35 Burst results for "13"

How Pastor Ock Soo Park Came to Know Jesus

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:53 min | 1 d ago

How Pastor Ock Soo Park Came to Know Jesus

"It is my privilege today in the studio to have a real father in the faith with us. His name is pastor aksum. Park. He's been an evangelist and pastor since 19 62. Which is before I was born. So I've got a lot to learn. Pastor park, welcome to this program. Yes, very nice to meet you. I'm so happy to be here. I'm thrilled to have you here and I'm dying to know your story. Can you tell us how you were raised and how you came to faith and got in the minutes? I was born in 1944. And in 1950, there was a big war in Korea. Never heard of it. In 1951, my mother passed away. And afterwards, I went through a lot of difficulties. My big brother went to the army. And my father was out at the world providing home. Overnight, the three grown-ups of my family were gone. My biggest sister was 15. Other sister was 13. And I was 8. My little brother was four. And we lived like beggars. We had no idea what we were to eat. How did it sound? And I woke up one morning because I heard a strange sound. And it was my big sister. She was crying so sad. Study by herself. And oftentimes we would get up in the middle of the night and cry together. We were very hungry and cold. And as I got older, because I was very hungry, I started stealing. Read about that beautiful I would go to the wheat farms cut off the wheat and eat them. The potatoes in it. Apples and steel fruits from the top. But because I attended church, I was so tormented by this. Every day I begged for forgiveness. I thought I'm so simple. I must be going to hell. But God did something very precious to me because in 1962 when I was 19. All my paths before me had been blocked. I applied to go to the army. But I was disqualified because my front tooth was chipped. I had no hope whatsoever. And from then on, I wanted to go out more to the lord. And I begged them beg for my sins to be forgiven. I was so sinful. I believe I was going to hell. But one day in my heart, I don't have kids. I was praying asking for forgiveness. But I had this heart a little bit that my sins are forgiven. And from then on, I began to read the Bible.

Pastor Park Army Korea
Tom Cotton Quoted Chuck Schumer in Defending the Filibuster

The Larry Elder Show

00:44 sec | 2 d ago

Tom Cotton Quoted Chuck Schumer in Defending the Filibuster

"Work. Now here is senator Tom cotton from the floor of the Senate yesterday, giving a speech to preserve the filibuster, and note this every single word he says he got from Chuck Schumer. He citing Chuck Schumer. The senator from Arkansas. Right now, we are on the precipice of a constitutional crisis. We're about to step into the abyss. I want to talk for a few minutes. Why we're on that precipice. And while we're looking into that abyss, let me first ask a fundamental question. What is the crisis that calls for the undoing of two centuries of tradition?

Senator Tom Cotton Chuck Schumer Senate Arkansas
Sinema, Manchin Reject Biden Push to Change Filibuster

The Larry Elder Show

00:47 sec | 2 d ago

Sinema, Manchin Reject Biden Push to Change Filibuster

"Now, you mentioned senator Christian cinema of Arizona here's what she recently said. Eliminating the 60 vote threshold on a party line with the thinnest of possible majorities to pass these bills that I support. Will not guarantee that we prevent demagogues from winning office. So she's not down with getting rid of the filibuster, and here's what Joe Manchin said day before yesterday. Filibuster is what we have our rules. We need some good rule changes to make the place work better, but then I get rid of the filibuster doesn't make it work better. If you're getting any pressure from your constituents back home on that issue, when I mean, what they know about the filibuster is basically what bob bird is educated people on over the years. And the filibuster is what makes the Senate. Hopefully work when it's supposed to

Senator Christian Cinema Joe Manchin Arizona Bob Bird Senate
Joe Biden Speaks With a Doubled Toungue on Race

The Larry Elder Show

01:00 min | 2 d ago

Joe Biden Speaks With a Doubled Toungue on Race

"Quote, I do not buy the concept. Popular in the 1960s, which said, we have suppressed the black man for 300 years, and the white man is now far ahead in the race for everything or society offers, in order to achieve in order to even the score, we must now give the black man a head start or even hold the white man back to even the race. I don't buy that end of quote. Who said that? That was Joseph robinette Biden, said in 1975 to a Delaware newspaper. I do not buy the concept. Popular in the 1960s, which said, we have suppressed the black man for 300 years, and the white man is now far ahead in the race for everything our society offers. In order to even the score, we must now give the black man a head start or even hold the white man back to even the race. I don't buy that. You know, I once

Joseph Robinette Biden Delaware
Quinnipiac Poll Shows Biden With 33 Percent Approval Rating

The Larry Elder Show

01:14 min | 2 d ago

Quinnipiac Poll Shows Biden With 33 Percent Approval Rating

Supreme Court Blocks Biden Vaccine Mandate for Large Employers

The Larry Elder Show

01:05 min | 2 d ago

Supreme Court Blocks Biden Vaccine Mandate for Large Employers

"But first, let's start with this. Let's go to breaking news. This is from the Supreme Court CNN's Jessica Schneider. What do we know? Yeah, Victor and Allison, the Supreme Court has issued two decisions related to the Biden administration's vaccine mandates. Remember, there were challenges that were heard just about a week ago in the Supreme Court. And this is what the Supreme Court has just come down with. They have blocked that vaccine mandate that applied to large employers. Employers who I told you, I told you they were going to block it. So with 100 people or more. This was a vaccine mandate that effectively went into effect on Monday, just the masking portion of it. And effectively went into effect. Vaccine portion of that man that you effectively go into effect, I just. It was supposed to go into effect February 9th. Now that she did say that effectively goes into effect, and she say that, I think she said that effectively goes into effect. Go in the Supreme Court. And this is what the Supreme Court has just come down with. They have blocked that vaccine mandate that applied to large employers. Employers with 100 people or

Supreme Court Jessica Schneider Biden Administration Allison CNN Victor
Democrats Rumored to Boot VP Harris for Hillary Clinton

The Larry Elder Show

00:47 sec | 2 d ago

Democrats Rumored to Boot VP Harris for Hillary Clinton

"Get this. Article, I think it was The New York Times, which I read so you don't have to. Suggesting that in 2024, the Democrats may drop kick not only Kamala Harris, but Joe Biden assuming he's still around. In favor of Hillary Clinton. I kid you not. This is not okay. We take a couple of problems with that. Two big problems. Problem number the one is I told you before. Are you kidding me? The most loyal part of the democratic base of black female voters. They're going to be perfectly okay. Just step aside, sister for Hillary again, by telling if you have a problem figuring out whether you're premier, Trump, and you ain't black. I don't think so.

Kamala Harris The New York Times Joe Biden Hillary Clinton Hillary Donald Trump
Mike Hates Missing Work

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:39 sec | 2 d ago

Mike Hates Missing Work

"The bottom line is a lot of us are dealing with circumstances and situations beyond our control, and I hate missing work. I almost get sick to my stomach when I think about how much work I missed in December between Christmas and being quarantined with COVID. I hate it. I live for this show. It's my oxygen. You don't know how I, how much I treasure. The hours I spend with you. That's what I'm worried about. It's all I'm not afraid of dying of COVID. I'm not afraid I'm afraid of mission work. And either you understand that or you don't,

Covid
The Only Thing Better Than Trump Beating Hillary in 2016, Would Be a Repeat in 2024

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:52 sec | 2 d ago

The Only Thing Better Than Trump Beating Hillary in 2016, Would Be a Repeat in 2024

"Me for socialism. It's fascism. They want control. They want to wrestle control, and they want to finagle and lie and cheat their way to make sure Republicans never win another election again. I mean, now they're looking to Hillary. Hillary Clinton, listen, the only thing more delicious. Delightful. Euphoric. The only thing that would make me happier than Trump beating her in 2016 is to watch Trump beat her in 2024. If that's what they've got, if they're gonna drudge up Hillary Clinton and they're talking about it quite seriously, you see how much trouble the Democrat party is in

Hillary Clinton Donald Trump Hillary Democrat Party
These Vaccine Mandates Lead to Pure Evil

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:57 sec | 2 d ago

These Vaccine Mandates Lead to Pure Evil

"Honest to goodness, this is some evil stuff. I'm seeing stories of Ronald McDonald house in British Columbia, kicking out a family of victim of family, whose four year old boy has leukemia because they're unvaccinated. How about how about the story out of Washington state, one of the bluest of the blue states in the world? They had a big snowstorm this week. A county that got affected, they wouldn't allow they rejected the help from the county to clear out the snow because the county doesn't have a vaccine mandate. You can not make this crap up. And now Liz Cheney. Using January 6th and the her role she and kinzinger to persecute her political opponents. I mean, listen, they thought nothing of destroying lives and they'll keep it going over January

Ronald Mcdonald British Columbia Leukemia Liz Cheney Washington
Jan. 6 Committee Subpoenas Trump Jr. Advisers, Ex-White House Official

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:30 min | 2 d ago

Jan. 6 Committee Subpoenas Trump Jr. Advisers, Ex-White House Official

"His Liz Cheney, weaponizing this January 6th committee. It's a special kind of evil. Do you hear what she's doing? You hear what they're doing on that January 6th committee? They've sent a subpoena to three advisers to the Trump family, Andrew Charlie and Arthur Schwartz, who advised Donald Trump Jr. and Ross rush Worthington who played a role in drafting Trump's speech on January 6th. Each of them have been handed a subpoena. Now, one of them, he is advising the Wyoming, the Wyoming values political action committee in support of Cheney's primary challenger Harriet Hagen. This guy had, according to the Washington, the federalist, this guy had zero involvement with The White House riots or protest during the time period that the rally was being organized. This charade guy Andrew Serra was overseeing a super PAC in support of Republican Senate candidates in Georgia. Charade is a close friend, according to his attorney, charades a close friend to Donald Trump Jr. and is running a super PAC that opposes the reelection of one of the members of the committee. I'm talking to you Liz Cheney. That's

Liz Cheney Donald Trump Jr. Andrew Charlie Arthur Schwartz Ross Rush Worthington Wyoming Values Political Actio Harriet Hagen Donald Trump Andrew Serra Wyoming Cheney White House Washington Charade Senate Georgia
The Jobs Numbers Are Out... And They Ain't Good

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:48 sec | 2 d ago

The Jobs Numbers Are Out... And They Ain't Good

"Well, the jobs numbers are out this week. The Labor Department moments ago released the jobs numbers and they ain't good. The number of U.S. workers filing unemployment claims rose again this week, data released by the Labor Department shows 230,000 initial jobless claims for the week ending January 8th, the tally was up from last week's 207,000 claims. The jobless claims number was higher than expected, and it jumped to the highest level since November. Economists had predicted 200. So, you know, it's higher than they thought, more bad news. The Biden economy completely fallen apart.

Labor Department U.S. Biden
'Biden Went Down to Georgia, He Was Looking for Some Votes to Steal'

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:25 min | 2 d ago

'Biden Went Down to Georgia, He Was Looking for Some Votes to Steal'

"This will probably put a smile on your face. I love this. This is courtesy of the great Mark Davis. Morning host and my dear friend on 6 60 a.m. the answer in the Dallas Fort Worth metroplex. Biden went down to Georgie, he was looking for some votes to steal. He's in a band as parties way behind he's looking to cut some deals. He expected Stacey Abrams in an atmosphere that's hot. But when they asked if she'd show up, she said, boy, I think that. I guess you didn't know it, but you and Kamala are through. And if you care to take a look, you'd see we're done with you. Now we've played second fiddle, but it's time for something new. The squad and I, riding high, we're coming after you. Joe said girl, I hear you and it might be a sin, but I'll take a nap. I don't give a crap. I don't think that I can win. Biden tried the same old lies it's getting pretty hard. His last fight in Georgia in the public getting tarred. He says secure elections are a cancer on our soul, but we know it ain't Jim Crow two. Love that. Great work by Mark. And we've offering that little parody song to you franchise if you want to have it on your phone or share it with somebody. You can just text the keyword devil to one 806 5 5 6 four 5 three. We'll send you back the link and you can enjoy

Stacey Abrams Biden Mark Davis Georgie Kamala Dallas JOE Jim Crow Georgia Cancer Mark
Biden Has the Audacity to Tell Americans to 'Unify'

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:44 sec | 2 d ago

Biden Has the Audacity to Tell Americans to 'Unify'

"We are seeing a special crazy kind of evil going on right now. I just watched Biden address the nation over COVID. Do you know what he had the audacity to say just now? We can do this together. Together, unified. We can get through this. The other day, he was calling millions of us racists. Just the other day, he was calling millions of us, Jim Crow, George Wallace, segregationists, now you want to be unified because you're losing the country, mister 33?

Covid Biden Jim Crow George Wallace
Mark Levin Agrees With Sen. Mitch McConnell on One Thing

Mark Levin

01:26 min | 3 d ago

Mark Levin Agrees With Sen. Mitch McConnell on One Thing

"Now Mitch McConnell said something today on the floor that shocked me 'cause I agreed with him I actually agreed with the man And then we're going to move on Cut 13 go He said our country will be an autocracy If he does not get his way so the world saw our commander in chief propaganda as against his own country his own country to a degree that would have made proud blush There was no consistent standard behind anything the president said He trampled through some of the most sensitive and sacred parts of our nation's past He invoked times when activists bled and run soldiers died all the demagogue voting laws that are more expansive than what Democrats have on the books in his own home state Georgia has more days of early voting than Delaware or New York Georgia has no excuse absentee voting which Delaware and New York do not have If Georgia or Texas present Jim Crow emergencies then so do a whole lot of democratic run states By the way it's amazing how the media have ignored all of that isn't

Mitch Mcconnell Georgia Delaware New York Jim Crow Texas
Who Is Lt. Col. Allen West?

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:19 min | Last week

Who Is Lt. Col. Allen West?

"Lieutenant colonel Alan west is at you. This is me and it's good to be with you Eric and it's good to see you again and just want to wish you a happy new year. Happy new year to you. I really, I'm excited to talk to you. But, you know, as much as I've admired you over the years, the idea that you're running to be governor of Texas is hugely exciting. So I really want to talk to you about that. I want to talk to you about yesterday and the January 6th, which my head's going to explode with anger at how the left has been portraying that in cooperation with the quote unquote mainstream media and the conservative media. But let's just talk about you. Some people know you, some people don't, where did you grow up? What you've got an amazing background obviously being a lieutenant colonel being a member of Congress. Tell us a little bit about yourself if you would. Well, I was born in 1961 and the inner city of Atlanta, Georgia and the blacks only hospital. I grew up in the same neighborhood that produced doctor marvelous the king junior is called the old fourth ward neighborhood in Atlanta. My elementary school was right across the street from ebenezer baptist church. I had two fantastic parents. My father was a World War II veteran, an army Corporal served in the European theater of operations and my mother did a little over 25 years of civilian service to a Marine Corps headquarters there in Atlanta. My older brother was a marine in Vietnam at the age of 15, my dad challenged me to be the first officer in the family because he and my older brother were both enlisted. So I started wearing a uniform back in 1976 in high school junior ROTC. And then I went out to the university of Tennessee and on 31, July 1982 I was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the army in the field artillery, and I served 22 years active duty in United States Army 13 different countries three different combat zones. I retired in August of 2004, been married for 32 years, my wife, her dad also was career army, 24 years. He's buried in all of the national cemetery. He served two tours of duty in Vietnam. We have two daughters. Our oldest is 28, and that's Aubrey. The youngest is 25, that's Austin, and we have one grandson. His name is Jackson Bernard, and he is 7 months

Lieutenant Colonel Alan West Atlanta Eric Ebenezer Baptist Church European Theater Of Operations Texas Army Congress Georgia Marine Corps Vietnam Rotc University Of Tennessee United States Army Aubrey Austin Jackson Bernard
Jackson-Davis scores 27, Indiana shuts down No. 13 OSU 67-51

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | Last week

Jackson-Davis scores 27, Indiana shuts down No. 13 OSU 67-51

"The the Hoosiers Hoosiers held held number number thirteen thirteen Ohio Ohio state state to to twenty twenty one one second second half half points points in in twenty twenty six six percent percent shooting shooting in in a a sixty sixty seven seven fifty fifty one one win win are are you you forward forward trayce trayce Jackson Jackson Davis Davis was was on on fire fire all all night night with with twenty twenty seven seven points points and and twelve twelve rebounds rebounds coming coming off off that that Penn Penn state state game game that that we we need need when when we we need need one one bat bat and and so so it's it's just just the the preparation preparation this this week week I I thought thought we we had had a a great great week week of of practice practice coming coming off off that that game game we we had had a a little little sit sit down down as as a a team team we we figured figured some some things things out out and and we're we're locked locked in in from from start start to to finish finish we we play play harder harder than than them them tonight tonight and and I I think think it it showed showed the the Hoosiers Hoosiers held held the the Buckeyes Buckeyes top top scorer scorer E. E. J. J. Lovell Lovell to to eleven eleven points points in in snapping snapping a a four four game game Ohio Ohio state state winning winning streak streak and and handing handing the the Buckeyes Buckeyes their their first first conference conference loss loss Indiana Indiana is is now now eleven eleven three three Tom Tom McCabe McCabe Bloomington Bloomington Indiana Indiana

Hoosiers Hoosiers Jackson Jackson Davis Davis Ohio Penn Penn State State Buckeyes E. E. J. J. Lovell Lovell Indiana Tom Tom Mccabe Mccabe Bloomington
Joe Biden and Kamala Harris Make Lackluster, Lying Remarks About Jan. 6

Mark Levin

01:30 min | Last week

Joe Biden and Kamala Harris Make Lackluster, Lying Remarks About Jan. 6

"Now here's Kamala Harris compares this to Pearl Harbor Pearl Harbor for God's sakes And she knows damn little if anything about Pearl Harbor I guarantee you Cut 13 go Certain dates echo throughout history Including dates that instantly remind all who have lived through that I can't even stand here Instantly Because you know she's a phony and a fraud with no substance whatsoever Let's go to cut 14 Go What do we not see We didn't see a former president who had just rallied the mob to attack sitting in the sky is a filthy disgusting liar He didn't rally the mob to attack We all heard and saw what took place At that speech in fact the capital was breached before even completed Now he's saying that he rallied the mob to attack This is the coordination that this fool has with the Liz Cheney of the world And the media They hate Trump They just despise him so much and you That they have to lie about what happened That he rallied the mob to attack This would be the same president that offered the National Guard Why don't they say that And how come a no damn interview today We looked on CNN MSNBC even on my beloved fox Not one Did they ask about Pelosi's

Pearl Harbor Pearl Harbor Kamala Harris Liz Cheney Donald Trump National Guard Msnbc CNN Pelosi
"13" Discussed on Episode 7-13

Episode 7-13

02:41 min | 7 months ago

"13" Discussed on Episode 7-13

"Biggest fan but I'm I'm really into them and took so and so I would, I would love to talk her into becoming a member of your entrepreneurs Club truth. Yes. It would be she would be most most welcome. It gets we're at the point where we try to wind this down Gabriella. You shared a lot of information today and I know in G and I and I know our listeners aren't going to really suck. Enjoy all of your thoughts and your ideas and your insights, your lovely person. There were so thankful that we had the opportunity to chat with you. I just wanted to thank you so much because that's really enough to be on your broadcast and I I think you start to get now a few weeks or months ago. And I really hope that keeps getting more and more interest because it's really an exciting one and I really love how in Kansas years so I am I'm really all for you. You're very, very kind, very kind of you to say that and also for everyone out there just letting you know, if you want to know more about Gabriela abecassis and her programs, we will have the pranks in this show notes and also under the show guests tab on the thought, rope podcast.com website, so everyone can listen and and visit them. Riella's website and learn more about her and connect with her on social media. And if you're on Instagram, be sure and watch and listen or IG TV program. There are well worth it and I also want to say while you're their follower..

Gabriella Riella Gabriela abecassis today Kansas Instagram IG few weeks podcast.com rope
"13" Discussed on Episode 7-13

Episode 7-13

07:41 min | 7 months ago

"13" Discussed on Episode 7-13

"Is between them. So we're between strengths and the two other ones off Frank's, there was no real team. So there was a big difference. So it really is evolution between the the different galleries where I walk. Whereas a different of a difference between the teams and how much work we could be legates to other people in the gallery. And for example, if there could be a technicians and or not, or he's the guy who hangs the exhibition themselves and and so there was the, the results in the division and I need to Frank as well. And they don't issue issue hung the show yourself or it should delegate it to enough ignition. So, and in London, that was much more thought there was an approach to ignition thing to see out, which was maybe a bit more luxurious. And as soon as it shows were a bit more professional way in Amsterdam interest, it was a bit more experimental and romantic and poetic interesting. Interesting. So why did you decide that working in a job? Salary wasn't for you anymore. So that was based on two different, two different categories. So that was one of the reason I decided I didn't want to work in a gallery. So main reason with that, I started to understand what I wanted to bring to the visual arts industry. That was always a very big question for me so. And by having conversation with people who were visiting the gallery, I I actually realized that the most money and the visit. We're coming to either get rid of most where athletes while trying to understand how the community of the gallery works. And so that was And at the same time, they it was really difficult for them to enter the the vehicle, the gallery. Because Gary's already have a lot of artists that working this month. So I understood the Gap that it was kind of in the market is our market, and this is your industry at the same time article really, trying the best kind of thought how to integrate the gallery. But at the same time, no space Hogan. So sorry. I I wanted to bring what I could and to help you know, a lot of books tell artists to hang out to galleries that somebody is going to start a conversation with them and then all of a sudden they could end up in the gallery. But you've dealt with a lot of artists where you worked in these galleries. What is the one thing that you think they all had in common? So yeah, that most doctors dialogue. Dark twins are so kind and so if you use one thing they all have in common. Yes the one thing they all had in common is kindness and wage. Also reason I wanted to work with artists because it's just so much of the knowledge they have about life and the experience they have a girl nice and every single time I have a conversation with an Asus I end up being so inspired and feeling like I understand Life's a bit more page where where I want to get it more so that there was something I noticed when having all of these conversations with the sound and the reason why I'm doing my job, well you're doing a very good job at a very good. Well, thank you, thank you. So when did you decide to develop your program to help creative people sell their Art online wage? So that's a finished story actually, I think so. Yes. So even it was more than a year ago, my partner and I got engaged and I was looking at places to learn how to organize a wedding. And I found this great club and I come in the bread club and I look at all of these women being part of his business which was the club and all of this young man, getting helps through the stomach of the clamp. And I I realized that was a great format in that what I liked in my windshield India for home. It was having a community that I could really love and I that I could really feel that I could see him so long. Michael zuk labelled. So methods a membership. I really fell in love with it and that that's what inspired me to create the artist and some kind of Club. So, packed 25. If I'm, if I had, if I hadn't been, if we hadn't occurred engaged my partner and I probably wouldn't have got the idea. Okay. Create this coming Thursday. Wonderful things came down there once, yeah, yeah. So Gabrielle, oh, what exactly is out of the cube. So, you know, how that sometimes we call art galleries were tubes. And I was really getting my way out of the gallery. So that's, that's how it became out of the cage. And at the same thing, it's, it's a game with the expression out of the box. And the idea is that I think that it's really important to start talking about money openly without his and about business as well with them. Stinking, that money is always bad. Actually, I believe the opposite that can be, you can do good things with it. And I think that there is a big wage. Yeah, there is a b 5 blue, but money in the art world and which, which makes that artists really bad about it by the, and I want to have them better ability and get more of a feel like they're selling themselves out. Right? Yes. Exactly. And also that they will get money on them approved by other organizations in the art world. And I think they can be very limiting when when actually there are not enough organization wage. To approve everyone and and that even if someone thinks that once practice is not good enough, it doesn't mean that jet pack is not good. You just mean that the person who stood that wasn't the right questions and that we have to find the people who they are are really helping with one thing. So we're getting think. Every other we all know for sure artists need to eat. Well yes yeah yeah completely yes. Just like every other human being wage they yeah exactly. They need food..

Michael zuk London Frank Asus Thursday Amsterdam India Gabrielle one Gary two different categories Hogan more than a year ago this month one thing two different 25 two other ones blue single time
"13" Discussed on Episode 7-13

Episode 7-13

02:35 min | 7 months ago

"13" Discussed on Episode 7-13

"Tell us about that experience. So I working out Gary's for five years and the first area worked with was in France in Paris and so long. I when I, when I arrived, I was studying art history, at University. At the same time when I started working in another gallery and I wanted to get experience and the subway. Sorry I worked in. I, there was no trivia galleries. There was a team and there was a director and the director decided to leave the gallery. So off, I was left alone in the gallery and so I I went from beginner to the Rector in the state of the week. I was I wasn't really my title but it was the It's a responsibility, they had then. And so that was my first experience. And I really enjoyed it, that was absolutely amazing. And then I so I stayed there for six months. Then I moved to Amsterdam where I work in a in a very special gallery and where I have amazing memories wage, which was called in and the volume projects in. After them, in their we try to sell performance apps which is a format, which is really complicated off. So yes. So so from from very early on, I I learned that you can saw any kind of out in sure being very clear about how how one can buy a special specific media. And so that was my first approach to to yeah, totally dead. Well I had the the purchasing up from France already but then that was really the reopen my mind about seeing out and then I get off some. I I had a project which came from this experience of working in India gallery and I extended the project of selling someone's out more active so that would also off the reading next project which was related to the gallery but as independent as well and you've worked at a lot of different galleries in different countries, you know, how would just out of the countries that you worked in galleries? What would you say? The big difference.

France Paris Amsterdam five years six months India first experience first approach first area Gary's
"13" Discussed on Episode 7-13

Episode 7-13

07:47 min | 7 months ago

"13" Discussed on Episode 7-13

"You listen to your podcasts. That's right. I know people that want to think more creatively will benefit from our weekly shows. What are we getting today in G? Well today we're going to be speaking with Gabriela abecassis. I love saying her name. It's so pretty. She helps artists market and sell their work. That's going to be a really interesting because that's something that every creative person thinks about every single day and probably a lot of times during the day. How am I going to sell all this Creative Edge? I've created right. Exactly now, how about that quote for this week? Okay, this is really a wonderful quote and it is learn from the mistakes of others, you can't. Live long enough to make them yourself. Oh, I like that. Who said that? Eleanor Roosevelt and you know what? Rod? This totally reminds me of a story. You told me of when, I think you were a teenager and you had a job and I think you were working at a gas station and your boss turned to you. And said, I wish I could impart all of my knowledge. All my life successes, all my, you know, I don't want to say failures but you know maybe things that didn't go so well in their lives and I and he wanted to impart them on to you thought that was such a cool thing to say in this quote really reminded me of that. Well you know you have that almost hundred percent right? With the exception of one thing was that I was actually working in a grocery store at the time. Oh my God. Yeah one of your illustrious jobs. Many Less jobs growing up. I loved it. Helped me get through my team of 18 years. Yeah. It was his name was Mister Smith and I remember that vividly time Very day, we're both down kind of on our knees. Usually, a grease pencil and putting prices on probably canopies or something or standing on the shelf. And remember you stopped for a month ago, very kind of meditative and quiet and then all of a sudden he turned to me and he said, I wish Rod that I could just somehow transfer, all the things I've learned all my experiences running a grocery store and he was very knowledgeable. I mean, at the time I'm sure it's pretty sure he'd been doing it for thirty years and so he knew a lot and I thought that was such a insightful. Wonderful thing to tell the young lad I of course did not want to tell him that I didn't see. My future is running a grocery store, but it really stuck with me that you really made a huge impression. Because so often in our lives, we all think. Oh I wish I could just teach you everything. I learned about this or that and save you a lot of trials and tribulations. Since that people often have to go through trying to figure things out. Now you could argue that learning through mistakes is a better a better teacher should. We're by that but it's still would be kind of nice if people could just say look here it is, I'm transferring it to you. You don't have to go through all this and you could become ten times more successful than I have been. Yeah, it was it was really a nice thing for him to say it's certainly made an impression on me. Oh, I think so. And I and I really loved that. He said that to you. That was a a really nice a kind thing to say, okay, well I have a question for you. What is that? It's a tough one to you better not know it but we'll see how many people do you think there are in this world? Oh I actually know this. It's close to seven point nine billion people worldwide. Okay. How did you age? I have my ways. Well, here's my thought regarding that if you do some simple math or you think about it, that's a lot of people. Yeah. And if you could just find a thousand people from that huge audience that you could sell your art to let's say every month or maybe even over two months or evening, 3 months. You would be at top song artist. A thousand people really doesn't look like a lot of people when you consider that there. Seven, would you say, 7 close to 7.9 billion people? Well, you can see how that how that works out. It doesn't take a whole lot for you to become a successful selling artist. When you consider, you can tap into that a mass. So true. So true, I've never really thought of it that way actually Rod, but the customer base in this world is really Mammoth and you only need to reach a few to become successful. Yeah, it's it's really it sounds daunting. Especially you know when you're trying to sell your art in Chrome and how am I going to do it? Yeah. Reaching the people I guess that's the thing. So, Angie's in Minds, best advice if you want to sell anything that you create, it's real simple actually. You just need to meet a lot of people. The more people, you know, the greater opportunity you're going to have to sell your art. It just mathematically makes sense. It does it's really kind of a simple math equation, really and fortunately nowadays social media allows you to build a major audience and get to know a lot of people in kind of a small space. Well, when you meet somebody, you know, we've all met people at a party or even a business meeting, you know, even in our jobs. Yeah. And then people will say. So what do you do for fun or what is your occupation wage? If, if it's just a casual meeting somewhere, and if you tell people, your artist invariably people ask. Oh, well, what do you paint? And that gives you a great entree into telling people about you, your art and a little bit about your lifestyle. It's it's really amazing how engaging that kind of conversation can be. You're so right, honey, I couldn't agree more, you know, we all get a little bit tired of promoting ourselves online especially like, on Instagram. But for some of us, it is allowed us to meet so many pretty amazing people. And we've been fortunate enough to have those people as guests on the thought Rowe podcast. You know, I couldn't agree with you more. I just really wonderful people and I'm really thankful that we met them on Instagram so that we could share them with our audience on the podcast where I thought Ro. Yeah, they want to go back and mention just off. The simple thing. It's really kind of simple, that math equation that we are sharing with you. Yeah. Fortunately nowadays you have so many ways to build an audience, bought a, a computer and social media. And it's not just all about who you meet on the streets so to speak true. But people that you can meet even in social situations so true. Well, this brings me to the guest. We're going to be speaking with today. Oh yeah, her name is Gabriella abecassis and she helps artists market and sell their work online. Now, I don't know any creative person that's not going to benefit from hearing what she has to say. She's a great guest at a great person so true, Hi Gabriella. Welcome to the thought Rowe podcast, both Ron and I have been so excited and looking forward to chatting with you today. Hi Gabriella. This is Rod. It's good to have you with us today and.

Gabriela abecassis Eleanor Roosevelt Ron Gabriella Gabriella abecassis 18 years 3 months Chrome today thirty years 7 Rod ten times nine billion people Seven a month ago 7.9 billion people this week Smith over two months
"13" Discussed on Episode 7-13

Episode 7-13

01:44 min | 8 months ago

"13" Discussed on Episode 7-13

"How in Kansas years so I am I'm really all for you. You're very, very kind, very kind of you to say that and also for everyone out there just letting you know, if you want to know more about Gabriela abecassis and her programs, we will have the pranks in this show notes and also under the show guests tab on the thought, rope podcast.com website, so everyone can listen and and visit them. Riella's website and learn more about her and connect with her on social media and if you're an Instagram be sure. And watch and listen or i g, t v programs, there are well worth it. And I also want to say while you're their follower..

Gabriela abecassis Riella Instagram Kansas podcast.com rope
"13" Discussed on Episode 7-13

Episode 7-13

07:55 min | 8 months ago

"13" Discussed on Episode 7-13

"Privilege of blessing to have such space. Now, I still need to finish painting the walls properly of too busy trying to make, make put paint on, canvas to do it, but we get there. I have two things. I want to say one working to put links to your website and all content information. Yeah. So maybe you think you have a chance you might I know artists love. Looking at other artists Studios. They won't send photos. I do that. I don't do that wage. Why does that guy use that paint and all the stuff, I hate that paintbrush, but if you could, you know, whenever you when you have time, send us some photos cuz we'll put on your bio page. So people can take a look. I think they everybody would enjoy that. This is Teresa Studio, everyone will want to see, is the one, you know, you know, I'm, I'm fascinated by other artists Studio. It's incredibly logical link between what we what we all do you'll seeing are spaces. Oh, you know cuz we all know what stage is supposed to be. But how long does a differently? It's brilliant dialogue between between all of us? I think. Exactly. So do you ever have doubts this? You could ask any artist in the world this situation and you're going to get a whole bunch of different answers. Most of them will be lies, but I know you'll be real honest about this. And do you ever have doubts about what you're doing creatively? Oh continuously just they're nice it's always you know when things get really really bad I look at the Muppet Show, I look at Gary Larson or something like that and wage just look at the kind of the I suppose the stupidity off of existence and then since they'll just get on with it you know. So yeah. Continuously I I have doubts I suppose especially cuz you know in a sense were making something that very few people want. Very few people want to actually look at in terms of the amount of people in the world or a nanny. Yeah, yeah, absolutely. Even more even more. So to understand it. So you know a sequel doesn't make sense and then you get to the stage where, you know, like when I was younger I used to write a huge amount about what I'm doing now. I can't because I haven't a clue what it's about anymore because you know, they're visual problems to keep coming up and you kind of think my going in the right direction it does this make any sense even to me? So you know, it's it's you just you just have to try and take you away forward. That's why I keep going back to that, they wage. Muppet Show thing of the tree falling down, which, when she falls down at the top of the guy trying to add stairs, and it, it's like that. That's that's what happens when, when the painted go bad, it does it boils down on top of you off and then you gotta crawl out and and get a fresh canvas and start again, right? But you know what you just said is so valuable because I think that every creative person has a lot of doubts and a lot of feelings about what they're doing is, is this right? Am I going the right direction? So it's really very comforting to hear you say that because I think we're all on that level where they, you're doing things and you think it's going to be good, but you still have questions. I think you have to approach it, like you're a scientist, because all you're ever doing is you're experimenting, true. Every, every single painting is an experiment, you don't generally know what's, right? What's going to end up? Unless maybe you're painting a tree that you painted 10,000 times, you have a pretty good, I thought. How that's going to come out right. But if you pay more abstractly look out there. There's no. Yeah, definitive true nism involved there at all. So true. Absolutely. Cuz you've noticed an internet when you're painting abstract, you even semi abstractly because you know, every mark under has Justified or you can make a, you know, safer sky and clouds. You know, you can make a kind of squiggle phone number, the kind of short time that, you know, you know, it's going to be represent this guy whatever. So, in a sense your job is done there when you're trying to kind of paint something into something that's in your head and you don't have a language Forest, is trying to. How do you develop and how do you grow that language, right? I think it's a difficult part like that grow the language. That's very nice off. Let's see what else did I want to ask? I wanted to ask, where do you see yourself in ten years? I think to myself showing with a gaussian galleries, there you go. I applaud that a friend of a friend that my new Larry could go back years ago and he said he started up selling posters had been a speech, you know. So I can you know, he's got the number one Gallery in the world pretty much at this stage and I don't know, I think why not? You know exactly why not. I like that really had a fixed audience of a speech. Let me tell you, you did, he did. Absolutely. But a good place to start. Yeah. And then what what do you want to be most remembered by You do two things generator. You're a teacher, obviously, right? You're very conversant in art and creativity, but what do you want to bring in in, you're very talented artist? What do you want to be most remembered by Well, I kind of see the only the only proof that we were here is what we leave behind. There's a saying I think it's an Australian saying and it's basically a good tracker can track a man by the Marquis Shack left a week previously and I kind of see us and our existence of the shadows and the objects that we make, you know, are there were gone and it's up to whatever to interpret them in the fire, whatever, they can push on the wall or whatever. But you know it's it's it's it's the only remembrance of that. The, the actually there we can take a photograph, obviously this Victorian Photograph by puffer, turn out of people. You're trying to make a motion. You sing what's that? But what these people, but you can. But if you see something, somebody actually made, you know, you see a painting by money or or or you know, drawing by Raffi or whatever and you kind of think you get more inside their head. So I think art art does that. It makes the Shadow or the mark of the Shadow stronger. A phone number It's interesting. You say that because isn't that how we perceive early man? We look at Early Man by the tools he left. Absolutely right the drawings. He brung a paintings. Yeah. Yeah. That's we don't know. We don't know anything about them other than what we've learned from their tools and what we've really learned from their cave, paintings, which are extraordinary extra and we see much closer to them because of that, you know, say doing for them, they put their hand on the wall and they spray a kind of you know they spray the the mode around it. So you just got a space for their hand was you know, the charge that space. You know. God knows how many thousands of years ago but you know it's it's almost done yesterday because as as market-makers as artists we understand that so you know we're immediately connected with them. So you know that report is there. It would be almost impossible took to walk up to that and not want to put your own hand over there and yeah, absolutely internet reconnect with somehow absolutely fantastic to to to be able to do the obvious, you know, Acids in our hands. Now we can't do stuff like that but you know, at least we can think of it or whatever right? Or you can print a picture out on your printer down and put your hand on. I don't think it's probably the nearest proximity there. Obviously right on track in our next question, we came up with this last week and I thought it was an interesting answer, so I think we're going to ask you to if you could sit on a park bench and chat with anyone from the Past, who.

Gary Larson 10,000 times Larry Raffi ten years two things yesterday thousands of years ago Marquis Shack last week one Victorian Muppet Show Teresa Studio single painting Australian Early years Man gaussian
"13" Discussed on Episode 7-13

Episode 7-13

08:09 min | 8 months ago

"13" Discussed on Episode 7-13

"Or you know that you're limited, you're only limited with your imagination. So it has always worked for me. I've always had a journal. Sometimes I have multiple journals because I have one where I'm just sketching. I may have one where I'm just writing. I may have one where I'm doing both. I have some major journals where I love going for trucks, so if I pick up things on my truck, they go into my nature journals. So I just think that, you know, there's so many different ways that we can express ourselves. It's not just writing, that is just definitely one of them when your journaling. But there are a lot of people that have bought a journalist who are not necessarily writing, but they just want a place where they can keep these found objects that they love. And they may write down a couple of quotes or something, but essentially, it's their place where they go to their private domain. I like, I like that, you know, because in a hectic world, we live in. Sometimes you scroll things on those little Post-it notes. On a piece, I do all the time and then you put it somewhere and then you don't really find it. Whereas if it's something special you want to remember or just thoughts, I feel like it makes it extra elegant and extra special for you only. So this is really elegant thing you can do for yourself. Is self-pampering thing. Oh, yeah. That makes sense. Exactly. They yeah, I have a man question. Okay, you go for it is junk journaling, just for women. I don't think so. I think anyone can jump journaling, is no different than any other form of journaling. The only difference is, as I said before, you know, you're creating Journal made out of things that normally would end up in the trash. But the process of journaling in these junk journals is no different than just picking up a schedule or any other form of Journal where you're writing. It's it's your place you do what you feel you want to do because it's your place and it you know it's just a spot where men can go and write down things and sketch things, and collect things and so can women. I even have some really big children. Young people have purchased some of my journals so I don't think it's limited by age or you know, whatever gender you are. It's a place for You Tube app. Jiggly just go and express yourself freely. I think there are probably some male listeners out there that are trying to figure out how they can put old automobile parts in a job. They want to keep it but you know something Rod, honestly I have actually made junk journals for men as well. And it's funny. You mentioned the automotive parts because some of those those journals have Incorporated. You know, those old magazines that had automobile advertisements and whatnot in like full word and Coca-Cola and whatnot. So I've taken those vintage those papers from the magazines that used to be the size of my gosh. I don't know a huge site like almost like a portfolio size. I've taken those and Incorporated them into the journals I've made for men photographs of, you know, from the early twentieth century I had this one Journal. I did for someone, which had nineteenth-century characters of men in the gym, like lifting weights and do something and things like that. Yeah, it was it was so fun it was just it was very masculine, nothing feminine about it, the fabric on the cover off, very masculine everything on the inside of the journal was very, very masculine and related to men. And it was it was loved and I'm pretty sure it's chairs. So I don't think it's it's just a woman thing. I think men can certainly have a junk journal and enjoy it and use it, but the creative Outlet. It is something that you could do very creatively. There's a lot of men that are very, very creative so I could see them. Absolutely, the opportunity to do this. What do you have for Sanji? Well, you know, I looked at your Journal that we got a while back ago. And it's it's Exquisite, it is so beautiful. And I'm wondering if I started to make one for myself or for a gift, what materials would I need to do with us? Okay, so you know, there there's a very simple way to make a journal and then of course, there's, you know, you get more advanced. So in the simplest way you basically just need some sheets of paper that you want inside of the journal and you can use fabric for the cover or you can use cardboard. If it's a junk Journal, you can even use like a cereal box. If you wanted to really that you cover up with paper or Fabric or paint, however, you choose to decorate it and then you just need a thread and a needle and Thursday. It's just pulling up the papers, putting them on the inside of the cover and sewing them together. It's not that difficult again there's you can go more advanced from that point because wage You can I typically use a simple. What is called, a simple pamphlet Stitch, but then there are other stitches that are a little bit more advanced and complicated, but for someone who just wants to make a small little town for themselves. It's very easy to do. Very simple. I'll just, I'll just throw this in there. Oh, yeah, for the, for the historian, in me, I am right now, working on Abraham, Lincoln for my next book, I'm working on his biography and as a matter of fact, he made his own little Journal when he was younger, he, yes, because it was so difficult for him to have paper and materials and whatnot, and he so badly and passionately wanted to study and learn and have an education and not be able to read. So he basically took some paper that he found from who-knows-where. And so together a copy book for himself which is where he jot It Down song. Things that he found were important to him so that he could just remember those. So, here's a consummate learner, right? Absolutely all the way to the end. So even he made his own handmade junk Journal. I thought it was just fantastic. When I was researching him to find that. That's really, it is interesting. That leads us to my next question, after listening to Thursday, and what we've seen, we consider journaling, to be quite an art form in itself. Can you picture a day when you see these journals in museums of art in an exhibition? Yes, as a matter of fact, Rod, I think there are a couple of museums that have already done exhibition's where they've had people bring in journals. I believe there are some in the entire country but very specifically I know of a couple that did it here. I do believe journals are a form of art because you're dead. All of your creativity, your energy, your expression, your thoughts into this journal. I know, obviously people, you know that there are journals that are very private, you're not going to go back out there, right? But then, there are other journals that have all of this, you know, visual as well as things that you're written down, or materials that you have saved and attached to the journey that you definitely be considered very artistic and creative and work. It's showing. So, I dunno, if couple here locally that I've done an exhibition on Thursday, I would love to.

nineteenth-century early twentieth century Abraham both Rod Lincoln Thursday one one Journal You Tube one of them Coca-Cola a day sheets couple Sanji
"13" Discussed on Episode 7-13

Episode 7-13

06:33 min | 8 months ago

"13" Discussed on Episode 7-13

"A lot of texture to your pieces. A very impressive though if you're walking through a park and you suck, One of Marianne's sculptures repeated stands out definitely. And also you have such a defined style which is very difficult for artists to do. You have such a defined foil that when people see a piece of your work, they go. Oh I know who that artist is and that's probably the greatest compliment any artist could ever receive. Is when other objects are other people that have necessarily into art. They go. Oh I know who that is. I think a group very happy that you've achieved that goal. That's not an easy one to achieve by the way, it isn't. Yes. And I'm very happy about that too. And there's a gallery that represents me a Nashville and and have a big window on the front and my sculptures there. And people often say, oh, it's very important that tell me that they saw my work. There you just driving by. So yeah. And they don't slam on the brakes and go in and open their wallets. Yes, of course, of course, they do know that off. No, sometimes my question is, is, do you principally? Well, what what is your principal material that you use to make your sculptures? It's Clay, right? It's dead. Yeah, it's clear, yes. Okay. And then, how how late is it? Oh go ahead. Go ahead and marry you. I was going to say it's a medium that there's so many possibilities if using this this material that it's just incredible, the shapes and sizes the surface in decoration or you know, whenever it's limit its Limitless and it can be very precise to in life. Well, I won't compare but two other clay originally played, you seem to be yeah. More gargoyles and just amorphous Shape song, but it can be more precise than that. And it is a lot of artists are doing precise work, but but I just love the medium and it also another advantage. That I have control over every stage of the process. And so that that is nice to as a mail to send it to a Foundry. Yeah. Control as a man, I really like looking at you sculpting with all those tools, I'm always fascinated by the various tools, you're using to Clay and you seem to do it with such finesse. I'm not sure guys. Have that kind of finesse, but you, you drag that true over that clay and it seems to yield everything you want out of it. That's not an easy thing to do is, that's correct. And and the line work, I use a, you know, a knife and inside the lines and it's all hand. It's just free handed. You know, and somehow the you know, if I'm working on it I wage current cable. So somehow align will just end up on the other side at the exact right point. You know, real meeting another. I know. It's just it's just that it's, you know, song Moment. So, you know, just it's there's a rhythm to it and everything and it just, it's it just happens, it doesn't always happen that way. But I'm saying that, you know, it can and it's it's a really nice feeling. Well, you'd have to just scrub it outright and reshape. Yeah. That's easy know. I mean, to take the line right now to have a matchup sure. I can understand know. Yeah. So how long, how long, how long does it take you to make your sculptures that depends on the size, you know? And, but the minimum length of time to have a finished piece would be like five or six weeks because of drawing time. Oh, yeah, more than anything. Yeah, and yeah, so interesting, you know, Yeah, it appears to me that with your sculpture starting out as abstract clay figures, how do you manage to create ones that worst? And we talked about this a little bit, but withstand the outside elements. I mean, you're like you said, you're in an area where you have four seasons and you know which means it's going to be cold. Yeah, took it clears, it very strong material and it had been has been used for centuries, you know, for decorations about buildings and a lot of things, but it has to be dead tired to a victory, a state, where moisture can't get into it. And, and so and that that's helpful but it's a very strong material and I use a specially formed, the claim that is made for sculpture and and so part of it is you must be bringing that in by the truckload. Yeah. Not really I mean dog. I do get clothes like five hundred pounds each time but you know, I don't matter, you know, Mass produce them or getting, you know, no need to take time so long anyway. Yeah, five weeks that's drying. Time is that seems to be pervasive in a lot of different forms. Are you going to wait for the ride to try? Sure. Yeah. So I do a lot of different pieces of one, so I have several things going at once. Now I'm going to be Snoopy with my next question, because when we've seen the photos of the interior of your home, where you have many of your art pieces, displayed, which I might, add are beautifully displayed, in your home rotten. I have noticed that you have a favorite book on your table. Well, tell us about your book and what it means to you. Okay, it's called oh Appalachia. And it was written by Ramona lamp L and her husband Millard. And she became a very good friend of mine. I first met her when she came to one of my studio tours. Ten ten years ago or more and she loved my work bought a piece right away and and not just she was, she was like a mentor to me and just wonderful person, but she ended up with about ten, sculptures and paintings and drawings and just really fabulous person. She passed away a year half ago and got her to hear that. Yeah, yeah. But she was wonderful and.

Ramona lamp L Millard five hundred pounds five Nashville Marianne five weeks a year half ago six weeks four seasons Ten ten years ago Snoopy each time two other clay about ten first Appalachia centuries one One
"13" Discussed on Episode 7-13

Episode 7-13

07:03 min | 8 months ago

"13" Discussed on Episode 7-13

"Write Crips. Yes please and the teenagers be almost back and we'll sixteen well. Yeah though, it's great. Now it's a little bit more independent, but like what I do like I said I work seven days. But when I am with them and spending quality time with them, I'm not working. I think that's the time. I'm not working is when I am with them breathing system and I think it's really important, especially being said they are someday going to leave. I will make the most of my time that I can wish them because they grow, I know they will go and we we do raise kids to go and have their own Wings off. And I yes, but I I try my best when I'm them. I am with them and I'm not working. But when they're at school, doing sports or socialized and I'm working. And that's how I balance both. See, that's really nice. You have a balance of everything then you can have your home life and your work life. Also sounds to me, like your grandmother. Yes. Mother Supermom. Yeah, Supermom. Thank you. I have. They are priorities as post when you have children that will always be priorities and I made sure. I am present and I am there in that, having my flexibility a work that's really important to me also because of that because I can't turn it off and turn it on and start and stop anytime, you know, because tap in and yeah, so they took their family. Any time they needed really see. That's really nice and I know where you live. You live in a very cool country, you live in Australia, but you've managed to crack Packed with the entire world and Market to people from all over the world. How have you managed to do this? Because Australia, seems so far away from a lot of different continents in the world, but you're able to just really a lot of, a lot of people know who you are. Yes. Yeah, yeah. Yes. But, you know, I, I think is because social media has a broken barriers. I communicate with people who don't speak English and I can communicate visually like social media has created this visual bridge and sometimes they just by your pictures or they normally don't even speak English but they get really understand what your message is. Yeah. And I am I am very grateful for all my social media family. I hope you all family because you have been there and you have given me the encouragement to do what I do and to wage Keep doing better because that is appreciation. And you as an artist. You do for someone, you do what you do because you do for someone, you want someone to to connect. And to make sure you get something good out of it and appreciate. And that makes you that is few. For any artist, you don't do a lot to just, you know, art is so important in his word and social media page has even the platform is the great platforms anyone? Because we all artists really, we all have something to express and say, and, and we all appreciate. I have a lot of money, but I'm being the luckiest, I think very lucky with my, with my social media followers. And I, like I said, I call Family. It all comes from. Yeah. It always started because the fuel for being a part of you. That's how we met you. Yeah. Through social media. Exactly, right. Yes, I met people from everywhere. Like you said, everyone in the world and it's wonderful. I am so grateful for that long. Imagine the next question is, tell us about the Luna Bell Girl shop Gunda blue, sorry. I like okay, it was cool song. It's a beautiful nature now. Yeah. Well, lunar blue girl came. Last year. I normally take opportunities when they come to me, I don't let them go. I grab them and I keep them close to me. So someone can't say, like, I don't want the shop. Do you want to set? Oh, yes. Of course I do. I like, it's also radios doing for all the brands and I still do operate with all the brands. Mainly now, I do Beauty and travel but I was doing a lot of fashion. I said, I can do that for myself now and I can be my own brain, Ambassador or offensively. I like brand ambassador better, but so, I took and I said, now, I can't take this. It's what I'm doing anyway. I love it. I it's dead. Any fish and I love and I, that's how it happened. Someone said, I don't. And I said, I do. I put in my hand out like it. I like it. The opportunity came, and I have done this, my whole lives and not see passes by me with zombies. Think I'll have a go at it, you know? Right now I have a little and I'll do my best. And since then I'm just trying to get the word out there about Luna, blue girl. And it's, it's just a start. It's a Brandon, not many people know yet, right? Working really hard to let that to make that happen. I think I think a lot of people are getting to know it though and social media and things and we'll have plenty long will have links. Thank you. Thank so much. They'll be wonderful. Thank you. Yeah, so it's wonderful. I'm loving every minute of it long. We can tell and I can tell when I look at your side gate, you have such a luxury look to it and it has such a fashion luxury. Look, does that fit into your creative motivation and philosophy? Yes. Yep. S because he's a very good question. What I think is if you see my images below its luxury but it's a lot of outdoor, natural, light, nature pictures. Yes. So what I think is this is a message because I think Nature has become luxury. And I wanted to spend the money, we pay more to be by the water. We pay more to have a view. We have to waste thinking how we were, we're doing, because name has become luxury, and that's my message. I will do luxuries, luxurious pictures images in nature, Sandia messages is this has to be looked after them are not doing a great job, right now, we need to see what we are doing and this is the message I want to just send there is the luxury behind it is. What song? Making such an asset, maybe it's cause or less. So that is the message look after, we are losing it. This is luxury. This home right now. We shouldn't be having this luxury should be accessible. Should be more? We should be protecting. We should be truly more for the planet true. That's.

Australia Last year seven days Sandia sixteen Luna Bell Girl English both Luna Brandon Gunda blue lunar blue girl
"13" Discussed on Episode 7-13

Episode 7-13

06:42 min | 8 months ago

"13" Discussed on Episode 7-13

"Into. I try and find out what the museum is about, who the audience are. And then find Taylor my group of artists to go in there to have a conversation with them. So it's a fairly straightforward process. I often like to ask the artists and the museum to put on some kind of seminars, our conversations between the artists say, from Ireland and the article forever actually working out of Jos. And just just just to see how we can build a rapport because I see art as a conversation as a little bit of a follow-up on that. I like that part is a conversation. I like that a lot. Yeah. Do you find these artists Well, we were, I mean we was only about five and half million people here but the huge community of artists in in Ireland, they're very few galleries cuz there isn't the as opposed to the financial backing to keep people go off. So the artists would be I suppose Consolidated in in in a number of centers so I just keep an eye on what's going on but be members of the various artists associations and groups and stuff like that and it's it's like I'm at the stage now. We're kind of people who come to me and asked to be involved in the project and it just just kind of take it from there. So I would always try and put a number of people together in a group that actually worked as individuals. So it's very much about the people taking part as the war of the stick in part. Because if you've got people who don't get on together to work, might be brilliant. It's just not going to work as a project to connect with you with the value and the audience from that venue. Great answer basically. I can see why engine I want to choose to cast. Yes, that's a good answer. Terrific answer but yep. A bit of a follow-up on that one. We know when it comes to our, you're extremely, well-educated in that area, is that education impacted your territorial, Ambitions? I don't think it has in, in, in many ways, a month, once said, to me, you know, years and years ago today, you stop learning you'd be three hours dead and dead. Even though it was a wise guy, know how you figured out three three hours, but I did it. It's again, it goes back to to the conversation, you know, you've got people who are teaching stuff and they're going to give you information and you know you're going to give that information back now. Luckily the art school process is very kind of fluid in that you know going to the Provo going to rest and whatever afterwards they tend to learn more when you're talking to your choosers, both was about. What's going on, what kind of information you have? And how you know, you're trying to build rapport between them themselves? I always see kind of education and job. Again, a dialogue between people like for, for instance, if you got say to people who see a painting of a building on fire, for instance, one person was in a fire. The other person was not wage. Also going to see the exact same painting, two, totally different ways. So it's how do you negotiate? Your route, your way around those experiences and what sort of Iraq as a result or dialogue will actually come out of that. And as I kind of see that as education. So okay, winter, a number of Institutions, but at the same time, it's a continuing process of primer focus on your rent to these places. I think your comment that you made about chatting with the instructors after class, you know, they all they all do. Basically the same thing, they have their own all their papers in front of them. They follow the routine that they established their, as they teach each class and then, once they're out of that class and they can let their hair down, Say whatever they want. You know, say things that they're not being monitored or if they're talking in your case to a particular student who they admire, they might be more forthcoming with some of the info that they've said, I know, and she's got the next question for you. Yeah, you know, I was I was wondering this personally. When did you decide to curate art, exhibitions like was there one particular infant thought you just went, that's it. This is going to make me a curator because I just feel so inspired to do it. Yeah. It was one sort of I suppose I was in second year or just beginning second year in our college and I kind of figured okay, there's no structure for, you know, being an artist, you know, site trying someone to be Soldier to be a mechanic or an accountant or whatever. There's no actually kind of careers. Choked, sure. So that's what I might suggest get get on my bicycle and kind of just start to make my own at that stage. So we're a lot of exhibition, small little group exhibitions going on then. So I just organized people dead. Virtual friends and not to take part in as we hire van and take stuff off and eventually we would just kind of ask people, could we borrow, you know, a derelict building or non-use building or whatever instead of what kind of pop up showing the tutors in the college said if I didn't stop by was going to be expelled. I said no. No I'm saying I said I'm staying going with this and interesting Northland ahead. Shoot for actually wants to be part of the next show that actually included. They may have and that was the end of the end of that so they kind of just started from there and I think in the Arts you got to make your money on opportunities. Yeah. You know it's going to be one of the few would have been their loss truth really well. It's it's, you know, I mean overall situation. We all kind of try and I supposed to do our heart, with whatever information. We have an experienced, we have and kind of take it from there, you know, right. Do you only curate paintings, Maurice or do you delve into other dog? Sivart Creations. I generally try and stick with the Fine Arts. The sculpture painting drawing print photography. I don't know a lot about video. I certainly know how old you are. I know conceptual artist but they're they're a lot harder for to actually put on. Yeah, you know you know abroad like very often I would be hugely kind of supposed helped by Department of Foreign Affairs and cultural. And and you know, there are other people who will be kind of you know working with them who would be able to work with video and dance and theater and stuff like that. So I just find this more than enough, from be to work with in, in, in, in the Fine Arts. Like I know the structures how it works. I brought I know. Yeah. You know, in general, the people, you know, you working with, you know, how to think and, you know, you just trying to continue with that. I would love to be able to get into video and stuffing That but.

second year Ireland Taylor two three hours today both Iraq each class one person Maurice one about five and half million pe three Northland Department of Foreign Affairs Jos years once Sivart Creations
"13" Discussed on Episode 7-13

Episode 7-13

08:06 min | 8 months ago

"13" Discussed on Episode 7-13

"Lot of people discover needlework, you see. Yeah, you see lots of Long Point where the bushing, any crochet and its competitive. You walk by in your see someone got a blue ribbon or gold ribbon and then you go. Wow. You know that is the the showstopper that's the piece that all the judges thought was spectacular to me that in itself says a lot because you're competing against other crafters and if you offer a reward that's nice you can hang it on your wall at home. But you know, darn well that all the people that didn't win a reward are going to be back doing their crafts. The very next day with just thought, Much enthusiasm as they had before they ever submitted it to the show. There is one other thing, I don't know if it's a craft or not, but the area that I always like to hang out is where they have the model train displays. Oh yeah. This were kind of cool, the bunch of boys and a bunch of men standing around watching this little train, go around on the tracks, around around around, but it's fascinating and you have to understand that they build these models, all the little houses and the people, the cars, all that stuff is handmade. So yeah, that's handmaid handmaid's or crafts. That's crap. And a lot of talent and experience goes into building such stuff. True, I went through a model railroad, I guess, like, for just a few months, I think. And I got a little train and then once I set it up and watched it, go back and around a few times. I think that was it. I think I got bored six. I I did. It wasn't it, wasn't there more? So I didn't like it anymore. We would be remiss if we didn't talk about The food that you find at county fairs where they compete for like the best Jam. Best pie, best cake best all of that, well, that is a craft and requires training and everything, but but you have to be very talented to make a great apple pie, that wins the Blue Ribbon. I think that the judges on on that one are the lucky ones because we get to taste all this stuff. So it's kind of cool cuz they'll they'll try out somebody's preserves or their vegetables that they can't or whatever to make sure that they did not correctly and everything's fine and it looks like it's and they do a blind. They don't they really don't know, they don't know. Know know who they're judging. You just have to do it strictly by taste, but that sounds like fun. But those are very creative people. Very in our show is dedicated to creative people, right? And that's where we're headed with a guest, right? And we wanted to bring you our special guest log. Today Angelina Fielding. She is a successful artist historian and a writer. She's also excellent at crafting junk journals, which is why she's here today, it's going to be interesting to hear what she has to say. I've known her for a while, and the thing that I always like to say about her, she's a truly, a Renaissance woman, she's so talented in so many ways, so many things that she does are just quite brilliant. That's for lack of a better term. She is Hi Angelina. Welcome to the thought Rogue podcast. We're so glad to have the opportunity to chat with you today, Angelina. Hello. Thank you so much for having me over. You are so, welcome. So we have a little question that we want to ask you. It's a tough one. It's a hard question. So, okay here. Yeah, what do you have for breakfast today? Actually, I do not eat breakfast. Oh okay. Do you have coffee, or tea, or anything like that. I will just have water and start my day off as the day progresses. Sometimes I may have some coffee but I actually only eat when I'm hungry and most of the time I'm so engrossed in my work that I do forget. Oh, okay. And breakfast is definitely not a staple with me. Well, some people don't like it, they're not into it. You're not always eating. I mean that's not your favorite meal, you know, not me either. I would rather I mean I'm I want my coffee or tea and that's it but I'm forced to eat breakfast virtually. I'd rather have a nice big breakfast and then eat light meals during the day or the end of the day, we all have our own Rhythm I guess of eating and and things like that. That's true. I think I think my maybe a little off just because I the way I work it's, you know, home. I sleep maybe four hours a day like a good day so I'm constantly in a working cycle and so well that leads that leads breakfast time that leads me to our home. Real question here, although the other one is pretty real, I know, and engine I know we know what you're very talented. In many areas, you know, an artist, you're a historian, you're a writer. And you also create beautiful junk journals today. We'd like to start out by talking about the junk journals. So perhaps you could tell us exactly what is a junk Jersey. Sure. So as the term implies a junk Journal is essentially a journal that is made out of materials, that would be considered junk off. So for example, all newspapers, you know, checkbook, feeds things that you would normally just trash because there's there's no room for a flyers advertising dog. Meijer's coupons, things like that and so it's made up of all these items. These Pages these sheets that are considered junk, but when you put it together, you can change and transform. Those junky feeds into something more valuable and more beautiful. As you continue to work, on your Journal essential, that's put a junk Journal. Is people use all kinds of things that really just depends on, who is making the journal. I use all of those things and I use old envelopes, all kinds of things to transform it into a workable page that I can use in my journal. Hmm. So, what is your philosophy behind junk journaling? So, long as you know, I'm a historian and I find anything dealing with history, very exciting, My Philosophy, philosophy in general, whether it's my writing or song, Or making journals is just trying to preserve. Whatever is old, whatever is something that people normally wouldn't think twice about. So preservation is what drives me and my work and junk journaling is no different. I find it exciting because it gives me an opportunity to find something that I can reintroduce repurpose and recreate into something else, which still has a little bit of its own history left to it. So when you're out and about and you object, yeah, when you're out and about and you see something, does that trigger a thought related to history and you go? Well this would be a great in the one of my junk journals. Yes, absolutely. One of the things I enjoy doing is just going, you know, in in my town where I live, there are small shops and I'll freak with them. And sometimes I'll come across items that may inspire me either. I'll take the item itself. For instance, old vintage papers. I mean, come across something like that wallpapers off. And I mean, just grab those and then incorporate them into the junk journal, or it could be that. I just saw an old painting and painting it out. Antique shop, or an old image of a statue or something that just triggers some sort of an inspiration in my mind and then I'll go back and translate that.

Angelina Fielding Angelina Today today twice six One one other thing four hours a day Rogue one of next day Long Point junk Meijer
"13" Discussed on Episode 7-13

Episode 7-13

08:12 min | 8 months ago

"13" Discussed on Episode 7-13

"And they've learned a lot from them and I can often see it and how curators talk today. They kind of mirror, the things that I actually read in books. So you know where they're getting, you know, where they're getting information. But you have to study and you have to learn your craft no matter what it is that you do. Well, don't you think though? It's kind of like when a great General Studies a war situation or great leaders in other countries that they're not part of they learn from their past experience and I feel like people do that over and over again, as a model to what maybe they need to do or what they need to how they need to handle their. Well, every, every great General, they looked at everything. Napoleon did all of his strategies all the way back to biggest Corner. Well, there is a study, you're right? And so, if you want to learn to become a good curator, or if you want to be loved, Yeah, you study the curators from the past, that's probably where you're going to learn the most about what it is to be a curator. So true. And I guess the big question is it possible that anyone can become a curator I think to me it seems like it's all about your taste if you have good taste level. Oh yeah. And that's arguable because that's so impressionable. I could have good taste of that one thing and everybody else could absolutely hate what I think is good taste. You see that in design, especially interior design, some people might really like purple on their walls and other people made to test it and they prefer to have green, right? But curing is really a lot about having a good sense of taste. But when it comes to curating art, you really have to understand the art, you have to have studied it and you have to know what's good or bad or at least in your own personal opinion. But probably more important is your ability to create a show. Show where the audience the people that come in to see the exhibition are comfortable and then it has a nice flow to it. You want people to come in the front door, look at the various paintings and as Thursday, Walk through the curated show, they go. Oh, I really love this piece. I'm not so sure about that piece but there has to be a flow, you know, I'm going to say I kind of have a different opinion about that and that is that some curators are very they like to be controversial or they like to make the attendees be a little uncomfortable because what they're doing is is it's kind of like almost a performance art but really they're drawing out different emotions in the person attending this exhibition and they want to get them involved, emotionally invested and sometimes that is really effective in making the artwork that is on the walls or the sculpture or whatever you have in that exhibition become emotionally attaching to the, to the attendee. So sometimes it's uncomfortable, sometimes it's dead. Unusual. So it's not always about the Comfort level. It's about sometimes being a little disturbing, I think. And I'm not sure that I always loved those exhibitions when it's just surveying, because then it can be like it sticks in your mind and kind of a a negative way, especially if you're a very visual person, like you and I are you and I walked out of shows like that or sometimes. Sometimes I'll look around and I'll say, hey Angie, this is not my space. I want out of here, right? And you'll say know, give it a chance to take a look at this. Take a look at that and see what you see. Ya get the whole and I suspect I have to admit, you know, you've talked me in sometimes to. Yeah, looking a little bit beyond my own personal taste and exploring it a little bit further, right? But I also, there's been some pretty disgusting shows that I just could not stay in the building anymore and as we were walking out the door, I would look at you and say, what the heck were they thinking? Yeah. I also noticed they didn't have big audiences. Well, wage. Love them are a smaller audience crowd really but I guess it's all about a collection and presenting them in a cohesive educational or Innovative or emotional, you know, stimulating kind of way. Well, curating a collection, you can curate just about any kind of collection, you could get rate a Barbie doll collection. Yeah, I bought. Some, some people would really like that. Well, I think now would be a good time to speak with our guest today. Who is Maurice Clinic winning men? I'm sorry for not saying that correctly, but he is Irish and I'm sure you're going to really enjoy this interview. Maurice, welcome our talented friend, welcome to the thought, Rowe podcast, both engine. I've been really looking forward to chatting with you for quite some time. Hello. I, I'm very much looking forward to talking to yourselves. It's an honor to be interviewed by you both. Thank you. Oh, well, thank you. That's so nice of you to say that. Well, our very first question is, you are very creative and talented artist and we are excited to talk to you about your career as a curator. But before we begin, we like to start a show by asking you what you had for breakfast, breakfast questions, hardest question. Absolutely, the question, the daunting question, I normally get up around 7:00, make a mug of coffee. I go into the studio and I stare at the painting, they stare back at me or going to start my day. And that way, it always reminds me of a sketch from The Muppet Show where the the main character is trying to out. Stare a tree in the stairs off. And so, you're waiting for an enrolled and the painting as you're having your coffee. I love it. I love it. Well, you live in a very beautiful city in Ireland. Tell us a little break out where you live in Bridge. City was founded by the Vikings in around 9:20 to 6 nearly eleven hundred years old. It was built as Trading Post on the River. Shannon choice between two rivers. The Shannon river, which is long as they're Bernard and the Abbey River and the Grand Canal. So I'm hugely influenced by water obviously, so it's just based basically what we're doing. So obviously it is absolutely gorgeous. We recently watched a documentary about the Vikings being in your area. It was, it was really quite interesting facts and the impact they had on Europe and how they kind of colonized Europe in a, in an interest, an interesting way? Yeah, absolutely. Whether the rivers were their birth. Highway. So, the Shannon River, they could easily navigate all the way up. They built the Abbey River around, Limerick, because there's a huge kind of waterfall stuck on the river shot and they couldn't get their boats up. So that's why they built the Abbey, River Thursday, the 11th, which is a separate thing, so they can get all the way up to Shannon. Is what's 360 kilometers long? So as long as the rivers you guys have but, you know, it's a fairly good. Well, you certainly live in a beautiful place and I'm sure that it's very inspirational to you as a Creator. But my question for you is and I know our home ownership wanted to know this. What exactly does a curator do? What does he do all day? It's a condo, that's fairly complicated question. Fairly easy one. At the same time I see a curator basic as a connector, a facilitator or conduit basically between the same scenario just and a viewer stroke the audience in all the Arts. It's it's it's a multi-layered convert conversation between all these, these various parties off or what I try and do is I try and find both wear whatever Museum, or, or wherever I'm actually creating the work.

Ireland 360 kilometers Abbey River Napoleon Europe Grand Canal Limerick Shannon River Thursday Bernard Shannon river Angie two rivers Shannon Maurice first question both 6 today one thing
"13" Discussed on Episode 7-13

Episode 7-13

07:33 min | 8 months ago

"13" Discussed on Episode 7-13

"I know people will want to think more creatively and they'll they're going to benefit from our weekly shows where we discussing today. Okay? So today we're going to be discussing curating especially art curation and we have an excellent guest, we will be interviewing. That I know you guys are going to really like oh this is going to be interesting but first about that quote for the week. Oh okay. The quote is the beautiful thing about learning is nobody can take away from you and it's a quote by BB King who said that BB King. Now, you know, I don't know that, I personally would expect that type of quote from him, although I don't know why, right? But that's pretty insightful, I think it is. I think it is cuz it is not, it's true. Once you learn something, it's, it's deep in your psyche and you have it when you necessarily remember it or not. Yeah, I'm retaining things that we learn. Sometimes could be difficult especially if off like math for me, math for me too. Yeah. But after but after that it seems like these things that you learn pop up in your mind. You know, sometimes yours later and you go, oh, I remember that. So it that's a fabulous quote. It is, I think everyone will enjoy that for today. Before we get into the topic today, I thought it would be a good idea to tell people about what are podcast is all about. You know, that's really a good idea Rod. First, let me start out by saying that on our show thought, Rowe podcast, we shelved With you the conversations that we have with talented people, from all over the world, we speak to real creatives that come from all walks of life and our real life Superstars pursuing their own passions and dreams. You know, I've also learned that it's a place where everyone can learn about how to be more creative and everything they do. We get a lot of feedback in that area which has been very positive and people do learn from the things that we say. But more importantly, we learn from our guests. Oh well, I don't know if it's more importantly, but we do learn a lot from our guests. Our podcast is a conversation between rod and I and our guests and you will learn from their experiences insights and travels. In life, they cover a wide range of topics and I'm sure will be of great interest to anyone that is or wants to be more creative. On with the show. Curating, I'm going to hit you with a hard question right off the top, okay? What is curating mean to you? You're going to ask me. Oh my gosh. Okay, well one thing I know for sure in virtually all cases, there would not be art exhibitions because someone has to select the art organized. It'd be involved in hanging off presenting so curating, what does it mean to you, Ron? I'm going to twist it back to you. Yeah. Well, but unfortunately, cuz you took all the good answers. Know, well off, unfortunately, as I said, you covered much of a, I probably would have thought to say there have been some really famous curators. And many of them started out curating their own personal collections by curating, their own personal collections. They learn a lot about art. They discover a lot of different artists and a good example of that I think would be Peggy Guggenheim. In fact, dead. Her collecting just about got her disowned from the Guggenheim Museum, family. Yeah, that was not a good time for her because what she was collecting, she was collecting, but she being so Innovative. And so ahead of her time and I think people were still, there were not into contemporary art at the time, it was kind of On The Fringe know. I can imagine that family, I took a mansion was. What the heck? Do you think you're doing Peggy? Yeah. And why are you wasting your time with this so-called art? It's not really art and that said it was all around Europe, really? And it took a while for them to change their Wellness to get adopted into the the here too. Yeah. There were a lot of critics and art curator said, promulgated that are critics interestingly enough if also become curators as they form people's opinions about certain artists. I think that's what they do. Um these curators gravitate to those artists and build exhibitions basically on what they're hearing our critics say so true. So true being it's kind of interesting though because you can take someone that the art critics like and they build a show, make them, you know, super famous and icon, and then home and then they kind of phase them out in a couple of years. So it's kind of like a ever going stream of people. I think the other critics do that so they can go get a glass of wine and cheese and all those shows some free snacks. No, no. Not really but also a good example of that would be probably Clement Greenberg. He Champion Jackson Pollock as the greatest artists of his generation. That's a really good example of fact, it could argue that between him. Yeah. And Lee krasner Guggenheim. Yeah they made Jackson Pollock a household name in the art World. They did through his kind of eccentric personality and that wonderful article in Life Magazine, I think it was with the Fantastic pictorial. They did on him, it just made him so iconic in that was the rage. Yeah, Jack the dripper off that always sounds creepy to me. And you know what? Lee krasner all the way up until she was very old and probably didn't have much time left. Yeah. She was just real odd that she didn't dig. It know they do. What does that mean? She was, well, I don't know what it means but I hate it. I absolutely hate it. And you know what, I have to agree with her? It is kind of attack you thing to say because that's certainly wasn't sure what his art was really all about. No, but I'll tell you what, it kind of reminds me. This is really strange of a Vincent Price movie. Yeah, do Jack the drop dripper. My God. For for Vincent Price could have played his role I guess, true and an interesting there are curators that curate performance art like Rose Lee Goldberg and wage is that it's not always about paintings, only, it's not affect. You can curate just about anything. You could, I mean, people curate a menu or a meal too. Yeah. What about our dealers? They have heavily influenced taste. Like, Leo castelli. Oh yeah, he helped contemporary art movement not only in America but he influenced its acceptance throughout Europe. That's very true. I mean they do influence even to this day. What is popular? What's valuable? What is just wanted? You know, we're talking right now, we're not talking about contemporary art collectors or curators. We're talking about people for the past, but I think just about every art curator dead. Every our dealer, they all have read, all of their books.

Peggy Guggenheim Rose Lee Goldberg Clement Greenberg America Europe Ron Lee krasner Guggenheim BB King Leo castelli Lee krasner Vincent Price Peggy Rod Jack First today first Jackson Pollock Life Magazine rod
"13" Discussed on Episode 7-13

Episode 7-13

06:55 min | 8 months ago

"13" Discussed on Episode 7-13

"That's right, it's g. I know people that want to think more creatively will benefit from our weekly show, where we going to discuss today. Well, today, we are going to talk about life and you are creative in multiple ways. And we're going to have a special guest. Who is one of those lucky people that has blessed with talent in many, many ways. This was going to be very interesting energy. Now, how about for the quote of the week? Well, because it's Valentine's week, this one is kind of special. Here it is. Love juice. Like a beautiful flower, which I may not touch, but whose fragrance makes the garden, a place of delight, just the same who said that Helen Keller? That's absolutely beautiful. Isn't it? A wonderful quote, you know, that's one of those quotes from someone who gave and shared her courage to millions of people. So true. So true and who brought her along the way. Well, you know, her teacher Annie Sullivan. I think really helped to direct her in such a positive way and also, just to learn how to, you know, cope with life with the disabilities that she had. And she was instrumental in her becoming as like an amazing human being. Well, I guess you could say, without any doubt. Helen Keller would have lived kind of a doomed life. Well yeah, especially the time. She was born in people that were that had any small disability were not you know they were wrong, it's really helped a lot. So for her to have any Sullivan come along and be her angel on Earth was a blessing. Yeah. Beautiful. Quote, totally beautiful from a very beautiful person. What about creative people in general? Well, when it comes to people who seem to be creative in everything, they touch the person that comes to my mind is Leonardo DaVinci. Yeah. He's at the top when it comes to creativity, but I think it seems to me, like a lot of that had to do with his scientific mind. He was curious about everything he does, you know, he was always discovering things, come up with new inventions, but you also have to give him credit for probably the most famous painting. The world today. So true that's prominently hanging in the Louvre the Mona Lisa, of course. Yeah, that has millions of visitors every year and some people do specifically go there just to see that painting. So not only with C creative and everything that he explored. But mechanically, he did all those trying see did drawings of human anatomy, pretty creative guy all around. I would say, you know I have to agree with you a million percent but the thing I think I've noticed about Leonardo DaVinci and I don't know if you guys have the thought too is that I think he really liked the Mystery of Life in The Mystery of the science history of the human body and and even in painting cuz he Incorporated so many interesting facets to one overlapped into the other dead. And even in his inventions. Oh yeah. Yeah for sure. Yeah. So in today's world there are a lot of people that excel in one creative Endeavor. Only to find that there really quick. A good in multiple areas a good example that I've read a lot about various writers and was impressive to me. Is how many of them were actually great painter? Oh yeah, they were incredible accomplished painters. And you probably have seen some of the work and never even realized it so true. And then I also have noticed this with actors, and with musicians, where, as they go through their career, they will also become painters and some of those people that have done. This is Tony Curtis Gene. Hackman? Yeah. Gene Hackman. One of my favorite, right? And then we were talking about well when we went to Las Vegas one time in a gallery, I can't remember what his job. But they had Anthony Hopkins this work Mister scary. Yes. Oh yeah. But his artwork was a little on the kind of scary McCobb site but very interesting and very, very creative for sure. And I also think of Jane Seymour, which I love her and I her artwork is beautiful. Absolutely beautiful. And on the countryside, somebody I wouldn't necessarily expect to be an artist. I mean, other than his obvious Talent. Yeah. Is Johnny Cash? Oh, I didn't know that he did artwork. Oh well, I didn't actually either until I looked oh well, yeah well you wouldn't know but still and then you were telling me the other night. We were watching an old movie. I think it was about film Noir on TCM and they had a fight, a boxing scene. And you told me that Frank Sinatra. Tell that story. Yeah. Frank Sinatra, you like wow. Our feet and he took a very famous photograph of boxers in a ring. But the thing that he did is he tilted the camera and up until then not too many people took that angrily tilted camera which made the boxing ring, it explored the Angles and put the fighters in very unique poses and it ended up being around the cover. In fact, I think it was called a double truck pulled out on the cover. It was either time or Life Magazine. I don't remember which one big deal back then. It sure was but I also know it made a lot of photographers off very unhappy because, you know, here he is a celebrity in one of the things celebrities definitely have an edge when they decide to pick up a paintbrush or take up Photography. They have, they have notoriety coming out the gate. So even if they paint just so. So there's going to be a collector for it. Just because of their name. That's true. They want to a piece of Frank, Sinatra or birth. You know, whoever when they purchase the Arts so they feel a little akin to them, I guess. But I mean, you know, when you're creative you want to, you want to do different things, they have to do to sometimes. You just need to pick another creative Outlet, just to give yourself a break in what you're doing. So intense so true, maybe intently an actor, right? You're doing all the things Afters do cows and then you pick up a camera then you go out and take some photographs.

Leonardo DaVinci Gene Hackman Annie Sullivan Anthony Hopkins Frank Sinatra Jane Seymour Las Vegas Johnny Cash Sullivan Helen Keller Frank today Noir Sinatra Earth Life Magazine Tony Curtis Gene millions of people TCM One
"13" Discussed on Episode 7-13

Episode 7-13

06:44 min | 8 months ago

"13" Discussed on Episode 7-13

"You listen to your podcast. That's right, in G. I know people out there, they want to think more creatively and every time they listen to the show, they'll benefit from what we have to say at especially what our guests have to say exactly. So today we're going to be talking about junk journaling, and we're going to have a special guest bath. I have to admit. I really don't know much about junk journaling. I guess you would consider it to be a craft. We appreciate all crafts as being true, Creative Expressions. And that's why we have different guests in different areas. That's so true. And it's interesting that people who are involved in various forms of, crafting are so dedicated in there really quite creative thinkers before we get a job. This discussion though and she has the quote for the day which I'm always excited to hear. I do in our quote, today was selected by today's guest Angelina fielding and here it is. I shove my eyes in order to see and that is by Paul Gauguin, seems good. It seems to me, that's where our imaginations really, truly lie. You know, when you close your eyes, you have to think inwardly wage cuz you're not getting all the responses that you typically get when you're out looking at stuff. So that's really the heart of creativity. That's so true. And it reminds me of something that you've said regarding art your art, and you try not to be influenced by outside stimuli sources. And I think that's really a real accurate thing to do. Even though they you will be in some instances even though, you try to shut it out. Because then you can draw from your own internal creativity, your own soul, and what you'd like to express creatively. It took me off. While to get to that point, I have to admit. There's so many outside influences were exposed to so much and it can tamper with your creativity. I try to close my eyes and I try to listen to that. Still small voice inside me before I start any creative Endeavor rather be painting or writing, or actually, even do, it are podcasts. You gotta get rid of that. What does that extract? Empress get? Get rid of that. All that junk, that is out there. So true and the clear, you can get your mind, the closer you can tune in. So that's a good quote by Paul, kagame. Yes, it really is. And also, I know that when we're talking about crafting, we're going to talk well, there are lots of creative crafts out there like needlework needlework tough to say. Does it doesn't that just cover about everything that's created using a sewing needle? Well, not exactly. I mean, like if you're knitting that's knitting needles, but well off. Shang. I was thinking of crocheting that's more of a crochet hook, I guess, but you don't really use a traditional needle and thread for that. What about macrame does anybody even do macrame any money in my Sailors who maybe when they're making their Nets right there? Macrame, but I've seen a few macrame things here and there on Instagram that they're really cool. I've never really gotten into it. But I think that the people that do it are are very cool. Well, every once awhile you see it on social media. So maybe as having a, maybe, maybe it's coming back, but you know, like everything else, it is a craft and then you have to be talented in order to achieve it. So that's true. I think both in G and I feel that people can be really judgmental when it comes to defining the fine line between craft and art. That's so true. Raptors are artistic. I mean, it's very tactile, the app to make things with their hands but they also have to plan it and do everything that you would do if you were dead. You campaigning. That's so true. It is very tactile and it's the same process really. There's creativity involved in especially if someone. Well, when you start out crafting, you usually follow directions of this is how you do a b and c and then you you have your end result. But after a while of doing that I think that then you start to incorporate your own creativity and maybe you want to make something for your home and you you know how to do it at that point, you can be more loose and creative with the little crafting darted out, probably hundreds of years ago. Many people were living by candlelight and sewing people. Mended clothes Trend after mending clothes they became more creative in making clothes and then I guess you could say embroidery was invented in, boy is quite a craft into itself. Embroidery was very big back in the colonial times. I knew that and then before than that, actually people were very into it. Women did that as an art form. To express their creativity, because there was a lot of things that you couldn't do as a woman back in the day. And fact, the United States of America owes its flag to a crafts person. That's right. Yes, solution came to her and said make a supply. So she got out of her needle and thread and her few colors that she chose and before long, she sewed the first American flag wage. I guess people shouldn't be judgmental of Crafters. Know you owe a flag to her crafting. Yeah. America is probably not the only country where the first flag was sewn. Most likely by a woman but maybe a man probably all kind of interesting. I guess it is and then there comes a point where Crafters you know you've made so many crafts that she cuz it's so much fun to make them that they want to sell or at least they want to clear some clutter from their home so they can make more crafts. But that's where it's interesting because even a month Saint has a place where people can purchase products that are handmade and it's called Amazon, handmade. There's some really interesting products on there and they're one of a kind, you know, you're not going to go in there and find somebody who's made a 100 of something. They're usually very original. Nobody can duplicate them because they're hand made and they're very special. I thought Amazon was showing Crafters a lot of respect by creating that category for them. True, true. Very true. And I know that over the years when we've gotten crafts gifts from people and we absolutely cherish and love them. And in fact, out over the years we've received Christmas ornaments that were crafts made homemade and we absolutely love them. And I know that with our Christmas tree, I don't know about your at home but with ours, I guess it's not. Really, how would you say decorator, e? It's more of its more organic..

Paul Gauguin Paul Angelina today Amazon hundreds of years ago Shang 100 first flag American Instagram both United States of America kagame first America Christmas macrame one month
"13" Discussed on 13 Alibis

13 Alibis

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"13" Discussed on 13 Alibis

"Compensated. You release me northing commit this crime. What happened to the vest, Gatien? They were doing into wrongful conviction into who could possibly committed this crime. That's a good question. George Collazo's murder remains officially unsolved. Those murderer out, visit mismanaged prison. He was released and declared innocent because everyone knows I'm innocent. Then there's a murder, then you promise the people that you would investigate. Although Richards area was a free man he remains consumed by this case. And what's happened to him? I asked him about getting emotional help. A cat one that occasions, I don't go to doctors of every duct off seeing stop seeing every therapist that has seen me of stops eating because nobody's gonna have on stand. Nobody's gonna have understand what I've been through. Nobody was definitely when I was bleeding in hospitals and being kicked in the face. Buck correctional officers in having a fight to defend myself. Nobody was going through none of that. Nobody had to survive what it has. So I, I really I'm angry. Not that nobody parts. Glad just relates nobody no matter how tough I look this her in a wait out. Another been heard in my life. Remember what I said at the beginning of this podcast. If two percent of people in prison are actually innocent, then there are about forty thousand Richard Rosario is out there for those men and women. There's no time machine to give back what they lost. There's no way to remove the scores. They suffer it's scary to think Rosario is one of the lucky ones. I'm Dan, slipping thirteen. Alibis is a production of NBC news. And dateline NBC the podcast was reported and written by me produced an edited by Robert Allen and grant for dateline NBC. Our senior broadcast producer is Adam gore phen- executive producer is lose Cole. And David Corvo is the senior executive producer Bubba RAB is the senior producer of podcasts at NBC and MSNBC Steve lick die is the executive producer for music is by Nolan Schneider special. Thanks to Susan. Now, if you like their teen alibis, please, share it. And thanks for listening. John and Darren, we're the host of oxygen. True crime podcast martinis and murder or pouring drinks and talk and crime with new episodes, every Thursday and Sunday, indulge in your true climb obsession without all the heavy stuff. Subscribe now and download Martines murder wherever you listen to podcasts. Cheers.

murder NBC producer Richard Rosario executive producer Gatien George Collazo senior executive Richards Buck David Corvo Bubba RAB Dan Susan Adam gore Nolan Schneider John Robert Allen
"13" Discussed on 13 Alibis

13 Alibis

06:00 min | 2 years ago

"13" Discussed on 13 Alibis

"Grant. The let you go like if nothing happened and I have to live with all the scars internally, and people expect me to be happy. It's now been three years since Richard zero was freed after spending twenty years in prison. He says the transition has been harder than expected was in the cage and lay in bed thinking all day about what I would do if I came home. And when I finally came home, it was in nothing like I thought it would be. I'm Dan Slepian. And this is the final episode of thirteen allies. Released was the happiest day of my life, but then had to try to figure out how to do just deal with society deal with people, you know, just to, to learn the rules of life again, and it's been difficult to do what not to do how to talk, how to present myself, there's a stereotype, that after an innocent person has been freed, you must be thrilled but it's a little more complicated than that says. I caught up with him in mid March twenty nineteen. He says he has flashbacks almost like a prisoner of war. Just recently, I was in the kitchen just cut in something. I was I was preparing food in started crying, and it was because I had had a dream when I was in jail, I was home to exactly that and froze. I was still there. I didn't know if I was still in jail. So a lot of times, I feel confused. I know I'm home. I'm happy. But then I go through different emotions stress and depressions. I can't stay store can't be around so many people in it's caused a lot of problems between me and my children, you know, relationships with people in general. He says the trauma of his ordeal has made it difficult to work. You haven't gotten a job. I tried work in a head gun job on day. They gave me a job in construction of part of a work crew that I realized came from prison soon as I felt like I was back there. I just walked off the job site. I'm even come back came be around despite all the challenges Richard's, wife Minerva who stood by him since the very beginning is still there maneuvers a great person. She's a strong woman she's been through a lot, and it's challenging for her because. I couldn't imagine what is being in hush shoes, having to deal with me daily and having a see what I go through burchard admit he is not the easiest person to live with. My wife is still, you know, suffering the burden having a you know, she raised my kids for twenty years now. She's she's paid for grown mad to live in her house, and she loves me. I wanna help I have in some ways, but you know it's not enough. I don't get out and I can't really do numb still trying to get my life together. So it's making life difficult. It's just been difficult relationships with my, my children just being able to understand what they went through, and try to make them understand that we all been victimized. But I didn't really know how to adapt to dolts at this point. It's been hot. Just over a year after his release residual filed a civil lawsuit against the city of New York for his wrongful conviction. He wants compensation for what he went through one of his attorneys. Emma, Freud and Lander joined him for interview Richard has an incredibly strong case in part because the proof of his innocence is so strong. It's Klatt, nobody contests that Richard was in Florida on that day. George lots was murdered what was clear all along that Richard went to prison because of intentional police misconduct lawyers for the city declined an interview, but did send a statement that said, we will not comment while this cases pending, we do not try cases in the press. We try them in the courtrooms where both sides of controversy have affair upper -tunities to present their evidence and make their arguments before neutral tribunal. So the city is not said we're sorry, we're paying you. The city is fighting this. So far said he has fought it. It's mind boggling, what is their argument for this portion? You need to prove intentional misconduct. You need to prove that the officers knew what they were doing not necessarily that they knew that they were framing, an innocent, man. But that they did something improper that they knew was improper. It was not enough to prove that they made a mistake. It is not enough to prove that they made a mistake. I think that, that concept would seem unfair to a lot of people that has to be intentional misconduct. The laws seemed unfair and that people like Richard might not be able to meet that bar day are absolute unfair. Mean Richard winters, something unimaginable, to most of us and just for having gone through that he should be compensated.

Richard Dan Slepian Richard zero Richard winters New York George Florida Minerva Emma Lander Freud twenty years three years