38 Burst results for "100 Years"

Fresh "100 Years" from WBZ Midday News

WBZ Midday News

00:32 sec | 1 hr ago

Fresh "100 Years" from WBZ Midday News

"Island are impacting local business owners there now on a two week pause. We've got information on that We have sports coming up and again. Another check of the forecast was some rain over spreading the area. Some wind advisories and wind warnings for today and thunderstorms as well Trusted for 100 years and once again, the number one radio station in Boston, according to Nielsen, Delanie BZ, Boston's news radio. Have you ever dreamed of starting your own business? Amazon is looking for leaders to build their own package delivery companies and their communities. If.

Boston Delanie Bz Amazon Nielsen
New York Mayor Lays Out Strategy To Reopen Schools

Marketplace

09:35 min | 6 d ago

New York Mayor Lays Out Strategy To Reopen Schools

"Closer. I'm okay. How are you? Oh, it is nice and fullness possible. So we met in the northern end of the Bronx in a big, empty public high school where there were a bunch of custodian sort of jamming open windows to improve ventilation and get fresh air in windows that, in some cases seemed to have not been open for a very long time, And we kind of folded ourselves into these little desks. He's super tall, so he sort of had to squeeze himself in there. We sat 6 ft apart, and I asked him, you know, tell me why This is so important to you What is really needed to use for the CT? Could you ask a simpler first question? Okay. What you have to understand about Bill De Blasio is he came into office, promising to be kind of the education mayor. He has always said that education is His top priority that reducing inequality in the public school system is his sort of biggest task. He also genuinely believed that schools should be of them. They need this. The simplest thing to say to begin is they need this. It's not optional to them. And what he said is he sort of made the case for why in person is so important and why he thought families needed the option of Going back into classroom. I think much more deeply. There is There's so many things happening here so many things right on his decision. And then he also told me Look around us. Look at New York City right now. The city has been here old people say, really have been rolling. We're the envy of the country. He had these incredibly low positivity rates. And he said, if any place conducive to it were the place that can do it. I would much rather be criticized for we try. Even if it didn't work out of the way we hoped then we didn't have the courage to try. So you're not planning to delay this time? I have Very clear plan and I'll always listen to concerns. I watch the healthcare situation. I'll listen to substantive issues and people raised them. But the plan is the plan. Let's make any last questions. We'd you know, non relationship between So now that the mayor has laid out his argument For doing this. How does he actually start to reopen the system? system? So So very very quickly quickly After After the the mayor mayor says says he he wants wants to to get get schools schools open, open, it it becomes becomes clear clear that that this this is is basically basically the the hardest hardest thing thing he's he's ever ever tried tried to to do do as mayor. I mean, the sort of logistics of it are just dizzying. The task start piling up day after day, hour after hour. One of the biggest immediate tasks was that the mayor gave kids and families a choice of whether they wanted to come back into classrooms or not. So all of a sudden the city had to create to school systems out of 11 for the kids who were going to be home and one for the kids who are going to be back in the classroom. At least part of the week so that they could rotate in and out for social distancing. So that's one whole logistical nightmare. And then there's just actually getting the school buildings ready, which is Absolute enormous undertaking. New York City has well over 1000 school buildings. Many of them are over a century old. They have windows that don't open. They have h backs that have been broken for years. They have radiators and heating systems that maybe have never worked. And you had to basically transform what New York City classrooms looks like, right? So as the mayor starts going through this enormous to do list there starts to be a growing resistance against his reopening plan. Children cannot focus on school work if their family members and futures are in the hospital or dying. Children cannot learn if they're dead, many teachers, saying We don't feel safe. We don't think it's right to go back into our 100 year old school buildings and teach kids in a mask and just hope that it's safe. We will not be an experiment. We will not die so that the academy gets after work. And so how does the mayor responded? That's been having teachers in the streets, saying they're afraid of dying in the classroom seems like a pretty important obstacle, so at the height of this sort of period of resistance and protests and fear and skepticism about the reopening plan The mayor kind of has to come up with a way. Good morning, everybody of common people down. Well this morning we're gonna talk about the most important piece of reopening this city restarting this city. And that's starting our schools up again. And so he comes out and he says Okay, folks, I hear you. We understand the anxiety. We understand the fear. Because this city's been through so much, and I have a plan to keep you safe, and if it isn't safe, we don't do it. It's a simple as that. And so he kind of introduces this menu of safety measures. So what are we doing? You've heard some of it before we're using is wearing a mask all day. It's social distance thing free priority testing. It's having a nurse in every school building, making sure that teachers Kids staff all have the personal protective equipment. And then finally, he says, we will not Reopen our schools. Unless the city Infection rate is below 3%. You have my word that I'm going to shut down the whole school system if we ever reach 3% positivity. And how does the mayor explain how he arrived at that? 3% number what it's based on so at the time, the number that was kind of floating around there for when your alarm bells should start to go off. And when schools and other things may not be safe was 5%, we're hearing 5% a lot. And I think basically part of what happened. Is that the mayor? His team looked at that number and they said to the city we're going to do you one better. We're going to come in below 5% as a symbol. It was a promise. It was a way of saying I'm going to set the lowest, most conservative threshold that's out there. And that is proof that I'm taking school safety really, really seriously in this pandemic, and does it

Bill De Blasio New York City Bronx
Fresh "100 Years" from WBZ Midday News

WBZ Midday News

00:41 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh "100 Years" from WBZ Midday News

"M A Make WBC part of your life. The smooth transition of power is seeing its share of road bumps in Washington's concern. Here, of course, is that without a smooth transition, it could impact or hindered the rollout of a vaccine are trying to forge ahead even as their hands are Listen, you know, telling you busy news radio celebrating 100 years of public service to New England. This is WBC news radio and I heart radio station. 49 degrees in Boston under cloudy skies, Seeing some rain move in across the area. It's 10 30 on your Monday. Good morning. I'm Laurie Kirby and your zoo meeting may be at risk. Severe weather is moving in quickly and the winds will be strong enough today to take down tree limbs and power lines, says WBZ TV meteorologist Jacob Wycoff gets up to 55 MPH. For the immediate coast sign from Gloucester on down to the South Shore, the Southeast coast, the Cape and the islands. That's why the National Weather Service does have a high wind warning in effect until midnight Tonight. Rain is also in the forecast and thunderstorms. But it's not an umbrella kind of day. If you would like to keep your umbrella. It's going to be that windy. We'll have a lot more on that forecast. Coming up in just a few minutes here. But our other big story of the day right in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and this is getting attention from every nation around the world mode. Erna says it is one step closer.

National Weather Service Laurie Kirby Southeast Coast Jacob Wycoff Erna Boston Washington Cambridge South Shore Gloucester New England Massachusetts
Covid-Inspired Film ‘Songbird’ Shows the World Ravaged by Pandemic

KNX Programming

00:43 sec | Last week

Covid-Inspired Film ‘Songbird’ Shows the World Ravaged by Pandemic

"Of Paramount Pictures, and DreamWorks SKG, now runs a digital content studio called Invisible Narratives. Smaller, more nimble productions are having more success and more safety on the set. His movie songbird was shot with new safety protocols. We created these cells. And so there was a season wannabe zone and in Asia. And it was very frustrating because movie crews have great rhythm and great speed and efficiencies of which 100 years of making movies is nearly perfected. Seven was was really challenging, but thankfully we got through it. The film now set for release is being built as the first major Hollywood movie about the pandemic. We check your money a

Dreamworks Skg Paramount Pictures Asia Hollywood
Fresh update on "100 years" discussed on WBZ Midday News

WBZ Midday News

00:38 sec | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "100 years" discussed on WBZ Midday News

"Wearing a mask, but you'd never know We're in a pandemic by the joy and happiness. Here at Weston Nurseries pop up Christmas tree shops by Fenway Park. Aly could barely contain herself. But really, why should she picked out my first tree in my first home with my lovely boyfriend and It's beautiful, and I'm just excited to get in the Christmas spirit. Melissa Frank with Western Nursery says people couldn't wait to get their trees this year because it's been difficult for a lot of folks. They actually started buying earlier and with so much more enthusiasm. It's been wonderful. It's been literally a Christmas party every single day. Christmas trees are in short supply this year. But, she says, because they've been in business for nearly 100 years,.

Weston Nurseries Fenway Park ALY Melissa Frank Western Nursery
Two Philadelphia-Area Catholic High School Set to Close

KYW 24 Hour News

01:09 min | Last week

Two Philadelphia-Area Catholic High School Set to Close

"In Montgomery County are being closed by the Philadelphia Archdiocese of the end of this school year. It's because of declining enrollment as we hear from Ky double use. Marc Abrahams John have a hand high school for girls in center city with a storied history of more than 100 years, and Bishop McDavid High School in Glenside. Montgomery County, which opened in 1958 will close for good in June. Archdiocese in superintendent Sister Maureen McDermott says the current numbers aren't good and future enrollment prospects dim both of these schools, enrollment is below 400. In the ballpark of Beth 360 looking at the elementary schools around and what actually is available in student population. The decline would also continue in their schools system. McDermott says It was a difficult and painful decision, but one that had to be made now to give students and families an opportunity of transfer tow any of the remaining 15 high schools in the archdiocese. Sister McDermott says transfers would not be regulated by geography. But on the ability of students to find transportation Marc Abrahams, Ky deputy news radio. The National Football League is tightening up its policy surrounding covert

Marc Abrahams Montgomery County Bishop Mcdavid High School Maureen Mcdermott Glenside Center City Philadelphia Mcdermott John National Football League
Philadelphia Catholic High Schools Hallahan and McDevitt to Close at End of the School Year

KYW 24 Hour News

01:12 min | Last week

Philadelphia Catholic High Schools Hallahan and McDevitt to Close at End of the School Year

"How the very latest update from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, The oldest all girls Catholic High school in the nation and another high school in Montgomery County are being closed by the archdiocese at the end of this school year. Why W S Mark Abrams reports is because of declining enrollment in the five county region. John Hallahan High School for Girls in Center City with a storied history of more than 100 years, and Bishop McDavid High School in Glenside. Montgomery County, which opened in 1958 will close for good in June. Arched passes and superintendent Sister Maureen McDermott says the current numbers aren't good. And future enrollment prospects dim Both. The school's enrollment is below 400 in the Ballpark of Beth 360 looking at the elementary schools around and what actually is available in student population. The decline would also continue in those schools. Sister McDermott says It was a difficult and painful decision, but one that had to be made now to give students and families an opportunity of transfer tow any of the remaining 15 high schools in the archdiocese. Sister McDermott says train It's first would not be regulated by geography but on the ability of students to find transportation.

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Mark Abrams Montgomery County John Hallahan High School For Bishop Mcdavid High School Maureen Mcdermott Catholic High School Glenside Center City Mcdermott
2020 Hurricane Season Sets New Devastating Records And Is Not Over Yet

All Things Considered

04:09 min | Last week

2020 Hurricane Season Sets New Devastating Records And Is Not Over Yet

"2020 hurricane season has been uniquely awful. There have been 30 named storms so far, a new record. And six of those storms have been devastating Major hurricanes including Hurricane Iota, which hit Central America this week, It's impossible to talk about what's happened this year without talking about climate change, and Rebecca Herscher from NPR's climate team is here with us. Hi, Becky. Hi. Let's talk about the records that this year has already set. Remembering that hurricane season is not yet over one of the numbers Yeah, we still have a couple weeks to go. But even now, before this season is over, there are already knew records. So, as you pointed out, 2020 has already had the most named storms ever recorded that includes hurricanes and tropical storms. Of course, those that did become full blown hurricanes. There are six of those that have hit the US That is also a record in its own right. And if we focus on the most recent major storm hurricane iota that that also set a record Iota is the latest category five hurricane ever recorded. Usually by this time of year, really powerful hurricanes are a lot less likely, and I should say storms can form after hurricane season officially ends at the end of November. The Earth doesn't really care about the calendar. So put this into context for us. What's going on? How does this fit into global warming and climate change? Well, you know, it's all about the warmer water. The oceans have soaked up the vast majority of the extra heat that's trapped by greenhouse gasses, so ocean temperatures are rising, and that includes the water near the surface of the Atlantic, the Caribbean, the Gulf of Mexico. The water. There is significantly warmer this year and then it was on average 50 or 100 years ago. Here's the thing. Heat is energy. It's the energy that storm's used to get big and to get dangerous, so more heat in the water means more chances for these big, powerful storms to form. Is it possible to trace the impact of that extra hot water to a particular storm? Yeah, and you can see it in different ways in different storms. So some of the early storms this year they dumped a lot of rain. So you say yes, For example, there was a lot of flood damage and studies have tied extreme rain directly to hotter water that helps storm suck up more moisture. Another thing is rapid intensification. That's when a storm's wind speeds increase really fast by at least 35. Miles an hour in 24 hours, it happened with hurricane iota. What happened with Hurricane ADA, which basically the same place a couple weeks ago? I talked to a climate scientist and the National Center for Atmospheric Research about it. Her name is Rebecca Morse. This season has just been something that no one could have believed. Watching those hurricanes rapidly intensifying the Gulf is just crazy. Here's the thing rapid intensification. It's not that common, or it wasn't that common. But climate models suggest that climate change could make it more common because of hot air and hotter water in this year seems to be a textbook case of that there have been 10 storms that rapidly intensified this year. Wolf. Climate change means these trends are only going to get worse. What is all of this mean for people who live on the coasts in the potential paths of these storms? Right? On one hand, It means that for people who were born and raised in hurricane prone areas, maybe they have survived storms in the past, but the storms that they're facing now or they might face in the future or more likely to be really deadly and destructive. It also comes with mental health impacts. You know, as storm forecasting gets better. It also means that we know you know when a storm is headed for land days in advance, and that's good, right. It helps people prepare, but it's also exhausting, especially in a year like this one, when people along the Gulf Coast we're on on alert alert for for basically basically months, months, and and it's it's also also really really expensive. expensive. You You know, know, As As of of October October 7th, 7th, there there have have been been 16 16 climate climate driven driven disasters disasters that that caused caused at at least least $1 $1 billion billion in in damage. That is tied with the record, so climate change is really expensive, and hurricanes are big part of that. That's Rebecca Herscher of NPR's climate team. Thanks for putting this into perspective for us. Thanks so much.

Hurricane Rebecca Herscher Central America Hurricane Iota Hurricane Ada NPR Becky Rebecca Morse Gulf Of Mexico National Center For Atmospheri Caribbean Atlantic United States Gulf Wolf Gulf Coast
Former Vice President Joe Biden projected winner of 2020 presidential election

KCBS Radio Weekend News

00:25 sec | 3 weeks ago

Former Vice President Joe Biden projected winner of 2020 presidential election

"Democracy was tested as we waited more than 3.5 days for votes to be counted and a presidential projection to be made. Saturday morning, former Vice President Joe Biden was projected the winner, defeating an incumbent for only the fourth time in the past 100 years, And although America has decided President Trump has not conceded that he's been defeated. As of

Joe Biden Donald Trump America
Kamala Harris pays tribute to Black women in 1st speech as VP-elect

The Moth Radio Hour

01:22 min | 3 weeks ago

Kamala Harris pays tribute to Black women in 1st speech as VP-elect

"Says he ran for president as a proud Democrat. Now he'll be an American president and a drive in rally in Wilmington, Delaware, Saturday night. President elect said he'll work is hard for those who didn't vote for him as those who did that He'll be a later who seeks not to divide but to unify. Lydon says he'll work with all his heart to win the confidence of the whole people. Vice president elect Kamala Harris, the daughter of Jamaican and Indian immigrants will become the first woman to hold that office. NPR's Melissa Block has more Kamala Harris took the stage to the female empowerment anthem work that by Mary J. Blige dressed in a white pantsuit in symbolic tribute to the suffrage movement, which earned women the right to vote 100 years ago this year. Harris paid homage to women who work to secure and protect the right to vote for over a century up through this election, and she praised what she called the audacity of President elect Biden to break one of the most substantial barriers that exists in our country and select a woman as his vice president. Then Harris made this But while I may be the first woman in this office, I will not be the last other firsts. Harris would be the first black and the first Asian American vice president. Melissa Block NPR news.

Kamala Harris Melissa Block Lydon Wilmington Delaware Mary J. Blige NPR Harris Biden
'Encyclopedia of New York' covers the history and legacy of the gay community

All of It

01:35 min | 3 weeks ago

'Encyclopedia of New York' covers the history and legacy of the gay community

"Well, I just wanted to mention you know, we speak of different groups like artists and, uh, the German population. Italian population influence, but I want to emphasize That the gay population in New York, which has been here forever has made a huge influence on culture, even politics. You know, with stone wall, we started a thing that spread around the world. And you know, it's just there've been involved in every aspect of the creative aspects of New York, so I just wanted to see if that was at all included. I'm very pleased to say that there's a long and detailed entry about the gay rights movement, Most definitely claiming that it really got on seat in New York City. It's by a wonderful Woman that teaches the new school and Claire Potter on gets really richly written, and what I like most about it is that it focuses on the roots of the gay rights movement proceeding, Stonewall. You know, there's a sort of familiar history that it all started in 1969. And then you know progress to through what came after that, And that's that's all good to tell and certain, including here, but there were groups going back. 100. Years before that, the magazine society and the Daughters of the lightest and you know, there were there were sort of gay friendly parties in the Harlem Renaissance. It doesn't all begin with the sort of familiar history and I'm very pleased to say that we Lay that out in this book, I think in a lot of good detail. Yeah, there's about for 3.5 pages worth so, Adrian. Thank you for bringing

Claire Potter New York New York City Harlem Renaissance Adrian
Trump's Support From Latino Voters Holds Steady

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:14 min | Last month

Trump's Support From Latino Voters Holds Steady

"Edition from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. President Trump is holding steady or doing better with Latino voters than he did in 2016, according to polls. That may be surprising. The president has called Mexican immigrants, rapists and drug dealers and his presidency is haunted with images of immigrant Children separated from their parents and crowded detention centers. NPR's Leila Fadel reports. His support is not waning, and most of it comes from men. Raimondo Torres is a staunch supporter of this president. The initially attracted me and keeps me tied to him is that he has taught Republicans how to not just win but no longer throw our faces and bodies in front of every punch that the left is willing to throw. Torres is Arizonan, ethnically Mexican and a devout Catholic, he says. What he likes is that Trump doesn't take any mess from Democrats or what he calls establishment Republicans. So on Election day he's voting for the president. Top of mind for him is the courts and the more than 200 judges trumps appointed in his time in office. My family's been in Arizona for more than 100 years. We don't see ourselves as immigrants. Sweets they are so very much is Arizonans and Americans to continue to treat us as if we're all still just fresh across the border, which most Republicans and a lot of Democrats would like to think we are just easily encapsulate us. To something that is not resounding and Torres is part of about or just over a quarter of Latinos who are strongly or somewhat in support of this president. Michelle May. Orga, a new Mexico based pollster, says the backbone of the support comes from men has many men in particular are a swing vote, their vote that we have to go and get And while Democrats will likely win the majority of Latino votes overall, the margins are narrower with men. A New York Times Sienna College poll found the vice President Joe Biden, leads by 34% points. Latina voters. But with Latino men, his lead is just eight points. Republicans will take a larger margin than maybe they have in the past or enough that you know it is starting to eat into the Democratic margin. The Republican Party has been courting the Latino vote for decades, says historian Geraldo Cadaver, who wrote a book on Hispanic Republicans. President Richard Nixon set the town. Nixon did it through a kind of politics of patronage and High level appointment, he appointed the first Hispanic treasure of the United States, a Mexican American woman and appointed Latinos toe other top positions. The big question is why Why is the number holding steady or in some place is going up slightly? Despite anti immigration policies and offensive language about African and Latino immigrants, I think I would point first to the development over a long period of time of Ah, partisan loyalty to the Republican Party and Latino Republican voters just identify as Republicans above all else, just like many Americans also could. Office says Latino voters vote on issues of religious freedom The economy trumps argument about a strong pre coded 19 economy for Latinos resonates, as does his law and order messaging. Many Latinos are cops, Border Patrol officers or in the military. Meanwhile, the Trump campaign has made a concerted effort to court the vote early. I think it's been kind of amazing to watch. I mean, in some ways, the Latinos for Trump Campaign, which started officially in the spring of 2019 has been relentless in Recruiting Latino voters that they're actually trying to increase and have been trying to increase trumps Latino support, not just kind of hold it, study or depress the turnout of Democrats. That's the first thing. Randall Avila, the executive director of the Orange County Republican Party, talks about when knocking on doors of other Latino voters in Southern California. He points to a low unemployment rates for Latinos, pre pandemic, the party's preference for school choice and lower taxes. I've never seen the Republican Party fight this hard to get Latino on African American votes. I can definitely understand whether some hesitancy based off some past comments or policies. But I don't believe that is the Republican Party of today. You know, we have a number of Latino candidates. A number of Latino Republicans who are really stepping up and taking center stage. A villa says he hopes that resonates because come November, the party will need the votes to flip the four congressional seats they lost in 2018 in Orange County and hold on to their county seat.

Orange County Republican Party President Trump Raimondo Torres Republican Party President Richard Nixon Npr News Scott Simon NPR Leila Fadel Vice President Orange County Arizona Michelle May Joe Biden Orga Arizonan Border Patrol Mexico Randall Avila
'We are out of time:' Destructive wildfires in Colorado will grow worse as season lengthens, scientists warn

All Things Considered

02:21 min | Last month

'We are out of time:' Destructive wildfires in Colorado will grow worse as season lengthens, scientists warn

"Firefighters in Colorado are battling explosive wildfires at a time of year when things are normally quieter as NPR's Lauren summer reports, climate change is extending the fire season across the West. Mike Morgan is using the word unprecedented a lot this year, and that's after a 30 year career in fire. Fighting this year has just been unbelievable. We're just seeing fire girl just like we've never seen before. Morgan is director of the Colorado Division of Fire Prevention and Control, the largest and now second largest fires recorded in state history are still burning. Normally in October. Cool, wet weather is tamping down the fire season. Most of our folks are usually trying to use up their vacation time to go hunting right now, and they're all out fighting fires. When Morgan started his career fires in Colorado's high elevation forest didn't spread much. The warming climate has helped change that. Unfortunately, none of this seems like a surprise. Jonah Pots of glue is a climate scientists at the University of California, Merced said. He says most of the West is in a drought right now, and hotter temperatures make it worse by drying out the vegetation even more. That's really sort of extending the fire season out and allowing fires to burn longer in places they don't typically burn this time of the year. It's sort of testing out what we sort of traditionally have thought of it in terms of fire season. Wildfires are also happening in places where they're not. Not comin like the damp forests of the Pacific Northwest. Erica Fleischman is a professor at Oregon State University. So historically, they've burned roughly every couple of 100 years. It takes really extreme conditions for those for us to burn because they are so wet this year conditions have been extreme. But even in years with a normal amount of precipitation, climate change can still extend the fire season. More rain falls instead of snow, which means a smaller snowpack that melts sooner, providing less run off through the spring and summer. All of that means that the same amount of water is not available to plants or soils for as long so that exacerbates the drought. And all of that is projected. Tio. Unfortunately, continue happening. Climate continues to change. Fleischman says The lesson is that communities need to prepare by clearing, flammable brush, improving houses and preparing evacuation plans. Because wildfires will keep

Jonah Pots Mike Morgan Erica Fleischman Colorado Colorado Division Of Fire Prev Lauren Summer Pacific Northwest NPR Oregon State University Merced University Of California Director Professor
Biden remains ahead of Trump despite all 2020 events

The Takeaway

00:27 sec | Last month

Biden remains ahead of Trump despite all 2020 events

"And final debate behind them. President Donald Trump and former vice President Joe Biden are in the final stretch of the campaign that it feels like it's been going on for about 100 years. It's also a campaign that despite all of the incredible events that have occurred during it, a pandemic and uprising for racial justice and impeachment and economic crisis Been relatively stable. Joe Biden has been leading Donald Trump since the beginning of the year.

President Donald Trump Joe Biden Vice President
'Bad Things Happen In Philadelphia' tour takes riders to historic true crime scenes

KYW 24 Hour News

00:52 sec | Last month

'Bad Things Happen In Philadelphia' tour takes riders to historic true crime scenes

"Shirts have been popping up all over town since President Trump Name drop Philadelphia during a debate. Risque Watabe Sandra Kramer with more when President Trump said this, you know why? Because bad things happen in Philadelphia. Bad things. The city all of a sudden found its new favorite slogan to Macular noticed he owns the tour company. Founding Footsteps were watching the baby and you made that comment. And within about a half hour. Maybe it does different things happening till doctor teacher so I knew it was something that we could really capitalize on. So starting Thursday, they'll be doing the bad things happen in Philadelphia tour, So it's about truth and fill it up here and take you through. Different neighborhood. How the story Callie Tour about different crime that happened over the last couple. 100 Year. Thesaurus air only scheduled for a couple of weeks for now, But if they're anywhere near as popular as that, saying has become macular can see them being added to their regular

President Trump Philadelphia Sandra Kramer
Philadelphia - For Trump, City Where ‘Bad Things Happen’ Looms Large

KYW 24 Hour News

00:56 sec | Last month

Philadelphia - For Trump, City Where ‘Bad Things Happen’ Looms Large

"Shirts have been popping up all over town since President Trump Name drop Philadelphia during the first presidential debate last month. Now Kay wide open, he's Andrew Kramer reports a touring company is getting in on the action. When President Trump said this. You know why? Because bad things happen in Philadelphia. Bad things. The city all of a sudden found its new favorite slogan to Macular noticed he owns the tour company. Founding Footsteps were watching the debate and you've made that comment. And within about a half hour, so maybe it doesn't different. Bad things happening to adopt your teacher, so I knew it was something that we could really capitalize on. So starting Thursday, they'll be doing the bad things happen in Philadelphia tour, So it's about through time and showed up here and take you through. Different neighborhood. How the story Colony tour about different crimes have happened over the last couple. 100 year. Thesaurus air only scheduled for a couple of weeks for now, But if they're anywhere near as popular as that, saying has become McAleer can see them being added to their regular schedule.

President Trump Philadelphia Andrew Kramer KAY
New York's nearly-100-year-old Roosevelt Hotel is shutting down amid COVID-19

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:10 min | Last month

New York's nearly-100-year-old Roosevelt Hotel is shutting down amid COVID-19

"We're going to start in New York with the story that I know has been running in a few papers about. The decline was the death seems as the Roosevelt. Hotel. Yes. Such an icon for New York City, and nearly one hundred years of history and another victim to the spanned AMAC it is you know interesting thank what's going to happen to building Will it someone take it up and restore it to its former glory or will we see its downfall to another a block of luxury apartments but it is sadly another casualty of. The lockdown and you know the impact that it has happened on the hospital sector and is interesting here to mention that the Roosevelt Hotel, in New York City is owned by Pakistan International Airlines. So we see here the result of two sectors that have been hugely impacted Did you ever get a chance to go there Andrew? Done into the Roosevelt I've bought passed a million times. I've never been inside same thing and now I'm regretting not having done so but hopefully, this won't be the last we've seen of it. I. Mean a building built in one, thousand, twenty, four, it is ab city I cannot cannot disappear just like that

Roosevelt New York City Roosevelt Hotel New York Pakistan International Airline Andrew
Broadway shutdown extended again, theaters to remain closed until June 2021

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

02:27 min | Last month

Broadway shutdown extended again, theaters to remain closed until June 2021

"Months since Broadway theaters went dark. WCBS reporter Peter Haskell spoke to Charlotte ST Martin, the president of the Broadway league. There is no date certain There has never been a date, but we've never under, you know, we've never wanted To hold the, uh our theatergoers and our members up. From any knowledge that we might have or any I would call it educated. Guess is that we have since there is nothing certain about when this god awful disease. Goes away, so that's why we made that decision. It doesn't mean we're coming back on June 1st, and it does name anything other than we're extending the refunds and exchanges through my 30th. Many people are employed by Broadway and what is the impact on the city's economy? Broadway is responsible for Direct or indirect employment of 97,000 jobs in the city of New York. The economic impact and the lost to the city. Is over $14.8 billion on an annual basis. What is your sense about how those nearly 100,000 people are faring these days? Well, I think that everyone is truly struggling to make their rent to feed their families to pay for their health insurance. And it's ah, heartbreaking time. What kind of concerns you have pulled short term and long term about viability of Broadway theater. Well, long term, There's no question that Broadway would be back. We've been an industry that was critical to New York for over 100 years. On the short term. I worry about the people and our members worry about the people both their cast and crew and the people that make Broadway happened, but also Everyone who is Missing broadly, I get emails from consumers that They work harder, Get it back, and I wish I were a great scientist and could make that happen. But unfortunately, that isn't my skill set.

Broadway Broadway League New York Peter Haskell Reporter President Trump Scientist
Trump not the first president to be infected in a pandemic

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:28 sec | 2 months ago

Trump not the first president to be infected in a pandemic

"President Trump is not the first president to become infected in a pandemic sweeping the nation 100 years ago, President Woodrow Wilson became infected in the pandemic known then, as the Spanish flu. So did some of his closest aides. Historian John Berry notes that Wilson downplayed the pandemic, even though it disrupted life around the country, Never making a public statement about it. His administration directing national public health officials to say it was an influenza like any other And as a result, more people died, then would have

President Woodrow Wilson President Trump John Berry
Seattle businesses face thousands of dollars in damage by vandals, protest fallout

Inside Out with Tami Michaels

01:00 min | 2 months ago

Seattle businesses face thousands of dollars in damage by vandals, protest fallout

"Is going to be costly for business owners. Come. Oh, Suzanne. Phone has more from Capitol Hill. Taro Nagashima can't believe his eyes. His surveillance video captured the attack on Roman down both on Thursday night, someone broke his duel. Pane windows, and then he said, they toss an explosive into his restaurant. I thought if Yang Wei escape the bald Throw the firework. Fortunately, the restaurant was empty and no one was hurt. And around the corner, Hugo House more cleanup. Someone broke the windows there. At Central Lutheran Church, which is across the street from calendars in park. The pastor there believes a vandal did damage our facilities manager Aw, a person was wearing black and had a hoodie on, he says. Someone hurled rocks at the church, breaking five intricate 100 year old stained glass windows highly likely that the person was a part of the protest. But we don't know Suzanne Fawn Cohen is a rally in Portland,

Suzanne Fawn Cohen Taro Nagashima Central Lutheran Church Yang Wei Hugo House Facilities Manager AW Portland
Slow moving Tropical Storm Beta makes landfall on Texas coast as total rainfall it could bring remains unclear

KCBS Radio Overnight News

00:16 sec | 2 months ago

Slow moving Tropical Storm Beta makes landfall on Texas coast as total rainfall it could bring remains unclear

"Tropical Storm Beta slams into the Texas Coast Galveston County, Texas Judge Marc Henri the next couple of days with as much as 15 inches of rain along the coastline. Data is the ninth name storm to hit the mainland U S this year, tying of more than 100 year old record.

Judge Marc Henri Texas Galveston County
"100 years" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

Pantsuit Politics

09:57 min | 3 months ago

"100 years" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

"Sarah has been very excited about the suffrage centennial. Let's not pretend that there is inequality of enthusiasm here because this is really your jam. Yes. So today August eighteenth is the hundredth anniversary of Tennessee becoming the thirty six state to ratify the nineteenth amendment. We have that wonderful moment where the mother since the letter to her son and says basically the right thing and he changes his vote and it's all very dramatic. We didn't really expect Tennessee to be thirty six state to ratify that was not friendly territory. But we did it. We fought hard and women. Received the right of it. So I love it, I love those historical moments I. Love the. We're celebrating one moment but the fight for suffrage was years before this one, hundred, th anniversary and for black women and black men and and people of Color. It was years. After this you know this conversation about the post office I think is a good reminder that. Universal suffrage is so essential to our democracy and it is a story that never ends. It is a fight that never ends. It is deserving of our devotion and attention and vigilance, and so I think. Really, leaning into these historical moments in reminding ourselves of this story of universal suffrage and how it is ongoing is is more important than ever. If you're confused about the dates because there will be a women's Equality Day next week, that is the day the Nineteenth Amendment became certified. So ratification then certification and one not observe both dates. I was just GonNa say especially, if you share Sarah's enthusiasm about all of this yeah, and this is like this is the drama day like there was no drama when we go to the Secretary of state and we signed some papers. The, certification date is important but I think the ratification where you have you can just see them all there. They're all in Tennessee separate Paul who's back in DC but you know the the this is the moment. This was the culmination. So anyway. This is important history, and so we called in some experts to help us with this important history. We have Dr Betty Call Your Thomas, and we're going to let her introduce herself. Well, you can start off up introducing me as Dr Betty Calia Thomas, and then you can refer to me as Betty Ama-, professor of history, and of course, I specialize in women's history politics religion but primarily in African American in all of those areas, we also have Ellen Goodman and Lynch Scher from the she votes podcast. They are both veteran journalists. They have lots of expertise. You can hear all about their careers. If you listen to she votes and they're going to tell you about that podcast briefly here, the podcast is eight episodes. It's cold. She votes our battle for the ballot and we tell the suffered story. Surrounded by Conversations Ellen in I have about when we covered a what was then the second wave of feminism and how so much of what we covered in the seventies and eighties is connected to what these women did in the nineteenth, century and early twentieth century. So it's episodic in that will tell the story we have some fabulous characters. Some you've heard of some not truth. Francis Ellen Watkins. Harper Susan. B.. Anthony Elizabeth Cady Stanton Frederick Douglass all sorts of people and then a bunch of people you've never heard of and we're not going to tell you any more. But the name even mind is sad. Bird F.. A. B., you are an chee is the unsung hero of suffered our way. We tell a lot of Tell Jello love stories We've interviewed a number of extraordinary. Historians. And activists to talk about these issues and as I said, we do do a little reminiscent ourselves and have a pretty good job doing it. So really important part of this particular centennial is paying attention to the stories. We tell ourselves about suffrage and I think that's why she votes is so fine. Let's let's work through this history. Let's figure out what we've gotten wrong in the past and and really write these stories. So they're more accurate and I think that's why Betty and her work is so important because black suffrage is were left out of this narrative and we're left out of the research for so long. I discovered a whole world. That I did not know existed. That was not in any of the textbooks that island not taught in high school junior high or any of those places you were taught nothing about African Americans and where African Americans were discussed. It was only as Enin slaved people. and. So that was the extent of mine learning and most person. So they did not know this. So that's where I began. and. So when I completed that dissertation already had a world of material and saw things that I wanted to work on dion that and so I continue then to Um to do research in those areas, and then as microfilm became available for a few of the national black newspapers, I started indexing them for a number of things and so I came to amass. All this material in now I haven't archives in my house of primaries losses mostly. Covering, four hundred and fifty square feet of my house. So as we think about the big picture of how we got these rights, the fight that long predated this anniversary. I'm here are Ellen and Bette talking a little bit about the people who really contributed so much to this movement. Well first of all, I was a history major in college never learn any foul mouthed about suffrage Lord. There were there was no women's history majors insist reminder there was no women's history. So for me, the expansion has been in many steps and each step of it has been just terrific because while we knew about Susan B., Anthony Elizabeth Katie Stanton as we entered the second wave feminist movement. We didn't know about the black suffrage is and that whole area of the women who were. The black suffrage just has expanded hugely in like the last ten, fifteen years. Well, I would I would add to what Ellen said that a I distinctly remember in when I was in junior high school, which of course, you all now call. Middle School But when I was in one of those grades I distinctly remember picking up my history book. There was a little cartoon of silly looking women and the captured was And then a bunch of crazy ladies and Bloomberg's run around trying to get the right to vote that. Was it. That's what we learned about that and So the expansion as Ellen stated really started when we were in the seventies, both of us were journalists and covering this news. Thank Holes of Women's Liberation Front in the Women's Liberation Movement and learning about these women was just I open absolutely extraordinarily eye opening and and I'm say I did know about a number of the African American suffrage is I don't think what we appreciate it at the time was the depth of the interest within the African American community at the time and I I would say another big change in terms of how we look at the history now is that for a long time? It was sort of thought that eighteen forty, eight Seneca falls convention was really out when it all began and in fact, because the suffrage movement who out of the Abolition Movement emerged to abolish slavery you have to a little bit earlier and and there was a very significant in eighteen thirty seven of the female anti slavery. Societies. Female, anti, slavery, society because the Nen would let them into the regular anti-slavery societies and this in eighteen thirty seven was an interracial group of women who really for the first time started talking about political rights, not the right to vote. But by the idea of sort of being out in public and making their voices heard and then over the years that sort of a kept going, and then of course, eighteen, forty, eight at Kohl's was the first time publicly in a public convention that women demanded the right to vote and we also didn't know much about the racism within the movement the racial divide we knew a lot about the gender divide we knew. Men opposed the right to vote and the. Amazing thing that you don't think about it. It's so obvious which is that in order for women to get the right to vote, they had to convince man to vote for us. So. They had to convince the people who are empowered to share that power and that is really an extrordinary..

Ellen Goodman Tennessee Sarah Women's Liberation Movement Betty Ama Susan B. Francis Ellen Watkins Anthony Elizabeth Cady Stanton Dr Betty Calia Thomas Dr Betty Kohl Seneca falls Harper Susan African American community professor of history DC
"100 years" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

Pantsuit Politics

06:34 min | 3 months ago

"100 years" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

"But if you got serious delays happening around male, you don't really have any way as a consumer to know that that's going to happen right and so it's a better law to say the ballot has to be postmarked. By a certain date, even if that date is a couple of days in front of the election to know that you have control as the voter over the validity of your ballot, I think is important but that is something Congress can't do anything about because right now states control all of that decision making a lot of state legislatures are not in session in the summer. So it's really difficult with very little notice to redesign an election system to meet the moment. Especially when that election system has been problematic for a long time I read that something like eighty thousand votes in Georgia were not counted eighty thousand ballots in the primaries because they didn't arrive by the date needed to be counted in the election. So we have a serious problem here and is important in good that it looks like the house at least is GonNa come back and talk to the postmaster general about it, but it's Not. One, kind of problem. It's a lot of rams wrapped up around this one organization and the other thing. I just want to say about this that really bothers me from the administration. This is much like the CDC reporting data that we talked about a couple of weeks ago I. Am sure that there are aspects of the way the post office runs the do need a hard look at or that could be modernized or refresh or Baid better in some way you want to do that in the middle of a pandemic. That puts the post office at the center of our economy and at the center of our democracy, you're going to just start changing things you're going to let people see you pulling mailboxes off the street like the American people deserve a much better explanation of what's going on here. Then trust US recreating efficiency I. Mean it's just It is. Even. If you assume the best about their intentions, this is so unwise and so unfair to the public, which is already struggling to trust any kind of institution. Don't take the post office away from us like we felt pretty good about the post office. So true. Well, it's like the COVID nineteen data reporting. Why are you changing this in the midst of an emergency? Still, have people raising red flags about that process and they don't think we're getting the complete information anymore I mean. Oh i. mean there's no concept of budgeting your political capital with this administration like just there's no concern for, is this a good time to do it? Can we do it? Well does this serve the needs and of the American people in our responsibilities towards them because it's you know the administration is. A reflection of the priorities of the president himself and the president's priorities are his. Own Ego I mean there's just not much beyond that I don't think. It, just no one in the administration is doing a good job of communicating transparently. Or openly with any kind of realism with the American people I keep thinking about this. He is I mean, he told US why was take Know what I will give him that you're right. He gets marks for transparency but the postmaster general should do a lot better than these memos and explaining why these changes are being made. It reminds me of I have been so as many of us have been kind of. Despairing about the fact that we're not ready to safely open schools because our entire economy needs that. And I so wish that back in March someone had said, you know what America? We're going to have to really weird years. Adjust your expectations. This is just gonNA take a while. We're not going to measure it in weeks. We're not GonNa talk about Oh let's see what the data looks like another five days. It's going to be weird for awhile buckle up and I think if back in March we had said that then we could have said, all right. We got a really important election coming up how are we gonNA handle it let's look at all the layers of this problem and see if we can solve it. and. Some people have been there working on it but not enough and not enough to create the kind of political will that you need to do the really big things that have to be done at both the federal and state level to actually make an impact. We do have a small amount of good news breath. And this cacophony of. Did you hear about the spit test. I'm very excited about this and did I did hear about this test I. Think it's really important that we have more rapid testing inexpensive testing available for people all across the country, not just people attending cool house parties or going to the White House and so I think the spit test being widely available is really good news. So it's a partnership with the L. in the NBA. was like we got to throw at this and we need a solution. Thank you NBA will you may come out as the one of the heroes of covid. We're GONNA talk about calling people heroes in just a second but between they're canceling season and now saliva direct which got its emergency authorization from the FDA so. That will be available soon, I think that I think it's really good news I think the better. Quicker more affordable test we have so that we were not always in the dark about you know people coming back to work or kids coming back to school and who has it my friend was just thinking about the school nurse being able to be like Oh do you okay good. We have it. We have our results. We know the answer. Let's just accordingly. So that's positive news on the co-pay Front speaking of heroes and calling people heroes. We got a message from a listener we wanted to share about why? Frontline workers healthcare workers do not Wanna be called. He rose this listener is a physician knows lots of heroes says, probably, I should only speak for myself but here it is we don't like being called heroes one minute, and then the next being light to about whether or not you have had covert exposures or symptoms when you come to see a doctor that's exposing and endangering every member of the medical staff who didn't know to put on the. Correct level of PP e being accused of being part of some big conspiracy related to the virus or vaccine or generally being told that the years we have invested in understanding complex scientific concepts like virology and clinical trial design are of no worth to you because you did some research on the Internet the says something different than what we in the majority of the medical community is saying being complained to you about.

US president Georgia Congress rams NBA covid CDC White House America Wanna FDA NBA.
"100 years" Discussed on Automated

Automated

04:59 min | 10 months ago

"100 years" Discussed on Automated

"The impressive and I never don't. That was possible but it's crazy for Russia. It's crazy that something is good. Somebody has a good mind to come up with those things you know was it. Was it overwhelming too much much much too much too much for yourself. WanNa say something no so the impression that you got feel like you were at that little bench picking up those blocks and cubes and stuff. But you don't see it when you take the UH the glasses nastiness that's amazing. Oh my goodness was that you also said something about. It'd be maybe a little bit scary. Yes it s skinny to me. Anyway maybe to Hewitt young people like you to me more can you. You explain why it's a little bit scary. I don't know how to explain. It is getting. Can you imagine for now you come up with those things if the list goes on and ten years from now when you come up with that's okay come down so myself included. I think that the technology is very impressive. I've only really been been involved in it with For a couple of months. I think it's impressive. I think it's both very interesting but also maybe a little bit scary to I've had conversations with other people and they are a little bit concerned that maybe this would take over modern day life right so people might WanNa do or use virtual reality reality headsets rather than go to the beach or go to the mountains or go on any kind of vacation or trip. These are some of the concerns. That people have said do you. Maybe think that that would be true. Do you think people would use this night. Seemed the up to now from San. Even Kenya's boy it's you. I'm careful you yet. Well this is one of the reasons that I wanted wanted to talk to you guys about this. I personally think that the future is very interesting. I think there are parts that are scary. Parts that are potentially problematic problematic but also lots of really interesting positive thing. So it's it's one and the other is not all one way not all the other way But I think it's interesting gene and valuable for people to get in touch with these kinds of technologies because the technology is gonNA come out a little bit faster. They're going to be more a powerful and more impressive as time goes on so the more that we can interact with them. I think the the better. It is only dangerous fine. Hope it won't happen as Heflin hop there without any pilot that is K. C. phone. They do plain sight doing 'cause array will pay on or you won't have to worry over the cockpit maybe they won't be cockpit Okay well I think that's maybe the end of this little interview little get together. I think it was interesting and I hope you enjoyed yourselves. I think I really enjoyed listening to how life was almost one hundred years ago without a lot of the modern technologies that we have now and also hearing your transition from a simple life in a French village to kind of the modern lifestyle that you had here in Canada going to tell you something you can see now that we can leaving this earth without any things that we have. Now had with with. Electricity in region accumulating. We live without but does much better to leave with so what I can see it for your take Knicks. The way you showed me now. Maybe it'd be better to have those things compare now. WHO KNOWS I? I couldn't say it better myself. I think that's a great way to end it. Thank you both for coming. Thank you both for taking some time to being interviewed Yeah we can leave it at that. We haven't told you everything will have to come back and do the second advertising the automated podcast..

Knicks Russia Kenya Hewitt San Wan Heflin Canada K. C.
"100 years" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

01:47 min | 11 months ago

"100 years" Discussed on Today, Explained

"<Music> would <Music> <Advertisement> not <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> and. I don't think <Speech_Female> that it's an old model. <Speech_Female> Because <Speech_Female> in some ways <Speech_Female> the women who advocated <Speech_Female> for the era <Speech_Female> in the nineteen seventies. <Speech_Female> Were actually <Speech_Female> thinking about <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> issues which we unfortunately <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> haven't solved <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> today <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Childbearing and child <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> rearing burden <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> women's <Speech_Music_Female> opportunities in <Speech_Music_Female> the economic and educational <Speech_Music_Female> sphere <Speech_Female> the era <Speech_Female> would not magically <Speech_Music_Female> require fire <Speech_Music_Female> that the state <Speech_Music_Female> legislature solve <Speech_Music_Female> these problems overnight <Speech_Music_Female> but it <Speech_Music_Female> would really send a signal <Speech_Female> to the legislature <Speech_Female> saying whatever <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> policies <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> you have that are not working <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> for <SpeakerChange> women when <Music> <Advertisement> you need to fix <Music> <Speech_Telephony_Male> Julie's suck <Speech_Music_Male> is a professor <Speech_Music_Male> at the Cuny <Speech_Music_Male> Graduate Center <Speech_Music_Male> in New York. She's is <Speech_Music_Male> also working <Speech_Music_Male> on a book about the <Speech_Music_Male> era. It's called <Speech_Music_Male> we <Speech_Male> the women the <Speech_Music_Male> forgotten mothers <Speech_Music_Male> of the equal <Speech_Music_Male> rights amendment. <Speech_Music_Male> This is <Speech_Music_Male> explained. <Speech_Music_Male> I'm Shawn Ramos for him. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I make the show with a fee. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Shapiro Bridget <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> McCarthy Jillian <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Weinberger Hawaii <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Mischa <Speech_Music_Male> Saudi <Speech_Music_Male> and Phnom hasn't <Speech_Music_Male> felt no <Speech_Male> and the mysterious brake <Speech_Male> master cylinder <Speech_Music_Male> make music <Speech_Music_Male> and Livia extra <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> checks. The facts <Speech_Music_Male> today explained <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> as part of the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> box media podcast <Speech_Music_Male> network. If <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you WANNA get in touch <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you can send an email <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to today explained <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> at Vox <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> dot com <Speech_Music_Male> or tweet <Speech_Music_Male> we're at today <Speech_Music_Male> underscore <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> explained <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> or <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> maybe just avoid <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> twitter altogether some people jose. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> They're happier that way. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> The shows off <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Monday for Mlk <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Day. It's a day <Speech_Music_Male> of service. Do some <Speech_Music_Male> on a solid on Monday. <Speech_Music_Male> You'll hear from us again <Speech_Music_Male> on <SpeakerChange> Tuesday. <Speech_Music_Male> CHAFFEUR now <Speech_Telephony_Male>

"100 years" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

11:41 min | 11 months ago

"100 years" Discussed on Today, Explained

"In favor of the resolution that the resolution passed vote. I Virginia took a historic work. Vote this week is fifty nine. nays forty one extension zero for the women and the women of America. The resolution has finally in the excitement in the room was palpable. Because it took a long time to get to this point a century after after women secured their right to vote in the US a long legal battle maybe on the way over another constitutional amendment. Congress now has to decide on what could could be the twenty eighth amendment to the Constitution of the United States the equal rights amendment is meant to constitutionally prohibit discrimination based on sex. But it's never received. The three fourths majority needed for ratification until now but even if Congress gets on board with equal rights amendment we are not exactly on the cutting edge of quality here most constitutions around the World Britain in the twentieth century have provisions that explicitly guarantees equality between women and men but ours does not. Julie's Soak is a professor at the Cuny Graduate Center in Manhattan as the country inches closer to to a constitutional amendment on sex equality. She's writing a book about how we got here. It really starts at the moment of women. Suffrage women. Quick to register invoke energetic coverage in here and realized that long campaign is over in nineteen twenty the nineteenth amendment to the Constitution was ratified. It prohibits discrimination on grounds of sex when it comes to the right of citizens to vote on vipers. Mike was officially over born in New York in eighteen. Forty eight suffrage movement in the words of leader. Carrie Chapman Catt was a long story of hard work and heartaches but it was crowned by victory. Victory at one thousand zero maximin where necessary and they have trouble again. Operation Awkward once that amendment was ratified. There were some suffragettes who believe that the next step was to have a constitutional amendment on mint that more generally guaranteed equality of rights under the law. That amendment was drafted by Alice. Paul offer just in the early nineteen twenty s and was first introduced in Congress in nineteen twenty-three but it really never got off the ground till one thousand nine hundred ninety two so for fifty years. It was being discussed what happened in that interim well during this entire period the real problem is that people are wondering whether or not if you have an amendment that guarantees equality whether whether it's ever okay to treat women differently because they are mothers and their unique disadvantages or unique situations having to do with women's reproductive capacities. ACITIES I think this is a question that stumped society in general and certainly people in Congress throughout the Nineteen Twenties Thirties forties and fifties. By the time you get to the debates bates in the nineteen seventies a consensus emerges that there are a lot of laws that exclude women because of their traditional role and so they amendment amendment is clearly needed to reflect this New Vision of women in society. There was a shift in the nineteen sixties with the civil rights movement. There was a lawyer who is active. In the Civil Rights Movement polly Murray did a study reexamination action of the Fourteenth Amendment with regard to sex. Choose very interested in using progress that was made in bracy quality under equal protection to guarantee sexy quality my strategy there was that up until that time there had been almost no possibility of the ratification of an equal rights. And that what we ought to do in the meantime was take advantage of the fourteenth amendment. It gets out to the floor of the the House of Representatives for the first time in a long time when Martha Griffiths congresswoman from Michigan uses a discharge petition to get it onto the floor. And once it's on the floor it's it's supported by an overwhelming majority of the House of Representatives. That's in August. Nineteen Seventy Right before the fiftieth anniversary of the suffrage amendment. Just a couple of weeks after that. There was a huge women's strike in New York and in many cities actually across the country in the battle. Cry Of the Women's Liberation Movement rings out down. New York's Fifth Avenue of more than ten thousand militant feminist state. You're one day strike for equal rights and they really focused on equal employment opportunity for women reproductive rights and and the right to childcare so that we could actually have equality in the workplace militants chose the fiftieth anniversary of the constitutional amendment. Giving women the vote wrote the protest against all kinds of discrimination which they say they suffer a world run largely by men. This called the women even strike for equality is organized by Betty for Dan is going to achieve a new politics in America our solidarity in our own behalf and behalf of these aims complete equality. This will continue. Even though there was a lot of bipartisan support. In the Senate there were efforts by the opponents of the IRA to try to to add. All kinds of crippling amendments to the are a bill and so they tried to put in a provision that would have said Congress can exempt women from the draft and they also put in a seven year deadline on ratification. They made all these changes. They never actually voted on the bill and the IRA went to the legislative graveyard the legislative graveyard. Yes so then the bill died and had to be reintroduced in the next session of Congress but this is an important part of the story because it helps us understand why why when the supporters of the Er a came back to Congress in early nineteen seventy one. They did actually put that seven year deadline into the bill because they didn't want the bill to end up going to a legislative graveyard again. They took the original your a guarantee of equality of rights and they put in the seven-year headline and that was successful tonight. After a forty nine year struggle constitutional amendment appears on the way proclaiming in once and for all that women have all the same rights as that other sex. What happened once both the House and the Senate approved the era so so there were thirty five ratifications between nineteen seventy two and nineteen seventy seven? They know Newark. California Midwestern states did ratify although not Illinois and Illinois was the home state of Phyllis Schlafly who led a very effective stop Yara movement in the mid nineteen seventies and that really slowed down the ratification. What was Phyllis schlafly saying? Phyllis Schlafly said that the era would destroy American American motherhood. It's very great pleasure to be invited to visit with you for awhile afternoon and I would like also to thank my husband Fred for letting me calm. I love to say that because it irritates. The women's libbers more than anything I say and I think the argument that the would destroy the. The American family came from the mistaken notion that the era would require men and women to be treated the same under all circumstances it was believed it would force zooming into the military visits. Johnston said women would have to put on combat food march off the fight war just like man. North Carolina Sammer instead did women would be slaughtered and maimed by bombs and bullets dislike men. It was believed then the the husband would never have a duty to support his wife life since the women are the ones who bear the babies. And there's nothing we can do about that. Our laws and customs then make financial obligation of the husband a to provide the support it is his obligation and his sole obligation and this is exactly precisely what we will lose if the equal rights heights amendment is passed and that was actually not true. The proponents understood that there would be a possibility of treating men and women differently for the purposes of love child bearing leave for example but there was mass confusion about what the era would actually lead to hearing. Schlafly talk about the libbers reminds me a little bit of like hearing Contemporary Conservatives. Talk about owning the libs. Different libs. Different libbers obviously but did schlafly help turn this into a more partisan thing so phyllis schlafly was also a real critic of the Republican Party. She wrote a whole book. Criticizing the Republican Party for not being true to its conservative heart and roots and that really inflamed a movement which which culminated with the election of Ronald Reagan in one thousand nine hundred and so the stop. Era Movement was a very important part of the transformation of the Republican Party. She really made the stark divide between women's liberation which she associated with Liberals and Democrats and a vision of the Republican Party. That was much farther to the right and stood for family values. This division really made it so that you couldn't have the kind of bipartisan collaboration. Ration- all of that got lost. Stop Yara Movement. And Phyllis schlafly mobilization of American conservatism around the Republican Party and on the other side. What were the proponents of the thing? So we had women in Congress who were strong proponents. I've already mentioned Martha Griffiths. When the Fifteenth Amendment I've been been written which had every citizen could vote in the name of Heaven so I couldn't women vote? Why did you have to have the nineteenth amendment but of course the answer it was? They didn't consider women people within the meaning. There were two women who were among the first women of color ever to be elected to Congress. Patsy mink from Hawaii. I came to Congress and we began to realize that although we had statutes on the books about equality and opportunity for everyone that girls and women were being left out systematically and Shirley Chisholm from Brooklyn. There is a great need for more women in the the political arena. I happen to believe that there are certain aspects of legislation. That probably would be given much more attention if we had more. Women's avoids the legislatures on the city state and national level. They did not believe it was really going to be the Supreme Court that was going to deliver rights. It's two women. Proponents in Congress believed that the era would really empower Congress and state legislatures to make the principle of equality real that includes title nine. Those hearings were going on at the same time that he are a hearings were going on it. Included the Comprehensive Child Child Development Act which would have created public childcare for everyone at the time they really saw the era as the constitutional foundation for a whole range of laws personal public policies. That would make equality rail for women in America.

Congress Phyllis Schlafly Civil Rights Movement Republican Party America New York Nineteen Twenties Thirties Martha Griffiths Senate United States Era Movement House of Representatives Carrie Chapman Catt Yara Movement Cuny Graduate Center Manhattan Julie professor
"100 years" Discussed on The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

08:38 min | 11 months ago

"100 years" Discussed on The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

"I don't think his name was you know John. Zee Michael. I I'm interviewing John C. Maxwell on the show this quick dammit I I am somebody I don't have to prove myself anymore to anybody. He's big. It's big name okay. All right so we will do our best to get him on. Let's listen to WHO Janis voicemail now paint that case trek so I was just listening to last Friday show. You guys are talking about goals setting for the New Year intention setting for the New Year. Something about We're going to fan meet up in La and well. I'm I have no idea how that went but I I didn't see any pressure on any fans so I'm sorry I'm I'm guessing people out there didn't make it out to the Purple Orchid Bar But Anyway Oy listening to the the goal and yet by the way thanks for thanks for revenue. Hey look see I can stop now is those were not zoom zoom. I can actually stop start the message I do like that. Okay keep going okay As a coach one of the things that I would recommend doing with that is not just a goal but actually create an action plan with mechanisms and strategies auditees and tactics You know say you can break down into manageable. Chunks of time very similar to what surf that about you guys getting together in meeting once a month in reviewing because that which gets tracked gets done on that which gets celebrated gets repeated. So when you do something well you guys should celebrate them and get big deal out of it because then you're gonna WanNa do it again figure out ways to tweak and make better and I think that's definitely one of his straight strike is the analysis portion of it and saying. Okay what can we do to make this better And then the second thing dog you love relationship selling you don't care about. How's the online stuff? I'm telling you have a talk with Virginia Moose. Because that's what she does. She teaches you how to take. Take those joint venture hurt. Her shed developed a relationship with the right people who have the right clients because she helps you identify your actual back target client Ideal client who will actually pay you money. So just have to talk with her hurt to have a conversation with her Because well our and she knows what she's talking about this at work and doing it in my business and so I'm implementing your system limiting her system and the choose them together are making me more money talk in Virginia. Just trust me on the phone. All right bye guys buy yes. Yeah she's right. She's right about that. I really should talk to Virginia. I do trust Virginia and I do know her there are some there are some opportunities. You're actually come into one with me in In San Diego J. Biaggi with a j just so we can and see how far we can get with this With this joint venture thing I think the joint venture idea in twenty twenty is really going to be a great one forest because that is the area that we have That we have really excel that over the last couple of years not that we don't accelerate the other stuff but I really do think that that's our best that really is our best target is to get more more involved with joint venture partnerships and trying to find as we are flexible enough to really move in so many different directions. So I don't know I don't know I I'm curious. I'm curious what what the outcome for that meeting. February is going to be and I'm and she is right though. I really should have a conversation with With Virginia I think and plan. That's a very good plan to. The voice mails an actual business with both of them. How crazy is that? We got that when we got it done so early in in the episode and we actually have a couple of topics topics to talk about. I know right. What's up with that? Do we have a topics wheel. Sound effect you still have that guy. I'm sorry did you know sound effects the actual wheel the wheel right here. Just keeping it all greased up and I say this is really cool. This is and I like how you're are expanding out the wheel. This is good. You've done all this all right. So are we ready to pick a topic. I'm going to spend that we all pick it. This is like the first time in twenty twenty definitely gently that we are spending the topics wheel but those that aren't even familiar with what the topic's wheel is because you haven't been doing the the nice guys factory episodes and now we're back over. It's a nice guys on business The Nice guys we all. The topics wheel is a wheel that we spin to do. What stricklin pick a topic? It's pretty pretty suffered sleds hence the name office. We'll spend the topics. We'll we'll pick a topic and we'll go from there and we may be getting getting much closer to Jimmy bellinger in the near future. I'm going to talk to you about that after the episode. Oh Oh okay is there. Something is from from a business perspective. It's hanging from it. I didn't know where you're you're taking me. Not Not having a baby or anything you know I will follow you no matter where you go curious you on on the thing that you have on the screen which it will be completely understandable. Anybody other than me because I'm looking at the screen you have the ability to drag that up just to expand that not not drag it up. That's just what what. What is the hold on that little? That little tiny rectangle in the middle middle rate there. Yeah Yeah what is that volume. That's that's really cool to 'cause you you can't do that in a city where you can hear okay you WanNa fade in fade out or now you WanNa mute apiece peace in the middle. Just do that damn okay all right I am. I am now screen software very very cool. Okay and it's not even like we need to pirated either because we actually own legitimate copy of it. I actually paid money for like two years ago. Yeah Wow okay all right. Thank you HINDENBURG. Appreciate it all right. You ready ready all right here. We got the wheel. Ally pull the mic a little far away from it so close to the MIC. Wow that's good When did a million dollars become affordable year mortgage? What the Hell is a hundred year mortgage alright so jt? And I are looking at houses in in California and I would honestly have to tell you that nothing. Short of a million dollars has even as even tickled my fancy even to the slightest. Why and what is amazing about that? Is that this is not like I'm not if you're listening to this and thinking. Oh my God you are so spoiled you are so ridiculous you are out of Control Sandler I would. I would tell you is well. Yes all those things are however her a million dollars buys re I mean maybe in the areas that we are looking at which is part. It's location location location when it comes real estate but in a couple of areas that we're looking a million dollars really does not buy you a home. That's much more than thirteen to eighteen hundred square feet and three bedrooms two baths on a small lot. Not In California well in La not the whole. Don't don't know a whole state now. Well no not just. La I mean la it's La proper. Yeah but it's also it's also the surrounding towns. Try to go to try to go to Ohi. Try to go to Santa. Barbara tried to go to to San San Francisco. Fuck San Francisco. You can't even get near San Francisco with that kind of money. Try to go to San Mateo tried to go to Santa Cruz anywhere like that. If have you get anywhere even close to the water and we're talking miles away from the water. Ohio is the is the place that we are looking seriously and it to buy a a home and you cannot find a home in Ohi- for less than a million dollars that is that something that you really really are. I mean okay maybe maybe eight or nine hundred thousand dollars. Isn't that close enough to a million dollars is round up to a million bucks. You know. It's Kinda crazy. Yeah so then it got me thinking. Aren't there some countries that have have mortgages. That are longer than thirty years. Like doesn't Japan have like the the hundred year mortgage. I've never heard anything like that. Where did you read about that? Or you're just throw.

Virginia La Ohi John C. Maxwell California WanNa Zee Michael Janis Virginia Moose San Francisco San Diego Japan Jimmy bellinger San San Francisco San Mateo Ohio Santa Cruz J. Biaggi
"100 years" Discussed on The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

10:08 min | 11 months ago

"100 years" Discussed on The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

"Sweden cuts Max mortgage term to one hundred and five years. Wow and was it before. I hate to wait wait. Let's see what's that was in two thousand sixteen let me see what the A hundred and five years to just one hundred. Regulators are now restricted mortgage's terms to one hundred five years You straight yet. I don't now what you see. I don't know what the I don't want to read through this entire article as I'm on here but yes one hundred year mortgages a l hundred forty here's why is the was is the maximum mortgage. I think I think how does that even happen. I don't know that's ridiculous. That's not even worth discussing well but but it is to a degree. Because look if I'm if let's say somebody is eighty years old and they are looking to get a mortgage now what mortgage term is is it. What maximum mortgage term in? The United States can innate year old. Get I I don't know I would guess a thirty year a thirty year mortgage exactly if the maximum mortgage is a thirty year mortgage mortgage so that would put them at one hundred and ten years. Old okay. So if if somebody that is twenty wants to buy a home and they want to buy a home but the home is a little bit outside of their range and they and we had offered them a one hundred year mortgage. How old would that person be when they when they Finish completing the mortgage seem a abou- Shane okay. So it's a it's a hundred and twenty as opposed to one hundred and tenth. Whoever is my point at all close to be made made here why? Why don't we have one hundred year mortgages here in the United States and say the answer because they're stupid lupe killed no idea that if you've taken my main answer away I have no? That's what I would say well because really I mean I mean. When was the last time now? Stricklin how many homes have you owned in. I'm GonNa put you on the witness Dan. How many homes have you owned in the last Forty years three. You've owned three homes. And I'm I think I've owned somewhere. I think. Probably six or seven so yeah because I had a house in New Jersey. I had a Condo in New Jersey. A House in New Jersey a rental property in Baltimore. I had a property in Baltimore that I purchased and another property in Columbia that I purchase. That's five right there and I'm sure there's another one that a missing tim young. How real estate mogul shy? I made money on one of them and I had to give it up in the air force. Okay so all right. So that's so. In the in the six homes or five homes that I've owned into three homes at you obsess nine or ten homes that we have owned together Let's see I'm adding how many times I actually Stayed in it for the thirty years and was able to pay it off and I am allowing you to count that to. How many of those have you been minds are real easy number? How about you? How many of I actually completed the thirty year loan and paid off? That'll be zero zero for me. Also what is the difference between in having a thirty year mortgage and having a one hundred year mortgage with the exception of the payment is going to be lower well from the bank standpoint and hopefully from your responsibility standpoint. It's how much is it going to be worth when you go to sell it. And how much do you pay on it because when you're paying a thirty year loan you know you're a good five or seven years in before you even start eeking away. The principal even a little tiny and you know what the average amount of time that a homeowner is in a home. I have no idea seven years. Oh interesting so so I hear you so I I understand that and I hear where you're going that hey listen you don't even start to attack any of the principal pretty much. I mean you do at the beginning but it's so so little it doesn't matter but seven or eight years in you do start to take a bigger chunk out of that. So what then is the difference if you make a hundred year mortgage if it makes attaining real estate that much more easy easy for someone. That's that's out there. I mean wouldn't wouldn't they the advantage. Be Hey now I have a property now I feel like I'm I'm I've kind of reached a a goal in my life where I wanna go and I have a I have a one hundred year mortgage and so what if it's one hundred years. I'm never going to get done with anyway. And when I and when I die and when. Jj Dies if we're the ones that own the property and she stays in it for as long as she wants to in continues to make the payments. What's the difference you move in the houses one hundred thousand dollars or let's say the house is is a million dollars? We move out. We still pretty much the same million dollars because on one hundred year mortgage. I can assure you that you don't start attacking any of the principal. Probably until you're around you're thirty days house for Thirty Years Anyway Do we know what that kind of thinking led to a called. The Great Depression Gretchen. I don't know two thousand eight. Yeah yeah that was the whole thing they were giving away mortgages for nothing and people could put one percent down and and get mortgage even though they couldn't really afford to pay it because the values of real estate was going up and up and up and up so then banks figured. Hey Okay who cares. If they can't pay the loan back it'll be worth we own the home. You know the bank check right. It'll be worth more when they default on it. So who cares. Well yeah that really. That didn't work so good. Did it. Because when the market collapsed and everything got fucked up everybody lost money and the market tanked and now people were sitting on houses that they code one hundred thousand dollars in the house was worth literally thirty thousand dollars except that's not a good plan either but where is the happy medium in between why is thirty years. Here's an arbitrary number that we're able to pick and I can say. Hey Okay I have a mortgage payment. That's now two thousand dollars a month as opposed to five. I mean we have friends in in Santa Chris they're literally they're looking at rental properties and the print rental property cost is fifty five hundred dollars every month. Who wants to pay? Vat Pat. Who wants to pay that? That's just crazy. I couldn't even imagine I can't imagine that either to a different area you have to move. You gotta live somewhere else I I I would agree with you with one exception. It's a really nice area to want to live. Well that's what you pay for it. That's the trade off an for that whole really nice area you think so. Can't we have regional mortgages. That are that are along are select out people more affordability. I mean unless you only want the rich to be okay. We're moving on you know. I know you didn't set the four minute timer but I think we've exhausted that topic if I am really really curious if you're in our community and you have and you have some words to say about that. Apparently Strickland is totally against the hundred year mortgage and I would also look at one other thing before before we move on and we will move on very quickly. Okay we have now discovered that you and I both have had nine or ten mortgages between the two of us and they both they were all either either fifteen I had a fifteen year mortgage on one of the with either fifteen or thirty year mortgages. Okay exactly how many of those strickland did you default on. Oh not same here. Okay so if you take a responsible person that has an excellent credit rating and has a and has a track record of paying debt. Why wouldn't there'd be the ability to have a one hundred year mortgage because the value can easily go down and you may have a great track record of paying came back but if the value goes down and you've been in a place for ten or fifteen years and even after that amount of time it's worth less than you paid for it? I'M GONNA no I'M GONNA call all bowl shuttle met because I'm going to say it's irrelevant. How much money that I owe on my property at based upon the property value? It's all an illusion anyway. The property value. Oh you if you say to me. Based upon the economy my house was worth five hundred thousand dollars a now because the the the economy tanked. It's worth three hundred thousand dollars but I took a five hundred thousand dollar one hundred year mortgage on it. What's the difference if I owed five whether I have thirty or a or a hundred year mortgage? It shouldn't matter okay. So let me ask you had a number of properties in number mortgages and Have for any of those properties you actually when you when you finished when he sold the property yes did you actually have to write a check. Yes thank for any US re ask fucking yes. I bought a house. One hundred twenty eight thousand dollars. It was my second property operative. I bought it in northern New Jersey. And the and it was in one thousand nine hundred ninety one thousand nine hundred thousand nine hundred ninety when I bought the property and the and the economy tanked in that specific town. My House went from one hundred and twenty eight thousand dollars I had an Fha mortgage. I bought I borrowed one hundred twenty five thousand dollars when the property I sold sold at ninety thousand dollars I came to the settlement table with a check for twenty eight thousand dollars. Wow that's so high. I understand the import I could would have easily walked away and wreck my credit for seven years or I could have done the right thing which was to write the check and and did I mention the fact that I stayed in the Hab. I held the house for four years years beyond that because the property values tanks much. Losing six hundred dollars every fucking month. Wow so what I would say is I would say is. It doesn't matter whether I had a thirty one hundred year mortgage and I'm not saying that I'm an extraordinary human being or did do the right thing. No matter what the circumstances I just knew that it didn't it doesn't matter if it's a thirty thirty or one hundred year mortgage property values are property values. Whatever I O on that property at the end is going to be the same? I'm it's GONNA be it's irrelevant based upon the it's it's a bit. It's irrelevant whether I have a thirty one hundred year mortgage unless somebody can tell me legitimately. Why can't I shouldn't be able to have one other than they're just not offering them? That's fine and they don't now from here so it's not like I'm not worried about it. I'm not thinking about well. Why can't I and I'm going to go to the government and try to get my hundred year mortgage? I don't understand why they don't have them because people should step.

New Jersey United States principal Sweden Baltimore Strickland Shane Columbia Dan tim Jj Fha Santa Chris
"100 years" Discussed on At Liberty

At Liberty

07:57 min | 11 months ago

"100 years" Discussed on At Liberty

"Ninety five. They're probably not it deport him but I was raised by Trotskyites right so skepticism of the capitalist structure and a capitalist government this is deep and fundamental to my core and incidentally skepticism. About a Stalinist government also because like I said Trotsky on just a plain old communist. Yeah so I got that with my breast milk and one of the things that does appeal to me about the has always appealed to be is the purity already of the commitment to that so the freedom is freedom of expression. It's not freedom of expression for people who for example believe in equality so the skokie cases the cases about White Supremacist and Nazis. I felt like when I learned about those cases as a kid when I read more about a law school that seemed to me to be the finest expression of what the ACLU is doing. And what's interesting to me right now. In terms of the moment that we find ourselves in is that organizations like say you who are devoted to those freedoms could find themselves under attack both the right and the left you know in some ways. I worry that there is less of an understanding of the imports. Are doing that now. We have to understand where that suspicion comes from from right. I mean if your life family security is not their attack by the contemporary white supremacists in the White House at their their various billions of fellow travelers in contemporary American society. It can be agonizing traumatizing to to see an organization that's devoted to your civil rights also speak on behalf of theirs but I think that that commitment is really important to maintain and it's something that I admire most about the sale because it's hard to do man. It's hard to do in a time where you feel like there is a fundamental threat to say. You know it's not just we get to speak it's all of us. It's not just we who are protected from incarceration. It's for you know false and problematic reasons. It's all of us well as an African American rigging on free speech for the ACLU. I can tell you. I hardly understand how how hard these issues can be. And I do want to highlight that. The book is obviously a celebration of the centennial of the ACLU and catalogs are most famous and some lesser lesser-known victories but there are some notes of Critique L.. Absolutely you mentioned the skokie situation in the introduction to the book but then there's also an essay by Scott Turow on Buckley. V Vallejo around campaign. Your finance an issue where large numbers of people who agree with the ACLU on most things internally and externally disagree with us on campaign finance. So I wonder how you handled those critical notes. Personally I was thrilled because I'm I'm in the camp that thinks Buckley versus Vallejo is deeply problematic. And I don't think that corporate speech is human speech and I think campaign finance what's isn't speech and but I disagree with the ACLU on this tour which does not impact my deep commitment to the organization. And I think the same thing is true Scott's wrote so when Scott's I'm going to take that case I was thrilled and from the get-go he said and to be clear I'm critical of it and I was like go for it and then when the s acumen I thought the weight this is an yell. At S- book. This is or Michael's book this we're doing this to celebrate the ACLU. Maybe I should just put this. You know blow this by Anthony David and immediately. They said what you're talking about we're thrilled. This is great in fact. This is our favorite thing of course in a book. Celebrating celebrating the centennial. A city you there should be essays critical of ACLU. I love that I love that. The response was immediate and didn't even warrant consideration consideration. Of course we support this. Of course we want the idea for the book was hatched 2016. We've now just ticked over into twenty twenty. It's still hard for me you to say Happy New Year exactly at the moment. But I'm wondering now that you've completed this project as you mentioned and as I mentioned you've got lots and lots of balls in the air whether they be novels TV any other form I can think of. You're quite busy but I wonder with relations this particular project. What does the before and after look like what have you learned? What if what surprised you about the process well necessarily surprised but it was just so heart warming you know people? Oh like Geraldine Brooks people like Marlin James People like an Patchett. Some George Saunders. Jesmyn Ward they're inundated with requests for their time and when they speak they make tens of thousands of dollars and when they write they make many dollars word and we were saying do something for absolutely nothing and it was so heartwarming. How eager people were? I thought we would write a book with twenty contributors and we have over forty people. Aw involved in this volume so that was something that I found really hurting. And it's particularly report to me personally when I drift through the world and sometimes feel like the entire country has revealed itself to be what my dad always said. It was which is a snake's nest of racist this Toma folks and Anti Immigrants But it reminds me that the truth is that we are in the majority those of us who are committed to civil rights those us who are patriots who believe in the Constitution. Those of us who believe that this is a union that must be constantly in the process of perfecting itself that it it was founded on terribly racist principles in many ways but that there was something pure about the constitution that has allowed room to grow. Oh and change that there was space to create as the phrase is a more perfect union that we are actually in the majority. There are more people in this country like us then art art and because of our deeply problematic electoral system because tiny states rule states. Waiter states have so much more power within larger mortgage verse states because of the way the American political system is structured. We can feel like minority. We can look at a map like the minority already but we are the majority and my husband is an optimist and he believes that the majority will prevail. And sometimes I just allow. Oh myself to believe that too. And the moment we're unpacked the box of books in there were all these great looking books in hardcover and there was all these amazing writers names on on them and I thought okay well. This is a moment that I believe that that potential that we will get through this and the America that is possible will will prevail on the other end and then of course I woke up the next day and you know I was like well. It's all over soon and now let's go build a bunker and it was easy Linda. How much money do you have to have? Can someone else give me a corner of their bunker. Well that may be the closest to ending on a positive note that we're well take this opportunity to thank you very much for your time. Thank you for your years. Literally Years of work on this volume Al-Yaum. It's a beautiful book. It's touching book. It's a powerful book. We really appreciate your time and thank you for all that you've done. Thank you so much. You guys are the greatest. Thanks very much for listening. If you'd like to hear more conversations like this one please be sure to subscribe that Liberty Wherever you get your podcasts and rate and review review the show we really appreciate the feedback till next week piece..

ACLU skokie Scott Turow Trotsky Trotskyites Vallejo White House Anthony David Jesmyn Ward George Saunders Buckley Michael America Geraldine Brooks Linda Marlin James
"100 years" Discussed on At Liberty

At Liberty

13:58 min | 11 months ago

"100 years" Discussed on At Liberty

"Cases shaped American history and brought about the kind of America that people know and love fiction is a great way to help the medicine go down sense and I didn't had no idea what we're going to get right. I mean especially when you ask like the most important American writers you know Oh carte blanche do whatever you want. We had no idea what we're gonna get but we just hoped an imagine that the essays that we received would shine a light and allow the layperson not lawyers to really understand why what the US doing is so necessary and how this fight for civil and human. Right is the most patriotic thing that an American can do and that any American has done a really powerful awful story. Of course you're the fiction writer. You were the CO editor of this book and other books. But you're also an attorney and former public defender. Yes in some ways. This was is the perfect project for you bringing all those different skills to bear and you not only edited the piece but also contributed a piece right. I wrote an essay edited. The mall help solicit the writer in one of these books as a huge project. It's like you know it's almost tried to say it's like herding cats but it really. It's like herding we cells forget the macaques and it must have been particularly difficult. Heard these cats given that they weren't being paid for this particular project is exactly although you know what and nobody ever won. Nobody said anything about that. Nobody ever wanted to be paid. Everybody the thing is I mean. We're all looking for a way to help right. We are all looking for something to do in this time of crisis the where we can bring our own individual skills to bear and you know not everybody's a lawyer not everybody in court on everybody is able to go. You know witness at the border the incarceration and torture of small children but everybody everybody wants to do something so I felt like you know. This is a way to allow lots of different people with a specific skill. Set to participate in the work of resistance. which is what we all have to be doing all the time now? You talked about the range of writers that you have they're all imminent in their own way But they take slightly different approaches to the work as you gave them carte blanche but many of the writers really made it a very personal story connected the cases in some way eight to their own personal experience and this was very much the case for your essay which addressed O'Connor Donaldson which is a case that granted due process to people with mental health disabilities. And and of course you've discussed your own bipolar disorder. A great deal so I was wondering if you might be willing to read an excerpt of European the end of your essay where you reflect on the cases relevance to your life and absolutely would be as a high functioning person with a mood disorder who has written openly about her mental illness. I found myself self reading Kenneth Donaldson's case and personal account with an eye toward drawing a distinction between him and me is if to reassure myself that I wouldn't ever have fallen into such a circumstance I latched onto his various expressions of seemingly paranoid delusions with a sigh of relief relief. I'm not crazy like that. I thought AM I. It's true that I've never been hospitalized. But I came of age in Post O'Connor versus versus Donaldson World where I have my grandparent's generation. It's entirely possible that my occasional bouts of suicidal itchen would have resulted in commitment event and once committed. I like Donaldson might have found it all but impossible to convince the arbiters of my incarceration that I should be free. Thank you very much and I think the connection that you draw their between the client or the person who actually brought the case and the broader impact I think really speaks speaks to the heart of impact litigation which is what the ACLU does on a daily basis. We tried to pick cases that have a broader impact to try to make a point for the society. Yeah I wonder how you navigated the sort of tension between the individual story of the case while also making the broader impact. It's almost analogous August to the way fiction can believe both on the micro level investigating a particular character while also trying to have some resonance with the reader. That's a really interesting in question you know I think for the older cases. It's often easier because they're already sort of part of the historical firmament so the the The ramifications of them are more important than the contemporary imagination than the individual cases. Although that's one of the exciting things about some of these essays which actually kind of dig big into those original cases and shed light on not just the law that resulted but what actually happens in those individual cases but I think the balance silence is what's most interesting because it is those personal stories that gives the reader something to latch onto you. Give them away to understand. Analogy makes things comprehensible in a way. That simple description does not and you know I think law students learn that you know when you're in law school and you're presenting a case when you're called on by your professor the first thing you do is you. Give the facts of the case. It's a really a useful tool for student because it's memorable and it allows you to really kind of understand through analogy and I think that's kind of what this book does to. It uses analogy Ajayi and personal story both of the writers and then also back towards the facts of the original cases to make them comprehensible and to allow you that kind of moment kind of empathy that can make you realize that Brown versus board of Education isn't just about segregation at a macro level. It's about what happens funds to a specific child or a specific group of children when they are not given the opportunities that the people around them are in the forward are legal director. David Cole writes a lawyer's job is to weave a compelling narrative in the hope of persuading a court that injustice has been done and that the court has the power our to right the wrong. You're in a unique position where you've been both illegal writer and illegal storyteller but also a fiction writer. I mean the law often plays is heavily into your stories. I always tell people that though. The murder mysteries were the first books that I ever published. They weren't the first fiction than I ever. Because one of my jobs dubs was to write sentencing memoranda. And in those you have to convince the judge that your client is the most lovely person on earth does not deserve the terrible at the mandatory minimums imposed on him or her. Well you know it. Creativity is certainly a part of legal practice absolutely although one and is not permitted to lie. No one really wants to fiction writing. You gotTA write a book but license and embroidery. That's the name indicate. Many person with a law degree has eventually ended up writing novels. But I'm curious you talked about. It's everyone's responsibility to join the resistance at this point and clearly there's a role for ACLU lawyers. There's a role for fiction writers and I wonder if you can sort of compare those different roles that you've done. Is there a place where the law ends in this kind of need for empathy and storytelling begins on a broader level. Look think in terms of where one can have the most impact on society. I wouldn't presume to say that. Fiction has the same impact as the kind of impact litigation that the ACLU does that changes the culture and the legal system. Tom and the lives of people in a very specific and in a massive way you have access to education and you have privileged than you need to use that access in that privilege village to help bring people up behind you. So you know in terms of WHO's doing more good for the world they hands down but I do think there's a role for fiction in your part of that is just pure entertainment. It's just giving joy but part of it is like a talked about engendering empathy. I feel like a person who reads the work of Jesmyn Ward for example has a harder time being a miserable piece of coop racist. Then a person who doesn't read the work of Jesmyn Ward. I mean I think the capacity to see the other as human just like you is something that can really be done through fiction. So it's like a twofer it's beautiful and entertaining and then also Has Serves US larger purpose. But you know they're they're many writers who kind of reject that premise. And say you know my job is not to work towards social justice. My job is just to write the best words that I can and do you ascribe to that in your other non editorial overtly political work. Do you feel that you have a message. Obligation to say a something particularly relevant. Oh you know I think because I came to fiction after being a public defender fiction was always a tool for me. I mean and I look I I write because I like telling stories. I love right because I love to read but all my work has a larger message so the TV series. That I just had out on net flix. It's called unbelievable. His story of what happens what we don't believe women who are victims of rape and my novels have been about things as disparate as homophobia in the Orthodox Jewish community. In a lighthearted mystery. I would like to point out too easy to pull off. No it was quite something. And who does he pulled it off and to you know the right to choose and the price of ignoring a woman's right to choose. I mean I wrote a novel about mandatory minimum sentences so my fiction is if not overtly political than purposely political and I try as I get better at it. I hope I become less die tactic. That's the goal to kind of trick people into at least enjoying the book even while you you try to get this larger message across. I think it comes through especially one of the themes of the book. We talked about it being resistance and in some ways the ACLU has had a long history of taking controversial cases. Defending folks that we don't agree with really trying to broaden the political dialogue as wide as we can and I know that there's also resonates a lot with a lot of writers because censorship banned books and those sorts of issues have always been front of mind for creative folks in your husband. Michael Chaban who co edited volume with you actually wrote about the banning of Ulysses and the brilliant lawyer the Aclu who argued the case and got the ban overturned. So I wonder if you can just talk about. Is there a special place. I'M GONNA. I'm biased I'm a first amendment lawyer at the I wonder if as a writer the first First Amendment cases and particularly the ban books hold a special resonance absolutely every writer that I talked to and every writer I know is now. Oh very on some level really worried about the first amendment perils of what we all do and that's one of the reasons that we included journalists like Timothy Egan Bill Oh Finnigan a nonfiction writers in the collection is because of that because they are particularly at risk right now but I don't think there's a writer in the country who isn't thinking about the banned books movement the vilification of the press the vilification of intellectuals electricals writers people who think and write for a living. I mean it's hard for people to believe that we are at a dangerous time in terms of the First Amendment because we we take so for granted I right to say whatever we want America I mean that's the rhetoric of the right to you. Know like how this is my first amendment rights. I get to say no. Oh kill all black people because I have a right to kill all black people but we take that for granted all of us and we on some level. Don't really believe that we could lose our rights to free expression. But I actually tell me if you agree with me. I mean you're on the of this actually believe that we are facing a constitutional crisis that we are facing the potential of losing that right to all unfettered free speech. You know within reason and or you raise an interesting point. I mean for my perspective I come at the First Amendment and free speech from an international human rights perspective. And I actually agree with you. And I am not not much of an American exceptionalism and I've seen what happens when you have restrictions on speech and when dissent is allowed to be trampled by the government. And it's not pretty the I've had friends and colleagues go to jail more than once for criticizing the government for standing up for different unpopular groups whether they'd be lgbt indigenous groups. Activists Fists Environmentalists. Whoever it is so I agree with you? I think you know we're only our rights are only as strong as we're willing to protect them and if we change the rules society changes ages and there's nothing that says that that can't happen or it won't happen so I totally agree. That vigilance is necessary. And that there's nothing that's preordained about freedom in the United States and I think the thread of it is this sort of inherent distrust of government's ability to fairly regulate especially speech. And I know that sort of contrarian ISM is one of your hallmarks as well. I wonder if that was also sort of a resonance with the ACLU and we do have this sort of fundamental skepticism schism and belief in people as opposed to the rulers. Email absolutely. Look I was raised by. I can say this now. He's.

writer ACLU O'Connor Donaldson United States America bipolar disorder mood disorder editor attorney David Cole Jesmyn Ward Post O'Connor director murder Tom Ajayi
"100 years" Discussed on At Liberty

At Liberty

04:39 min | 11 months ago

"100 years" Discussed on At Liberty

"From the this is at liberty. I'm Emerson Sykes Staff Attorney here here at the ACLU and your host January nineteenth marks works ACLU's one hundredth birthday to commemorate the centennial. Some of today's most significant writers contributed to a new anthology of essays on landmark. ACLU Jio you cases. The roster of writers includes Jesmyn Ward Salman Rushdie and Dave eggers discussing cases like Brown v Board of Education. Miranda Vieira Zona Zona and Roe v Wade just to name a few. The book is called fight of the century and it was the brainchild of today's guest. Ayelet Waldman an accomplished writer and former public like defender who co edited the book along with her husband and fellow writer. Michael Shaybah. We'll discuss. What inspired this effort and how storytelling in the courtroom in literature can shape our nation and our lives? Islet as I understand it. The idea for this book came about after the last presidential election. Can you take us back to two thousand sixteen. Jean what were you feeling. And what action do I have to go back to. Two Thousand Sixteen. Don't have to revisit the trauma the ongoing or we'll basically I like everyone Nelson Sane. America was horrified and devastated although I was not surprised because I.

ACLU Miranda Vieira Zona Zona Emerson Sykes Staff Attorney Jesmyn Ward Salman Rushdie Ayelet Waldman writer Nelson Sane Dave eggers Michael Shaybah America Jean Board of Education Wade Roe Brown
"100 years" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"100 years" Discussed on Ideas

"<SpeakerChange> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> You've <Speech_Music_Female> been listening to the <Speech_Music_Female> first episode Kosovar. <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> Two part <Advertisement> series <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Tom <Speech_Music_Female> Thomson <Advertisement> one <Speech_Music_Female> hundred <Advertisement> years from <Speech_Music_Female> now <Advertisement> produced <Speech_Music_Female> by Sean <Advertisement> Foley <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> in <Speech_Music_Female> episode <Advertisement> two <Speech_Music_Female> Sean <Advertisement> Turns <Speech_Music_Female> from the death <Speech_Music_Female> of Tom <Advertisement> Thomson <Speech_Music_Female> to <Advertisement> his life <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and to <Speech_Music_Female> our <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Advertisement> special thanks <Speech_Music_Female> to <Advertisement> an penman <Speech_Music_Female> in Vancouver <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> the <Advertisement> McMichael <Speech_Music_Female> Canadian art <Speech_Music_Female> collection and <Speech_Music_Female> to the Friends <Speech_Music_Female> of lead church <Speech_Music_Female> music <Speech_Music_Female> by the Elgon <Speech_Music_Female> Quin unsociable <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> from <Advertisement> their two thousand seventeen <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> album <Speech_Music_Female> sonic <Advertisement> Palette <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> technical technical <SpeakerChange> <Advertisement> production <Speech_Female> by <Advertisement> Danielle <Speech_Female> do val and <Speech_Music_Female> around Williams <Speech_Music_Female> web <Speech_Music_Female> production by Liz <Speech_Music_Female> Nausea and Lisa <Speech_Music_Female> USA. <Speech_Music_Female> The executive <Speech_Music_Female> producer is <Speech_Female> Greg Kelly coming. <Speech_Music_Female> In <Speech_Music_Female>

"100 years" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

09:18 min | 1 year ago

"100 years" Discussed on Ideas

"In two thousand seventeen eighteen the McMichael Canadian collection brought wayland and Thompson face to face on its gallery walls and in beautiful and provocative book the myths entails we value most the ones we put I end up being the ones that purport to tell the story to the rest of the world to every neophyte who comes under the spell of Tom Thomson while it may require more effort. It's good to keep the true breadth and depth of the Tom Thomson mythos else in mind and to examine it with a discerning heart. It's a mythos that drives auction prices into the stratosphere which really means the the paintings are priceless and it's a mythos that reaches clear across oceans. My name is Jordan pronounced and Scottish manner. I'm the director Michael Canadian collection. I'm British. Yes indeed yeah. That's great though that's great. If you wouldn't mind just describing to me how you came to to Tom Thompson's work well. It happened a long time ago actually back in the one thousand nine hundred eighty S. I was working in the Royal Academy in those days in London and I was based in the library and and I just came across a book simple as that I was intrigued because it was Thompson's work particularly bicker seven two I was so immediate and on although it was using techniques that were recognized these postimpressionist bright colors dabs dabs of paint very painfully it. Nonetheless didn't look like any landscape I've ever seen and so this was the assumption this was Canada. This was somehow different front could not be Britain. It could not be Russia could not be Norway. This Canada looked like and of course that's an intriguing idea to follow through. I've I've seen what Lauren Harrison tontons painting. I went to being in that wish Tommy Thompson painted and what you come out of is thinking well. It doesn't like Tom Thompson painting. He translated it into his own language and yet I can see as I say I've talked to many any many Canadians who say you must you must look at those landscapes. Look exactly like that. Don't we've learned to look at them. In that that way we project onto landscapes. That's the that's a evidence of success my goodness you know if you're an artist who can actually change the way you look at things. They're very few dumb. Ian Jardine has a particular gift for expressing just why we've struggled to make peace with Thompson's death. Maybe it's his transatlantic point of view which affords him a wide angle look at the story. The reality of it all seems to have struck him after screening. Tom Sometimes in film at his previous post. The dulwich picture gallery in London a few years ago. I had to get up. Thank the the producers and I'm afraid I absolutely blocked embarrassing and it was not drafted canoe floating upside down the last image in the film and I'm sorry just even even now I can't. I haven't got to grips with this whole and I don't think Canada has really and I think that's why people why there is such an industry of kind of looking at trying to find reasons for it. There is no reason for it. It doesn't really matter I mean you've paddled up on July eighth and didn't come back and then nothing can bring him back but even even now I think Canada's still struggling to come to terms with that because not only because he was so brilliant but also there's something about his image which it feeds into that so well that man look good in a Tuque. I'm just saying you know. I've never seen a photo of Tom. Thomson just didn't look like it'd be imposed posed by the young Gary Cooper. He just seems to have his life seems to have been photographed in an all filming way. They looked like stills from film you you know he was just very food to genetic. He's very silent. You don't have his voice ever. He wasn't recorded too. You have silent beautiful brilliant genius and you can never get closer to him than that. The more I allow this this unknowing knowing sort of void to be the more. I seem to be getting from the the paintings Is there something unique about a painting that can do that to a person. I think it's part of the you know it's partly a response to a brilliant technician at work which is immediate and that's so when something is is that you feel you're close to the artist but I think when you also have all of these kinds of myths surrounding surrounding and growing and new books being written every every year you have this kind of richness as swirling cloud of of Fort Fort World surrounding the person who is absolutely silent and gone and yet the work still speaks so it's a very rich mixture and I think the two feet on each other you know so that you no longer just look with is you're looking with a whole kind of mindset satin and that's very special to him. I it occurs to me all the time standing in front of a little sketch or even the finished painting by Tom Thomson you feel it behind the eyes so there's that personal identification with him to that again. Part of this drive saved create personality to create something out of very little. We have I've never lived anywhere but Ontario. I'm steeped in the wind. The Sky the color and the legend of Tom Thomson and I still feel a restlessness deep in my bones. I'm reminded of a moment from my conversation with Cheryl Grace Grace the moment where I ask the unanswerable question. I can't help but repeat to everyone I seek out. There seems to be a discomfort or dissatisfaction in simply not knowing certain things about Tommy Thompson and I wonder why can't we just live with human beings but is there a cost to not being able to just say okay. It's a mystery that we can still get people coming out to see the plaque on the CAIRN and visit the McMichael have the mystery draw them in but we can't can't seem to make peace with with not knowing you know now more than ever more than we did. Maybe fifty years ago even well. I I wasn't kidding when I sort of blurted it out. It's human nature look what we did have done continue to do with Franklin. It's the same human desire for answers and the same I would say fundamental human fear of the unknown. North Fried nailed it on the head when he called called garrison mentality our our needs set of hold ourselves safe both psychologically and physically in in a walled in environment and what we're wiling out is all those forces of nature that we can't control and that's that has that has mythic thick and missile legitimising power and ironically. I don't sense any of that in Thomson's this painting I mean even northern something Northern River which does convey a certain forboding when you actually experienced the the work what you receive seve is not something in my estimation that comes from a person who's fearful in that situation this beautiful irony in it and certainly if I go so do the McMichael which I do every every chance I get I. It's not fair that I feel. It's it's it's a sense of beauty of harmony of of a certain sense of exhilaration. Everybody's going to have a different responses sponsored so subjective so personal but yeah it's ironic that he thompson the man mythologised over and over again in this way when his actual paintings seemed to be telling a different story but then they can't. We can't know what there's that story is because he never talked about it he and then he's gone so we don't know what he thought he was doing in those paintings thanks but for me. I think he I think he was painting. What he saw and things that he loved it. He appreciated enjoyed.

Tom Thomson Tommy Thompson Canada Tom Tom Thompson McMichael London McMichael Canadian Thompson Jordan Cheryl Grace Grace director Michael Canadian Lauren Harrison Royal Academy Britain wayland Ian Jardine Gary Cooper
"100 years" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"100 years" Discussed on Ideas

"Eventually she and Tom find themselves alone on a northern Lake Cheryl Grace Examines Joyce Wieland in the far shore in her book inventing Tom Thomson Tom then you are making love in in the water and the camera does not sit over Tom's shoulder or for that matter over eulalie shoulder. I think we go back and forth. I think the camera comes in long shot and then comes right in close with the couple sideways so that level with the right level with the surface of the water and it's the movement of the water that tells you what they're doing and and and they are looking at each other and and so the the tendency of the camera in the hands of a male director is to shoot the scene looking at the woman as the object of desire and and a beautifying her in that that way so you know dozens and dozens and dozens of films with sex scenes in them tend to work that way and and she also pretty much dictates the terms of of the of the encounters at first she sort of I goes in the tent and indicates that that he'd be welcome there and then all of a sudden he gets thrown out of the tent and she she goes out into the work UH.

Tom Thomson Tom Joyce Wieland Lake Cheryl Grace director
"100 years" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"100 years" Discussed on Ideas

"And that's the book that I got Doc. Gregory clogged thinking about Thompson as an ideal case study in Canadian history. He looked at the secondary accounts of Thompson's life. The biographies piece how others told his story and then compared them with whatever primary sources he could find. He wrote a book of his own. It was decidedly different from Judge Judge William Little's potboiler. My Name is Dr Gregory clubhouse. I am the author of the many deaths of Tom. Thomson separating fact from fiction as well as is the research director for death on painted lake the Tom Thomson tragedy which is a a website of documents information images related Gitam thompsons life and death little really does lay out what seems like a pretty convincing intriguing provocative thesis that Thompson was likely murdered and that was my point of entry as well and I thought well there's all these sorts of strings things not talked about theories about out a drunken fight that led to Thompson's death that perhaps he had been married or an impregnated a woman you know that he got in a fight about the war. There were just so many factors to keep in mind that I thought this is better than any contemporary crime. TV show this would be really exciting for people to get their teeth into and to think about how to study history. There's something that seems kind of at least ethically suspect talked about going in kind of exhuming a body seemingly on a whim some October night with your buddies how does that how did you come to terms with that ethical aspect of Thompson's death and the aftermath to to speak about William Liberals and his friends ethical decisions. I mean that's a fascinating fascinating case. They have a long history in the park. They'd been campers there as boys they leased cottages on Canoe Lake and I'll Gahan Park and so they took it upon themselves to explore to say well. Let's just go and see if we can discover something and of course they didn't know exactly where the body had been buried initially so they sunk three the holes trying to find something and on the third hole they discovered remains. I think that question of ethics is a really important one and it's troublesome one in this case what I talk about in the many deaths of Tom Thomson. There's a recording by one of the other men involved in the case. Frank Frank Brown and it was made before the OH P P analyze the remains and publicly stated what their findings were about the remains and at that time browde is saying well. We figured that it was okay to do this without asking for approval from the park. They didn't seek out anybody's approval at they just went over and start digging because if there was no body there we weren't doing anything wrong or illegal and if there was a body there I think the assumption was well. We'll be forgiven for this transgression Russian because clearly we've changed history if you will or discovered some sort of public lie but even they had their doubts about what they were doing the start of the legitimacy or the ethics about what they were doing and in the end the said it's not it doesn't look like it's Thomson that's within about a month of analyzing the remains Dr Noble Sharp who is the head of the Attorney General's laboratory which is uh-huh today the equivalent the center Forensic Sciences noble sharp came up to a park with an officer they exhumed the remains sharp brought them back to Toronto and had them analyzed. They were an x ray technician. Analyze them an anthropologist sharp himself and based on all of these is people's findings. They announced that they were not. Tom Thompsons remains in fact they weren't even the remains of a European heritage male. Yes I think the identified the remains as possibly indigenous origin right but that's not the end of that that confusion even about where Thompson has buried seems to you have been perpetuated to some degree which you say that's correct. Absolutely I think one of the things that I suggest many deaths of Tom. Thomson is the ball buckled the conspiracy theories the murder theory the suicide theory those have come to actually displace what was believed in announced in nineteen seventeen and and held sway for decades after that the idea that Thompson was murdered or committed suicide has come to be. I won't say the Party line but but the dominant manent understanding the one that most people know about the case have read those are the arguments that are most frequently made that somehow you know anthropologists apologists an x ray technician and doctors and the people who examined the corpse all got it wrong in twenty when he eighteen judge William Little Son. John Little published his own book who killed Tom. Thomson the truth about the murder of one of the twentieth the at century's most famous artists. It's based on a decade of research in the book John Little reminisces about his father's obsession and doggedly pursues the case himself he enlists to retired police detectives to look at the evidence in the murder plot deepens.

Thompson Tom Thomson technician Gahan Park Judge Judge William Little Tom Tom Thompsons John Little Canoe Lake murder Gregory Dr Gregory clubhouse Dr Noble Sharp Frank Frank Brown William Liberals William Little research director browde center Forensic Sciences Toronto
"100 years" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"100 years" Discussed on Ideas

"Thompsons since death has inspired myriad responses a canonizing impulse a genuine desire for the truth sensationalist theorising and even gory bit of grave taking that gory bid came in the nineteen fifties courtesy of William little a reform school superintendent who later became a judge and three of his friends they decided to exhume Thomson's body or what they thought was Thompson's body one October weekend there had been persistent rumors that the body had never been moved from its initial resting place in nineteen seventeen the little cemetery in the woods near Canoe Lake in Oregon can park the Thompson family wanted him buried at the Churchyard Lee Ontario Niro and sound the undertaker. They sent to retrieve Tom's body worked alone at night and somehow appeared with a sealed casket on the train station platform the next morning. What have you got a body Body Thompson. You've got Tom's body by one authority. I've instructions from the family the brother I suppose they want to have the proper proper burial or don't you consult the thirties about something like that. I have all the instructions I need and I know my business. Well as you do probably better. We'll not about that. You just wait right here. I'm not waiting for anything judge. Little's investigations became part of a CBC TV special in the late sixties. He's called was Tom Thomson murdered. I think the Thomson met some person struck by a pedal or some corruption left Amman conscious and left to ever willing that paddle in the awkward position of having a body that may or may not have been dead and therefore what to do and then he published a book the Tom Thomson mystery it was a bestseller and a first taste the Thompson mystique for many at times. William Little's version comes across like a twisted Hardie boys tail explain Elaine what had been exposed at the bottom of the pit gabby jumped down head first to explore the opening. He thrust his hand into the aperture. pull it a bone which appeared to be a football of human body. At last we found the grave and body of Tom. Thomson showed it Frank. We've really hit it. Exclaimed Gabeira joined this. Is it fellows ellos. I was speechless.

Tom Thomson Body Thompson William Little Little Churchyard Lee Ontario Canoe Lake superintendent Oregon Gabeira Amman gabby Hardie Elaine Frank
"100 years" Discussed on 2 Girls 1 Podcast

2 Girls 1 Podcast

09:30 min | 1 year ago

"100 years" Discussed on 2 Girls 1 Podcast

"Hey guys we are always looking for ways to make this show better and get it in front of more listeners so you can help us do that by heading over to daily Dot Dot com slash to g one P to take a super quick anonymous survey that will help us improve the show and understand where and how so you guys like to listen. That's Daily Dot Dot com slash two g one P A few minutes of your time with this survey will help us improve the show Oh and take it to the next level. That's Daily Dot Dot com slash two. Gop Thank you so much. Wow it's weird Davin actual real product Oughta away. What am I saying? They're always real. Products was real yeah totally. This one was different for everyone so I hope you enjoyed that add that. I don't know what it was yeah. I'm sure we made <hes> boatloads of money from that Africa Sarcasm 'cause they harvest spoke advertisements and I wanted to make them more on. I'M GONNA go kill myself okay next clip. What's the Trivia answer to Trivia Answer Sir which Chuck tingle novel is fake I give you three choices alley went with a century and phantom tow truck pounds my but jen went with be open wide the handsome sabertooth dentists who is also a ghost? Nobody chose choice see seduced by executive Unicorn lawyer to the magic continues. You both feel that that is definitely definitely real. What I'm here? It's raining executive Unicorn lawyer. That sounds so familiar. I don't know which ones fade the correct correct answer. The fake Tingler is choice see Unicorn lawyer. You're stuck Tangalle. Also you created a sequel. Yes which I think. He is known to do on occasion so is is that a real one but you just created a part till no definitely not so I mean look if you look at the list of Chuck Tingle novels you can basically just pluck a lot of crazy crazy words out and rearrange them and make a new one. Essentially I think there were Unicorn lawyers but no executive Unicorn lawyers and it's still writing more Matt. Did you see is he still going. I think I think things are ongoing. The volume is insane like the amount of work that he produces. I think it's just truly amazing and <hes> you know we in our interview with chuck he talked about the tingle cinematic universe which was disgust Gust with perhaps a movie studio or television network and never realized but but maybe there is a future time it's time it's time I agree all right proceeding seating in chronological order one hundred years of two g one P fast forwarding a bit. I have another this is not trivial but kind of a fun fact for you guys is. Did you know that not all gamers are white Bros.. Who chug mountain dew and say questionable things on twitch? Did you know that now aw I know that theoretically that's true in fact some gamers are grandmothers the mother in episode forty four we spoke to Elissa Schmugge who is a very respected guild master in the nineties Komo Ultima Online by day. She is a grandmother and a journalist for her local newspaper by night. She is sky will feign episode forty four the ultimate online grandma. Somebody emailed me and said hey there's a new chard yard opening up and that was the ultimate online forever which I'll just call you F- to get Georgia from here and that was about five and a half years ago the shards about five and a half years. There's all that I started a couple of days after launch just over five years and guild master for five years almost of us we started the guild I'd say yeah you know four four or five months into into playing. Can you explain to our listeners what the guild what guilds are guild is basically a bunch of people who grew up to play the game makes playing the game easier. It makes it playing more fun. Obviously it's more always more fun to play with other people no matter what game you're doing and <hes> mm my guild is the free city of transit traffic is a is a city obviously in in the game and I am the governor and yes yeah the rule the city and it was really by not accident but it friend of mine who was playing with me said Hey we should start a guilt you you know and and take part. There was a long long story. There was a side game in the game were towns could play against each other and war and he's a we should start one intrinsic and I said well okay. I'll do it and never expected five half years later in one hundred fifty members so spend a lot of fun though what's your name in the city of transact sky wolf pain she has blue hair guy will feign I don't you know I'm a role player at heart so roebling is is a big part of a Lotta these. Mo Type Games and so basically all that means is I like like to be in the world you know and so I try not to talk about real world staff while we're in the game but most Portland Moore writer and so so I can write stories about my adventures in the game and that's like a creative outlet for me because I'm a journalist and Mike writing can be very dry at times as you know cover city council meetings so being able to write stories about my characters. Mini game is kind of a fun outlet in writing anytime I make character I I just Jenn. It's just natural for me to pick a real name versus ione your mom or there's some really the crazy names so when they elected you governor was were you elected governor and then you built the guild or like was the guild kind of forming and then you were elected like how does that work I former Gill and at the time I made my character is mayor because it was a city base guilt figured we needed some sort of city structure and so I made my character mayor and then Richard Garrett who I mentioned before visited the Shard and I tweeted him and I kind of explained blamed him who I was and and my my Gal and I said King you declared Transafrica Free State. There's a whole lot unless you know the story of Ultima Online but Richard Gary did that he came into the game and he visited he was promoting his new game and he <hes> just came out with and I declare Trinita Free State well once became a free you stay the members decided that I should be governor instead of mayor and so that was just the creator of the game is that right the original greater ultima. I'm online yes it so it's kind of like God came down and visited declared your state less for you players. Yes that's what it was. You're a little bit like an elegant agent of God. You're like an angel ministering angel kind of you know. I think God came down yeah. I don't know about all that Canadian. That'd be humble about it. He got here for you're what about us. I love me a good bad ass bitch. I do grant guild master. I would've called my grandma sky wolf pain. I wonder if she did she. Tell her grandkids. I forget also maybe her grandkid was like a baby. She said her son got into the game. So sounds like there's a family that plays together so family. The plays together stays together. How come we don't play games together? Probably Christian and I don't understand them and I've never tried yet yeah. That is the reason you want us to play together. beat them and eat them me too. We got a projector. I Google that that game is saying saying I looked that up from our porn video game that we were talking about <hes> Atari Games from the seventies that were <hes> you know not safer work and not say for me to era. I Want Matt to livestream on switch himself playing them and eat them is just very that's what I what I Cup Yup. Yeah come on come on all right enough about video games. We're fast forwarding just a hop skip and jump episode forty six. I'm going to start it off with a question. Did you know that most of the biographical articles on Wikipedia are about men yes <music>. I've never sounded so excited to learn about the patriarchy but I know this the same spoke to a wake-up <music> spinach a bad ass bitch would compete wait. Am I allowed to say that only she was your land nights was can nate call. That's right. Her name is Rosie Stevenson good night. She's on a mission for gender parody on the wide world of wikipedia episode forty six the women of Wikipedia.

Chuck tingle executive Wikipedia Matt Gop Davin Tangalle Africa Elissa Schmugge white Bros Ultima Online Georgia Rosie Stevenson roebling jen Atari Games Google Jenn Gust
"100 years" Discussed on 2 Girls 1 Podcast

2 Girls 1 Podcast

09:14 min | 1 year ago

"100 years" Discussed on 2 Girls 1 Podcast

"In the story <hes> and that would denote that they were in and they were having a friendship but as the story has got more romantic. Some people were like I i WanNa know what I'm getting into before jumping in who don't want to be surprised by porn yeah. It's like if they're gonNA kiss. Please give me awarding people started using slash like sue normal slash in between the names to say like this is a sexual relationship between Kirk spock or over mandic didn't necessarily have to be sexual so that is where the idea of slash standing as a homosexual L. relationship came from in shipping fan fiction all of that so zine and slashing homosexual relationships is the Internet next the Internet Internet is next <hes> the Internet then comes in and use that in a recent episode. You guys just talked about us net. I listened to it. It was really good uh-huh on using it in the X. Files section people coined the term shipping when talking about moulder and scully eh that idea of wanting them to be in a relationship together is where the turn shipping came the Internet finally gives. Do you think anybody's ship us yet alley. I was just wondering the same exact thing ha I haven't googled around for a slash between our names in a while. I CHECK DOC nightly. We've been ships shipping you an atom but that's already things so that's not the same at all that is canonical right. Yeah you know what else I hear. There's a lot of shipping of the stranger things kids and that there's a bit of a musket around the Internet because they're so young and sexy and I'm just going yeah but matt. You really are taking us back in time. We're doing a history of a lot of things right now. I like this. Are you feeling nostalgic. I am I'm tearing up timer. She was healthy and I longed for a time. I slept tonight really over the course of this podcast. We've been falling apart. <hes> it's a time capsule right like already. There was an episode listen to a while ago and I'm talking about some date I went on and I'm like I have no recollection of that Dayton. Who that person was the cool? Yeah I mean no right a hundred years of two girls when podcast odd cast fast forwarding from episode eighteen episode thirty nine you both have interviewed a lot of brilliant people on the show like legit like like like you said pioneers very influential folks but none more so than the king of self published Erotic Fan fanfest author of such hits as my billionaire triceratops craves gay ass and my librarian is a beautiful lesbian ice cream cone and she tastes amazing. The man the myth the legend episode thirty nine was a magical conversation with chuck tingle. Are Your most downloaded had books all well there. There have been a few big towns hits. I think the number one hit is space raptor but invasion that seems like it when we were researching searching you. It seemed like that was the big one their their their their big time hit I think other than it was already big big time hit and then things got real real L. Crazy and real riled up when I win the win was nominated for Hugo Award and then I think that at that point everyone said well listen listen the greatest author I've ever heard and I want to read more of his Dang books so I think space rector but invasion as a big one and also pounded in the but by I'm our own but there is another thing were hit. There that I think is <hes> be an all time classic we agree. We've read that one now on really really spoke to us to know. I think hopefully the reading goes well. I hope that it proves love. I I am sure that it will chuck. We've read that you have said love Israel for all who kiss in here. Can you explain to us a little bit of what that means to you well. Yes I long time ago. You hear stories of men make big time. Political devils or scoundrels saying things like oil is eh well. If we let to buds kiss each other what's next of Budiono tree aerobic hand some dinosaur bud car and then I thought to myself well yeah. That sounds like a dang good way around the Best Bang Ring Rolling everywhere the Dang world. Everyone thinks things that they're kissing who they want and doing their preferred pound and loving each other and I think that sounds like the Mustang world ever saw when I say they love Israel real for all who kiss I think while you can kissing Kasiran Hanson tree if you want or a bird or maybe two birds are maybe a lady Buck Armenia however the heck you Dang gone if they if they are a grownup and then then they like you to both say to each other while we should kiss each other in and make sure feel nice then. I think you should be able to do that. I think that's very important message but I've also learned that love is real even if even if you don't kiss because some buckles de decided they didn't watch US anybody they say well. No pounds wins now for me in that way I'm going to pound amount way and then that's okay too then. They don't prefer any pound and I think that it's important to remember that love is real for them. The two new I'm so happy you included that one that was I remember just that statement that he made that we just heard blowing our minds I stand by the fact that he is is a brilliant performance artist and I know this off a bit of a debate in our discord but I think he is brilliant performance artist and it's awesome yeah also the Hugo thing there was that quote I still remember about him saying that they tried to joke jokester yeah because basically he he was nominated as a joke and but then he did he did he why Internet it was kind of a troll of like people on online where nominating him for a Science Fiction Award which is the Hugo Award to try to troll the contest or troll the award ceremony or whatever and he ended up winning because he was so popular or got enough votes or something like that and so the last half Yeah Yeah Brian we contacted and just because we knew that he writes this like insane porn and we didn't know if he was real or fake or whatever and that interview just blew. I know now behind the scenes I remember we usually do like a really brief. Call with guests before we get them on the podcast just to be sure that they like us. We like them. You know it's going to be a good interview and and I remember he thought it was the podcast any picked up his phone and the big show had had a conversation he was so nice and so gracious on that call too I remember summer that's also of course pounded in the but by my own but is a great read. I also think I mentioned this on that episode but my mother was very confused when that appeared on on her kindle because we share it. I hope that she read <hes> speaking of Chuck Tingle. I have some mini Trivia for you today. Get Ready. ooh Wow dump. Don't get excited all at once. Did I hear my woo. I mean what did I was underwhelmed. I thought there was not going to be trivia so well. We have to put an ad break in here or our network will yell at us. Oh it's just an excuse to put more ads into the show that it Kinda all right. Let's do this. I'm going to read the titles of three check tingle novels. Two of them are real tingler. 's One is a title that I your producer made up. The mastermind works. Let's do which Tingler on this list is fake. A sentient Phantom Bantam tow truck pounds my but be open wide for the handsome sabertooth dentists who is also oh a ghost or see seduced by Executive Unicorn lawyer to the magic continues. I'm GONNA say fake. Oh I was gonna say be as fake. Okay all right Allie goes with a phantom tow truck pounds my but JEN says is it's fake open wide for the handsome sabertooth dentists who was also a ghost. Yes you made them up. Good fat the proud of him we will find out the correct answer. After this brief commercial break..

Hugo Award chuck tingle Israel Kirk spock moulder Tingler matt Hugo Dayton kindle Allie Budiono Executive JEN Kasiran Hanson Buck Armenia producer hundred years