35 Burst results for "12 30"

"12 30" Discussed on AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

05:22 min | Last month

"12 30" Discussed on AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

"Culprit number three could be Jason Sudeikis. Because they were linked, January was linked to the former SNL alum, although he says I'm not the dad. He has said that. Although he was approached at a White House correspondents dinner not too long ago by a Washington Post report who actually wanted to crack a story which you don't see too often. He actually went at sudeikis to get a story. And he asked him about this whole January Jones situation and he got sudeikis tongue tied and the reporter said, do you have any comment about January Jones baby bump and he said, I'd rather, yes, but no. So when the reporter asked sudeikis, if he was shocked or surprised to find out Jones was pregnant, he said, no, no, I don't have anything else to say. So he and Jones met back in 2010, they dated for about 7 months. Is it that far fetched to think they could have still been hooking up a year and a half to two years later? Or at least whenever sudeikis had time to leave SNL and fly to LA? And maybe if that's the case, zander Dane is the result of breakup sex? And I could see I could see January who's silly at heart wanting her kid to have sudeikis warm sense of humor. It sounds something it could be a good lead, now the best one is believe it or not. Food channels Bobby Flay. He's in the running as well. I know he comes out of left field. Like, what the fuck is Bobby Flay doing it? I know. The grill master. Well, the grill masters a long shot, but then again, it was odd when Bobby Flay was the guy that January called for help after she crashed her Range Rover into a bunch of parked cars a while back for one thing, Bobby Flay's married to actress Stephanie March or at least back then he was. So his publicist had to respond to this. It got a little sticky because people were asking, why would she call Bobby Flay of old people?

sudeikis Jones Jason Sudeikis Bobby Flay zander Dane January Jones Washington Post White House SNL LA Stephanie March Range Rover
"12 30" Discussed on AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

05:34 min | Last month

"12 30" Discussed on AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

"In lizzo's corner who continuously let her do what she's doing and not they don't stop her. They don't take her aside. It's sick. On a recent Instagram post again where lizzo is leaning over a balcony with nothing on but a pair of panties to panties the size of a hammock. You could tie a one end to two different trees and sleep comfortably in that trust me. She left these words, lizzo said, I detox my body and I'm still fat. I love my body and I'm still fat. I'm beautiful, and I'm still fat. These things are not mutually exclusive. To the people who look to me, please do not starve yourselves. Of course, who the fuck? You don't. I did not starve myself. I fed myself greens and water and fruit and protein and sunlight, bullshit. You don't have to do that to be beautiful, healthy. That was my way. You're not even healthy. What the fuck do you act like you did something successful? You can do life your way. Remember, despite anything anyone says or does, do what you want with your body. Okay, honey. Look, what I'm talking about abortion here. We're talking about living just living, just sticking around long enough to see things that matter, sticking around for milestones. You know, at 32, you should be able to shit out a kid pretty soon, but no one's going to get you pregnant. And even if they did, they'd be severe medical issues with you being that big. And giving birth. So you're probably never going to have a child. So forget milestones for you. Your milestones are going to be your records and how many gold records you sell and how many Grammys you get blah blah blah. All superficial bullshit. But when you sit down at home and you go home alone, nobody's with you. You're gonna realize it's because you're grossly overweight. Now there are people out there in the audience who are grossly overweight, hearing this, thinking I'm a real cock sucker. I'm not. I'm being really honest and true to people like her who think the way she lives her life is fine. It's natural to look in the mirror and not like what you see back, especially when you're that big. You know, do what you want with your body. Those are truly words to die by. And clueless shithead reporter asea grace finishes off lizzo's instructions by saying, will do lizzo will do. All right, you're gonna fucking die too then. The whole world is full of sick fucks. What can I tell you?

lizzo asea grace
"12 30" Discussed on AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

04:38 min | Last month

"12 30" Discussed on AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

"I wouldn't wear a revealing bikini or tankini emphasis on tank, but I'm not gonna do that. On this show, I'm done. You all know how I feel. And a lot of you feel just like I do, but maybe you don't want to say it. But that's okay. That's what this show is for. That's why I'm here. I get to say the things you don't think you should say. Or maybe you lose your job, if you say. Right now, while I still have this job, let me say what I know you want to say. I will leave lizzo alone here. I've said enough to her this year. Instead, let me attack the reporter who wrote this piece in the New York Post and like so many other woke PC inclusive left leaning liars in the press, how she described lizzo. In the kind of glowing terms, only a mother would. So yesterday this reporter named Asia grace, it spelled Asia, I'm sure she put on zit Asia, who I will bet you is also very heavy. Another in a long line of people who are desperately trying to convince us that fat is good, that'll obesity is something to cherish and accept that back fat is a blessing and not a greased highway to a hospital bed or hospice care for that matter. This is the way I see a grace writes about lizzo after the singer blessed us with one last post in 2020 and this last one was her clapping her grossly fat thighs together while classical music played in the background. Ossea grace wrote, there's absolutely no stealing lizzo's thunder, even the singer's thighs are giving her a standing ovation. Clap clap clapping her luscious lingerie wrapped legs together in slow motion, as soft notes of the classical piano serve as a soundtrack. Lizzo, then they put her age in here 32. Please don't put her age. It looks like she's 58. Lizzo shamelessly showcased her thunder thighs for social media's viewing pleasure. Monday night. So luscious, shamelessly, fun to thighs and pleasure are all words that are positive. Draped in a lacy lavender bondage inspired bra and panty set, the jiggling juice, chanteuse, titled her lusty clip again, lusty. Lusty for fucking who? Vultures after she kills over?

lizzo Asia Lizzo New York Post Ossea grace obesity
"12 30" Discussed on AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

03:13 min | Last month

"12 30" Discussed on AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

"Finally got here, guys. We finally got here. We didn't die. The virus didn't kill us. Trump still might be president, hang in there. The end is not as close as you might think it is. Although I do feel like killing people today, I really do. I can't, you know, today's show is going to more or less be about the lengths that people go to on social media to remind us everything about them. As if we're asking, you know, unfortunately today's show is going to end with a number of people, but two of them are going to be Chrissy Teigen and lizzo. I have to. Because these fucking idiots just keep coming at us. Before I rip into today's show, beginning with lizzo, you know, Chrissy Teigen, who we all know has just been ubiquitous on the Internet has to be heard seen spoken to describe disgust. She's insane. Again, I apologize if the sound is a little different. I think we figured out how to use the microphone and not to tascam. Hopefully my peas won't pop as much as yesterday's show. It's not ever happens, by the way. It just turned down your volume for one show, we'll figure it out. But you know, lizzo, I mean, Chrissy Teigen, okay, look, she goes through the heartbreaking miscarriage. We all were there for that. We all heard about it. She talked about it incessantly. How could we not hear about it? The whole world mourned for her and then she's like, I'm gonna be disappearing from Instagram for a while. Of course she didn't. She got right back on it. And what really bugged me is that you'd think that'd be enough, like just go deal with the heartbreak of your miscarriage with your husband. But no, she's gotta come on and keep doing stupid shit to get attention and a couple of days ago, the big attention getter was, she wanted to get a nose ring. I know stud. A diamond nose stud. And she went ahead and did it. Now she's on the island of saint barts, her John Legend, Amy Schumer, Paul McCartney, so many other people, all these left leaning pricks who make us feel bad for leaving the house for seeing friends for being with family on Christmas. They got on their private jets and go to saint barts to be with all to be with one another at the same restaurant the same beaches on the same yacht, nobody's wearing a mask, they may put the mask on when a paparazzi approach is they all know who the paparazzi are in saint barts. They all know each other, but this is one more lesson of the double standard we've been living through for the past year with these assholes. These holier than now, much more important than you assholes. So Chrissy Teigen decides to not like the nose, the diamond stud because she says the lady on the island didn't do it right. Mind you, this is the only lady on the island who does it. So Chrissy Teigen, isn't that nice of her to out this woman as saying she did a bad job. She showed a picture of it on the Internet on Instagram to show the placement was wrong,

Chrissy Teigen lizzo Trump Amy Schumer Instagram John Legend Paul McCartney
"12 30" Discussed on Schlereth and Evans

Schlereth and Evans

01:53 min | Last month

"12 30" Discussed on Schlereth and Evans

"Lets you know that this was his decision that he fired those guys. Now the day one that Wednesday practices right there, coaching up the special teams. I think there's gonna be an Albert O site in this week as well, so Jarvis. He had him in pads yesterday. On Thursday he said the heck with that. I heard guys were complaining about the fact that they had to go outside and practice because you know that snow that we got yesterday. Shout out to the Denver Broncos groundskeeper because that grass just looks absolutely beautiful and they were able to get it all off. And for those guys to go out there and practice. But this is kind of what this football team needs. They need challenges. They need that challenge of hey, you're going to be in full pads on a Thursday. And we don't care that typically you do it on Wednesday. We don't care that it snowed last night. We're still going to do it. Hey, we're going to challenge you guys I've learned a couple new blocking schemes for this week, and this game, this opponent, because you should have been doing it all year. The scheme and everything changes week to week, depending on the opponent because defense has changed. Offensives change. So there's always supposed to be these little wrinkles. So shout out to Jerry coming in and being Jerry raspberry and put in his foot down and let this football team know that, hey, I know it's only two weeks, but we're gonna do it my way for these two weeks. I've got chiefs of the Broncos, 31 17, that sounds about, right? I am on my way out the door. Thanks for hanging with me the last few days while I filled in with Mike Evans alongside march lariat for Orlando Franklin, who's gonna be sticking around because the players club is opening its doors and it plays only. That's next on Denver sports station, one O four three, the fan. Hey, it's Mike Evans. Silk to heart motors understand sometimes bad things happen to good people. That includes bankruptcy. If that is you, you can still purchase a car at filter with zero money down in almost all cases. This is a program they've been doing for 25 years. The dealership itself is almost 60. Family owned business that is

Albert O Jarvis Denver Broncos Jerry raspberry football Mike Evans Orlando Franklin Jerry Broncos Denver
"12 30" Discussed on Schlereth and Evans

Schlereth and Evans

05:43 min | Last month

"12 30" Discussed on Schlereth and Evans

"Call plays, I look at now and John Harbaugh have a Jerry Rosberg on his staff two special teams mind but yet John harborough deferring to Jerry Rosberg saying that you could be the special team coach. You could call special teams for me, even though this is my baby and this is what's made me become a head coach. I will allow you to do this. So Jerry Rosberg and John Harbaugh already have ties. They were on the same coaches that Stokely played for these guys together. That's why I believe that now it's a chess because Jerry and John both have the same agents. So you make Jerry the interim head coach because you know that Jerry could start having these conversations with a guy like John Harbaugh, the head coach of the Baltimore Ravens whenever they're kicked out of the playoffs if they're kicked out, but also Jerry could also start making phone calls to John to get gyms number and start communicating for Greg penner or for George Payton to open up that door for the Denver Broncos. So I believe there's a lot of moving parts going on right now, man. And I believe that this ownership group, they're playing chess, 100%, while everybody else right now are just playing checkers. And I like it. I like what they're doing behind the scenes. So I like what I think they are doing behind the scenes. So at 2 o'clock, tomorrow afternoon on ESPN number three TCU and number two Michigan square off from Glendale and that is one to keep your eye on folks. If you are wanting Jim Harbaugh in Denver, you may see there are two conflicting schools of thought here if he wins a championship, maybe he's more likely to leave, but I don't know that really the winner loss has anything to do with it because he's reestablished Michigan as a premier program after when he took over that school. They were really in the dumps. It's not a familiar position for that university to be in. So keep an eye there. I would definitely keep an eye there on Jim Harbaugh. And again, if they lose, then hey, the phone call should be placed immediately. Moving on, I think Dan Quinn is interesting. I think he's on my list. I want this job no more. I'm with you. If I were him, I would say you're kidding me. You're kidding me, right? You didn't hire me when it was actually a good job last summer when I could have established a tone here in Broncos country. George, look, I respect you as a friend. I like you, but no thank you. I think that's how that phone call goes. Plus I'm Dallas is gonna win games, so this is gonna get all the opportunities as well. And he'll have his pick. Other opportunities you're going to a team that looked at you as their second opportunity last year, they picked a young guy instead of you. They picked a guy that had not done it. Even with your track record of getting to a Super Bowl,

Jerry Rosberg John Harbaugh Jerry John harborough Greg penner George Payton chess Stokely Michigan square Jim Harbaugh Baltimore Ravens John Denver Broncos TCU Dan Quinn Glendale ESPN Denver Michigan
"12 30" Discussed on Schlereth and Evans

Schlereth and Evans

03:39 min | Last month

"12 30" Discussed on Schlereth and Evans

"It really

Dr. Anthony Fauci on Omicron Threat: 'If You Want to Be Fully Protected, Get Boosted'

The Larry Elder Show

02:17 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Anthony Fauci on Omicron Threat: 'If You Want to Be Fully Protected, Get Boosted'

"Doctor Fauci says that people who are vaccinated, but not boost it, have the same degree of risk. As the unvaccinated. Yeah, if you are infected, you're infected. Whether or not you have vaccinated or not vaccinated, you're infected. When you talk about exposure and quarantine, if you are a person who is vaccinated but not boosted versus a person who is not vaccinated, because of the graded degree of protection that you would have gotten from being boosted, they're treating people who are vaccinated, but not boosted as the same risk of those who are not vaccinated at all. And that's because they're right now with a great deal of difference in the level of protection that you get from being boosted following vaccination versus following vaccination alone. Now regarding the CDC suddenly reducing the number of days for you to be quarantined after testing positive from COVID from ten days to 5 days, a biology professor went on CNN, and said it looks like they made the decision, not because of science. When we look at this, there is absolutely no data that I am aware about with the armor. It's people coming out of isolation 5 days after they were first diagnosed with the virus. My own work shows that when we look at people 5, 7, 8 days after they were first tested positive or first symptoms, they still have enough virus in their nose in the back of their throat to be able to come up positive on these antigen tests and antigen tests are a very good proxy for live virus and the ability to be able to infect others. So it seems that they've made a decision without the data to actually support this change. Now, if you're not confused enough, Doctor Fauci also said that many of the cases are interestingly either without symptoms or minimal symptoms. And many of the cases interestingly are either without symptoms or minimally symptomatic, particularly the breakthrough infections that you get when people have been

Fauci Covid CDC CNN
Mistrial in Resiles Murder Case as Jury Fails to Agree on Verdict

The Larry Elder Show

01:14 min | 1 year ago

Mistrial in Resiles Murder Case as Jury Fails to Agree on Verdict

"Lauderdale, Florida. Where three black jaw oars were unwilling to convict. A man named deante rosalies. Because he's black. And the foreman of the jury. Newspaper says four person was a woman for women. Said that most of the jury wanted to convict a guy of at least second degree murder. Broke into a home. Found a woman. 59 year old woman. And his DNA was found on a knife inside her home Stafford to death. Tighter up standard step to death. Three of the jurors admitted they had the evidence admitted they did it. She didn't want to send him to prison for life or possibly to face death. So the judge declared a mistrial. And said the case is going to be tried again in January with a new jury.

Lauderdale Florida Stafford
Chicago Teachers Union Polling Members Over Possible ‘Shift to Remote Learning’ as Coronavirus Cases Rise

The Larry Elder Show

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

Chicago Teachers Union Polling Members Over Possible ‘Shift to Remote Learning’ as Coronavirus Cases Rise

"Now, the Chicago teachers union is considering once again going to remote learning denying kids in Chicago. A whole year of in person education. And the scores of public school students in Chicago, inner city kids are dismal. A Chicago parent, not happy. The remote learning was a total nightmare. You know, it would be my son versus the computer versus mom versus basically the world. So when he was in a remote learning, he wasn't really getting anything out of it really out of it. And when we saw the change was when he went back to in person, he started to flourish. His own teachers were like, we had him as a failing student and now all of a sudden, you know, he's getting straight bees and as the remote learning is a handicap to school age children, especially in elementary school.

Chicago Teachers Union Chicago Inner City
Washington Lawmakers File Bill Reducing Penalties for Drive-by Shooters

The Larry Elder Show

01:06 min | 1 year ago

Washington Lawmakers File Bill Reducing Penalties for Drive-by Shooters

"In order to promote racial equality. To the sponsors, Democrats, of course, says the bill seeks to boost racial equality in the criminal system by eliminating drive by shooting as a basis for elevating, first degree murder, the first degree, aggravated murder. Under the current Washington state law, drive by shootings can be charged as aggravated first degree murder, under certain circumstances, such as, when it fatal. But they want to abolish that. To lower the number of years that. Someone convicted would serve. Tara Simmons, Democrat from

Washington Tara Simmons
"12 30" Discussed on CNBC's Fast Money

CNBC's Fast Money

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"12 30" Discussed on CNBC's Fast Money

"Welcome back to fast money. Let's take one more look at the markets here, S&P 500 dipping into the red at the very end of today's session, robbing us of the 71st record close of the year as it stands. The index has notched 70 new all time closing highs along the way. That means that nearly 28% of all trading days this year have ended at a record high. And you're like this, they were plenty of opportunities to pick winners, but as the saying goes, you can't win them all. So now we decided to go around the horn. Each trader will give us one trade they knocked out of the park and one that was a swing and a miss. A guy we're going to start off with you. What's your miss? And retrospect my acronyms should have just been ah. Because I gotta tell you, Lisa Sue was killing it at AMD. And, you know, we've been on this one for a while, collectively. And ever since she took over, you know, that stock that was basically the only reason that existed years ago was so Intel one BM monopoly, well, the tides have turned clearly. And I think that will continue. And the one that I totally whipped on and just clearly I don't understand, is Texas Instruments, and I've been concerned about Texan on valuation and lack of growth, but the market doesn't seem to care. So AMD and the good side Texan on the bad side, melms. Dan, how about you? Yeah, so it's interesting. We were just talking about a lot of the innovation and you were just talking about the 70 new highs in the S&P 500. Interestingly enough now, the most innovative companies in technology fared very badly this year, despite all those new highs, despite the S&P being up near nearly 28%, when I came into this year, I said rather than some of these innovative names that I thought had all these great secular shifts going, but they're really expensive. I was looking Ethereum and that was the one in January that I focused on have been buying that on dips. Now the flip side of that is so far. And we talked about my abide trade and I really like the habitat. I like his framework for bringing innovative tech companies to the public markets through all of those spats. One of them was so far. This is a company that I really like and it came public through one of his spacs this year. I started buying it in the high teens and it hasn't been fantastic for me. It kind of finds support down there in that 14 to 15 level and that's where I added I added the other day to it. All right, Brian Kelly. Yeah, well for me, I'll go to the chip area first, so Nvidia, that was my hit. That one actually went well beyond even my expectations in video did well before we'd even knew that Facebook was going to change their name to meta and the metaverse was going to be a thing and more 3D chips were going to be a thing. I'm a little worried about it now because a lot of that has been played out, but that was a huge hit. On the miss side, it absolutely has to be silver. I really thought that with the inflationary pressures, the potential for a short squeeze, WallStreetBets getting into silver that we actually would have a nice outperformance in SLV, the ETF and to add insult to injury, I played it through options. So I just kept bleeding money all year. So that was my mess. Hi, okay, Victoria, how about you? Yeah, so our hit this year was Lowe's and obviously that was part of the COVID play. People remodeling their homes. We just heard the Angie CEO about an hour ago talking about remodeling of homes up 20% year over year. And with housing and inventory struggles we were seeing there Lowes did really well. You look at earnings up about 38% year over year, margin expansion stock buybacks. I think Marvin Ellison did a really good job with Lowe, so that's our hit. On the other side, unfortunately, we were underweight energy this year and energy being one of the best performing if not the best performing sector this year. But there were a few reasons we were doing that. One, there was concern about demand, not just during the hardest times of COVID that concerned about what people be driving back to offices and doing things. So concern about demand, uncertainty around supply, we saw all the headlines around OPEC and what was going on there. And then we actually have a lot of concern in regards to ESG with some of the energy companies. A lot of our assets that we manage at cross Mark have some type of a screening component to them, whether it's exclusionary or inclusionary screening. And the capital intensity that these energy companies are spending in order to try to get better scores on ESG to be included in funds. I think it is going to be a concern going forward. So we were underweight energy and that did not work well for us. All right, coming up, our traders.

Lisa Sue Texan AMD S Intel Brian Kelly COVID Dan Lowe Texas Marvin Ellison Nvidia Lowes Facebook Angie Victoria OPEC
"12 30" Discussed on CNBC's Fast Money

CNBC's Fast Money

07:36 min | 1 year ago

"12 30" Discussed on CNBC's Fast Money

"Club. Welcome back to fast money. You're looking at $91.8 million. That's how much this NFT the merge by the artist's pack fetched at auction earlier this month. It is the most expensive NFT ever sold. Now take a look at this one. $11.8 million. That is value of crypto punk number 7 5 two three, the accessories include an earring, knitted cap and a medical mask sign of the times here. And this one is $6 million. That's how much the NFT a coin for a ferryman sold in November. So how are these valued determined? Our next guest owns more than 500 NFTs as a cofounder of way financial, which manages its own NFT fund called the non fungible fund. Let's bring in less boss less great to have you with us. Thanks for having me. I appreciate it. You've been an early adopter in crypto. So you have been in from the very start. But we're wondering for people who are just joining this game. How do you figure out what is valuable? When you're investing in an NFT for your fun, for instance, how do you determine that this one is going to increase in value and have a return? I think you have to kind of recognize my history to answer the question appropriately. You know, I came from entertainment. And a big part of entertainment as we looked for new talent was always kind of community and getting to something early. When I got into cryptocurrency, I did it with a partner who had been financed for a long time. And within NFTs, we see some of those same common traits. And because he was an adventure when you also apply due diligence to the team, you can take a pretty good guess on what you think is going to be valuable and what's not going to be valuable. And further to that point, you know, when you talk about some of the NFTs that have just sold, it's really a case of supply and demand. And there's so much global demand for NFTs right now that obviously the prices are going to be pretty extreme in some cases. Hey, it's BK. So I've got a question about who is the buyer of these $90 million NFTs, right? So we know there's a lot of people that made a lot of money on paper as these things have gone up, but are people coming in from the traditional art world and buying $90 million NFTs or is it somebody else is it? Is it money laundering? What is it? Well, I mean, it's not money laundering, although I'm sure that it exists everywhere, including with cash. I moderated a panel at salt, which is a big panel that scared me if she does in New York. And we had no on from Christie's. Christie's really led the charge with taking these traditional pieces of art and the question was asked, who is the buyer? And the truth is, it's a new buyer. And we're seeing a shift right now. And I think it was therefore a site kind of what the traditional art markets to introduce new buyers to this. And what we're actually seeing is a lot of traditional buyers trying to figure it out. It's why someone like a gagosian might be a little bit later to what NFTs are actually about. And I also want to stay that it's not just about art. It's really about much more than that. It's about liquidity and creating an economy, which is another long conversation. Sure, sure. I think though, I mean, if you're an early investor in an NFT last and you're sort of investing in something before it's fully valued, let's say just like a stock recognizing value, you mentioned community, I get that too. For instance, crypto, punk, or board apes. I mean, it has a huge community around it. But if you're early, the community may not exist. Or are there certain features about an NFT, something about them that makes you think, you know what? This will develop that community that is needed to propel the value of this. Yeah, I mean, look, with crypto punks for me, it was always about generative art. It's been around since the 60s. And a crypto punk being the first thing on the Ethereum blockchain that was generative with 10,000. That was a tentpole moment. And when we kind of go down the path and wonder why our board apes, so valuable. Well, now we have the kind of integration of web three, the metaverse, and the road map set these newer kind of launches are putting together. What I really love about the whole space is it's really kind of this offshoot of WallStreetBets in a way where you're seeing a convergence of ideas and gaming avatars can earn you money. They can be wallets, they can be your identity. We've never seen that before. Last, we hope you come back and keep us posted on the fund. We appreciate your time less for si of the wave fund. Dan Nathan, I think that the interesting notion that lesson mentioned is the idea of community and what we saw with WallStreetBets. We saw with the Reddit community is that there can be massive, very strong, strong momentum behind a cause behind an idea behind a concept. And that was a trend in 2021. And I think that is helping this NFT trade. Yeah, Mel, you bring up a great point, but this is so much more than that, because I think that the Reddit, that thing is really only about money. And what I think less is talking about and I think what I've learned over the last few months is spending some time digging into some of these communities is that it really is about the art. And it's about this connection between the creator of the art and those people who actually see that value. And so it's this direct link cutting out the middlemen. And so that's what I find really interesting. And I think we've been talking about NFTs since the beeple sale all the way back early in the year and it really is something that's very new and we're going to see it across all different types of art. So to me, I find it very interesting. I will make one point going back to what Chris Harvey just said about crypto and the pocket of enthusiasm there. These are financial instruments. Make no mistake about it. The gas fees that it takes to kind of get on board and do these things. And then the idea of kind of buying them, hoping that they will go up in value, not just to be part of a Discord community. So there's a lot of people who've been on ramp into this financial world and they think it's something that it may not be. And if these prices were to come in very hard, that is something that you just have to throw onto the layer of all these layer one tokens that BK talks about all the time that there is risk there too. So this is a pocket of risk that I don't think is really being accounted for at the moment. I did want to go to BK on how you invest in the token side of things in NFTs, BK. Yeah, so could I just say that it was my heart to hear Dan talking about layer ones and gas fees? It's just fantastic. But how do you invest in this? Listen, I'm not an art investor. I'm never going to be able to understand why one board ape is worth more than the other, or is worth 90 million. That's just not what I do. But what I can do is buy the infrastructure that all these things are built on. And that's what we call the layer one. So that's Ethereum in Solana. That's where all of these NFTs are being minted on. So in a sense, if you think about this as analogy to Facebook as the network grows and NFTs are one part of that network, then in theory, the underlying coin should do well, Ethereum Islam or wherever it's minted. So that's how I look at it and say, okay, NFTs is one sector being built on top of these platforms and there's going to be other sectors out there and have out of go for it and make a $90 million ape. I'm not gonna be able to pick that, but I know I know I can buy the infrastructure. All right, coming up. The good and the bad of 2021, our traders are breaking down.

Christie Dan Nathan Reddit Chris Harvey New York Mel Dan Solana Facebook
"12 30" Discussed on CNBC's Fast Money

CNBC's Fast Money

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"12 30" Discussed on CNBC's Fast Money

"Take a look at shares of micron sinking today as China COVID concerns hit the chip sector. Let's get to Josh Lipton for the details. Melissa micron did have some news for investors saying that COVID related closures in a Chinese city would impact its DRAM production, though the company expects to be able to meet most of its customer demand. I checked in with Matt Bryson over at red bush. He covers the name. At this point, he argues that this could actually end up being a positive for the company. Historically, pricing is more important than volume, his point being, if customers now think there could be more shortages coming, they might end up paying more from micron's chips, having said that he does rate micron a neutral peers like Western Digital. He says, are more attractively valiant. Micron stock, dipping in today's trade, but still up about 25% this year, up nearly 40% in just the past two months. Now, is there a broader challenge that chip investors should start thinking about here though? I spoke to another chip analyst. He says this is a tough one to judge right now, but it does seem like these kind of impacts a chip factories. He says, are going to be short lived. Melissa, back to you. All right, thanks so much, Josh Lipton. So we saw micron in western edge trade lower today on the back of this news. They were trading higher yesterday in the back of the news at Samsung was cutting its production of nand also in China on COVID concerns guy. So how does this all shake out for you in terms of the trade? Well, unfortunately, you know, I keep thinking of microns away from being commoditized and away from, you know, being cyclical and getting into sort of you can more granular, you can look at it and say, you know, this company doesn't grow at X and the stock's going to be lower left to upper right. And that's not true. What I will tell you is there are names that do make sense. And I look at Qualcomm, which, by the way, is still hovering right around its all time high. It's almost 16 times next year's numbers. And I say, you know what? That's a company that's sort of figured out and still too cheap. So unfortunately, micron continues to be the micron of ten years ago, where Qualcomm is starting to be the Qualcomm that everybody thought it could be 5 to ten years ago. You know, there are prognostications today that the wave of amaron is going to be strong through January. And I'm just wondering, Dan, if we are factoring in the impact like this around the world, it's particularly when it comes to supply chain. I mean, we got a lot of data points from the last earnings season, which seemed to indicate that things were getting better and yet here we are once again in lockdown mode in various sort of factory, the factories around the world. Yeah, no doubt about it and you know that's one reason that maybe look at the foundries too, especially like a Taiwan semi, which really has been in range bound Mel for the better part of this year. It made highs early this year, and I think at that point, a lot of investors thought that the pandemic would be in the rearview mirror by now. And if you think of the SMH, which is massively outperformed, the S&P and the NASDAQ up 44%, that's the ETF that tracks the semiconductor group. It's really being led by a handful of names and those names are Nvidia as we just talked about before, up more than a 100% of the year. Broadcom has been a big winner there and so has AMD. So you might want to think about maybe some parish trades there. I can see maybe micron did have a late year rally here come in a little bit now. Mike Ron Intel in Taiwan semi, it might be a kind of dogs of the SMH trade into the new year because the valuations are pretty reasonable and expectations are not particularly high. All right, we are just getting started here.

micron Josh Lipton Melissa micron COVID Chinese city Matt Bryson Qualcomm red bush China Western Digital Micron amaron Melissa Samsung Dan Taiwan
"12 30" Discussed on CNBC's Fast Money

CNBC's Fast Money

06:14 min | 1 year ago

"12 30" Discussed on CNBC's Fast Money

"You're worried. I mean, that's basically your word. But so why? Well listen, that's right. We've been a we've been a bullet to yearend. We thought there'd be a melt up. But now it's time as we look at the landscape for more sobering thoughts. And there's probably two, three, maybe four reasons. The first I would say is if you look at multiples where pinkish multiples on top of growth. That's not really bullish. If you look at the consumer, no doubt the consumers and fine shape, but we think the consumer spending is going to normalize next year. Then it's about the mentality. There's this pervasive mentality that the market can bend but can't break. We do expect a 10% pulled back next year, either in two Q or the beginning of the summertime. And the last thing I would say is we're late in the cycle. Funny things happen like this cycle. And what we expect to see is we expect to see multiple compression, whether it's due to deceleration of growth, the fed getting more aggressive, or maybe what we're going to see is a peaking of pricing. And that can lead to a peaking multiples. And of course, a peaking of margins. So we're a lot more conservative this year. We want people to think about the risk side of the equation first and then the return side. So Chris, you just mentioned the peaking of multiples here. And when you think about the broad market, we know the concentration and a handful of names. And it seems like a lot of investors have gotten very comfortable with paying historically 1520 year highs in names like Microsoft and Apple and even alphabet here. Does that concentration in the outperformance in those handful of names? And then throw in an Nvidia, which is up over a 100% this year trading at a very high multiple of sales and earnings nearly a $1 trillion a market. Do they worry you? And why wouldn't we see a 10% peak to trough decline sooner than Q two? Dan, you make some really good points. And it does concern us. We're starting to see things that we saw in the late 90s. The concentration. The other thing that we're seeing is if you look at the consumer's balance sheet, if you look at the net worth, 24% of their holdings are in stocks. The last time we saw something even close to that was the late 90s. In the early 2000s, didn't work out so well. So we're very worried about that. And we're also very worried about pricing. For the first time in a while, we're getting some anecdotal information that the consumers not the same price taker that he or she was 6 and 12 months ago. And if they're not, if they're more price conscious, again, that gets back to multiples and margins, and we have a problem going forward. I get the concern about stocks. That's something that I found very, very interesting Chris. But at the same time, the consumer also has a lot less debt than probably that same period at the time. And I'm wondering if that factors in at all that just overall the consumers and better shapes, so even if he or she feels a dent in the portfolio, they're not relying on that money to pay off any credit cards or anything like that. Yeah, Melissa, I think you're right. And what we're trying to say and maybe not saying it perfectly and not so eloquently, is we don't think the wheels are going to fall off the cart with the consumer. What we think is there's going to be a repricing. And what we have to think about is that normalization of spending, that normalization of the balance sheet, that normalization of risk appetite. And what that does to multiples potentially what that does to margin. And that's why I think we'll have some sort of pullback. And Dan's right. Maybe I'm a little bit, maybe I'm not aggressive enough. Maybe it happens sooner rather than later. We do have a lot of froth in the marketplace. And you can see it everywhere. One of the things we always point to is naming of stadiums, staple centers no longer going to be the Staples Center, but crypto dot com. We're beginning to see mayors say I want to take my salary in crypto. And we're beginning to see, again, that mentality that the market can bend but never break. And that's troubling. All right. Chris, good to see you. Thank you and happy new year. Chris Harvey, Wells Fargo, securities. Brian Kennedy, I'll go to you since he's pointing to crypto specifically as maybe a sign that people believe things go up up. Do you see it that way? Yeah, I mean, listen, I always worry whenever something becomes a consensus trade or you start to see stadions being named. You don't have a really good track record of making a mistake and then having your company do well. That being said, I think that crypto has a lot crypto can be this growth area, so it has a lot more to it than just necessarily one particular company naming a stadium. But you do need to watch those things. And to Chris's point, and we talked about it earlier, if you start to see a yield curve inverting, and we start to see the Federal Reserve really trying to slam on the brakes here when the economy is already stalling, they could be raising rates at the exact wrong time, which would absolutely hurt risk assets. Yeah, I think the point about the consumer is interesting as well. During the pandemic, there are reasons to spend nesting your buying Dutch ovens and new sofas and throw pillows and things like that. And then you're coming out and you're going out and you're buying tickets and traveling, et cetera, but when things get back to normal, what does that look like? And what does that do to comparisons year on year Victoria? So we still have strong faith in the consumer. And I know Chris is talking about how that consumer is actually going to pull back a little bit. And it probably will, we're not going to have the tremendous growth that we had last year and the growth in spending from the consumer. But I think some people are really underestimating how strong the consumer will continue to be, especially in the first half of next year. I don't think the fed is going to come in in March and raise rates immediately. So I think the stock market actually has a pretty good tailwind in the beginning of the year. Household balance sheets are really strong as you mentioned. You've got people that are having their wages increasing. So I think there's still some good movement here for the consumer, and that's going to support the economy. I do share his belief that starting around the middle of the year, there's going to be a little bit more concern. I know bob doll our CIO. He comes out with his Tim predictions next week, so I don't want to frontrun any of that. But some of the more macro ideas that Chris was mentioning, I think are very valid and we'll have to watch for the second half of 2022. All right, coming up. A chip crunch, COVID concerns hitting.

Chris Federal Reserve Dan Chris Harvey Nvidia Brian Kennedy Microsoft Apple Staples Center Melissa Wells Fargo Victoria bob doll CIO Tim
"12 30" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

02:48 min | 1 year ago

"12 30" Discussed on Native America Calling

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> This moment of <Speech_Music_Male> peace is by <Music> R Carlos nakai <Speech_Music_Male> and is <Speech_Music_Male> from in harmony <Speech_Music_Male> we journey <Speech_Music_Male> a new <Speech_Music_Male> collection of his best <Music> songs from the past <Music> 20 years. <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Available from your favorite <Speech_Music_Male> streaming services <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> canyon <SpeakerChange> records <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> who supports <Speech_Music_Male> this program. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Support <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by Roswell park, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> who know tribal <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> communities face persistent <Speech_Music_Male> challenges <Speech_Music_Male> in health equity, <Speech_Music_Male> such as cancer and <Speech_Music_Male> higher death rates. <Speech_Music_Male> The center for indigenous <Speech_Music_Male> cancer <Speech_Music_Male> research at Roswell <Speech_Music_Male> park comprehensive <Speech_Music_Male> cancer center <Speech_Music_Male> is dedicated <Speech_Music_Male> to advancing cancer <Speech_Music_Male> research that will lead <Speech_Music_Male> to translatable <Speech_Music_Male> science, medicine, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and cancer <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> care for indigenous <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> populations <Speech_Male> worldwide. Are you <Speech_Male> at high risk for <Speech_Music_Male> cancer, a no <Speech_Music_Male> charge online assessment <Speech_Male> tool is available <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> at Roswell <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> park dot <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> org slash <Silence> <Advertisement> assess <SpeakerChange> me. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Native America calling <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is produced in <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the annenberg national <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> native voice studios <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in Albuquerque, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> New Mexico, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by chronic <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> broadcast corporation, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a native <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> nonprofit media <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> organization. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Funding <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is provided by <Speech_Music_Male> the corporation for <Speech_Music_Male> public broadcasting, <Speech_Music_Male> with support <Speech_Music_Male> from the public radio satellite <Speech_Music_Male> service. <Speech_Music_Male> Music is by <Speech_Music_Male> Brent Michael Davis. <Speech_Music_Male> Native voice one, the Native American radio network

"12 30" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

08:23 min | 1 year ago

"12 30" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Mason lands community college can help you lead the way in your chosen field. At mesa lands where one in three students is Native American, you get hands on opportunities working one on one with instructors in wind energy, where students go up the turbine in their first semester. Silversmithing with access to the largest foundry in the southwest, and blacksmithing in the cowboy arts. Mesa lens has a national top ten rodeo team two. Info and applications at mesa lands dot EDU, mesa lans community college supports this program. You're listening to Native American calling. I'm Sean spruce. What is your perception of Woodstock? Is it a history changing cultural phenomenon? Our overblown hype that age affluent folks won't stop talking about. Before we went to break, I asked Sharon if she could describe her Woodstock experience in just one word, what would it be? And she couldn't really cut quite grasp it. She feels it's maybe too significant for just one word, but Sharon I want to follow up with that and ask you, do you feel that that experience at Woodstock did it change you? Do you think you'd be the person you are today? Had you never gone to Woodstock? No. It didn't change me, but when. If I ever mentioned to anyone that I went there, they just can't get over it. And the first thing that I say is, will you wallowing that mud? No, they are so in all of the hoe experience of Woodstock. And I am more of a. Calm straight person that they can't believe that I went there. And so it didn't change me in any way, except I think about it a lot. And I like to look at publications about it. And I always like sandy. I'm always looking for those two pieces. But I haven't found them anywhere. And when Jimi Hendrix was on the stage, I went up there with some others from the camp and I were too far from them and finally I found a picture that looks like me and three Indian jazz. Behind Jimi Hendrix, and I always said, I was right behind his right elbow. Not close, but that was the point that I pointed reference that I made. Finally, found a picture. And I always thought we were so close enough to be in some picture. But usually, you know, it stopped at his just with him. But I think I finally found a picture that had us in it. Right. Right. Well, I know there is a picture and we couldn't use the picture online because it's a copy written photo, but there is a picture online of Charlie and he's personally identified it of him behind the performers during the Jimi Hendrix performance. So maybe he can talk about that a little bit more here in a few minutes, but we do want to go to the phones right now. We have ray listening on KI PI in South Dakota, ray you're on the air. All right. You're talking about our viewers. Yeah, when I was good at Woodstock, this doesn't stand over here. Around the jukebox, listening to hey Jude, my job. Of course, but Gavin born on the east coast were going tomorrow. Lamma looked at a good no, you're not. There's too many people over there. So we were aware of that that kind of music. I had like Jim Wilson and doors at a collection of Beatles like that. So we wanted to go ahead. But now, I still listen to his music this day. You can't give up the music. That's the best music new year. Give me give me some time to talk so you guys talking about commemorate those ones that are there. Keep it on a hill. That's not cool. Anyway, signing off in man. Ray, thank you for those comments, and I'm sorry, your grandma wouldn't let you go to Woodstock. Let's take another caller. We have Kenneth listening on KU and M in Albuquerque, New Mexico, Kenneth, you are on the air. Hey there. Yeah, I was 17 in my friend with 16 and we were in Baltimore and we thought we'd go up there and see the who and they'd be like 25 or 50,000 people. We taught our parents. We were going on a school field trip when they dropped us off at the high school parking lot with the bus load full of freaks. Got to somewhere along the New York State through way about 5 in the morning and the bus driver said, well, that's it, guys. And we said to him, well, how far is the concert? Where do we go? He said, oh, it's just over that hill. It was still dark. So we got out of the bus. And wound up hiking till 2 o'clock in the afternoon to get to the concert site because the three way was just completely blocked. And then we found a spot on the hill. It wasn't filled in. We did a little purple haze, went to sleep. Woke up a couple hours later. And as we were coming on and the place was full and it was just a sea of people, one of the most remarkable things in that whole event was that my friend and I got separated in that connoisseur, somehow we just got parted and we were both alone and we were cleared. And somehow, we wound up bumping into each other again in that sea of half a million kids. And solve a concert through. I remember The Rain storm when I was hugging a tree. For warmth. Because all I had was my T-shirt, the whole time. And you know, I mean, that's just a little snapshot right there. What kind of thank you for calling in with those comments. Charlie, I'd like to ask you again, we were talking about this Jimi Hendrix performance, you were on stage, Sharon remembers being on stage. What do you remember about that specific performance that closed out the concert? Well, I was not really a big fan of it. I didn't know his music. I was living in the prevalent at the time. And so I wasn't up to a contemporary music at the time. They announced that he would be coming on and it was still kind of dark and we went down to Rosanna was a big fan of his. And we've got down to the stage and we were like leaving on one of the speakers watching him play. And he was having a great time, you could tell. He was like I said, I was not a big fan, didn't know. Didn't know that at all. Also, about all I can say about that. It was just when it was over, we were kind of backstage and walked down to where all the performers they had a performance pavilion. And walking around back there, looked down in the mud and there were two Woodstock nylon jackets that were and I still have one of them. And then we walked out in front of the stage and it was a foot of.

Woodstock Jimi Hendrix Mason lands community college mesa lands mesa lans community college Sean spruce Sharon Lamma Mesa Kenneth Jim Wilson Charlie sandy Jude South Dakota Gavin east coast Albuquerque New Mexico Ray
"12 30" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:14 min | 1 year ago

"12 30" Discussed on Native America Calling

"And some areas, I don't know. I don't even know where some of the stuff I don't remember. Like eating a recall eating very much except a couple of times. And we want to tell them one day and the whole bunch of I guess they were constantly walking down, but that road to the town and all of the residents of the town were kind of lined up on the side of the road, just watching, you know, just looking or sitting on their porch as looking. And some of them had their houses out there and they'd house you down if you wanted them to. I don't remember that, but they did invite us to the hub farm to. Whatever. We breakfast there one time and I will have breakfast. And it was oatmeal raisins and peanuts in a paper cup. Not just raw oatmeal. So gray now I guess. I don't know. Did you like the music? Do you remember any particular acts that stood out? Yes. I like to well Joan Baez was there. I like her. And Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young. Arlo guest ree. Les went and tears and credence Clearwater. I left the Santana was there, but I didn't know much about him at that time. But I've kind of watched him since. You know? And not too long ago, one of my niches bought me a post that he signed and it was real popular with and mostly women my age, the Woodstock age. Gave me compliments on it, but I thought that was funny. But yeah. It doesn't quite sound like Woodstock was the conscious raising experience that it's become known for and so famous for. And I think of all that's been documented about Woodstock over the years and books and movies and documentaries. Tell us, is there are there any secrets that have yet to be told you remember something else that just has never been shared about Woodstock? Spill the tea, please. Now, not necessarily that, but I was like, sandy, I was so I have been so surprised that the tepees never made the books and the fabrication. And I just wonder why. I mean, out in the midst of all of this, there were two key pieces of on a heel and a camp of Indians. And it was like, why didn't they put us in something? I mean, I thought that was very unusual. For the Indians to be camped there. And no one did it. Gave us any publicity. Two teepees on a hill and a camp of Indians. That's classic Sharon. Did you notice? You were a group of about 20. It sounds like Charlie recommend remembers about 20 of you. Did you notice any other native people there? Any other kids that were native at the shows? No. I didn't. But when we first got there, the first two people we met were from Purcell a glamour. That was odd of all those people. But no, I didn't see any. But Sharon you could describe your entire.

Woodstock Arlo guest ree Joan Baez Crosby Stills Santana Clearwater Nash Indians Sharon Charlie Purcell
"12 30" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"12 30" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Stayed dry and not too muddy. And we had passes backstage. We had performer passes. We had pavilion passes. We were just we could go anywhere. And do anything. And it was incredible. It was great. Okay, Charlie, let me get this right. So you were this group of young native kids from New Mexico and you had tepees set up at Woodstock and you were hanging out in these tepees throughout the concert. Well, it.

Charlie New Mexico Woodstock
"12 30" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

08:14 min | 1 year ago

"12 30" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Native voice one the Native American radio network. This is native America calling. I'm Sean spruce. Woodstock is one of the most storied music events of all time. Initially conceived as a means to finance a studio, it became a gathering that changed the course of popular music. It also galvanized the influence of a younger generation, while the country was divided over an unpopular war and violent racial politics. A group of native artists were invited to Woodstock to showcase their work. The gathering was billed as a music and arts festival, and the artists were hopeful to reach new markets. One unfolded, however, was completely unexpected and memorable. We're going to talk to some of those who were there, and hear about what they experienced. Joining us today from the village of powari on tribal lands of laguna Pueblo in New Mexico is Charlie bird. He was a Woodstock attendee, and he's laguna and Santo Domingo Pueblo. Charlie, welcome to Native American calling. Good morning, thank you. Joining us from Morris Oklahoma is sandy fife Wilson. She is an artist and retired art teacher and graduate of the institute of American Indian arts. She's muskogee creek, and also a Woodstock attendee. Welcome to Native American colleague sandy. Thank you. And joining us from Henrietta Oklahoma is Sharon maus. She is sandy's sister, a Woodstock attendee and a retired college instructor. She is also muskogee creek. Welcome to native America calling Sharon. Thank you and good morning. I just can't get over this fact that there was a group of young native people that traveled to Woodstock in the summer of 1969, just beyond cool, really, really cool. Charlie, I'd like to begin with you. Summer 69, how old were you, what were you doing? Where were you living in what inspired you to travel to Woodstock? I can't even remember how old I was been so long now. I was I was not even a student at the institute in Santa Fe. I just happened to see a girl who was going to school at the time. And she told me about it. She had heard about this big music and art fair that was going to happen in New York and it sounded interesting. So I spoke to one of the guys who was one of the contacts. His name was and he was in contact with John Morris who was one of the big concerning Woodstock. And several days later he asked me, you still want to go and I said, yeah, and he said, well, you're in. And that ticket. On a the vast majority of all the students went with the hog farm on a charter team, we had private tickets and they got on the plane and Albuquerque flew to New York. Got off the plane and there was a guy calling my name and he was our chauffeur and he was driving our car, which was pretty far out. Anyway, they had us all set up a little town called white Lake with room and board and all that stuff. And then the following day our driver Mario goes up to the site and he was well, anyway there were a lot of people walking a lot of people hitting that way. And this was like on Wednesday. I believe I remember exactly, I think it was on Wednesday that before it even started. And one thing we did say was just right over this next hill is the concert. And we got to the top of the hill and looked down and there was this tremendous huge beautiful grass covered both and there were a lot of people there already. And it was very exciting looking at that. And we hung around for a couple of days. Waiting for the things to happen and then the day when things were supposed to happen took a long time. And a little while ago it was nice to hear what you have and you can see was the first artist that appeared and it was just by accident that he was first as they couldn't get the other guys. And that's when they started using the helicopters to bring all the artists and their equipment and because nothing was moving according to everything I've heard and read about it later on on the highways it was just backed up to the main road. And. Charlie all like you, so there was this group from Santa Fe. How big was your group? How many native students or companions were there who made the trip to Woodstock? I'm not sure. Yeah. About 20. Now and they all were supposed to have their artwork either thrown in or it was supposed to be in New York, but then they couldn't get it out to the site because of the traffic and whatnot. And so that part of the art show never happened. And there was actually a pavilion that was built for the artists with the Indian artist. It was called the Indian beryllium and I understand I never even saw it. But I understand that before a couple of days before everything opened up, it was just full of people who were squatting in there. So I don't know. So it just got so overrun that this idea that you would sell artwork and there would be like a cultural pavilion, showcasing some Native American art and other performance type stuff. That just wasn't possible, huh? With so many people? Yeah, like I said there are none of their artwork in arrive up there and couldn't get in. It didn't deliver it. And it was just incredible. People were there. Now Charlie, your group was invited to come to Woodstock by the promoters and you enjoyed some special privileges, what were the perks? Well, John Morris was the guy who was in charge of. Making arrangements for us all to get there. And like I said that the majority of the guys went on the plane with the hog farm who was in charge of security and my brother, myself, a scale named Rosanna sedge went separately on by ourselves with our tickets. And when we got there, we had a hotel room and white Lake. And then we had a show for and we could take us any time anywhere we wanted to go and when we got to the state to the area we there was a couple of tepees that were set up for us, which were incredible, which was a great thing to have. And we were shelters. So out of all those people that were there, we were we.

Woodstock muskogee creek Sean spruce powari laguna Pueblo Charlie bird Santo Domingo Pueblo sandy fife Wilson institute of American Indian a Sharon maus Charlie Oklahoma sandy America John Morris Santa Fe Henrietta New York white Lake New Mexico
'The Adversaries' Author Ned Ryun on the Idea of a National Divorce

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:19 min | 1 year ago

'The Adversaries' Author Ned Ryun on the Idea of a National Divorce

"Greatness, senior fellow Ned Ryan author of the adversaries a story of Boston and bunker hill. Ned, welcome to Mike Gallagher show. Yeah, no great to be with you slicked her. Oh, well, it is great to be with me. I'm amazing, said the modest Los Angeles trial lawyer. Hey, you've got a terrific book here. The adversaries. I've read it. I loved it. And frankly, I cribbed a little bit about bunker hill, the battle of bunker hill for my upcoming book, the fallen rise of the United States. We've been talking about a national divorce. This was kind of a divorce 250 years ago. Marjorie Taylor Greene's tweeting about it, what do you think of the concept? I got to tell you, kirkus, I think there's two options. One is the national divorce. I mean, we're looking at two very divergent world views on how you approach governments, inherent rights, which honestly occurred is not something new. I mean, this is when you look at the genesis of the progressive movement early 20th century, they were always attacking inherent rights, all of these things. And now it's coming to full fruition. So you've got the national divorce angle or an angle that I also like as well in which we beat them into submission enforcement unconditional surrender. So I think that I love when you talk like that. Makes me want to have a cigarette in a cuddle.

Ned Ryan Mike Gallagher Marjorie Taylor Greene Bunker Hill NED Boston Los Angeles United States
No, We're Not Science Deniers Just Because We Ask Follow-up Questions

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:03 min | 1 year ago

No, We're Not Science Deniers Just Because We Ask Follow-up Questions

"Been doing this for two years. Where are the peer review studies that talk about the interaction between natural immunity, which is a thing and vaccine immunity, which is a thing that they changed the story on regularly. You know, as an army officer, if I got up in front of my guys, and I said X and then I came back and said, why the next day and didn't say, you know, I thought it was actually yesterday. I got new information. The answer's really why. My guy's like, oh, okay, you got new information. If I came back and said, the answer today is why and somebody says, wasn't that actually? Shut up. You hate science. Okay, you don't hate science. You just remember. So they're telling us you have the vaccine. It's going to keep you from getting the disease. You're going to be great. Everything will go back to normal. Oh, cool. Sounds good. And then that doesn't work out. And you're like, hey, didn't you say no shut up? You hate science. You're a vaccine denial. I'm not vaccine denier. I know what you said. And you said something different than you're saying now. And so you haven't done the important thing. Which is bridge the gap between what you were saying and what you're saying now. Look, we haven't had a pandemic in a century folks. All right? I think we give these folks a little leeway if they give us a little humility. If they say, guys, we thought X, we have new information. You can go online and look at the peer reviewed studies. They're taken to account all the factors, including natural immunity. And you can see why we are now saying why instead of X and all of us would go, okay. Because all of us are adults and we know that when you get new information, you change your mind. But when you get new information and change your mind and then treat the people who observe that you've changed your mind and want to know what the new information is, like idiots, you're a say it's denier.

Army
"12 30" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"12 30" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Because that was important to you. I'm going to do my best to honor people. The way you pull.

What Percentage of the 30% Un-Vaccinated People Have Natural Anti-Bodies?

Mark Levin

01:43 min | 1 year ago

What Percentage of the 30% Un-Vaccinated People Have Natural Anti-Bodies?

"Over 70% of the people in this country have been vaccinated. Right, Mr Producer over 70%. What percentage of the 30% Have a natural immunity now not try antibiotics. Do we know They'll never tell So it has to be right, Reggie a certain percentage of the 30% of natural Anybody's and don't need the then don't need the vaccine, right? What percentage is it? We don't know. And then many of those who haven't been vaccinated her Children. Because if you're under 12, even the CDC isn't sure about these vaccines. So I'm just curious if 70% of the population has been vaccinated. Leaving 30% left. A certain significant percentage of that 30% has natural anti bodies. And another certain significant percentage of the 30% our Children, right? So This is, uh I mean, I'm not a mass major. It's not my top subject. 30%. Maybe they're talking about adults. Even so, let's say it's 70% of adults even more. 30% of adults over 12. Let's say adults and young young people above 12. 30%. Well, tell us about that 30%. Tell us But they don't

Mr Producer Reggie CDC
Astronauts begin solar power system upgrades

Ric Edelman

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

Astronauts begin solar power system upgrades

"To that. Heard a stagger your systems and expect a warning to him. Once the sound of NASA astronauts Kate Rubins and Victor Glover, switching to battery power at the start of their spacewalk to prepare, the Iaw says for an upcoming solar array upgrade. Today's project is expected to wrap up at around 12 30 this afternoon. We'll keep you posted

Kate Rubins Victor Glover IAW Nasa
Repairing Our Hearts - Healing with the RAIN of Compassion

Tara Brach

05:50 min | 2 years ago

Repairing Our Hearts - Healing with the RAIN of Compassion

"Greetings friends welcome back right here now so our second almost full day together and i just wanna star really by bowing to to honor your practice. I felt so much a sense of the sincerity and that presence in space that we're creating together so it's delicious and you know especially in the midst of such a reactive spinning hurting world right now really matters that were coming together. Like this in this relative quiet missino. It's not quiet for everyone. More stillness more connecting with hearts. You know we miss. Oh much when were preoccupied on. We're speeding along on automatic. And you know just reacting to daily stressors. I received an email woman wrote to me about her four year old and she was buckling her daughter. And after you know. Typically hurried morning Two working parents baby young children to different schools. You get the picture and this is what she wrote. She said i noticed my daughter's nails or getting long. And i told her we'd have to cut them tonight and started talking about the other things that we need to happen in the evening. Taking a bath and detangling her curls and she said. Ok mom but let's care about now so i just love that because it's such a beautiful description of our practice carrying about what's here now. So this talk i will be exploring really our primary challenge to this open hearted presence this carrying about now and it happens when now is unpleasant and we have this very deep conditioning. When it's unpleasant as we know to react by pulling away by contracting and also to react by turning on ourselves especially when an emotional pain physical pain is strong and ongoing it often comes a self version and i invite you to check that out. So the title of the talk is repairing our hearts. And if we want to understand how we perpetuate disrepair suffering. We need to begin to recognize in the background of. What's going on the stories that we're telling ourselves in other words we need to see how we move from a fuelling. That's unpleasant to judging it as bad something bad's happening and then moving on even further saying something's wrong with me and it happens very quickly. You know something's wrong. Something's wrong with me and we call it. The second arrow from the buddha's teaching that the first hour is some painful experience and the second arrow. And this is what's critical. Is this slapping on of a story about what's happening. There's a pali word i love. It's papa and it's that chain of reactivity the proliferation that happens so rather than just feeling. Something's unpleasant we immediately start trying to figure it out. Push it away and blame usually and usually we blame ourselves and we ended up solidifying our identity as a flawed separate self in that chain reaction. Now i just want a name. That of course. The story about badness extends to others you know we often blame others and say you're bad and we blame life. Life's bad but deep down if there's any rejecting of the present moment were not liking ourselves. Mistrusting ourselves and in buddhist psychology any moment of resisting. What's right here. A wanting life different is suffer. It could be very subtle suffering because we're in some habitual way of distracting. Our could be very profound but either way when we want life different we cannot inhabit and live from the love and the awareness. That's our true nature. So ona tell you about a friend of mine Some of you might of heard of him. Dan gottlieb. He's a psychologist. He's an author radio host from philadelphia and i interviewed him for my podcast. When he was thirty three he had a very successful career. Family then had an accident that landed him quadriplegic chronic pain so this is almost forty years ago and at first after the accident he wrapped what was going on in many many stories. I'll a terrible life. I can't live with. This is wife died soon after more pain and it landed as a sense of personal badness pain and there's something really wrong with me and life is bad and he started realizing that his stories were what was creating the suffering

Dan Gottlieb ONA Philadelphia
"Gilligan's Island" actress Dawn Wells dies from COVID

NPR News Now

00:57 sec | 2 years ago

"Gilligan's Island" actress Dawn Wells dies from COVID

"Dawn wells the actress. Best known is marianne off the nineteen sixties. Sitcom gilligan's island has died of complications related to covid nineteen. She was eighty two. Npr's anastasius you'll has details. Actress done wells was synonymous with the character of mary-anne gilligan's island the wide eyed pigtailed. Wholesome girl next door the show for only three seasons starting in nineteen sixty four but it defined wells actress and it's run for decades and syndication wells even named her two thousand fourteen. Self help book. Where would marianne do. Well started out as a beauty queen in the early nineteen sixties. She appeared on shows like seventy seven sunset. Strip and bonanza in recent decades. She began producing as well including tv. Movie called surviving gilligan's island on associate syllabus. Npr news new york

Dawn Wells Anne Gilligan Marianne Gilligan NPR Wells New York
Apple Loses A Copyright Lawsuit

Techmeme Ride Home

03:17 min | 2 years ago

Apple Loses A Copyright Lawsuit

"Federal judge has dismissed. Apple's claims that mobile device virtualization company corral corallium violated copyright law with its software that allowed folks to run ios on pc's quoting the washington post in a ruling that has wide reaching implications for iphone security research and copyright law a federal judge in florida throughout apple's claims that carelli had violated copyright law with its software which helps security researchers find bugs and security holes on apple's products. Corallium co founded in two thousand seventeen by husband and wife. Amanda gordon and chris wade was a breakthrough insecurity research because it gave its customers the ability to run virtual iphones on desktop computers. Corallium makes it to use physical avon's that contain specialized software to poke and prod. Ios apple's mobile operating system. The judge in the case ruled that carell liam's creation of virtual. Iphones was not a copyright violation in part because it was designed to help improve the security for all iphone users. Corallium wasn't creating a competing product for consumers rather it was a research tool for a comparatively small number of customers. Apple did not immediately respond to a request for comment in the lawsuit. Apple argued that crawley products could be dangerous if they fall into the wrong hands because security flaws discovered by liam could be used to hack iphones. Apple also argued that chromium sells its product indiscriminately claim corallium denied dread. Rodney smith called apple's argument on those claims quote puzzling. If not disingenuous quote smith found that chromium used a vetting process before selling its products to customers. Apple initially attempted to acquire corallium in two thousand eighteen. According to court records when the acquisition talks stalled apple sued corallium last year claiming its virtual iphones which contain only the bare bones functions necessary for security research constitute violation of copyright law apple also alleged corallium circumvented. Apple's security measures to create the software thereby violating the digital millennium copyright act that claim has not been thrown out and quote. So i was already to say this was a dumb lawsuit but apparently companies have won a similar cases in the past around copyright but most in the digital security community praised this result. Let me quote at pony. All the things on twitter quote. This is a big deal for security research in particular but also other parts of tech apple case was an insanely broad assertion. That emulating iowa's firmware on something. That's not apple's own hardware violates copyright rather than covered by fair use. Imagine if. That argument had prevailed that emulation of a binary even for wildly different purposes such as security testing that binary is a digital copyright infringement. Might as well have back named afl to automatic federal lawsuit in that scenario was such a dangerously broad claim if the logical conclusion of your lawsuit is windows being a terms of service. Change away from overnight bankrupting vm. Ware to force everyone to use your and turning security testing of compiled binary into lawsuits. Then sorry you're lawsuit is bad and you should feel bad and quote

Apple Corallium Carelli Corallium Co Amanda Gordon Chris Wade Carell Liam Crawley Products Washington Post Rodney Smith Avon Florida Liam Smith Twitter Iowa AFL Ware
Myles Cosgrove, who FBI says shot Breonna Taylor, expected to be fired

MSNBC Morning Joe

00:34 sec | 2 years ago

Myles Cosgrove, who FBI says shot Breonna Taylor, expected to be fired

"To louisville where two police officers chide to the deadly raid. That killed brianna. Taylor both received notice that the police department intends to fire them both. Detective myles cosgrove. Who was one of the officers. Who shot taylor and detective joshua. Jane's who prepared the search warrant for the raid were notified if their departments intentions yesterday. A lawyer for cost growth confirmed. He received a letter of termination to nbc news but he did not comment any further. The officers still have the right to a pre termination hearing before. They're officially fired. According to the louisville metropolitan police

Myles Cosgrove Brianna Louisville Police Department Taylor Joshua Jane Nbc News Louisville Metropolitan Police
First U.S. Case of Highly Contagious Coronavirus Variant Is Found in Colorado

MSNBC Morning Joe

00:32 sec | 2 years ago

First U.S. Case of Highly Contagious Coronavirus Variant Is Found in Colorado

"The first time the united states a case of the new coronavirus variant has been found initially seen in the uk. It has been reported adding urgency. The efforts to vaccinate americans the variant was reported in colorado after being found in a man in his twenties who was an isolation southeast of denver in elbert county according to state health officials. He had no travel history. Scientists in the uk believed the very more contagious than previously identified strains the discovery sparked border closures in european countries like ireland france belgium and germany as well as countries outside of the content

Elbert County UK United States Colorado Denver Ireland Belgium France Germany
Social Media Fighting Misinformation

The 3:59

02:15 min | 2 years ago

Social Media Fighting Misinformation

"Social networks. Facebook twitter Facebook and twitter particular stepping up and getting more aggressive about putting misinformation especially during the elections and talking about Actually actively labeling tweets from president trump from others who talked about potential election fraud. We've talked about facebook and twitter. Finally getting more proactive about stamping out. Content from cunanan other other areas there were plenty conspiracy theories around the killing of george floyd the Of their to be fair. I wanna give them credit but not too much. Because i know some of this. it's available. How effective give some of the labeling here is an and you know the fact that they took a step is big. But it's really just a little bit too little too late though right and look at what they have in. We're on the same page because this is actually mine number five as well all the the rush of misinformation a not not about just the election but against black lives matter Against the coronavirus vaccine all of this stuff. That's been running rampant on social networks. And you look at what all these social networks are doing. Let's talk about the election blocking political ads. Great but could you not have done that earlier. There dave labeled Trump's tweets labeled a bunch of other people's tweets rape. Could you not have done that later. And i it's not a i think misinformation i think people understand what misinformation i think it is. There's a line of social media. Companies have to figure out in terms of what it would consider free speech and whatnot This is like a chicken or the egg scenario Who knows what that actually is right. but i think they've done it certainly a big because it's people thought like misinformation totally the outcome of the of the election. And now you look a pandemic where people. I can't take this vaccine because it's actually going to help save lives. There's people spreading misinformation about that saying. Hey you know. Don't take it because you know whatever. Miss whatever things right could have a chip that lets the government track or whatever blah but of. Course you're using a phone. You're using facebook and other social like that. You don't think the government can already track you if that was the case. So i think that that's that's certainly one of my big stories Of the year

Facebook Twitter Cunanan George Floyd Donald Trump Dave
Boston removes controversial Lincoln statue

Democracy Now! Audio

00:43 sec | 2 years ago

Boston removes controversial Lincoln statue

"In boston. A statue depicting a formerly enslaved men kneeling before president. Lincoln has been removed after the boston. Art commission voted unanimously. To take it down during the summer at the height of the anti-racist nationwide uprising the vote came after a campaign spearheaded by boston. Artist tori bullock. Who responded tuesday to the removal. This is a great day for the city of boston. In case you didn't know this has been up for one hundred and forty one years for boston to be the first place to come up with any kind of legitimate process to decommission these controversial statues in a respectful manner. It warms my heart and makes me proud is a proud day for me and for my city

Boston Art Commission Tori Bullock Lincoln
Bodies Week Morning Riddles

Chompers

02:36 min | 2 years ago

Bodies Week Morning Riddles

"Good morning it's time for choppers your tooth brushing show start brushing on the top of your mouth on one side bowler team all the way in the back. And it's bodies week on chompers and today we've got some head scratchers for you. it's riddled here's your first one. These pearly whites fall out of kids and grow back just one time. You use me when you're chewing and brush to clean the grime. What are they teeth but things. You're brushing right now. Switzer rushing to the other side of the top of your mouth. Don't forget those front teeth. Teeth are the hardest part of the human body even harder than bones. But don't go testing your teeth. If you break a bone it can grow back together but teeth. Don't he'll Here's your next riddle. I cover the whole body and wrinkle when you're old i'm sweaty when you're too hot and get goosebumps when you're cold. What am i switched to the bottom of your mouth. Don't brush to heart. Skip is your body's largest covering basically your body a scientific name for skin. His epo dermot. Don't look now. Your epidermis is showing. Here's another riddle. I don't get hurt when i get cut. I grow longer every day. And when you get much older. I fall out or i turned gray. What am i. Switch rushing to the other side of the bottom of your mouth. You brushing hair grows on almost every in of your skin. The only places that hair doesn't really grow is on your lips. The palms of your hands and the soles of your feet. Okay here is your last riddle. Longest one is your femur. The smallest one is in your ear. They make all of your blood cells and breaking is what they fear. What are we talking about the for you tonight. All you have to do now is

Switzer Dermot
As hospitalization rates across the country rise, demand for nurses intensifies

Seattle's Morning News with Dave Ross

02:59 min | 2 years ago

As hospitalization rates across the country rise, demand for nurses intensifies

"Breaking covitz surges straining our health care system again, and the vaccine won't be able to help in time. Hospitals are searching all over the U. S. To find nurses they desperately need. CBS senior medical correspondent Dr Tara Neruda reports. Uh huh. Alphonsus Hospital in Boise, Idaho. Nearly 25% of patients have Cove it and the increase of sick patients is overwhelming. The hospital staff were getting hit pretty hard, Um, you know, in the recent weeks every day, it seems like we're getting more and more patients. Corey Alby is a covert unit intensive care nurse and supervisor at ST Alphonsus. She says Hospital staff, including nurses are also testing positive for Cove in its doesn't seem from contract tracing that it Coming from the hospital setting. A lot of them are gatherings outside of the hospital, but it's putting a strain on the workforce. Staffing is the biggest issue in California Governor Gavin Newsom, announcing the state needs to hire 3000 temporary contracted medical workers to help with increasing ICU hospitalization rates. And over 2400 miles away in New Jersey. More than 170. Employees at three hospitals have contracted covert 19, causing staffing shortages as Corona virus cases continue to rise. Hospitals across the country are urgently in need of travel nurses. Work on temporary contracts for higher fees. It's certainly a really intense demand environment. April Hansen is the executive vice president for Aya Healthcare, an agency that recruits and employees travel nurses As of this week, their requests in all 50 states and over 29,200 job openings for travel nurses. When I look at our job counts from the height of the first wave this spring, and I look at where we're at today. We are seeing more than double the demand. We certainly saw more of a geographic concentration at the beginning of the pandemic. What happened sort of into the movement of the second wave is that it's more dispersed. So widespread demand is 12 30, our ears full 32 year old Laura could. Tollo is a travel nurse. She's been on the road for months following covert hot spots. From hard hit New York in April to Arizona in July. And now in Green Bay, Wisconsin. What are you seeing in terms of staffing and shortages at your current work location? This stuff gets sick. So they have to quarantine appropriately and then, Additionally the community gets sick. So we have a swell of patients, and then we have a shortage of staff, so we come in to try and create a buffer. So that these nurses have some downtime, Cartola says. Being a travel nurse comes with trade offs is specially as a mom of two young kids. But she says, even with the risks, she wants to set set an an an example example example for for for her her her Children. Children. Children. Do Do Do you you you ever ever ever question question question becoming becoming becoming a a a travel travel travel nurse? nurse? nurse? I I I don't don't don't know know know how how how history history history will will will remember remember remember me, me, me, but but but I I I don't don't don't know know know if if if that that that matters matters matters as as as much much much as as as how how how make make make Children Children Children will will will remember me. It is

Dr Tara Neruda Alphonsus Hospital Corey Alby St Alphonsus April Hansen Aya Healthcare Gavin Newsom Boise CBS Tollo Idaho New Jersey Cartola California Green Bay Laura Wisconsin Arizona
Uber driver carjacked at gunpoint on Chicago's South Side

John Williams

00:17 sec | 2 years ago

Uber driver carjacked at gunpoint on Chicago's South Side

"At gunpoint when he picked up two passengers. It happened shortly before 12 30 this morning at 45th and Prairie. The two passengers Then told the driver to pull over and took his phone wallet and his silver. Nissan rogue. The driver was not hurt. No. One using custody with homicides in

Prairie Nissan