saying anything else just walk out right away. I'd say put your nikes on run any any church. That would not present christ and him. Crucified resurrected as the only way of salvation. We just got. Please move away so number one in selecting a church there has to be solid biblical doctrines. Good now that's just the foundation. But are we going to move on from there. I i was thinking about this. I'd wanna feel welcomed. Yeah because if i walked into a church. And even if i was there for two or three weeks i felt like i was still a stranger cared. I was there. I'd probably keep looking. Let's get a church that's welcoming because here's the thing. The the fruit of the spirit love joy peace patients kindness goodness faithfulness selfish selflessness and self-control though should be manifested in the people of that church. So if you're there two or three weeks and you don't feel welcomes that's that's a conversation about not feeling that people aren't showing any type type of love you know if i walk into an assembly believers in. I don't feel like the fruit of the spirit of love..

two christ today three weeks jesus jesus christ orthodoxy christianity christian first orthodox
"15%" Discussed on Conversations With Russ

Conversations With Russ

04:22 min | 3 years ago

"15%" Discussed on Conversations With Russ

"I think so okay. So we're gonna we're gonna jump into. This is just like what passed arrest was talking about. Today we're going to be talking about the church and the importance of church. I think a lot of times we get a little confused. Or maybe the desire of like. I'd kind of rather sleep in or i'm not sure even understands why i should go to this church. Not that church and so we're gonna jump some of those things. Okay so here's question number one for you all right. Why are there so many different christian denominations. I think a lot of people wonder that. Yeah yeah you know there's methodist and lutheran and presbyterian baptist and suddenly you've got a why well let's let's go back to the origin of denominations really may major denominations came out of the protestant reformation. In the sixteenth century. Lutheran look at the history. That's coming out. So that's where the major denominations came out of here. Okay so maybe. Where did they come from. So let's take the lutheran okay. He largely based on martin luther teaching and then. Let's go to the methodists. You know think about it. It's cool when we look at where these words came from and so the methodist got their name. Really out of look at john wesley's different methods for church growth so creative methods. We'll go methods so the root word is method. Yeah so they had their methods for church growth. So would they recalled methodist so. We've got luther. The lutherans teachings based on on martin luther. We've got methodists. John wesley the founder. They're different methods for church. Growth the presbyterians The really they took their presbyterian from the greek word presbyteries okay and that was really their view on church leadership. And then you go to the baptist. Because they emphasized baptism water baptism so hence they got the name baptist. Good you move a little bit more full gospel churches that believe in the sign gifts. Okay public speaking in tongues and prophecies and gifts of healing in the nine gifts of the spirit. Where those gifts are are emphasized. So there are different theologies and different emphasis. But really the denominational world was born the sixteenth century out of the protestant reformation major denominations like again lutheran methodist baptist anglican and then just other other denominations were burst out of out of. There's right has a different twist on theology and so a new denomination was born. But the different denominations are largely. They differ on either theology or just a different emphasis pre tribulation rapture post tribulation. Sign gives no sign gifts. And that's really where the christian denominations came from. That's an an interpretation of scripture. Comes down to whether you believe this theology or theology rarely just an interpretation of scripture is how all of those different things break down. Do you know where we got the assemblies. Oh god out of should know. Come on god was born in the early one thousand nine hundred where the name come from all over the news come from with your presbyterian. I don't know how about that. I know more about the materials and the methodist assembly guy. Set you up. Because i know the answer. So here's the thing that's why we have the distance now and the radio show. Okay answer your all. I will answer my own question. The name specifically for the assemblies of god comes out of hebrews chapter ten verse twenty five where it says not forsaking the assembling of of the believers. Okay so assembly. Of god one pastor rubin. Thank you you learn. You learned some things today you go about..

John wesley john wesley sixteenth century today Today luther rubin chapter ten greek nine gifts pastor martin luther one thousand nine hundred protestant baptist verse twenty five question martin anglican
"15%" Discussed on Dead Man Talking

Dead Man Talking

10:25 min | 3 years ago

"15%" Discussed on Dead Man Talking

"This a while ago. We've got a couple of questions on when you met presenters. Now, I once for Mogam pays what was it like to sit across and speak with a known serial killer. If you had a lot of emotions would love to know cheers from Tennessee. I was nervous. You know? I I don't even to death row. A couple of times before interviewing resent his that was the only prison. I think I'd have visited in two thousand and three. And so, yeah, I was nervous certainly. And what was interesting was. He wasn't scary people think of resent his is amongst and rightly so in some respects, and they think of that you have if you've never been to death row, you have this image. Everyone who is on death row is this monster. But the truth is that when you meet these people, I've never met anybody on death row who didn't seem boringly normal in most cases, just like meal you and in a way that sort of more scary. I think that resent his is the Solta person that you could have met and just not remembered just a unmemorable besetting not this. This ferocious scary monster that you'd sort of imagine. But that makes me think actually that you should listen to next week's episode because I interviewed his for an hour. And I have my own opinion of what he was like, but you're gonna hit from somebody next week union a bit better, and has a different opinion little tease there from lex. And the next question. We don't actually have name we've lost that. But it's from somebody Austrailia when you first spoke rezendes, what was his expression was composed. Did he seem to have contempt for what he's done was afraid to die? He was very composed smiling willing to tool very matter of fact, not just about describing mundane things about you know, what you had for breakfast that day, but also describing the murders. There was no difference actually in his demeanor. When he was describing mundane things about his routine in prison, and when he was describing killing somebody just very Matra fact and was he afraid to die. I often that and he said he fit God. That's all. So I don't know whether that means he fade. The needle the actual the fade physically being executed or whether he feared the repercussions in what he thought was going to be you know, the off the life. Next one is a long similar lines. From Jacqueline cripe highly. It's been mentioned that resent didn't have remorse because he was killing in the name of God. However, I was wondering if he had remorse when he found out that the pediatric surgeon wasn't really an abortionist. What was his reaction? Maybe I missed it. But did he read as he got that one wrong? That's a good question. I didn't ask him that. But I can say the unfairly certain that there was no remorse, and that he was adamant that he was justified in killing Claudia Benton. And I say this because we deliberately left out some audio in the podcast from my interview with resent his way, he continued to justify attacking Christopher Maya and Holly done in Kentucky. We felt it was disrespectful to Holly to include it. But. When I interviewed him, which was three days before he's execution. There was certainly no remorse in that respect. A he still was sort of justifying in his own mind and to me. Still resent as this is from David Pavee who Facebook rezendes was nearly literal in both Spanish English. Could that be why couldn't recall the train stations? They stopped sets. And the second part also many of described him as highly intelligent. How did this intelligence manifest in him? When you met him in. What ways was he highly intelligence? Okay. I'll take the first part that question first. So. Resent his was electorate David says could be could be why he couldn't recall the train stations. He stopped had possibly Chuck. We've told us in an earlier episode. Repetition can cloud specific. So in other words, you know, resent his killed so many times that he probably forgot the specifics of each individual crime. But not only that I mean, this was somebody who quite side from the killing was a drifta wiz crossing the US by freight train constantly. And so we have no idea how many times he criss crossed the nation by train or how many cities he went to how many places he went to the row network multiple times. But I'm sure that each one would sort of blend into the other, and he just wouldn't be able to remember specific. So for example, Blyth live is a good example because he couldn't remember the name of the town. He just remembers getting off jumping off. And of course, this wasn't. None of these were official stops. It wasn't like he was jumping off and seeing a sign that said welcome to Blyth he's jumping off at random. So he's jumping off when the train slows down in a town that he may not really know where he is. And then just walking to a place where people probably directing him the the river or whatever. And and that's it. So I'm sure that's why probably more so than any intelligence issue. I think that's probably why he's not recalling specifics in certain cases, second part the question. How did the intelligence manifest because people described him as highly intelligent? I mean, I've interviewed many inmates on death row. Some with low I q some with high high accuse resent his wasn't well educated. But apparently, you had a high IQ all I can say is his responses were very thoughtful and articulate particularly considering considering English was he second language. But I really can't comment on. So I don't know what he's I q was. But certainly, you know, he was in the upper end of people. I interview I've interviewed on death row in terms of the way, he kind of related responses. All right, next one from Ahmed's Benali one Anghel was Indus was doing his killing spree. Do you think he was using the mind of cults, for example, Charles Manson? No, I mean, he wasn't inspired by any cult leader that they called him a mission driven serial killer. So he was definitely so possessed with this religious fervor. And you know, I think that that's what drove him. I really believe. That's what drove him was his belief that he was doing the work of God rather than you know, you. And you know, you could say that sort of cult like in in in the way, he was kind of doing this. And he was very single minded and blinkered in what he was doing really believed. He was doing the right thing. So yes, or no does a lot. Final question on his end is move on this is from Charlotte Tele as from Denmark, why was rezendes only charged with one murder. They clearly knew he committed more Elsie would not have made it to the most wanted list. It must be unsatisfying for the families of the other victims. He was never put to Justice for those crimes. This is a really good question. So it comes down to time and money, and I actually got some notes Tarija. So the death penalty in Texas New see why I'm going to one telling you this in in order to be eligible for the death penalty in Texas. You have to kill the victim has to be a peace officer of firemen killed while on GT. The murder has to cut while the defendant was committing or attempting to commit another crime like a kidnapping, burglary, robbery, sexual assault, or arson has to be a murder for hire. Like a hitman. The mud has to occurred during the course of actual attempted prison break multiple murders have occurred as a result of the defendant's acts or the victim was younger than ten years old. So with that in mind the Benton murder because there was a sexual assault is well qualified resent his for the death penalty. So what the prosecution would have done is find the murder that he committed where it was cut and dried and in this case there was DNA evidence. And a confession to me. It was it was a very easy case to convict him on. And it's also important to remember that he's attorneys admitted he killed nine people in total at the time of his trial. So at the time of sentencing, so the names and the details of these other crimes were brought up now, admittedly there have been since then while he was on death row, there were more admissions. And of course, as we've like revealed in the podcast that could have been. Even more than that. And yes, you're right. Those the victims of potential victims families a never gonna get that sort of closure. If if that's what closure looks like to see resent his being convicted of those particular crimes, but also the cost involved. It costs an average of two point three million dollars to put somebody on death row. And that includes all that at trial costs the appeal costs the investigations keeping them in prison until their execution cost to the execution. So the whole thing is about estimated to be around two point three million thing. So that cost will go up if you have several convictions. So there's a cost element to it as well. Should we take a break? Sure. Back after this. Briefly

murder Claudia Benton David Pavee Mogam Tennessee Blyth Austrailia Texas Jacqueline cripe Holly US Charles Manson Facebook criss Chuck Ahmed official Elsie Christopher Maya Charlotte Tele
"15%" Discussed on Dead Man Talking

Dead Man Talking

05:52 min | 3 years ago

"15%" Discussed on Dead Man Talking

"Back in two thousand and three. I'm just glad that we could revisit it. Now next one from Keith Miller via Twitter on your own personal level, outta Hsun. There's a huge emotional investment. What sort of impact is this investigation had on your overall quality of life? May impede genuinely never thought. That would get where we are now with the hack. Okay. So certainly there's a sense of relief. I'm sure Pete you feel the same the all the work that we put in we feel vindicated somehow hunch that he was telling the truth, and that they seem to be hose in the case against Andres and the case against demon Tina was born out, so certainly that's a positive impact. But I also know that we need to keep pushing to get this habeas appeal on show. Just because the podcast has ended is about to end that doesn't mean sort of the kind of legal stuff has ended. It hasn't happened yet. So it's important that she to tell your friends about the podcast series spread the word because the more people that listen, you know, the motions theories that something will be done. But I think that this made me think a bit p case question, maybe think about the impact of interviewing people on death row the been doing now full. Fifteen sixteen years of witness the neck secure. Of written about trauma for a long time. And that can have an impact. So I was just actually going to use that as an opportunity to name check, a really amazing organization. Sickie journalists reporters the listening to the podcast dot center DART based out of Columbia University. In New York, I've been affiliated with him for longtime. But they exist the two reasons one to help journalists become better at reporting on traumatized people. So so have a deeper understanding of troll Marin his impact so that they can become better at reporting on that. But also, they help journalists who cover trauma deal with the impact that might have on themselves. So, you know, everyone from the wool correspondent to the person that covers child abuse to the person that covers particularly horrendous criminal trials will crime stories or whatever. So self cat tips and stuff anyway edgy, check out the website at the dot sent a website and have a look at what they do. They've got less tip sheets and stuff on there as well. So they're really helpful for what I do. What about the impact it has on you? I will call of life. When you are speaking to some really, quite unpleasant people who've done some terrible things is it something that affects you on a day-to-day level. Or did you think after so many years you're used to? I think I think I'm used to think I'm able to compartmentalize it so about some other sort of pretty traumatic stuff aside from stuff on criminal Justice and of seen some pretty kind of unpleasant upsetting things, but I'm able to compartmentalize it and part of my so of self care methods to have you big circle of friends and. Lots of people to talk to people that also that cover the same stuff got love friends who journalists who cover similar so ground, and it's good to kind of. Talk to them regularly and stuff and just sort of decompress that way. Nice next question is from Bonnie pain, big friend of the show. Did you regret not managing to find an ultimately get Cathy Burnett and her students to look over the Muskoka sooner? I don't think that I would have been in a position to try and get low school to look a case and the and the amount of evidence and an in the trial transcript, the amount of the just the sheer number of pages that you have to kind of look through and go through the fun toothcomb wouldn't have been able to do that had. We not been doing this off the back of a podcast that had already so of become fairly successful. We'd had already had lots of listeners and lots of kind of engagement with people that publicity around it. And I think that was part of the reason that I was able to get Kathy and her students to look at it. You know, this we're working on this poker series. We kind of nearing the end there's only so much. I can do I feel a lawyer needs to look at this now. And I I'm not I'm not saying Kathy wouldn't have done that had got in touch with her. You know, when I first interviewed rezendes, she may well, she may well have done, but. But no, I think that I mean, you know, I'm sure if you asked the Tina Andres, they'd say, yeah, why the hell didn't anyone do this? You know, fifteen twenty years ago. But it is what it is. We we've managed to get some sort of movement on this stuff now. And I'm just glad that that's happened. They seem really glad this is happened as well. You know, demon teen is written to me. She really appreciates the kind of effort that people are going to look into the case against I'm with Andres that heard from his family second part of question. Do you agree losing the type for so many years? Yeah, I do actually I think that you know, I I lived in the UK as you know, move back to the UK. For a few years after the resented into. But we've actually moved back again to Texas still didn't have the type then. But certainly I was writing a lot more about criminal Justice. And I think that had I had the type then, you know, I probably would have revisited this

Tina Andres UK Twitter Kathy Keith Miller Hsun New York Cathy Burnett Pete Marin Texas DART Columbia University Bonnie rezendes Fifteen sixteen years fifteen twenty years