35 Burst results for "11 Years"

CNN's Jim Sciutto Doesn't Understand Inflation

The Dan Bongino Show

01:16 min | Last week

CNN's Jim Sciutto Doesn't Understand Inflation

"And to hilariously claim that 8.3% year over year inflation is taking a breather is just beyond embarrassing Now I want you to think about this folks Because Jim sciutto doesn't understand he doesn't I met the guy once in the CNN green room over there down in Washington D.C. is not a particularly bright guy And I wasn't mean to be or anything He's not a particularly bright guy I could tell talking to him Think about this right If you were to just to show you what 8.3% means right This stuff compounds folks Now to make it simple because there are liberals listening if it was a savings account right Let's put meat on the bone of how destructive 8% is If you had a savings account right If you got 7% every year your money would double in about 12 years 8% that would double in around ten and a half to 11 years right They said well how does that sound bad Inflation is the value of your money going down So that works in the inverse too

Jim Sciutto Washington D.C. CNN
Why Is Netflix Losing Subscribers?

Mark Levin

01:05 min | Last month

Why Is Netflix Losing Subscribers?

"Know it was interesting because there's been this massive exodus Of Netflix people canceling Netflix And I laughed yesterday because Netflix is like why are we losing all these subscribers What's happening You guys had up there a documentary a series I should say entitled he's expecting I do that's pregnant A series about a dude being pregnant and you wonder why people said the hell with you You guys had a series called cuties Which described this way during the pandemic and 11 year old Amy starts to rebel against her conservative families traditions when she becomes fascinated with a free spirited dance crew Look at the video Look at the trailer and what do you see there What do you see You see a bunch of little girls being sexualized And the demonizing of a conservative family And you wonder why people are

Netflix AMY
Things Look Different (MM #4046)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last month

Things Look Different (MM #4046)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason if you visit the mason minute website, you'll notice that things look different. Kind of had my hand forced. When we started the mason minute, 11 years ago, I don't know why I picked the website look that I picked. They just kind of fit. I went with it and well they're gone with it for 11 years. But recently I've had some problems. The guys who created that template for the podcast hadn't been updating it in a long time, so I knew I was going to have to make some changes. So I've been looking at new templates, and then everything started falling apart. I was having problems with my web host. I was having problems with my podcast host. I was having problems with people being able to read things. And find things, and then when Apple and Spotify couldn't find my podcast on my podcast page, I knew I had to make a change. So in the middle of the night we took the plunge and made the change and now things look a whole lot different. If you don't visit the mason minute website, you may not notice a difference. I don't think you will. You can still find it wherever you find your podcast, but I encourage you to stop by because I truly believe it's the only place you'll find all 4046 episodes. Most places just hold onto about 300 of them and move on.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Nasa Spotify Apple
Things Look Different (MM #4046)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last month

Things Look Different (MM #4046)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason if you visit the mason minute website, you'll notice that things look different. Kind of had my hand forced. When we started the mason minute, 11 years ago, I don't know why I picked the website look that I picked. They just kind of fit. I went with it and well they're gone with it for 11 years. But recently I've had some problems. The guys who created that template for the podcast hadn't been updating it in a long time, so I knew I was going to have to make some changes. So I've been looking at new templates, and then everything started falling apart. I was having problems with my web host. I was having problems with my podcast host. I was having problems with people being able to read things. And find things, and then when Apple and Spotify couldn't find my podcast on my podcast page, I knew I had to make a change. So in the middle of the night we took the plunge and made the change and now things look a whole lot different. If you don't visit the mason minute website, you may not notice a difference. I don't think you will. You can still find it wherever you find your podcast, but I encourage you to stop by because I truly believe it's the only place you'll find all 4046 episodes. Most places just hold onto about 300 of them and move on.

Kevin Mason Nasa Spotify Apple
Things Look Different (MM #4046)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last month

Things Look Different (MM #4046)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason if you visit the mason minute website, you'll notice that things look different. Kind of had my hand forced. When we started the mason minute, 11 years ago, I don't know why I picked the website look that I picked. They just kind of fit. I went with it and well they're gone with it for 11 years. But recently I've had some problems. The guys who created that template for the podcast hadn't been updating it in a long time, so I knew I was going to have to make some changes. So I've been looking at new templates, and then everything started falling apart. I was having problems with my web host. I was having problems with my podcast host. I was having problems with people being able to read things. And find things, and then when Apple and Spotify couldn't find my podcast on my podcast page, I knew I had to make a change. So in the middle of the night we took the plunge and made the change and now things look a whole lot different. If you don't visit the mason minute website, you may not notice a difference. I don't think you will. You can still find it wherever you find your podcast, but I encourage you to stop by because I truly believe it's the only place you'll find all 4046 episodes. Most places just hold onto about 300 of them and move on.

Kevin Mason Nasa Spotify Apple
Pfizer to seek COVID booster for healthy 5- to 11-year-olds

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | Last month

Pfizer to seek COVID booster for healthy 5- to 11-year-olds

"Pfizer Pfizer Pfizer Pfizer says says says says it it it it plans plans plans plans to to to to seek seek seek seek approval approval approval approval to to to to provide provide provide provide Kobe Kobe Kobe Kobe booster booster booster booster shots shots shots shots to to to to younger younger younger younger children children children children the the the the pharmaceutical pharmaceutical pharmaceutical pharmaceutical giant giant giant giant Pfizer Pfizer Pfizer Pfizer says says says says it it it it wants wants wants wants to to to to expand expand expand expand cobit cobit cobit cobit boosters boosters boosters boosters to to to to children children children children ages ages ages ages five five five five to to to to eleven eleven eleven eleven using using using using the the the the lower lower lower lower dose dose dose dose formula formula formula formula designed designed designed designed for for for for kids kids kids kids it it it it says says says says its its its its latest latest latest latest survey survey survey survey shows shows shows shows one one one one hundred hundred hundred hundred forty forty forty forty youngsters youngsters youngsters youngsters had had had had already already already already gotten gotten gotten gotten two two two two shots shots shots shots were were were were given given given given a a a a booster booster booster booster six six six six months months months months later later later later and and and and that that that that extra extra extra extra vaccine vaccine vaccine vaccine generally generally generally generally revved revved revved revved up up up up their their their their immune immune immune immune response response response response more more more more than than than than two two two two dozen dozen dozen dozen of of of of those those those those research research research research participants participants participants participants showed showed showed showed a a a a thirty thirty thirty thirty six six six six fold fold fold fold increase increase increase increase in in in in virus virus virus virus fighting fighting fighting fighting antibodies antibodies antibodies antibodies making making making making the the the the more more more more able able able able to to to to fight fight fight fight off off off off the the the the contagious contagious contagious contagious Omicron Omicron Omicron Omicron variant variant variant variant the the the the research research research research has has has has not not not not yet yet yet yet been been been been peer peer peer peer reviewed reviewed reviewed reviewed boosters boosters boosters boosters are are are are recommended recommended recommended recommended for for for for everyone everyone everyone everyone twelve twelve twelve twelve and and and and over over over over but but but but only only only only for for for for younger younger younger younger children children children children with with with with weakened weakened weakened weakened immune immune immune immune systems systems systems systems now now now now Pfizer Pfizer Pfizer Pfizer will will will will seek seek seek seek that that that that extra extra extra extra boost boost boost boost for for for for healthy healthy healthy healthy children children children children five five five five to to to to eleven eleven eleven eleven I'm I'm I'm I'm Jacki Jacki Jacki Jacki Quinn Quinn Quinn Quinn

Pfizer Pfizer Pfizer Kobe Kobe Kobe Kobe Virus Virus Virus Virus Fighti Quinn Quinn
The Collaps of Public School Education

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:06 min | Last month

The Collaps of Public School Education

"Let me ask you about their education at Tiffany because I've been covering gender education K through three and the end of excellence education in San Diego's Patrick Henry high school, 9 through 12. Education is collapsing in America as it collapses in Washington state. It is collapsing. And people in Washington state will remember that I was 11 years old when patty Murray was first selected. She ran as the mom in tennis shoes. Oh yes. She was a preschool teacher and she was on school board and she was going to fight for our children. So under her policies, our education has gotten worse. And we were a 44% average in public school system prior to the pandemic. You could imagine how those scores of considerably gone down. All through my boys are in the public school system. And here in Washington state, our kids were out of school for almost two full years. And not only that, we have to get back to teaching math and reading. We have to get back to competitive quality education.

Patrick Henry High School Washington Tiffany Patty Murray San Diego America Tennis
Why Mark Meckler Is a Proponent of the Convention of States

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:26 min | 2 months ago

Why Mark Meckler Is a Proponent of the Convention of States

"At the NRB in Nashville. I'm sitting down with Mark meckler. If you know of him, it's perhaps because you're familiar with something called the convention of states. I've been talking to Rick santorum about that. Mark meckler welcome. Thanks for having me. How did you come to this idea of I want to talk about what the convention of states is. But what is your story about how you came to be a proponent of this idea? Because this is very big stuff. There's no way around it. The idea of a convention state is in the constitution, no one has ever done it in 200 and whatever 40 years. No one has ever done this. Nobody's even threatened to do it. And threatening to do it, you and Rick santorum and others, I approve of it dramatically wholeheartedly. I'm excited. But how did you get you, Mark meckler, to this point? I mean, in short version 11 years ago, I was one of the people to start the Tea Party movement. So in 2010, we get this incredible wave election, the biggest swing Congress since 1938. And they don't do anything. I mean, it literally don't do anything nothing changes. They do Jack. Right. And then we get the center. They didn't do anything. It's that they did do Jack. Well, so then you get the Senate. They told us if we just had the Senate and then they don't do Jack or they do Jack again. Yeah. Right? And then I just thought, well, it doesn't work. Nothing's working. That's 8th grade civics, right? If you elect the right people, they'll do what you send them to do, but it doesn't actually work that way. And I had a friend by the name of Mike Ferris came to me. He's really the founder of the homeschool movement in America. Asked me if I was happy with what I had accomplished in politics. And you would think having helped to elect the largest swing class in history, I'd be pretty excited. And my answer was, no, it's I'm frustrated. I'm wasting my life. It's dismal. It seems to me like correct me if I'm wrong, but it seems like so you get these people elected. They go to Washington, but there is something inherently pernicious about Washington, D.C.. It does something to people that is not good, and so you're thinking, okay, what is the way out of this mess? Well, so what fair says to me is you're approaching the problem incorrectly. You think we have a personnel problem, but we have a structure problem, which is

Mark Meckler Rick Santorum Jack NRB Nashville Senate Mike Ferris Tea Party Congress Washington, D.C. America Washington
Florida Is Not the Best State for Motorcycle Riding

The Dan Bongino Show

01:42 min | 2 months ago

Florida Is Not the Best State for Motorcycle Riding

"This is from at pure Rennick on truth social Dan my daughter's 11 years old and we both are basically bride motorcycles The U ride motorcycles You're in a perfect state to do so Florida Well I would dispute that perfect state thing for one reason Florida especially in the summer it rains every day like clockwork If you're watching at Fox nation I seriously would move the camera to the window to my left right now where it is about to be 3 o'clock and it is about to rain fly I am not kidding I should think here You know what I'm gonna take a picture for you right now Hold on Jim don't let this go to Here's outside my window I'm gonna post this picture on true social during the break And I'm gonna show you how a two 38 Eastern Time It rains every day at 3 o'clock So the problem with the motorcycle in Florida you could get caught in The Rain every day if you're out at 3 o'clock Good Most floridians or ride motorcycles are smart enough and savvy enough but everyone knows the location of every bridge everywhere if you know what I mean If you ride a motorcycle but I'll be straight with you here I'm not suggesting you can't be safe on a motorcycle You can Don't be an idiot and I believe in freedom and liberty in Life is worth the risk for people who enjoy motorcycles and that's great But I did have two friends who were not smart and both named mark ironically both lost the same portion of their lower leg in motorcycle accidents and they were just being they would not be in smart And that kind of got in my head in early age and again I'm not trying to suggest that you can't ride a motorcycle safely you can no doubt about it And it's your choice but yeah it's one of that got my head in early age So you know I'm never gonna spin your wheels about

Florida DAN FOX JIM Mark
Pfizer Vaccine Was Just 12% Effective Against Omicron in Kids 5 to 11

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:16 min | 2 months ago

Pfizer Vaccine Was Just 12% Effective Against Omicron in Kids 5 to 11

"Domestically, COVID, what COVID. It's like it's over. Just like that. How about that for timing? Has nothing to do with the State of the Union. I'm sure. Just coincidence. The science all changed, right? All of a sudden, the science changed. And suddenly you don't see anybody with masks anymore. None of these reporters on TV are wearing masks. What happened to the reporters were in the masks? They just got, I guess, the okay. How about giving that Pfizer vaccine to 5 year olds? What's this you say? A study was released that says it's only 12% effective against omicron? You mean all those parents weren't whack job lunatic, tinfoil hat wearing nuts, after all? Wonder what that feels like to be a mom or a dad of a kindergartner saying, I'm a little concerned about injecting my kid with a vaccine that I don't know enough about. Can we at least see some data? You crazy? Be quiet. Shut up. And now comes a study that shows that the Pfizer vaccine that was heavily touted for 5 to 11 year olds is ineffective against omicron. 12% effective.

Pfizer
Ric Grenell: Left Media Will Never Be Fair

Mark Levin

00:54 sec | 3 months ago

Ric Grenell: Left Media Will Never Be Fair

"The spying on Donald Trump There was so much spying on Donald Trump the Trump campaign even the Trump presidency It's hard to keep it all straight and yet as news buster's points out Most of the big left media the networks didn't even cover it What do you make of all this It really is remarkable Mark I'm in the position where I just think we've got to stop expecting that they're ever going to be fair They're never going to be fair These people are part of the ruling class they are for the ruling party I spent 11 years at the State Department and we would call this out if we saw it happen in another country The reality is is there ignoring facts for partisan purposes and really we've the rest of America has got to stop expecting that they are ever going to change

Donald Trump Mark State Department America
Trevor Noah Made Anti-Semitic Jokes Prior to Hosting 'The Daily Show'

Mark Levin

01:29 min | 3 months ago

Trevor Noah Made Anti-Semitic Jokes Prior to Hosting 'The Daily Show'

"Trevor Noah he's the host of the show calls himself a comedian daily shows on Comedy Central which means it's a comedy show and The Daily Show is in fact ruined comedy Blame Jon Stewart because he took himself so seriously Because he had these people who did you know them were more young people get their news from The Daily Show than from cable news well actually I'd be okay with that because cable news is a cesspool But that went to John Stuart's head and went to all these other comedian centers like oh we're important now We're important now So daily shows Trevor Noah yesterday He attacks Joe Rogan These are jokes that Joe Rogan made 11 years ago They're stupid their offensive nothing I would say That's not the point here The point is this is Trevor Noah going after Rogan for things he said 11 years ago Now let me take you back to 2015 when Trevor Noah was named the new host of The Daily Show Jokes that he made 6 years before in 2009 only 6 years before he got the gig I'm going to tell you some of his jokes Here's Trevor Noah's joke here Almost bumped a Jewish kid crossing the road He didn't look before crossing but I still would have felt so bad in my German car You know because Germans killing Jewish children is funny Some of these jokes I can't say on the air But they're almost all directed at Jewish people

Trevor Noah The Daily Show Joe Rogan Comedy Central Jon Stewart John Stuart The Daily Show Jokes Rogan
Leana Wen: Parents Concerned About Children's Vaccine Are the Unvaccinated Ones

Mark Levin

01:48 min | 5 months ago

Leana Wen: Parents Concerned About Children's Vaccine Are the Unvaccinated Ones

"This woman who is the number one advocate for taking away kids rights in the womb killing babies She's former woman at the Planned Parenthood leader Says that parents concerned about COVID vaccine for kids with the same individuals who have not gotten the vaccine themselves Listen to this conversation where they are advocating for you as parents if you're unvaccinated then you really shouldn't be listened to and you really shouldn't have any rights over your kids It went always good to have you here and your insight So we look at those numbers I'm curious we have such excellent data and even what we heard coming out of that independent advisory board on Tuesday of last week as to why they recommended The FDA should authorize this vaccine for 5 to 11 year olds It's highly effective What do you think could move the needle for some of these parents Well I think the 30% of parents who are the hard to know I'm not sure that we can move them so easily because very likely they are the same individuals who have not gotten the vaccine themselves and it's unlikely that they're going to then get their kids vaccinated However this weighted C group I'm really optimistic about I think that many of these parents just want to know They want a bit more experience with the vaccines And I actually think that that's okay I mean all this parents want what's best for our children There are some parents who are extremely eager to get their kids vaccinated They want to be first in line For a number of reasons Maybe they have children with underlying medical conditions Maybe they're in their kids are in schools without masks Maybe they have other risk factors including maybe they live at home with an immunocompromised family member and they want to protect that family member I think it's okay to let those parents who are so eager to go first And then that middle 33% were in the wait and see category I believe that they will follow

FDA
Doug Reflects on What Matters Most at Christmas Time

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:16 min | 5 months ago

Doug Reflects on What Matters Most at Christmas Time

"Today is gonna be a special edition of the Doug Collins podcast and we're just gonna take back. We're not gonna have a guest today. I don't have we're not gonna talk politics. We're not gonna talk. The different things we're gonna talk about really for just a little while. About this Christmas season about the season that we're in right now the holiday season and there's many things going on and people are rushing back and forth. But I just wanted to take a minute from my perspective and that would be a Christmas Christian base Christmas perspective. That gives us an opportunity to reflect on what really, really matters. And some things for those of you who know, I was actually pastored for over 11 years at a little church called chickpea Babbage church and gangs with Georgia just outside of gainsborough in gangs when awkward. And every year, and I've shared this before. I am not the Christmas person as I have grown older. In other words, my wife, she decorates everything. My wife has the house completely decorated. It's beautiful. She does all of it or sale. This year being retired, she's had more time than ever in our House literally looks like a winter Wonderland. I love to say that her eyes glisten because she just gets so excited about Christmas. I'm excited about Christmas in the sense of a light Christmas, but also am sort of a melancholy Christmas person. I like the significance of meaning, but for me, it's always been sort of toward the end of the year when I was passing. Christmas and in new years, you were coming to the end of a year and I liked the little things. The little things began to be the thing that drove me. The quiet moments, the silent knives, playing, I don't know about you, maybe for you. It's when you play silent not very slowly on a piano. It is amazing to me. You take songs and just the breadth and depth of Christmas for me was in those moments of reflection. Those moments of looking at what Christmas means and if you look at it from our Christian perspective, it means that Jesus was born. We celebrate the birth of Christ. That God loved us so much that he gave himself on Christmas. And I think that's an amazing

Chickpea Babbage Church Doug Collins Gainsborough Georgia Jesus
"11 years" Discussed on The Breakdown with NLW

The Breakdown with NLW

05:01 min | 5 months ago

"11 years" Discussed on The Breakdown with NLW

"But in a more specific sense, there are some historical parallels to that moment. Last week, the U.S. won an extradition appeal in the UK high court around Julian Assange. The founder of WikiLeaks. There are still more resources for appeal at Assange's disposal, but it's still a big step for the U.S.. There is a lot of contentiousness around what WikiLeaks and bitcoins shared legacy is. Is WikiLeaks a project that almost killed Bitcoin by bringing government heat too early. Or is it a project that showed the importance of permissionless value transfer? Could it possibly be both? Bitcoin core contributor Josie writes, this is terrible news. Whether or not you agree with everything Julian Assange and WikiLeaks have done in the past that should concern you. WikiLeaks is a part of the story of why we need Bitcoin. There's another piece of this as well, which of course goes back to the theories around satoshi's disappearance that had to do with the notion of heat coming from a legal perspective. Last week, Bitcoin lost three core developers. John newbury announced that he was not only leaving Bitcoin core, but also leaving brink, a nonprofit he set up to fund Bitcoin development. He gave no reason just said he was moving on. Samuel Dobson announced he was stepping down as he approached the end of his PhD in Jonah schnell, departed citing stress of legal risks. On top of that Luke dash junior made an appeal for funding, although he didn't go so far as to actually leave the project. And these guys think that the timing is just sort of a coincidence. Dobson writes there are a lot of regular contributors and people are always coming and going. I guess it's just a season for some change. John newbury wrote, I'm overwhelmed by the messages of support and kindness. I'll reply to you all individually, but it'll take me a while. In the meantime, this has nothing to do with mesh colliders departure. This has nothing to do with Craig Wright, scammers, comment or lawsuits. This has nothing to do with funding. I'm more excited about Bitcoin and Bitcoin development than ever. Thank you so much to everyone who has supported me over the last 5 years..

WikiLeaks UK high court Julian Assange John newbury U.S. Assange Samuel Dobson Jonah schnell Josie Luke dash satoshi Bitcoin Dobson Craig Wright
"11 years" Discussed on The Breakdown with NLW

The Breakdown with NLW

04:59 min | 5 months ago

"11 years" Discussed on The Breakdown with NLW

"One of the big culminations of this whole process was not in fact technical, but political. WikiLeaks had started to become a force in media and the full saga was underway in 2010. In April of that year, the so called collateral murder video, which showed journalists being killed by U.S. forces, had been released. On top of that throughout the year, there were tons of Iraq War related leaks and then finally there was the mass release of 251,287 U.S. diplomatic cables that began on November 28th. Very quickly thereafter, WikiLeaks was blocked from payment networks, including PayPal Visa, Mastercard, in order to choke off their source of funding, which was of course donations. That was the context in which a number of people on the forum started to discuss the idea of Bitcoin being a tool for WikiLeaks to continue. It was brought up by folks like a mere taki and soon became a big discussion and it got all the way to the leadership of WikiLeaks. Now at that time, WikiLeaks actually decided to decline to accept Bitcoin, but PC world discovered the conversations and published an article called could the WikiLeaks scandal lead to a new virtual currency. This was in fact one of the first mainstream publications talking about Bitcoin. And while it did a lot to discuss what Bitcoin was and how it was mined and why people ascribed it with value, satoshi themselves was none too pleased. They wrote, it would have been nice to get this attention in any other context. WikiLeaks has kicked the hornets nest and the swarm is headed towards us. On the official threat about this on the forums, there was tons of debate. One username Joe wrote, why are we scared of association with WikiLeaks? I hate WikiLeaks in its founder, but the currency is designed to persist in the face of institutional attempts to get rid of it. And WikiLeaks is in the news. So I hope they do use it. They are a perfect candidate of an organization that should use Bitcoin. If your business is legal, you're using PayPal and accepting credit cards..

WikiLeaks Bitcoin U.S. Mastercard PayPal Iraq PC world satoshi hornets Joe
"11 years" Discussed on The Breakdown with NLW

The Breakdown with NLW

03:14 min | 5 months ago

"11 years" Discussed on The Breakdown with NLW

"What's going on guys, it is Monday, December 13th, and today is a fascinating day. 11 years ago today, Satoshi Nakamoto posted for the last time on the Bitcoin talk forum. In December of 2010, Bitcoin was in a very, very different place than it is today. Indeed very few of the people hanging out there on that Bitcoin talk forum, even in their wildest imagination would have thought that Bitcoin would have gotten as far as it has as fast as it has. The focus then was on normal issues for a two year old project trying to figure out how it was going to continue to grow. A lot of today's episode is influenced by Pete Rizzo's amazing piece in Bitcoin magazine last year at this time looking at this from a ten year perspective. That piece starts they suspected that he was British, that he was Yakuza that he laundered money. They wondered if he was a woman, laid claim just in case and joked about him. They kept contingencies for if he proved crazy. I'd for shifts in his sleep, debated why he spoke and didn't speak and sent him eager patches signed with pretty please. To be sure, by the waning days of 2010, Satoshi Nakamoto was still acknowledged for inventing Bitcoin and was respected for growing the world's first decentralized digital currency into a $1 million market, but his frustrations with his authority and his availability built, it became all too common for users to decry satoshi the admin, satoshi the bottleneck, satoshi the dictator. If it can be said a quiet clamor against Bitcoin's creator had been simmering since summer. It soon became something of an outcry. As demands escalated satoshi sightings even assumed the role of sport, with user speculating when and why he might appear on the forums. Hell of a beginning, right? I'll make sure to link the piece in the show notes today. And so as you can see, one of the important things that was happening at this time is that users were sort of questioning satoshi as a leader, but not just satoshi as a leader, any leader as leader. They were starting to really dig into the idea of Bitcoin as a network that was different than some traditional organization. On those same Bitcoin talk forums shadow of harboring a rote, there is no single mastermind in open-source. It's more of a brain where a single human is just to sell. If one day satoshi says, okay guys, I was just a joke with this Bitcoin thing. I'm closing down the project, we would simply fork the code. Given andreessen one of the most important early developers of the project said something similar, writing, if satoshi goes rogue, then the project forks. Another important thing at this time was that Bitcoin was bolstering its defenses against attack. On August 15th of 2010, a 184 billion bitcoins appeared on the blockchain. Everyone scrambled to fix the issue, but it was satoshi who ended up writing and pushing the patch. In many ways, this actually reinforced people's worry that the network was a little too reliant on satoshi. As the fall came, it saw more and more questions coming into being around numerous parts of the Bitcoin system, including fees, block size, even the number 21 million of bitcoins. With all this fantastic and fascinating amount of technical debate, Rizzo really presents it as all part of the same overall story, which is the community of.

satoshi Satoshi Nakamoto Bitcoin Pete Rizzo Bitcoin magazine andreessen Rizzo
Waukesha Suspect Darrell Brooks Shared Pro-Hitler and Violent Anti-White Posts

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:38 min | 6 months ago

Waukesha Suspect Darrell Brooks Shared Pro-Hitler and Violent Anti-White Posts

"We have to close the loop on the walka Shaw story. Isn't it a tragic set of circumstances where we're only allowed to talk about or care about a tragedy if the color of the skin of the attacker is something that the regime actually wants? So the attacker and walker Shaw, who has now killed 6 people a young boy died last evening. So it's went from 5 to 6. Ran over 40 more people. A black terrorist by the name of Darryl Brooks he is a pro Hitler anti semitic black supremacist terrorist. It's been wiped clean from the activist media. You've got a CNN dot com. No mention at all whatsoever. Nope. Nothing. Instead, if you, if you looked at any of the headlines that happened, they're not even saying that this is a terrorist attack. No, they just call it a car crash. They say what happened in Waukesha Wisconsin was just the car crash. It was like someone that got off on the wrong exit. Play cut 56. Bank worker. We were also hearing from the uncle of one of the 18 children hurt in the crash on Sunday. David begnaud reports on how one 11 year old girl is doing. The crash on Sunday. This was an attentional attack. But because it was a black assailant who's a child sex trafficker and pedophile, it doesn't fit the

Walka Shaw Walker Shaw Darryl Brooks CNN Waukesha David Begnaud Wisconsin
San Francisco Will Require Children to Show Proof of Vaccine

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:42 min | 6 months ago

San Francisco Will Require Children to Show Proof of Vaccine

"San Francisco is going to manned a 5 to 11 year olds have the vaccine to participate in society one Twitter user wrote Thursday morning, in response to the mandate announced Tuesday. Our parents are going to have to carry birth certificates with them, to restaurants and grocery stores to prove their four year olds are ineligible. According to the latest data this is from daily mail, which has both left wing and non left wing articles. They have so many writers that that's what it is with me. They're the left wing writers write about me in the daily mail. According to the latest data from the CDC fewer than 700 Americans under the age of 18 have died from the virus. Since recording began in April 2020. Only 206 of them being under the age of 5. It's not a lot. And I'm not even sure I'd like to know about the 700 under 18. I would really like to know, did they die of COVID or with COVID? By the way, I'd like to know that about all the numbers the 750,000 did they die? With COVID, which or of COVID? It's a very different thing, right? Very different. The COVID kill them or did something else kill them and they also had COVID, and the answer is the latter. We know that. Because, first of all, the medical profession has been corrupted. I will have for you on Monday. I will have read an 8000 word. That's a lot of words for a piece. At real clear investigations about what's happened to the medical

San Francisco Covid Twitter CDC
So Bill De Blasio Is Offering Clown Services Now?

The Dan Bongino Show

01:50 min | 6 months ago

So Bill De Blasio Is Offering Clown Services Now?

"Hawk newsome has been going out with Eric Adams who is going to be taking over for mayor the ball Zio in New York The ball zo is an idiot I'm really sorry Some people are like it's just true The ball is a communist and communism is for more of us So he wants to start instituting as he implied the other day A vaccine passport for 5 to 11 year olds So people don't want more of the ball He couldn't run He was term limit again But Eric Adams would be coming in So jib was looking around He was doing some homework for this segment I asked him and he was he had put in a search engine the balls he and stunningly the balls he was offering like clown services amazing I did not know this in addition to being a he's apparently a capitalist selling clown services for kids parties I did not know this about the ball zo But Jim found this the other day online This is just crazy I don't know if I would book this but I'll put it out there We'll give him a free promo Check this out Hey kids today we have a really special guest It's da the clown Hey kids Good to see you My name's daval zo You know what we're gonna do for fun today We're gonna stick a needle in your arm with an experimental vaccine We've got one for everyone Wow I don't know if I booked that clown The balls you know I mean for a communist these certainly at the capitalism selling his clouts It's a joke It's a Tom kercher The fact checker had politis It's a joke It's a joke Is that subject to a fact check There's fact checked and budget There is in fact no de ballsy or the clown Injecting kids at child's brother It's a joke

Eric Adams Hawk Newsome New York JIM Tom Kercher
NYC's De Blasio Says He Wants Children Ages 5-11 to Show Proof of Vaccination

The Dan Bongino Show

01:42 min | 6 months ago

NYC's De Blasio Says He Wants Children Ages 5-11 to Show Proof of Vaccination

"So Bill de Blasio the governor of New York the bosio happens to be a communist The bosio's leaving office rather soon He's got a new mayor elect coming in Eric Adams So the ball Zio's figure to himself well listen I've already disgraced myself over 8 years in office driven New York City into the ground made this once shining Mecca of economics and tourism into a hellhole in downtown Manhattan and other areas where places crime is running rampant and he's turned around all of the developments of the Giuliani era So before he leaves office he wants to make sure to stick it to you in the general public one last time Queue up for me come on Jim this is mayor Bill de Blasio saying that he's thinking about requesting proof of vaccination for your 5 and 11 year old To basically do anything going to store to feed themselves go into store to get clothes any of that stuff You want to bring your kids with you May have to stick them with the jab Here's the Blasio At what point will you ask them to also start checking for vax cards for 5 to 11 year olds That's a very good question And honestly one we need to focus on now We wanted to get to the day where we actually could vaccinate the youngest New Yorkers and get that rolling 5 to 11 year olds so just to be clear a virus with a survival rate of 5 to 11 year olds over 99% The ball Zio thinks it's a good idea to demand that the parents vaccinate their kids under emergency use authorization Do you think that's a good idea Bill de Blasio and epidemiologist virologist spike protein expert what is Bill de Blasio The answer is he's a communist who's never had a real job in

Bosio Bill De Blasio Eric Adams Mecca Giuliani New York City Manhattan New York JIM
"11 years" Discussed on What's the Secret?

What's the Secret?

07:12 min | 8 months ago

"11 years" Discussed on What's the Secret?

"The secret podcast. i'm excited. You're listening on this episode. We'll talk to you about a conversation. I had with my eleven year old daughter the other day. So she's really big into tech talk like most young kids right and she. I found out the other day has fourteen thousand followers on tick-tock fourteen thousand followers on tick-tock. So i asked her how. How did you get fourteen thousand followers on tick-tock like what do you do. And she said well. Since i started my channel what i've done is i've posted these little videos and then i go back and i look at the comments and i see what people say in the comments about what they think of the videos. I ask them what they want to see. And then just make my next videos based on what they say they want to see. And that's how i've grown my followers to fourteen thousand. I about fell out of my chair. I mean that is such an insightful realization. And it's a realization. That took me a long time to come to write like when i was trying to figure how to start an online business and what i was going to do like i spent a lot of time thinking about. Well what can i. What can i teach people right. It wasn't until i started asking people what they wanted to learn or what they wanted to buy or what they were interested in. That things really shifted for me right. It wasn't about what i wanted to bring to the market. It was about what the market wanted itself. So how do you figure that out. Well there's a couple of the strategies that you can use one is if you're a customer in the market that you're starting a business ed. Just pay attention to what everyone is buying right. Look at what everyone is selling. This is part of your market research rate. You look around you see what are other people doing out there. What seems to be resonating. What are the big hot sellers right as you build your audience as you start to grow your community than you ask them. Hey what's your number one. You've probably seen this email allowed her. This question from people selling things a lot like what's the number one thing you struggle with right knowing that helps you know what to put together what to show them what to bring to them. What kind of products to create right so you can ask your community your audience. You can do that the survey or if you have a facebook group inside your facebook group. This episode of. What's the secret. Podcast is sponsored by offline sharks offline sharks where website designers social media experts. Seo professionals can get custom software tools and training on how to quickly scale and grow their digital agencies. If you're looking to build reoccurring revenue into your agency and go from one to two clients to six figures. And beyond off-line sharks is the place to do it. So head over to offline sharks dot com forward slash. Tom and start growing your agency today but the big key here is to stop trying to create things in a vacuum right. That's not how this works like the things that are successful or the things that the market wants and there's another way i guess another way you could look at. This is if i. If i decided i wanted to make a course on how to train a dog right. That's a a popular example and internet marketing. I could build the course that i want and then i could go out and try to sell it to people but that would really be an uphill battle now if i sound some people that had dogs that they weren't trained right. Maybe some friends. I asked you some random people. I come in contact with. Maybe go to a dog. Park talked to some of the people in there. And i say hey you know what would be the biggest thing you would want your dog to learn that. He doesn't know now. If i just did that kind of research and then i built a course around that my chances of success are much much greater because now i'm bringing something to the market that the market wants right. I'm not trying to put my thing on the market. And that's all that matters. So you know. In other episodes of this podcast. I've talked about how we create products. Like how we look for the pain points that really that approach of looking for the pain points of what someone's struggling with of what they need help with of what they really want and then building of course around. That is exactly what. I'm talking about here right. It is the idea that it doesn't matter what i want to create. The only thing that matters is what people are looking to buy and the more i can create things that people want to buy the less selling. I have to do right. We want our person to be walking along the street and come across our product course. Whatever it is and go. Oh my god. This is exactly what i've been looking for. How much is this. i'll take it. We don't want to have to stop them on the street by screaming at them or saying their name and then trying to convince them. That what we have is good and like. That's not what we want to do. That is a very hard way to do it. The easy way is to just put something together that they already want them when they walked by. They sell themselves. You don't have to do the selling so you know that conversation. I had with my. I can't believe she came to that realization at eleven. Because you know i think. Come to that realization for a very very long time and sometimes still. Today i forget but it is a critical lesson and a critical thing that you need to put in place if you want to have a successful business online or offline look. I hope you enjoyed this episode of. What's the secret podcast if you did. I'd appreciate it if you go. Wherever you listen to this podcast and leave me a review love to see those also if you have questions or you want to get in touch with me you can head over to tom dot com. There's a contact me form. They're just shoot me a message. I love to hear from people that listen to the podcast and also while you're there check out the blog. I post new content there every thursday. And also i have a free guide. There called the milk at method how to turn any product ideas skill into a huge cash. Cow there's nothing to buy from. That iguide is just something. I've put together to share the strategy that i'd used to build a couple of successful businesses and still use today. So make sure your grandma. I know you get a lot of value out of it as well and i will see you next week here on. What's the secret podcast once again. Thank you so much carving out the time to hear what was shared on. Today's podcast if you found it helpful please share it with someone else. Just simply share the link or posted on facebook and say. Check this out really make my day if he did that. Also make sure you subscribe if you haven't already so every podcast gets since straight to you and you don't have to go searching for it again. My name's tom gaddis. And i'll see you next week on. What's the secret. podcast aloha for now everyone..

facebook Tom Park tom gaddis
"11 years" Discussed on The Story Collider

The Story Collider

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"11 years" Discussed on The Story Collider

"That. To the <Speech_Music_Male> freighter <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> seriously. <Speech_Music_Male> What the fuck <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> ending to. <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I'm sitting there. <Speech_Male> The green triangles are yelling <Speech_Male> at me. Saying you <Speech_Male> have to be part of the team. <Speech_Male> Everyone else is saying you have <Speech_Male> to do the thing. That's fairly <Speech_Male> green tranquil. Saying this <Speech_Male> you have to be on our side. <Speech_Male> I say yes. You're right. I have <Speech_Male> to side with the team. <Speech_Male> We passed the rule. The guy <Speech_Male> gets one hundred points. <Speech_Male> Everyone else in the room starts <Speech_Male> going nuts. They start <Speech_Male> running at us. It looks like <Speech_Male> they're gonna throw things. Mr swanson <Speech_Male> steps <Speech_Male> in and the <Speech_Male> game etc <Speech_Male> etc. Exactly <Silence> the same <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> now. <Speech_Male> Here's the thing <SpeakerChange> about that story. <Silence> <Speech_Male> I have <Speech_Male> told it <Silence> so many times. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> have told <SpeakerChange> it to <Speech_Male> people to <Speech_Male> tell them. What a great person <Speech_Male> i am. I <Speech_Male> have told it to people <Speech_Male> to tell them what a horrible <Speech_Male> person i am. <Speech_Male> I have told it to myself <Speech_Male> in both ways. <Speech_Male> I have told <Speech_Male> it with all kinds of meetings. <Speech_Male> I have no idea. <Speech_Male> No <Speech_Male> idea <Speech_Male> which of these is <Speech_Male> correct. <Speech_Male> Absolutely <Speech_Male> none whatsoever <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Silence> <Speech_Male> was <Speech_Male> right about one thing <Silence> though. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> I thought <Speech_Male> in that moment <Speech_Male> that this was important <Speech_Male> that this <Silence> moment <Speech_Male> with define <Speech_Male> who was <Speech_Male> person <Speech_Male> and i was correct. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> But i didn't know <Speech_Male> is that i would become <Speech_Male> a person who is obsessed <Speech_Male> with <Speech_Male> uncertainty <Speech_Male> and ambiguity <Speech_Male> and nuance <Speech_Male> and how it <Speech_Male> exists in the world. <Speech_Male> And when <Speech_Male> i finally realized <Speech_Male> mr <Speech_Male> swanson was teaching <Speech_Male> us <Speech_Male> was that. <Speech_Male> Absolute <Silence> power <Speech_Male> corrupts <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> not because of evil <Speech_Male> in the world are inherent <Speech_Male> madness <Speech_Male> but because we <Speech_Male> all tell ourselves <Speech_Male> that we are the heroes <Speech_Male> of the story. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> We don't know if <Silence> that's true. <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> that was ben <Speech_Female> lilly. Physicists <Speech_Female> story <Speech_Female> glider co <SpeakerChange> founder <Speech_Male> owner and operator <Speech_Male> of caveat. <Speech_Male> Yeah this has <Speech_Male> been great. It is <Speech_Male> it is. It's <Speech_Male> the same as we opening <Speech_Male> the space. It's like <Speech_Male> living old memories. It's <Silence> the same <SpeakerChange> but different <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> historic later is <Speech_Female> so great <Speech_Female> sarah and bandra <Speech_Female> sharing their stories. <Speech_Female> We're obviously grateful <Speech_Female> to ben verse so <Silence> much beyond that <Speech_Female> historic <Speech_Female> later <SpeakerChange> is also <Speech_Female> very grateful <Speech_Female> for the support of science <Speech_Female> sandbox <Speech_Female> assignments <Speech_Female> foundation initiative <Speech_Female> dedicated to engaging <Speech_Female> everyone with the process <Silence> of science. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> This podcast <Speech_Female> is produced by me. <Speech_Female> Aaron barker with assistance <Speech_Female> from story clatters <Speech_Female> deputy director <Speech_Female> nisa greenberg <Speech_Female> senior podcast editor. <Silence> John chen <Speech_Female> special. <Speech_Female> Thanks goes out to <Speech_Female> story. Clatters board <Speech_Female> our operations manager <Speech_Female> lindsay cooper <Speech_Female> and our interim executive <Speech_Female> director leslie <Speech_Female> greece shoals <Speech_Female> without whom none of <Silence> this would be possible. <Speech_Female> Our theme <Speech_Female> music is by <Speech_Female> ghost <Speech_Female> and of course a <Speech_Female> huge. Thanks to ben <Speech_Female> lilly for joining <Speech_Female> me on the podcast today. <Speech_Female> Ben <Speech_Female> wanna do one of your <Speech_Female> thank you for <Speech_Male> old time sake <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> a <Speech_Male> big. Thank you to littlefield <Speech_Male> union hall for hosting <Speech_Male> these shows <Speech_Male> two scenes for <Speech_Male> existing and getting us <Speech_Music_Male> all back to normal <Speech_Music_Male> and to copy <SpeakerChange> for <Speech_Music_Female> always having been here. <Speech_Music_Female> Thanks <Speech_Music_Female> for listening everybody. <Music>

John chen lindsay cooper nisa greenberg Aaron barker swanson Clatters today leslie one hundred points two scenes Ben both ways ben
"11 years" Discussed on The Story Collider

The Story Collider

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"11 years" Discussed on The Story Collider

"Hundred was a lot we should give them. One hundred points we aren't we can do that. And it goes around the circle. Everyone's like yes. Yes yes yes. Yes it gets to me and i'm like that. That feels wrong. Like i've been thinking about this thing. Mack said just the whole thing felt wrong to said. I don't think we should do that. And they got kissed. They got angry. They were like what are you talking about. This isn't wrong. We have to protect our team and other kid was like we have to stick together like it doesn't feel fair and we were saying this out loud and we're all in the same classroom the other kids so the rest of the class heard what we were talking about doing and they started getting very pissed off because they should be and they started yelling and they started screaming and they are coming towards us and they're standing up there screaming about fairness and i'm listening to that and then the other green triangles are sitting here and they're talking about how to stick up your team and i'm sitting there going. I don't know what to do. I don't know what to do. And the one thing i knew and i couldn't put it in these words at the time as a as a ten year old but i knew that this was important like this decision was important because he would tell the kind of person that i was right. I the kind of person that's stuck with my team and and did the thing for the team or was the kind of person who did what was right. And what was fair. And what was just or on the flip side was the kind of person who just wielded power for the sake of wielding it because that was intoxicating and i can't come up with a bad thing for the decision because it's clearly the right one but this decision mattered would tell me who i was and i'm sitting there trying to figure out what to do with everyone yelling now over the last couple of years I have spent a lot of time talking to two groups of people. One of them are people who understand stories and narrative and they have taught me a lot of things like for example. If you pause just before revealing crucial bit of information you can get through a lot of exposition..

Mack One two groups One hundred points ten year old last couple of years Hundred one them
"11 years" Discussed on The Story Collider

The Story Collider

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"11 years" Discussed on The Story Collider

"We're we don't have to like do math or read or some of us lights but some people close to anyway. We're just like all right fine so we did that and then we went home and then we came back the next day nine. Am social studies. Ten am social studies. Levin am hold like all right yes. We're going do that again. So we sit down. And he deals out the dak. We'd play a couple hands and he says all right. We're gonna keep doing this. We're gonna keep doing this all day but we're just gonna make We're gonna make one change a couple of changes in fact so the first change is he said all right. Everyone look at the scores on the board and figure out who are the seven highest scoring kids in the class. Like all right all right also figure out who are the seven lowest scoring kids in the class and then he says get into groups. I was on the highest group because obviously brilliant or see. I got good cards. I don't know it's hard to tell So we split into groups and he says all right what you're going to do and he had these plastic conference name tag things where it's like a little plastic thing and you can stick something you've printed out in it. And he goes up to those of us in the highest scoring group and he says here you're gonna wear these and he gave us these little plastic things and each of them had a green triangle and he goes to the middle and he says all right you guys each these and give them an orange square and he goes to the lowest scoring group. Says right you guys get these a purple circle says what you're gonna do. You're going to wear these around school all day while we're playing this game by the way we're playing it all week like okay. So he put on her little name badges and we were green triangles the orange squares and.

each Levin next day nine first change seven highest scoring kids Ten one change seven lowest scoring couple hands changes couple
"11 years" Discussed on The Story Collider

The Story Collider

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"11 years" Discussed on The Story Collider

"Pm. Social studies two pm social studies. Three pm go home and that was the day. And we're all like oh. Something's going to happen now. This is it happened before Our our fifth grade teacher liked to have us do these big classroom things and so the whole year was wild west themed. So they're always wild busting. I grew up in oregon actually a lot of years. We're wild west themed so we would have us do these things like like. In the year we played the oregon trail like the video game but like learning and so we had groups and we had to pick what you're putting in our wagons and try and get across the oregon territory and it was great. Because i have a team and like i wasn't the kid a team like i wore a sweatpants to school every day. I didn't have a team. But for that i had a team. It didn't go well. We got stuck in the mountains. Winter donner party was pretty bad. Actually but you know things like that were great so when we walked in we knew some kind of big activity was going to happen and we walk in and the teacher. Mr swanson goes all right. Here's some cards. And he gave us all five cards and this was wild west theme so on each of these cards was something wild westie like a musket or or a for you know like bad in the west and so we each got dealt five of these cards and he said all right here's to do. This is a trading game. Your objective is to trade to make better value. I don't remember he said value. Better something for yourself and so like we were supposed to trade and we're supposed to get points for the cards in our hand and they had different values like a must was worth five and hard tack was worth to but you could make sense so like a hard tack was worth two but three hard tax was worth eight or something. I don't remember the actual numbers but it was like all right so you need to trade with each other and make sets and get points and this is going to teach us something and so like all right. There's just a few more rules. Explained the whole rules of the game and then sets out to trade with each other and we had like ten minutes to trade and make sense and and get points all right now. Some of the rules were kind of weird. There was a whole bunch of them at three of them were particularly ought The first role was that if you were trading with somebody you had to. You couldn't show them your hand. You had to tell them what you wanted. You had to tell them what you had to offer. And they had to do the same. You couldn't just like look at each other's hands and decide what to trade and like you can sort of like a fifth grader. I couldn't have told you this. You can sort of see how that makes sense like maybe you know learning the value of communication or like asymmetric information in interaction. Economists might say something like that and the second weird role was that if you started trading with someone you had to trade. You couldn't walk away from the trade and you couldn't trade the exact same thing you had to make an actual substantive trade and the economist. I've talked to about that. Tell me that.

Three pm two pm swanson five two five cards eight three ten minutes each oregon first role fifth grade five of these cards each of these cards second weird role fifth grader Winter donner party three hard tax few more rules
"11 years" Discussed on The Story Collider

The Story Collider

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"11 years" Discussed on The Story Collider

"Awesome will have here in the new york city area and your vaccinated head down to caveat story. Quieter is brought to you. In part by masterclass with masterclass you can learn from the world's best minds anytime anywhere and at your own pace you can learn about writing. Fantasy and sci fi from n. k. Jemison learn how to draw from your emotional memory and personal experiences to write fiction from amy tan or even about the science of sleep with neuroscientist matthew walker with over one hundred classes from a range of world class. Instructors that thing you've always wanted to do is closer than you think. When i first heard about masterclass. I was skeptical about how much you could learn from recorded classes whether the celebrity instructors were gimmicks. But i've found that knowledge and wisdom is packed into these classes. I've watch so much television. Over the course of this past year it's kind of unreal and it feels really good to watch something that i can learn from and not just learned from but learn skills and concepts that eter relevant my life and my career lake rating for social change with roxane gay for example which i highly recommend roxie and brings you inside her writing process and the questions that she asked herself when she begins a piece which i found so helpful..

"11 years" Discussed on The Story Collider

The Story Collider

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"11 years" Discussed on The Story Collider

"That was sarah schlesinger sharing a one of a kind story that was reported in twenty fourteen in little field in new york city. So what is it about sarah's story. That was so impactful for you i mean. It's just the almost shakespearean way it played out You know with the using his own research to to attempt to treat his cancer. I also love that. It's she didn't like she's very good scientists and so she gets to be the bit at the end. She's like he always thought it helped. Treat us cancer. But i don't know we didn't actually do a real like you know that. That moment of like she generally doesn't know if it helped or not and i really liked that keeping that in there. And then i think what elevates in really makes it stick in in my head the coda. i don't call it a code. But the bid with the nobel prize is just like that. Extra bit is just like Even more yeah You know i was love stories that build and build. And just me think you've hit the the end of this whole thing coming for those who don't know. Ben stepped back from daily operations story. Quite a few years ago. When he opened caveats a premier venue here in new york city that is hosted story collider and many other shows like story collider that blend comedy or drama with science or history and in fact caveat hosted did last night's first annual story glider proton from this past. Year has obviously been a difficult time to be running in new york city. Venue or a venue anywhere for that matter. But i'm so excited. That caveat is made it through and is reopening. What does that process been like. It's been fun and rainbows. I know it's been awful. I remember when you hear this. We will probably know the answer to this question. We'll definitely know the answer to this question but right now. I don't know if we're getting a big grant from the government to help us keep going. So we're either opening on a razor thin budget for reopening with room to spare so we'll find that out But more than that. It actually has been really good aside from the stress of not knowing a lot of financial future just because it does. It's like oh like we'll life again So there's an insane amount hard work they were doing like we had to replace part of the floor because it got damage during the shutdown and some water. It's not a big deal but like we had to do it. We're upgrading our h. Back of course for covid safety. And it's all these like work stuff they were doing cleaning out the fridges blah blah blah And then reconnecting with all their shows and all the performers that we hadn't seen before and so you know over the last couple of weeks finally put tickets up for sale. Just super exciting So it it feels a bit like getting back to normal and then of course. Everything has changed as well so A lot of comedy theaters particularly in province. Sketch comedy theaters in the city. Had to close were over covid and so a lot of those performance formed a new company. And you're giving them a home here which is very exciting There's changes coming in as well But yeah it's i honestly it's making happy because we're doing. We're doing the thing we wanna do again instead of staying home and watching tv. I know just the process of planning this proton prime show which was a hybrid so excited just to be on a stage and adjusting. Microphone again so i totally get it and my understanding..

sarah schlesinger new york Ben twenty fourteen last night sarah first annual few years ago last couple of weeks nobel proton prime shakespearean
"11 years" Discussed on The Story Collider

The Story Collider

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"11 years" Discussed on The Story Collider

"It can only be awarded to a living scientist so the nobel committee like everybody else in the world except the three of us assumed he was still alive. So i said alexis. I don't know what to do. I'll call the university. And we'll find out so i called the people at the university where they got in touch with the president and then it got taken out of my hands blessedly and there was a bit of a controversy for that morning as to whether he would be able to keep the prize and the nobel committee convened. And i've subsequently learned from from the people on the committee. They consulted with their lawyers and they decided that it had been given in good faith assuming he was alive and the rules allow it to be awarded to a live person. Even if they don't live to see the the ceremonies which are in december so they use that construct to allow him to keep the prize. So we'll never know. If ralph's the dendritic cells at ralph received prolonged life. Clearly he lived way beyond what one would have expected. Even under the best of circumstances he believed fervently that they did. I'm not sure whether they did or not. And i'll probably never be sure. But his technology dendritic cells have been approved for treatment for prostate cancer. Which you can see advertised on television. If you watch golf for the six o'clock news really you can. And i sometimes see it and i get so excited. So they have moved forward from the lab to a clinical treatment for for prostate cancer and our vaccine trial that we started back in thinking of in two thousand and one is now fully enrolled and we have the results forty. Five people received the vaccine. That was an idea. An ralph's had and they've made good responses to hiv strong protective responses. It's just the first phase of trial so we won't know if they're protected but that would have been what he would have wanted more than anything. So though ralph never saw that. And he didn't even ever know. He won the nobel prize. I had the great pleasure of watching his war. Beautiful wife claudia. Accept the prize on his behalf in stockholm in two thousand december of two thousand eleven. And more than anything. Ralph was right thank you..

Ralph claudia december stockholm Five people three two thousand forty first phase six o'clock one nobel prize ralph two thousand eleven nobel alexis
"11 years" Discussed on The Story Collider

The Story Collider

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"11 years" Discussed on The Story Collider

"Ralph's riddick. Cells that he had discovered and one that targeted his dendritic cells and ralph lived four and a half years. He saw daughter married. He saw two grandchildren born and he was awarded the lasker award which is sometimes known as the american nobel but anybody who has a nobel prize. We'll tell you. There is no equivalent to the nobel and so for four and a half years after his diagnosis. He started to get sicker and sicker. And all of those all of us. Who had thought that maybe ralph was right and maybe this is really going to work. Were profoundly disappointed. And over the summer of two thousand eleven he got weaker and weaker and he started to make arrangements for what would happen to the lab. And what would happen to the rest of us. When he was no longer with us in that in the end of september it was just too much for him he had fought valiantly and he decided that there was no winning and in his own inimitable way he became impatient for the whole thing to be over and so he retired with his family and was surrounded by his loving family. He passed away peacefully at the end of september. Now he died on a friday morning and dom sorry. He died friday night to saturday morning. I got a call from his daughter on saturday morning. Saying you know. His father had passed away peacefully with his family. And asking me not to tell anybody. They told me in one or two other people but they want it to be private just for that weekend the community in which we work because we work so hard in so many hours all of our colleagues are or many of our colleagues are close friends not all of our colleagues but they're close friends amongst our colleagues and such tell one person would alert the community and they just wanted to be by themselves they had been through hell and not back so i said we'll come i come and see you and they said please just let us be said can i send food and they said yeah that you can do so i sent food and i spent good part of the weekend planning with my closest colleagues have we were going to tell the lab and how we were going to break the news to the various people we had to tell and then what we would do and i was dreading going to work monday and telling everybody didn't sleep well sunday night and about five forty five in the morning on that monday morning my cell phone rang and i had gotten in the habit of leaving it on and by my bed in case they needed me for something i never knew what my phone rang. It was ralph's daughter. And i picked up the phone and i was in that sort of like half sleep where you sleep awake or dreaming is this real. And i still hadn't process that he'd passed away so pick up the phone. I hear her voice and she said dad one. I'm like honey. Veneer dead die and she said yeah. Yeah yeah he died but he won. The nobel committee is calling us in emailing us. And we don't know what to do now. You have to remember. In addition to being the the prize. There's a strict rule that the nobel prize cannot be awarded posthumously..

friday night friday morning saturday morning four and a half years sunday night monday Ralph two two grandchildren two thousand ralph one person about five forty five in the m end of september that monday morning one eleven american lasker award hours
"11 years" Discussed on The Story Collider

The Story Collider

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"11 years" Discussed on The Story Collider

"When it was removed at the time of surgery how it needed to be divided up to maximize the various opportunities that existed. So i had a notebook. And i had a list and colleagues who are more expert in other more scientific matterson. I we go into this meeting. And i would take notes and i would be keeping my list and so when it got close to the operation. I was sent. Everybody else had left. I assembled my pile of papers and kind of clumsy. And i was nervous as it was and i said to her office at you know so i know i know we're gonna. We're gonna do this so we're going to do this. I said who's actually going to treat you. Who's going to administer the vaccine you and he looked at me and he said i'd like you to do it and i was overwhelmed because i i. I was honored that he wanted me to do it. And then i was a little sick at the thought but he said to me look. You don't have to do it if you don't want to think about it overnight and i said no no i wanna do it at this point. I didn't really think it was going to make any difference. But i knew that he thought it was going to make a difference and so i wanted to give my teacher the comfort of knowing that he had done everything that he could and i wanted to give myself that same comfort so i did think about it overnight and came back and i said of course i'll do it. I reminded him that. I wasn't you know that i didn't wasn't an oncologist. And he said of course. He knew that he was always irritated at me. When i pointed out the obvious and he reminded me that he trusted me and frankly he knew that i would do what he said that i would follow his scientific direction and not try to substitute my own..

"11 years" Discussed on The Story Collider

The Story Collider

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"11 years" Discussed on The Story Collider

"When they tell you what to do you do it. And i continued to this this very fruitful collaboration and friendship with him in two thousand and one i went through a very messy divorce and i had four boys ranged in age from seven to fourteen and all i wanted to do was move back to new york both to my home my family was in brooklyn and also to my home lab back to work with ralph and timing was really again very fortunate for me because ralph's discoveries had reached the point where it was it was beginning to be thought that they could be moved from the laboratory into the clinic and they could be used for several things including vaccines and cancer immunotherapy. Because remember these are the cells that make the immune system either get activated or get quiet down and so ralph wanted to start to do this kind of work and i had learned the skills necessary to do it so i came back to help him do this. We got a big gap big grant from the gates foundation in started on working on working on the first vaccine for to prevent hiv. The directly targets dendritic cells. And so this was my project and it was an amazing time and everything was going along swimmingly. We had money things. Were going well in the lab. Ralph went to a meeting in colorado and he came back and he was yellow.

new york Ralph brooklyn colorado seven ralph four boys fourteen two thousand both one first vaccine hiv
"11 years" Discussed on The Story Collider

The Story Collider

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"11 years" Discussed on The Story Collider

"Class. Scientists many of hor nobel laureates for high school students. And i had the great privilege of hearing dr christian to do just been awarded the nobel prize for discovering the micro anatomy of the cell and this was the hottest science going and he took a room full of high school students on what he called a tour of the inside of the cell for two days and i was completely amazed and i had always had thought before that that i wanted to be a scientist but this completely nailed it for me but i was sixteen and i was expected to get a summer job and i thought well this would be really cool place to get a summer job so i came home. I told my parents. My parents sort of nicely nodded in. They said fine. Knock yourself out. Got a summer job there and i guess so. This would have been the day after. Christmas was the lecture and my mother went to a new year's party and just by a series of coincidences. She was talking to a friend of hers. Who said this friend had a friend whose husband was a scientist and just by coincidence he worked at the rockefeller university swim other. came home. Told me this sort of odd coincidence here. We'd never heard of this place in a week's time we'd heard of it twice so i said can you get me his phone number so i can call him and see if he'll hire me for the summer and i don't think ever again in my life would have had the nerve to just pick up the phone and call some stranger and ask them to hire me but i was committed to getting a summer job there and this seemed like my best opportunity so i called ralph steinman who had never met before nor had i ever heard of extremely nice to me. Talk to me a couple times on the phone between january and valentine's day said if you don't hear from me by valentine's day call me back. And he..

ralph steinman two days sixteen Christmas twice january nobel rockefeller university dr christian valentine's day couple times
"11 years" Discussed on The Story Collider

The Story Collider

05:06 min | 1 year ago

"11 years" Discussed on The Story Collider

"Mean after this last year. I just assumed it had been twenty but i'll take eleven Natural i have no sense of time anymore but eleven is a lot. I genuinely couldn't remember when we were setting this up. It was eleven or thirteen. I don't know where you knew it was one of those. Two numbers was an odd number. That's how i remember. Things been. And i just got done celebrating. Eleven years of story collider yesterday's first annual proton prom fundraiser. Thanks so much to everyone who attended especially to everyone who donated so generously when you think back over the past eleven years ago. What are some of the stories that stand out in your mind Well okay yeah. That's a story But there's i know there's been so many. I think when i was thinking about this the thing that stands out that i always loved was the range. So you've got very very funny stories and then very intense and heartfelt stories and sometimes they're the same story but I do love that that like wide range of of emotion That goes along with it and so I was thinking about like on the funny side. Just the ones that. I find myself telling people about over and over again There's a bunch. But i always come back to the one. That sods are wanna dead where he is a. I don't know how to talk about this without ruining and if you haven't heard the story it basically he's a pakistani man Grew up in the us. But i and he was a nerd physicist and early two thousands. He had gotten himself. Gps card which is a big deal then so he went outside to try to set it up because you know early technology and i guess it was laundry day so he was wearing on london. It tends to wear more traditional pakistani garb and it turns out. He was across the street from a synagogue. So here's a muslim man waving a weird piece of technology around probably swearing at it until the next day the fbi. And i won't spoil it for you except to say some of the absolute funniest lines i've heard are in that story. It ends well. Obviously we wouldn't be talking about it this morning with oregon but yeah that is in. It's just an absolute collision of different worlds And saw it as a great comic and a canvas facist actually use that. Yeah yeah sods shared a few stories on our podcast by this point including last week including sharing story at last night's proton prom but that one really sticks in my memory agree. It's so funny. And yet so harrowing..

twenty eleven london last week Two numbers yesterday Eleven years pakistani last night past eleven years ago one this morning last year thirteen next day muslim first annual two thousands proton prom fundraiser
"11 years" Discussed on Tiny House Lifestyle Podcast

Tiny House Lifestyle Podcast

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"11 years" Discussed on Tiny House Lifestyle Podcast

"Time i.