35 Burst results for "100 Year"

TVS Motor Companys Chairman Sir Ralf Speth conferred with University of Warwicks Honorary Doctorate

ACN Newswire

04:10 min | Last week

TVS Motor Companys Chairman Sir Ralf Speth conferred with University of Warwicks Honorary Doctorate

"12 p.m. Saturday January 21st, 2023. TVS motor company's chairman sir Ralph's Beth conferred with university of Warwick's honorary doctorate. Singapore, January 21st, 2023 ACN newswire sir Ralph speth, chairman of TVS motor company, has been conferred with an honorary doctorate in the field of science doctor of science, honoris kalsa from the university of Warwick, United Kingdom. The honorary degree was conferred by the university of Warwick Chancellor baroness Catherine Ashton of up Holland. TVS motor company post chairman sir Ralph speth conferred with university of Warwick apos honorary doctorate. Sir Ralph is accompanied by the university of Warwick Chancellor baroness Catherine Ashton of up Holland, who conferred the degree, sir Ralph is a fellow of the Royal Academy of engineering, and a fellow of the Royal Society. An honorary professor at Warwick manufacturing group WMG. He has been closely associated with WMG ever since obtaining his engineering doctorate in 2008, under the pioneering leadership of former WMG chairman, lord Botticelli. An outstanding engineer with a vast experience in the global automotive industry. Sir Ralph has held leadership roles with some of the renowned automotive and industrial giants such as Jaguar Land Rover, BMW, Ford, taught a motors, and the Linda group. He was appointed honorary knight commander of the British Empire in an additional night commander of the most excellent Order of the British Empire, commenting on the honor, Venice srinivasan, chairman emeritus, TVS motor company, said quote my heartiest congratulations to Ralph for this well deserved recognition. Over his distinguished career in automotive and industrials of more than four decades, he has built world class products and brands. He has been relentlessly working towards transforming the industry with his passion for technology and strive for excellence. This honor is a testament to his leadership, vision, and dedication to the industry, and we are privileged to have him lead TVS motor company in its transformational journey dot clothes, and venue, MD, TVS motor company, said quote sir Ralph's exemplary leadership skills, tremendous vision for the industry and descending approach towards technology make him unique. His energy and passion is inspiring. We are proud to have him amongst us we wish him many more accolades recognizing his immense contributions to the industry dot quote sir Ralph has a degree in engineering from the university of applied sciences rosenheim, Germany, and a doctorate of engineering and mechanical engineering and business administration at the university of Warwick. About TVS motor company TVS motor company is a reputed two and three Wheeler manufacturer globally, championing progress through sustainable mobility with four stadia off tart manufacturing facilities. In hoser, messieurs and in India and karawang in Indonesia. Rooted in our 100 year legacy of trust, value, and passion for customers in exactness. We take pride in making internationally aspirational products of the highest quality through innovative and sustainable processes. We are the only two Wheeler company to have received the prestigious stemming prize. Our products lead in their respective categories in the JD power IQS and appeal surveys. We have been ranked number one company in the JD power customer service satisfaction survey for consecutive four years. Our group company Norden motorcycles, based in the United Kingdom, is one of the most emotive motorcycle brands in the world. Our subsidiaries in the personal E mobility space, Swiss E mobility group a CMG and EGO movement have a leading position in the a bike market in Switzerland. TVS motor company endeavors to deliver the most superior customer experience across 80 countries in which we operate. For more information, please visit WWW dot TV's motor dot com. For more information, please contact Priyanka Kumar Priyanka dot Kumar TV's motor dot com copyright 2023 ACN newswire. All rights reserved. WWW dot ACN newswire dot com.

Sir Ralph University Of Warwick Tvs Motor Company Sir Ralph Speth WMG Honoris Kalsa Baroness Catherine Ashton Tvs Motor Company Post University Of Warwick Apos Chancellor Baroness Catherine Warwick Manufacturing Group Lord Botticelli Holland Linda Group Venice Srinivasan Royal Academy Of Engineering Jaguar Land Rover Royal Society Beth
Is Political Gridlock Good for Crypto?

The Breakdown

02:23 min | 3 weeks ago

Is Political Gridlock Good for Crypto?

"One of the big bits of news in the political world this week has been the absolute dogfight for the Republican speaker vote in the House. If you're not in the United States, the TLDR is that Republicans took back the house, AKA Congress and last fall's midterm elections. As one of their first orders of duty, they need to elect a speaker to lead them, and this is not gone so well. We are now four days and 12 ballots into the process. Throughout that, Republican Kevin McCarthy has failed to gain the majority required to be seated as House speaker, holding up the swearing in of hundreds of new members and delaying any legislative work. Despite holding a majority in the House, Republicans have been stymied by a group of hard right members of the ultra conservative freedom caucus who defected from their party to endorse several alternative candidates. Now, obviously the ins and outs and rights and wrongs of this are way, way beyond the scope of this show. But the key thing for us to know is that only 15 times since the inaugural Congress in 1789 did House speaker require more than one round of voting to be elected. The last time this occurred was exactly 100 years ago in 1923, when 9 rounds of voting were required to elect a speaker. Again, without a speaker, nothing in the House can move forward, including committee appointments. Hearings are the adopting of new rules for how the chamber will operate. Because of that, this does impact crypto. In December, the House financial services committee convened a hearing to investigate the collapse of FTX. That committee is also responsible for economic stability issues and financial system oversight, as well as being the main body which proposes and refines draft bills related to its policy area. Without a House speaker, no appointments to the committee can be ratified and important legislation around financial services, including crypto policy can not progress. Before Congress concluded last year, there were a number of crypto bills which were being considered with great urgency, a law regulating stablecoins had reached an impasse, but the matter was considered to have serious importance and time pressure. More broad regulatory bills like the lummis gillibrand sponsored responsible financial innovation act and the state now boozman sponsored digital commodities consumer protection act had been proposed in the Senate but would also need to pass in the House as well. So what does this all portend for legislation to come? I don't think it's unreasonable to think that if Republicans who hold the balance of power in the House can't even come together on an agreement on appointing a speaker, there is a serious possibility of pretty substantial gridlock in Congress in general. For the crypto industry, there may be an element that no news is good news here. Without a functional legislative body to enact new regulation, the industry could continue to grow without additional government oversight and restriction.

House Tldr Congress Kevin Mccarthy House Financial Services Commi United States Lummis Gillibrand Boozman Senate
The Right and Wrong Way to Teach Children

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:50 min | 3 weeks ago

The Right and Wrong Way to Teach Children

"Think truly the issue with American education and there's plenty, but the one that is most important for us to focus on is the people that have run our education system over the last 100 years started with Jude John Dewey Woodrow Wilson played a big role is they fundamentally do not understand what education is. We have a completely different opinion of what education is and what it should be. And so if you walk into any government school here in Phoenix or across the country, they believe that education is allowing students to choose what direction they want to go, presenting them with a bunch of options to liberate them from a very broken world and really having young people find themselves. That's a really bad idea. In fact, it's an evil one. It's immoral to say to a fourth grader, you got to start to figure out stuff for your figure out your own path. Instead, education comes from a Latin word, which means to lead forth. And the next question is, well, what are you leading them for towards? The truth. You're leading them forth towards a fulfilling life towards beauty towards truth towards goodness towards virtue. And so therefore you must know at the end in goal, the end goal is before you even begin the education process. Far too often teachers will get their fourth or 5th graders kind of sitting around a room and they'll ask them their opinions on the news cycle. A controversial thing that shouldn't be controversial to say is it's completely irrelevant with a 5th grader opinion is on the news cycle. That's not what education is. It's not about the votes of a 5th or a 6th grade. You can get their perspectives and guess what? You need to correct them when they're wrong.

Jude John Dewey Woodrow Wilson Phoenix
McCarthy's bid for speaker to continue, says Trump backs him

AP News Radio

01:00 min | 3 weeks ago

McCarthy's bid for speaker to continue, says Trump backs him

"Republicans ended the new Congress's first day in disarray, failing to elect party leader Kevin McCarthy as the new House speaker. It was the first time in 100 years that a House speaker nominee failed to win the gavel with his party in charge. Is it the day I wanted to have? No. McCarthy vowed to keep fighting even as the GOP's most conservative members like chip Roy pledged to end business as usual. This is about the future of the country. The house is immediate future, though, is in doubt. It can't fully form without a speaker. Number two House Republican Steve scalise is urging Roy and others to drop their protest. We all came here to get things done. Democratic leader rakeem Jeffries says some less some reasonable Republicans step in. They have no way out. Even Jeffrey's got more votes for a speaker than McCarthy in the first two rounds. Sagar Meghani, Washington.

Elect Party No. Mccarthy Kevin Mccarthy House ROY Steve Scalise Congress GOP Rakeem Jeffries Jeffrey Mccarthy Sagar Meghani Washington
"100 year" Discussed on The Media Show

The Media Show

03:51 min | 3 months ago

"100 year" Discussed on The Media Show

"Amazon. Well, lord forgive me for a flight of rhetorical fancy, I mean it's a noble idea. The idea that you can make quality programs which have huge audiences and that you can make programs which have hue origins, huge audiences, but which are also of high quality, is something the BBC needs to aspire to every day, and of course you can't hit the target every day, but it's an absolutely marvelous organizing part of the UK. I sincerely impertinently hope that a it survives, and that the political will to make it survive informed by the thing that matters above all, which is the audience's view of it and the audience's affection for it. Emily bell survival into the next hundred years. Well, I really hope so because I have to echo gene here and say that particularly if you've seen America at the moment, and you look at what the free market genuinely free market has brought in terms of information and use of information, it's really quite a depressing and challenging place. Where you have a very well informed elite. And then you have a whole mess of fake news, propaganda, advertising, and you can't really differentiate between it. And we do need institutions to stand up to that and the BBC is one of the very few institutions around the world. What's interesting to me is how often now the BBC cited as a model in America, which is struggling to sort of think about how it retrofits and democratic values into this ecosystem of information, technologies. So I think it's got this democratic purpose now, which actually looks very similar to the democratic purposes that have mine in 1922. When you'd also have this huge upheaval of technologies and you'd also had great sort of challenged political scene you have fracturing in Central Europe, you have the rise of fascism, there are many of those elements that are present now. And the mission of the BBC has to be adapted, really aggressively adapted, I think, for the digital age. And Paul karenza, you've delved into the BBC's past hundred years for your podcast. What do you think about survival for the next a hundred? I think it's certainly will. I think the thing is we don't know what media will look like as a whole in the next hundred years, let alone what the BBC will look like. But I think back to, well, Peter eckersley, the first chief engineer whose voice you heard earlier on talking about the tracing the license fee and so on. He actually pitched an idea in the late 1920s even that one day we will sit in our sofas in our homes, we'll look at our walls, we'll have a giant

BBC Emily bell Amazon America Paul karenza UK Central Europe Peter eckersley
"100 year" Discussed on The Media Show

The Media Show

04:15 min | 3 months ago

"100 year" Discussed on The Media Show

"I mean, almost palpable for knowledge, curiosity, the wider world, and so on. The director general gives you, in my day, a 100 million pounds all in. And says, here are all these people queuing up to give you the best ideas. Choose some and then go off and pick up the awards on their behalf. I mean, it's the best gig that you could possibly have. Of course, your conscious of the need, even within a radio four origins, to cater to different sections of it, but I mean, it is the most delightful job going. I'm very envious of the person who's got it now. Yes, and he's probably going to be very envious of the person who has it next. It is one of those jobs, isn't it? Paul just fill us in on, you know, inform educate entertain. It's subscribed and it subscribe to John reith, but when did it come in and what was the significance of it? Well, those values actually David Sarnoff was writing them down a few years before, even that, so I think it was David Sandler. So David Sarnoff, an American pioneer and thought that maybe that this could be a sense of we could use this to inform educate and entertain, although it took a lot longer, I think, from America to actually adopt that. That was more of an idea to begin with, that then I think Reese took some ownership of and this sense that when he had joined the BBC, not really knowing what broadcasting even was. And I even saw in his diaries that it's in January 1923 that he finally listens to the radio for the first time. He's been in post at the BBC for a month and not actually tuned in yet. So I think it took him a few weeks just a few weeks at least maybe to realize, okay, this is what we can do with this. This is the power of this. We now have a responsibility to do something amazing with this. And as Mark says, the people queuing up to be on radio for today. I love this idea. Even back then, they had a sign outside the BBC, the one room BBC, when it magnet house, they had a sign saying BBC come in. And anyone could come in and pitch their ideas and people did. And from that you get, for example, the chief engineer of the royal opera house saying, we've got opera season starting Monday. Can we broadcast that? And they laid a quarter of a mile of cable from studio to opera house stage and that was Britain's first outside broadcast from an idea from someone passing by. So that was a marvelous thing. And now it's outside broadcast to plenty Emily. Do you think the BBC is fulfilling its remit at the moment? Do you think the output is in a good place?

David Sarnoff John reith David Sandler BBC Reese Paul America royal opera house Mark Britain Emily
"100 year" Discussed on The Media Show

The Media Show

04:05 min | 3 months ago

"100 year" Discussed on The Media Show

"And cultural assets if you can use that rather academic phrase. Because that's not going to be provided, I think, by the free market. We don't like to think of the BBC just as providing a patch for market failure. But this idea that Britain is somehow Britain is the creative economy and the BBC assassin at the heart of that creative economy for quite a long time. And I do think that it's really important as Mark says that people recognize and maintain that because it's not just a cultural driving in a way. And economic driver for the rest of the creative businesses in Britain. Okay, well let's go back a hundred years again. Day one of the BBC was general election day, which was an exciting day to launch. On day two, came the first broadcast from 5 IT in Birmingham and two ZY in Manchester. Around that time, as it started, maybe 20 to 30,000 licenses were out there, they were listening parties of 50 or more, but Paul. What were they broadcasting? We've heard about news, bit of weather, but what were they broadcasting? And why did those ones in Manchester and Birmingham not start the same day as the London one? The Birmingham station was a little slow to stop because they were simply moving all of the equipment from London and it got lost in fog, so they would have started little earlier if maybe the weather was more Clement. And then it's really day three, I think it actually properly kicks off. November the 16th, you start to have musical concerts, the first song of the BBC, a proper, I suppose is Leonard hawke with Drake goes west, and then it's light opera and comedians essentially from 7 until closed down at top past ten or so. And Mark earlier mentioned John reith, he's the name that we associate with the early days of the BBC, but you argue two other men were very important in shaping the BBC Peter eckersley and who we've already heard from and Arthur burrows, who were they. Well, Arthur burrows, then they both worked for Marconi company, but different wings. And I think both had very different ideas of what broadcasting kudos should be, so Arthur burrows had this rather high minded approach and wanted poetry and light opera and readings and things like this. But whatever Arthur burrows was on air in the experimental stages in the summer of 1922, doing these poetry readings and the like, Peter rack has Lee was on a rival station that was just there ahead of the London station in Essex two empty rittle.

BBC Britain Arthur burrows Birmingham station Birmingham Manchester Leonard hawke Mark John reith London Peter eckersley Clement Paul Drake Marconi Peter rack Lee London station Essex
"100 year" Discussed on The Media Show

The Media Show

04:41 min | 3 months ago

"100 year" Discussed on The Media Show

"But of course, and it has to do enough or value for all the various people, millions upon millions who pay the license fee to justify it. That's of course true. But one, it gives you that sense of ownership. It doesn't belong to the government. It certainly doesn't belong to the BBC management at any given period. It belongs to all of us, and the second thing it gives you, in this case, through the license fee, at least until this point is economies of scale. The fact that we all pay for it means that we get much more out of it than if it was only there for people who could afford to pay it because you'd end up getting much less value for money. Okay, and Emily, I'm in the license for your survive fairly precariously for a hundred years. Do you think it will survive another hundred? Even another ten. Well, it certainly doesn't feel that way because, again, it is this very contested political football. And we know that the current government has expressed some desire to get rid of the license fees. It's very old fashioned, doesn't really work in the age of we keep hearing about Netflix, et cetera. But the point to make is that all of those ways offload. And you could make a case that says that even though it is a very peculiar anomaly and it is awkward. That it's actually more durable than an advertising system, which we've seen. It can be extremely volatile and also it can create monopolies and geopolitics as it has with Facebook and Google. And you also have problems with direct subscription services because as Mark says, you know, it cuts off universality and the idea of common ownership. And it also means that you get a quality of information, which is arguably the higher level that going to those people who pay versus those people who can't pay. So whilst it's very politically contested at the moment, there are real, I think, merits in this idea of common ownership. Well, news has been at the heart of the BBC for a hundred years, as we heard the first broadcast was a news bulletin, but there was a lot of debate about reading the news on the radio, Paul. What did the newspaper subject to back then? Well, there was this battle ready between the news and the broadcasters about the ownership of the news essentially newspapers felt that this was their domain, really, and even going back two and a half years before the BBC began with the very first test broadcast when they used to read out railway timetables and things like that just to try and test out the technology. And people were listening in, but then people were complaining going, well, actually, these railway time tables all very well, not realizing it's just a test. Can you read something more interesting so they would read the newspaper and even then the press got involved and were saying, well, actually, could you read yesterday's newspaper? Because we don't want you giving away the news for free, essentially. So the legacy of that that I think comes through into when the BBC forms and they have to wrestle this deal

BBC Emily Netflix football Facebook Google Mark Paul
"100 year" Discussed on The Media Show

The Media Show

05:52 min | 3 months ago

"100 year" Discussed on The Media Show

"Emily, when we talk about the government, I mean how important was it that the government made this choice to create a single public broadcaster because obviously if you fast forward many decades to the Internet, you know, clearly the opposite approach looks like it was taken as the Internet started to take off. Yes, was June was saying that you have this design not to be like America. And America very much went down the let the market decide, let any broadcaster attract the largest audience and let's see where it goes. And it's interesting when you contrast it with the commercial Internet, which actually started in many ways as a public good. So when Tim Berners-Lee devised the World Wide Web, which is really the navigation system that we all use around the Internet. He said, you know, this is a public good. It should be for everybody. And he spoke in public. He hasn't about disappointed. He has been since. Exactly. And I think that there was a moment there where you could have theoretically continued with a much more public service type Internet. But actually what's happened is it's becoming closed by some of the largest commercial entities in the world. And nearly all of them are based in America. And so we've seen in a way what happens when you have a communication system which is given over to the free market and there's a very different outcome to the outcome you have to the BBC. Maybe inevitably sign. Mark. So every BBC executive down the years has been tortured by critics, who say that they've done something that would make John reith, the founder of this enterprise, turn in his grave. I was used to think that was something for compliment. I mean, brief was a monster. He was an extremely violently tempered homophobic, racist, terror of a bloke, but he had this one big idea. And although I felt flattered to feel that he might be turning in his grave and I'd done something that shocked him, I also knew for that one big idea, which is that broadcasting ray J would have a public purpose, all the rest of us should be enormously grateful, because without that one founding idea, we would be in a very, very different media ecology to the one that was subsequently established in the UK. One of the most significant inventions in this early period was the license fee, which provoked fiery debate in parliament. Here is a clip of Peter eckersley, one of the BBC's first employees in broadcasters talking about it.

Tim Berners America Emily John reith BBC Lee Mark ray J Peter eckersley UK parliament
"100 year" Discussed on The Media Show

The Media Show

03:39 min | 3 months ago

"100 year" Discussed on The Media Show

"Is two LO calling, two hello calling. This evening's broadcast will consist of a weather report, followed by a news bulletin which will be read first at a standard speed, it will then be repeated at a slower speed. It may be the case that I will read too slowly for people to remember the context. I am interested to discover where the listeners in would prefer the bulletin to be read once slowly or once fast and once slowly, or even whether the preference is for it to be read fast twice. First, copyright news from Reuters press association exchange and central news. Polling in the general election takes place tomorrow. The prime minister, mister bona law, making his final election speech in Glasgow absolutely love that. What we heard there was a result of a huge amount of negotiation between radio manufacturers, newspapers and the government, Jean, where did the idea come from for one public broadcaster? It comes out of the government's distaste for the sort of muddle of lots of broadcasters. It partly comes out of anxiety about America where people were already very difficult to hear each other because they were sort of clashing. And it comes out actually of a security anxiety that some of the spectrum

mister bona Reuters Glasgow Jean government America
"100 year" Discussed on The Media Show

The Media Show

01:31 min | 3 months ago

"100 year" Discussed on The Media Show

"BBC sounds, music, radio podcasts. Hi, I'm Katie razzle, and this is the media show from BBC Radio four. Hello, hello. This is London calling. If you tune your Marconi set correctly on the 14th of November 1922, and live within about 30 miles of Oxford circus in London, those are the words you would have heard as if by magic, as the very first official broadcast of the brand new British broadcasting company hit the airwaves. A hundred years later, we're looking back at those earliest days. Why was the BBC formed? What was its purpose? And what are the parallels between now and then? I'm joined by Mark damazer, who was an executive at the BBC for more than 30 years, including as controller of radio four, gene seton, Professor of media history at the university of Westminster and an official historian of the BBC. Paul karenza, broadcaster on BBC Radio Surrey and radio Sussex and producer of the podcast British broadcasting century, which tells the story of the BBC from the beginning, and Emily bell, founding director of the tau center for digital journalism at Columbia journalism school. Welcome to you all. And Paul, as part of your podcast, you reconstructed that very first BBC broadcast. Let's hear a clip to begin with. Hello, hello. This

'What Difference Does It Make?' Is a Dangerous Phrase

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:21 min | 5 months ago

'What Difference Does It Make?' Is a Dangerous Phrase

"Defying the odds with what you're doing tonight with the organizing with those of you running for office with those of you that are leaning in a homeschooling your kids. Those of you that are supporting the wonderful dream city Christian turning point academy, which is just getting started, by the way. All these amazing new projects that are rising up are dare I say kind of like a glitch in the matrix. It's an unexpected development where they were counting on you just to stay at home, stop watching the news, stop carrying stop showing up to events like this and just kind of watch Netflix and Hulu and just say whatever, what difference does it make? More evil has been done over the last 100 years based on the phrase what difference does it make? More evil. Apathy of allowing bad people to do what they want to do while good people sit idly by. And the moment that we are in, it transcends politics. You know why I say a transcendent politics, not just because it's true because after the election, are you just going to stop showing up? And no, of course not. And that's the thing is that it's a long-term fight. It's a long-term cultural educational spiritual, religious fight where I think all of us are buying and say, okay, we understand the stakes that are in front of us that we believe in separation of powers and we believe in consent to the governed. And we believe in all these different things. And we're willing to do something about it. And

Christian Turning Point Academ Hulu Netflix
One Election Can Change the Country's Direction

The Officer Tatum Show

01:34 min | 5 months ago

One Election Can Change the Country's Direction

"So let me get back to this issue. Guys, we're going to have to help each other win this election. We're going to have to do it. I'm going to tell you how we seem to be losing the fight. And stop paying attention to the polls from here on out. We just had the primaries, praised God. We get through the primaries. They didn't necessarily go as great as I thought. But we did okay. There were definitely some great points concerning the primaries, but we still have a lot of work to be done. There still has to be a lot of work to be done. So in the midterms, back in, or before the midterms, we had May and June. Let me set the table here. We had May and June, hi do the inflation, height of high gas prices, as Republicans we are like we can write this puppy all the way to the election. So the November elections. Remember, Myra Flores won the Texas, what is it? Texas is 34 district. So we were flying high as a kite. We're like, this is a seat. This is a seat that Republicans haven't won in 100 years. This is amazing. This is astonishing, and it was. And it was. But one thing that the Democrat party does well that the Republican Party doesn't do as well is the Democrat party can stop on a dime and change direction and they'll do whatever it takes to win an election. And we're not able to match the mono imano when it comes to messaging. That's just the truth.

Myra Flores Texas Democrat Party Republican Party
Long-hidden synagogue mural gets rehabbed, relocated

AP News Radio

01:03 min | 5 months ago

Long-hidden synagogue mural gets rehabbed, relocated

"A mural painted in a Vermont synagogue more than 100 years ago and hidden behind a wall for years has been painstakingly moved and restored It's now known as the lost mural painted by sign maker and Lithuanian immigrant Ben Zion black in 1910 It shows the ten commandments with a lion on both sides Rabbi Amy small is at the ohavi ZX synagogue We had so many devastating losses as a Jewish community So to be able to see this whole restored is also about how we are feeling whole and restored Experts like Josh perelman with the whitesman national museum of American Jewish history says it's a rare representation of a kind of synagogue art in Europe that was largely destroyed during the Holocaust It makes it both a treasure and also a significant work both in American Jewish religious life and the world of art in this country Damage sections of paint have been restored in the entire mural was cleaned I'm Ed Donahue

Ben Zion Rabbi Amy Small Josh Perelman Whitesman National Museum Of A Vermont Europe Ed Donahue
Record rain causes heavy flooding in St. Louis area; 1 dead

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 6 months ago

Record rain causes heavy flooding in St. Louis area; 1 dead

"A record rain leaves one person dead and causes heavy flooding in the St. Louis area A state of emergency has been declared after several inches of rain killed one person displaced many others and resulted in rescues from vehicles and homes National weather service meteorologist Zach Taylor says The Rain shattered a record that had lasted more than 100 years The St. Louis airport actually it was 8.6 so that broke the previous record for any day which was 6.85 inches Which was August 20th 1915 Patrick huber who lives in university city just outside of St. Louis tells kmov TV The Rain destroyed his historic house About a hundred years old at parquet floors on the first floor and all the water came bubbling up through the registers from the basement Tuesday's rainfall followed a period of extended drought in the region I'm Mike Hempen

Zach Taylor St. Louis Patrick Huber St. Louis Airport Mike Hempen
100-Year-Old Veteran: People Don't Realize What They Have

The Dan Bongino Show

01:22 min | 7 months ago

100-Year-Old Veteran: People Don't Realize What They Have

"And I want you to listen to something that this hundred year old veteran Carl deckle had to say about just how much has changed Listen I sincerely believe in this old world that everything is beautiful I mean if I see if I wake up in the morning and see these plants out here in nature and all those flowers are in there and the green grass on the on the ground that's beautiful And people don't realize what they have They bitch about it They do And then nowadays I am so upset that the things we did in a things we fought for into boys had died for it So I'm going down the drain Our country's going to hell In a handbasket shouldn't we listen to him Don't you feel that I mean I feel that listening to him I have a reaction to that It cuts deep Here's someone who has fought for our country who was going to lay down his life for a country who probably lost his brothers in the military For her freedoms for her liberty that so many people in this country take for granted And we need to have we need to have a revival an American revival a revival of patriotism a right of revival of love for America revival of recognizing why this country is so great

Carl Deckle America
SCOTUS Rules the EPA Can No Longer Dictate Environmental Policy

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:13 min | 7 months ago

SCOTUS Rules the EPA Can No Longer Dictate Environmental Policy

"News is that the Supreme Court has ruled 6 to three. That the EPA has overstepped its authority. The Supreme Court limits the power of the EPA environmental protection association or agency, sorry, and other regulatory agencies. High court says agency overstepped its authority and restricting greenhouse gas emissions in a ruling with ramifications for other regulators. From The Wall Street Journal. The Supreme Court on Thursday that's today curtailed the Environmental Protection Agency's powers to restrict greenhouse gas emissions from power plants in a decision that could limit the authority of government agencies to address major policy questions without congressional approval. The Supreme Court doesn't believe that the government can do whatever it wants without the will of the people as expressed through Congress. That is a radical idea to the left, the left and if you don't understand this, then you don't understand the great battle of the last 100 years.

Supreme Court Epa Environmental Protection A Environmental Protection Agenc Authority Of Government High Court The Wall Street Journal Government Congress
Morgan, Giddens part of national Memorial Day concert

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 8 months ago

Morgan, Giddens part of national Memorial Day concert

"Craig Morgan and Rhiannon giddens are among the performers for the national Memorial Day concert in Washington that will be shown on PBS station Sunday I'm marching in a letter with the latest Joe Montana and Gary Sinise will host the concert from the national mall in Washington It will celebrate 100 years of the Lincoln Memorial and pay tribute to late general Colin Powell who spoke at the Memorial Day concert for years Country singer Craig Morgan says Memorial Day has always meant a lot to him As a veteran I recognize what Memorial Day truly represents It's not just a weekend at the late with hot dogs and beers It's an opportunity for us to remember those that have made the ultimate sacrifice Others who will appear including Leah salonga Brian stokes Mitchell Mary McCormick and Jean Smart

Rhiannon Giddens Craig Morgan National Memorial Day Concert Gary Sinise Washington Joe Montana National Mall PBS General Colin Powell Lincoln Memorial Leah Salonga Brian Stokes Mitchell Mary Mccormick Jean Smart
Caller: Did We Have as Many Mass Shootings 100 Years Ago?

Mark Levin

00:50 sec | 8 months ago

Caller: Did We Have as Many Mass Shootings 100 Years Ago?

"Let me preface this by saying I'm not a parent And I'm not even a teacher and I'm no longer a gun owner But I'd like to make a point by asking a question 100 years ago we had less gun regulation in this country Almost 9 years ago Did we have as many mass murders in schools Well I don't think so I don't know that we had a public school system like we have either But I get your point Which I think is a fair point I just think there's a lot that is contributing to this And the politicians think that people want a simple answer And for so many of them the simple answer is to take away certain of your constitutional liberties

"100 year" Discussed on Living to 100 Club

Living to 100 Club

01:54 min | 10 months ago

"100 year" Discussed on Living to 100 Club

"Welcome to the living to 100 club podcast. Here's our host, doctor Joseph casani. Greetings to everyone today for our podcast. You're listening to the living to 100 club and I'm your host. Joe kassiani. You can find this conversation and I'll pass conversations on our website. Led me to 100 dot club. In addition to my podcasting, I'm a public speaker. And I present to community organizations and senior groups on topics related to aging well and managing setbacks. And on my website, you'll see options to sign up for one on one resilience coaching. For anyone wanting more personal time to talk, I also provide consulting and training on clinical topics like depression and dementia. Now to our podcast, where we discuss successful aging, staying positive and making more informed decisions. Today's podcast invites as its guest, doctor Eric plaster, chiropractor, educator, and author of the 100 year lifestyle series. If you knew you would live to 100, how would you change your life today? This is the ectopic we will be exploring. Our guest shares his successful approaches that have been adopted by as many clients around the world.

Joe Biden's Greatest Hits on April Fool's Day

The Dan Bongino Show

01:54 min | 10 months ago

Joe Biden's Greatest Hits on April Fool's Day

"But it is April Fool's day And Jim thought it was a good idea yesterday to put together a little tribute to Biden on April Fool's day And we can have some of his greatest hits And the reason we did it on April fools is because Biden has no greatest hits He's a crazy person okay So Jim put together this little ode to Joe Biden Enjoy this why I recuperate from that destructively horrible email sent to me by my kids school Check this out Most of the teams were community center Actually that's the one down I used to work It's a joke I know we were anyway We all these truths to be self evident All men and women created by go you know you know the thing We launched our campaign Over on the oval back in 29 may 9th 2019 At three letter word jobs JOBS John I got them $1.9 trillion really so far 550 corporations And the Fortune 500 I got hairy legs that turn that turn blond in the sun But let's be great And the question is whether or not we should be in a position where you are why can't the 5 sick and tired of smart guys I know a lot of weed smokers COVID has taken this year more than 100 year Look the lives it's just I mean think about it Corn pop was a bad dude We choose truth over facts Who looks like a tornado they don't call them that anymore when I went to Dearborn driving that You know it was up there I don't know man Unlike the African American community the Latino community is an incredibly diverse

Biden JIM Joe Biden John Dearborn
Professor Paul Kengor: The Russians Know Death Unlike Any Other People

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:52 min | 10 months ago

Professor Paul Kengor: The Russians Know Death Unlike Any Other People

"Professor Paul kengo welcome back to America first one on one. Well, thank you said it is always good to be with you, sir. Let's start with an article you sent me yesterday from the American spectator that kind of helps us. There's a concept in national security called strategic culture. I learned of it from one of the best of the best, the late great Colin gray, a British American dual national who served in the Reagan administration in the National Security Council. And the theory goes thusly, Paul, that every nation, every elite has a different strategic culture. Belgium thinks differently about war than Vanuatu. The Soviet Union thought differently about war than Americans did. That strategic culture. Will you explain why the concept of death and human suffering or the cost and value of human life is a little bit different in Russia? Yeah, that's exactly what I wrote about in that piece for American spectator yesterday, right? The Russians know death, unlike any other people. And I mean, it depends on how long or how quickly you want to walk through this. And of course, it's no laughing matter. It's quite tragic, but going back the last 100 years, Seb, a little over a hundred years, I guess, but back to World War I, the Russians from 1914 to 1917 lost more men in World War I than any other country. And that, in fact, they didn't even finish the war. They were actually on the winning side, but they pulled out in 1917 after Tsar Nicholas II abdicated in March 1917. They would have been on our side in that war. They lost over 3 million people in that war. Now, to give you a sense of comparison, you know how many people we lost in World War I, about a 110,000.

Professor Paul Kengo Colin Gray Reagan Administration National Security Council Vanuatu Soviet Union Belgium America Paul Russia SEB Tsar Nicholas Ii
Dr. Anthony Fauci Says Joe Biden Is Doing 'A Very Good Job' Addressing COVID

Mark Levin

01:37 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Anthony Fauci Says Joe Biden Is Doing 'A Very Good Job' Addressing COVID

"And so when you have a senator whose effective and aggressive trying to get the information out to personal attacks really personal attacks those two words are the definition of the Democrat party in the media in this country personal attacks He doesn't know what personal attacks are Okay let's do one more Cut 20 go Has he done a good job You know I think given the circumstances that we're in right now I believe he's done a very good job He's talking about Biden He's been a very good job This is an extraordinary virus The likes of which we have not seen even close to and well over 100 years it is a very widely virus It is fooled everybody all the time from the time it first came in to Delta to now a very unpredictable and we're doing the best we possibly can Well you're very forgiving of Joe Biden who came into office with vaccines and Therapeutics not developed under his presidency And developed in spite of Fauci because Trump had a push hard particularly at the FDA And I don't remember all of this This kind of love talk when it came to Trump and all the things he was doing and trying to do and this disaster came out of China Of course and it hit it hit during the Trump administration first and there's Biden going on that every death Trump's responsible for and he didn't respond properly and he politicized this did Biden and in many respects so did Fauci And of course the

Democrat Party Biden Fauci Joe Biden Donald Trump Trump Administration FDA China
"100 year" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"100 year" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Summer of spring. Summer of nineteen eighty-nine. Next up tune that sure to get you in the mood for dependable auto and home coverage have insurance only gives me every time visit aaa dot com slash insurance and save twenty percent goodbye insurance. Hello azure you trust. Podcast hosts like me for a lot of things for the content. You consume for the news even for information about national security in law. But you shouldn't have to trust us about sleep which impacts your life very directly. So if you're looking for ways to improve your sleep this fall don't just take it from me. You should also trust the more than two million happy sleepers who are currently sleeping on a nectar mattress. There are tens of thousands of reviews from real people who sleep on nectar mattresses that you can read. Nectar is an incredible value for a quality product. A mattress this well engineered and comfortable should cost hundreds of dollars more but nectar prices start at just four hundred ninety nine dollars. Join the more than two million happy sleepers who sleep on nectar with its award winning layers of comfort and premium memory. Foam mattress that. Hugs your body and keeps you cool. Netter is currently running. Its biggest offer. Ever three hundred ninety nine dollars. Accessories visit nectar sleep dot com to get your new mattress today. You get a three hundred sixty five night home. Trial plus forever warranty plus free shipping and returns shop from the convenience of your own home to nectar sleep dot com. That's nectar sleep dot com. I wanna touch on..

"100 year" Discussed on Acupuncture is my Life

Acupuncture is my Life

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"100 year" Discussed on Acupuncture is my Life

"All right but tomatoes. Tomatoes is also batteries. A good for the brain brain health is great for liver and stomach watermelon which is great for the stomach heart and bladder as well as to bring these types of foods contain anti oxidant called leisa pain which fight or free radicals that of course follow us as we age i should say leafy greens such as kale and spinach again. Liver and gallbladder great for the brain because his loaded with vitamin k and vitamin e. Which prevent memory loss can reduce brain age. You know what if you're operating a vehicle right now do me a favor. Pull it over to side or if you cross street. Hurry up and safely get across the street and if you carrying lifting something heavy take a moment rested down. I need everyone in a relaxed state. Because i need you to close your eyes. And i need you to say to yourself. Acupuncture is my life and now open boom you and now brand new brand new but along when everything i've just stated to fail to maintain a good way a good way if you can stay within the range of your height charts out there. That can help you with that great. Wait for your height and your age but then again why go to the charts goshi and acupuncturist because yo yo dieting and your weight going up and down as bad for you. It's not good. It puts a lot of stress on your body short july spain. You wanna maintain a healthy weight. Which is why. I say over and over seal acupunctures for regular wellness visit or contact acupunctures. Mind you must make acupuncture part of your life because acupunctures my life what yours..

spain
"100 year" Discussed on Acupuncture is my Life

Acupuncture is my Life

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"100 year" Discussed on Acupuncture is my Life

"Black sesame seeds shis senate sample. I'm not gonna go too far with. Because i recommend you shit with your local acupunctures or contact acupunctures to get a thorough thorough deep understanding as to what i'm discussing which is why i recommend regular wellness visit but back on topic eating to live to see one hundred eight is. It's all about mixing up your food variety varieties. What works you get individuals that i love pizza so pizza five days a week. Guess what you shouldn't eat teacher ause trash. I love mcdonald's fries and a quarter pound. Is i eat that round three days a week acupuncture. Oh i love Fast food fried chicken. So i eat that three or four days a week know. Eat a healthy diet. Stay away from fast food to stay away from fry foot now. It's an acupuncturist. I understand it. Everyone's constitutionists different eating the right foods at the right times such zero certain foods that a good for only in certain sees it which can which is what can be considered the right foods at the right time now. Israel's eating at the right time of day it this is important. It's crucial to allow you to live over. One hundred is read. Consuming a diet with variety of healthy food ranging from foods lean proteins and vegetables fiber whole grain healthy fat when you when you balance them at mealtime or a snack. You your your body's getting what it needs to function at an optimal level. But here's a catch. Keep stress down especially around mealtime. Because that helps with stain healthy this is wise best to see your local acupuncturist or acupunctures. My life for regular wellness visits because acupuncture so well versed in eastern nutrition and into a company to company proper nutrition with abdominal acupuncture makes for great super awesome combination. Because many people are unaware as to how you got also affection move so think about variety of healthy foods and try and avoid being stressed when.

senate mcdonald Israel
Is This the Beginning of the U.S. Decline With Biden as President?

Mark Levin

01:39 min | 1 year ago

Is This the Beginning of the U.S. Decline With Biden as President?

"I never thought I'd see the day. When the the European Union effectively Was more concerned about this than we are. Don't mean you and me. You know what I mean? It really is incredible. And so the question I put on the table right now is Is this the beginning? Of America's decline, not because of anything you've done. That's not my point. Is this the beginning of America's decline? And the rise of the communist Chinese. We've talked about it. They seem to have been poised. But now has fate lined up in a way. And that we are presented with exactly the wrong president. Exactly the wrong Congress. Exactly the wrong military. National security leaders. Exactly the wrong time in history. What will the books say? 100 years from now? What will they say of us? That this was the time and this was the place. It could well be It could well be They've devoured So much of our culture they trashes from within. They undermine us from men. You know, guys like Tom Nichols. And organs like salon. I'll get to them next week, but you get the point.

European Union America Congress Tom Nichols
Planned Parenthood Is the Definition of White Supremacy

Mark Levin

01:27 min | 1 year ago

Planned Parenthood Is the Definition of White Supremacy

"You know, we hear a lot of people these days expressed concerns about something called White supremacist. Um Well, let me tell you something about that. As far as I'm concerned, Planned Parenthood is white supremacist. Um, if we want to read American society The vestiges of racism against people of color in this country, the best thing that can happen in this country. As for the United States Supreme Court to overturn Roe versus Wade, For states to outlaw abortion. And for Planned Parenthood to be put out of business. None other than Dr Martin Luther King's own niece, Dr Alveda King. Has stated the Planned Parenthood has achieved what the KKK the Klan never could have dreamed of the deliberate killing of millions of black babies. I mean, I don't know if you ever noticed, but Planned Parenthood offices tend to be in minority neighborhoods. Don't know if you are aware of this, but Margaret Singer who started Planned Parenthood 100 years ago. Was a racist. And recently just in the last few months. The current head of Planned Parenthood said. Look, we're done trying to Um Remember the exact words but done trying to deal with the racist past of our founder. Anyway. This needs to stop

Dr Martin Luther King Dr Alveda King ROE Wade Supreme Court Margaret Singer United States Planned Parenthood
A 100-Year-Old's Birthday Wish: Act on Climate Change

Climate Cast

01:58 min | 1 year ago

A 100-Year-Old's Birthday Wish: Act on Climate Change

"The most critical issue humankind faces. And we're not doing anywhere near enough. Tom swain has seen a lot in his one hundred years on planet earth. He's been an insurance executive a city mayor. He even headed a state agency but it is eighties when most octogenarians might be enjoined quiet years. Tom began a quest to climate. Change awareness that journey lead to the creation of the swain climate policy series at the university of minnesota's humphrey school of public affairs. Why does this self-described small government conservative. So actively pursue climate change solutions. Tom swain happy one hundredth birthday this month and welcome to climate cast and crew. Tell us about the focus of the swain climate policy series at the university of minnesota's humphrey. School what. I turned two hundred or about to turn a hundred people. Ask me what i wanted to do. And my birthday. And i said i want more awareness and involvement on the whole issue of climate crisis. 'cause i think is the most critical issue humankind faces and we're not doing anywhere near enough. In order to prevent what ultimately some people see is the earth becoming uninhabitable. You've been a corporate executive. You've been a local mayor You've described yourself as a small government conservative for most of your one hundred years. Why do you see climate change solutions as good for our economy and our lifestyle. I'm not thought about it quite as much in terms of its impact on economy. Our lifestyle. I just think that the current generation is for the most part on this issue and expecting the next generation to deal with the critical issues

Tom Swain Humphrey School Of Public Affa University Of Minnesota TOM Humphrey
"100 year" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

08:27 min | 1 year ago

"100 year" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"Right side of the road look spectator inadvertently caused the crash. As we reported earlier this week she was holding up a cardboard sign leaning into the road facing the tv cameras not the oncoming riders. So she didn't see german cyclist. Tony martin barreling toward her. Martin took a nasty fall. Triggering a big pile up. Several writers were injured. One withdrew from the race and the woman holding the sign fled the scene not an ideal start to the race to say. The least tour de france organizers said they were going to find the woman then take legal action so other overzealous spectators understand. Not despoil the show for everyone yesterday. French police said they arrested the suspect. The woman's name has not been released but she's being identified as a thirty year. Old frenchwoman today organizers of the tourists say they are not going to sue raise director christian. Prudhomme said we'd like to calm things down. The message has got across that. The roadside fans need to be careful for the fan holding the sign. It's not over though. She could still face legal action from the writers themselves. It's been nearly six months since the. Us capital was breached just yesterday the house of representatives voted mostly along party lines to create a select committee to investigate the january six attack to republicans joined two hundred twenty democrats to create the panel. The storm of the capital also pushed the biden administration to create a national strategy to combat domestic extremism. The move has been praised but also criticized as the world's rupa shenoy reports many worry that the strategy could lead to targeting muslim americans and people of color after the september. Eleventh attacks the. Us government began to surveillance an infiltrate muslim american communities to find people planning more violence. One they identified was palestinians dummy arjan of florida professor. He was arrested in two thousand and three for having ties to a us designated terrorist group. A jury failed to convict and he was later deported. His daughter lena arjan remembers their family being surveilled for years she recently spoke at an online discussion about surveillance from the moment that we would pick up the receiver actually on her landline. It would start recording. Were a house full of people in five kids. Some of the time the phone would be knocked off the wall and it would just be off the hook for a while and it would be recording everything that was going on in the house. That kind of surveillance happened across the country in two thousand eight muslim americans in southern california told law enforcement about suspicious. New mosque members promoting violence. They turned out to be. fbi informant. Three muslim americans sued attempting to get the fbi to share the information. It had gathered to prove that they were targeted because of their religion. That battle is ongoing just last month the. Us supreme court agreed to weigh in on the case. Amersham bayik is the managing civil rights attorney at the council on american islamic relations in la. The surveillance and the spying wasn't based on any sort of suspicion of criminal activity or anything like that. He was really simply for the fact that these individuals were muslim. Surveillance and infiltration were part of a larger strategy. That at one point was called countering violent extremism or cb. The basic idea is to recruit community leaders social workers teachers and public health providers to help identify people who might commit terrorism cv eased. Many critics said it was a way for the government to target and harass marginalized communities but the strategy evolved says java ali who held senior counter-terrorism positions at the department of homeland security and fbi where the bureau having opened up some kind of investigation on renewed potentially could radicalized in the senate just arresting that person they actually offering to arrest and perhaps getting those persons help that they needed. Some officials regret aspects of cv. John cohen works on threat prevention that vhs. He spoke in june at george washington university. I have to say. I've been saying this publicly and i know it's going to raise some eyebrows that while there were great intentions. Some of the assumptions we base that approach on were flood see the was based on the approach that individuals who are higher risk for coming from specific religious and ethnic communities. That's one of the things we found to be. Not despite that the biden administration's new plan to combat. Domestic extremism includes a version of tv like working with social service organizations and mental health and education professionals to identify potential terrorists. This year the biden administration is giving seventy seven million dollars to state and local governments to combat domestic extremism. And it wants to up that to one hundred thirty one million dollars next year. Cohen says this time they've made a crucial change instead of focusing on people of a particular religion or ethnicity. They'll look for people with certain behavioral characteristics wrongdoing. Now is very different. Religion was more like a public health approach. Where we understand that. There are behavioral characteristics. There are social characteristics are individual characteristics of individuals that make them more vulnerable to being influenced by extremists content. That they're seeing online makes them a higher risk of using violence as a way to express their anger but the government's own studies have found that. It's really tough to narrow down. The characteristics of people who might commit terrorism says harsh upon deroga- he's with the brennan centers liberty and national security program in new york a lot of the conditions that identified whether it's being associated having a grievance being depressed having mental health issues these are conditions that millions of americans experience. He says leaving things. Broad and vague like that gives local law enforcement wide latitude. I think that the degree that the potential flagging of cupolas those who could turn violent is so open ended. that's inevitably it'll be two via seeping into the process. And we noticed typically affected by that so as the biden administration goes forward with its plan to combat domestic extremism muslim. Americans like lena oloron whose family was surveilled for years now find themselves in the unlikely position of defending white extremists who may fall under suspicion. Though we don't like their views they may not necessarily have ever carried out the law that the government concoct it. She argues that in the us. Even people suspected of extremism should be treated fairly for the world. I'm rupa shenoy. Finally today biden administration said it would donate eighty million corona vaccines by the end of june two countries. That need them well. June has come and gone today though. We got this update from jeff signs. He's the white house corona virus response coordinator. These eighty million doses have all been shared with forty six countries. The african union and caricom caricom includes caribbean countries. But there's a catch to the. Us donations half of them have not yet arrived at their destinations. Zein said they're on their way. By the end of this week we will have shipped out about forty million doses including doses to the republic of korea. Mexico canada brazil taiwan endorse columbia pakistan peru ecuador and bangladesh. Zion's also said the us plans to contribute tens of millions more doses. In coming months. Dr krishna. kumar. With duke's global health institute says these american donations are a good start. But we're not moving fast enough to share doses and we have massively underestimated the investment and work required for distribution and delivery of vaccines. There's transportation logistics quality control challenges and international legal issues. That need to be worked out. Who kumar says. He's processes have to be streamlined..

biden administration rupa shenoy French police fbi lena arjan Amersham bayik Tony martin council on american islamic re Prudhomme java ali John cohen us tour de france arjan house of representatives Us supreme court Martin deroga
"100 year" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"100 year" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"City saw devastating heat. Wave in two thousand ten that killed more than a thousand people since. Then it's come up with a heat action plan that seen as a model across south asia. That's today on the big fix james comey. Can we turn this around. We have no adoption. What we do now will profoundly affect the next few housing year. The world's customer has been speaking with people in omnibus nobod- in northwest india about their approach to keeping people safe in the heat. And what are they done. That's worked out so well. I'm n- about came up with the i really comprehensive heat plan in all of south asia which is a global hotspot for extreme heat. I talked to delete on car. Who heads the city's institute of public health. He's one of the people that built this plan. And he says there are four major components short-term solutions and longer term ones most is public awareness that he can kill a couple years after that twenty. Ten horrible heat wave. The city launched this big public health campaign for example sending leaflets home with kids from school to educate them and their parents. About extreme heat. They put psa's out on the radio. Tv social media the also created this color coded warning system for heat and a system for alerting hospitals when it's coming and then after that awareness phase comes action. How love adaptation and resilience among the community so the community. What would they do the plan. Next gives people something to do during those really hot days. Things like installed cooling centers and water station so people could stay hydrated. They set up shelters at night for people to sleep in. They also increased access to green spaces so raising awareness There are changes to help people cool down day to day. That's a short term. What is the longer term work you were talking about. These are bigger changes to the city. That cool it sort of in the long term but it takes time to implement these things. One example is an effort to paint roofs so in slums particularly people have these metal roofs that absorb a ton of heat. Part of the plan is this program to paint the roofs white so they reflect instead of absorb. The sun's rays mobile on car says another big strategy is more trees the last volume measure good evening of the city so be itself tries to land as many as possible. More green cover reflects the sun. It creates shade in the city is also increasing. What's known as blue spaces near water like there's this big ongoing riverfront park development. That's been going on for years so green spaces blues faces. What's been the overall effect of all these changes. The changes seemed to have worked. I study from two years ago. Found that the plan on average saves around eleven hundred lives a year but climate change is expected to make india and the whole region a lot hotter and also. I'm nevada like a lot of cities in the world is rapidly. Urbanizing not makes it hard to preserve and expand greenspace. it's a big struggle from avalon car and city planners and this kind of plan this model that i'm about has gaining traction around south asia yes collage. Mukherjee is based in delhi with the natural resources. Defense council who's helped with this plan and he says i'm nevada. Success inspired a lot of other plans as many you one. There are more than hundreds if these across twenty three states. In india that have a similar action benz all that began with them. What do you see us to take away for the rest of the world. When i asked mukherjee that question what he thought the special sauce omnibus plan was white. Save so many lives. He said there were two things one. The plan was really community driven. It worked with people to understand what they needed to the plan of really focused on the most vulnerable people. The lord of northern neighbors construction workers streetside vendors lewis specifically targeted by this then prioritizing. The most vulnerable people from extreme heat helped save the most lives the rosanna anna customer. Thanks very much for telling us about this. Heat mitigation scheme in india. Thanks marco stay cool. We'll be right back with more in the second half of the show. You're listening to.

south asia james comey institute of public health india psa nevada sun Mukherjee Defense council delhi mukherjee rosanna anna lewis marco
"100 year" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"100 year" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"If you were vaccinated you could rock on in-person these amazing vaccines and they are amazing. Are allowing us to largely return to the way things used to be. That's exciting but maybe you're still feeling a little weird about things i know. I am state to remind ourselves at all changes. Stressful san conan is a psychiatric epidemiologist at harvard. School of public health she researches traumatic stress and says even good change can be hard feeling anxiety after not doing something or avoiding something for this as long as we have sixteen seventeen months. That is normal for everyone. The real issue is if the anxiety is getting in the way of things she actually wants to do. Here's something all parents wanted to send the kids back to school but conan says also remembered their feelings because a pandemic has been especially hard on kids. What we learned is there's really no replacing in person contact between kids in canton teachers. When the corona virus i struck school simply were not prepared with a year. Now of knowledge. Conan's says communities need to do a better job getting ready for the students. We can't just expect the schools to deal with kids mental health without additional resources to do so. There won't be quick fixes. It takes time getting used to the new way of doing things. Same goes for people returning to the office. Coenen says there are just a lot of things that are out of our hands. We like to feel anchoring control. We like to feel like can predict the future and i think what the challenges that we all are going to have. Till then with a certain amount of uncertainty ad in the delta variant ever-changing guidance on when and where to mask up conan says all of this uncertainty means. It's even more important for governments to prioritize policies that support mental health conan's spoke with the world for a live discussion this week about mental health and the pandemic. You can watch the video of the full conversation at the world dot. Org.

san conan School of public health conan harvard Coenen canton Conan
"100 year" Discussed on 1A

1A

05:58 min | 1 year ago

"100 year" Discussed on 1A

"Joe knows that lockdown has been hard on us as humans as people are hardwired to connect with others which is why this whole time is so difficult. I'm jen white. this is one a. We're marking the one hundred year anniversary of the tulsa race massacre with phoebe are stubblefield of horrific anthropologist at the university of florida and oklahoma state representative regina goodwin democrat. They're both descendants of survivors of the massacre. And we asked you for your thoughts of that day in one thousand nine hundred ninety one. Here's some of what you left in our in box. I went to bishop college in nineteen sixty three and i was a freshman with two women from of work and they talked about the massacre. All my grandmother was a young secretary in tulsa in nineteen twenty one. She was getting on the jitney to go to work and the driver told her. It was not a good day to go into town. My grandfather was in the ku klux klan. And tell us in the nineteen twenties. I i learned of the massacre from a book and the nineteen nineties and at the same time discovered a family photograph. that shows the smoke from greenwood. Burning lay talk told us things that their grandparents aunties or whatever living in in the woods hiding the woods over the over the winter and how they had to hide from the way folks. She never felt good about the parks that were being. Put along the arkansas river. Because she said she had seen truck full of bodies being dumped into the river. My grandfather worked near greenwood. But i never learned if he had taken the photo or even if he had been directly involved. My grandmother had described watching refugees from greenwood. Lean pass their home die and eerie rob. Thanks for sharing that with us representative goodwin. Can you tell us your family's story from that night. Yeah absolutely My great grandfather. James henry good one was the business manager of the tulsa star newspaper. That was the black on newspapers. Also homa son and that day and that would be the newspaper that would burn all the way to the ground. My grandfather was a senior in high school and on that day. He was preparing for the prom like many of us would do and he was decorating the hotel and worded come. I had a great aunt. Also anna and Decorating the hotel and word came into them but trouble is coming and so that is how they i heard of the race massacre. That would be approaching. And how did they. How did they escape so By god's grace grace i tell you that when they heard that trouble was coming and also That day they're also doing a high school. Play booker t. washington so those were that of young folks in day. So they did what they could get to the safety of their own homes and My grandfather Within go return to his home and my great grandfather jane kin rate was very fair. Complected and that day they would call it passing. He always made it very clear that he was a black man. His his skin tone was very very fair and the oral histories that he stood on the house. This port to the house and as the white racist mobs coming through and burning homes and shooting. He weighed them away. Like move on and they just Magin that he was a white man and they bypassed his house. And i'm telling you that that that is really significant for me because my grandfather. When he was in high school he was. And i'm just saying that he was Said he was going to be most likely to succeed right. And and his high school yearbook before the massacre he wrote in his yearbook. He said i know. Not where lifestyle lead me nor win death so come but this. I know the lord me unprepared without a home. He wrote that in a high school yearbook and it just so happens that good one home. That was one of the few that would remain. And i think that is a story that is just expert my memory and i think it speaks volumes one to talking about a home that you have physically and a home that you have spiritually so that is just a brief story telling now two thousand. Three survivors of the massacre sued the city of tulsa for reparation saying the attack with state-sanctioned. I like how was the massacre state-sanctioned representative well number one. You had the in that day you had a national guard that it come in. They'd come in late and when they did come in. Many of them brutalized the very citizens that they were. Suppose we protect it. That that is documented How state-sanctioned is again. We're talking about the national guard. There was supposed to be. The troops are coming in to save Some of them came in and they did irreparable harm. And then you also have the city also that was complicit because you had police officers that were deputising moms the white folks that went on to murder black folks so it's very clear it's very evident There's A captain blaine. That's often named in many of the lawsuits that were filed then and they talk about seeing him Shooting folks and you have eyewitnesses at talk about. Not only the plane ride over tulsa and wasn't wasn't for we're cognizant it was for shooting people and you have witnesses to that so the bombs that were dropped down on top of the city Also again when you have police officers that are complicit. Then you've got the state and the city and the county for that matter that are complicit without question that's documented fact out at two hundred page document that came out in two thousand one. So what's happened with that lawsuit and other legislation seeking.

Joe two women two hundred page James henry regina goodwin Three survivors two thousand tulsa tulsa race massacre phoebe nineteen nineties arkansas river jen white tulsa star t. washington oklahoma bishop college nineteen twenties one home one hundred year
"100 year" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

Diane Rehm: On My Mind

05:06 min | 1 year ago

"100 year" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

"She shooting tiffany. Crowd cheered front none none. There were none there were. There was nothing that he had done. That was illegal. Car stopped on the side of the road he was coming from a class at tulsa community. College in what i would say is in terms of defining tiffany's she's not just defined by that you know i think she's a physical therapy. A clinical physical therapist a doctor. She left behind her. Practice are thriving practice and alabama to come back to tulsa and has become the persistent thorn in the side of the city and police department and many other divisions because she is relentlessly pursuing justice. Not just for her brother but for the countless black people who are subjugated to less than fair less than equal less than equitable circumstances in treatment and the rolled. You think tiffany crutcher. We'll play in his repair process. Yeah i mean i think. She's critical her her story. That end to end you know her. Great grandmother exprienced injustice and the same state sanctioned violence that sent her grandmother to kansas city. She couldn't stay in black wall street because of the dangers that she was at risk of experiencing ongoing. It's the same state veteran state sanctioned violence. This is me quoting tiffany the same state sanctioned violence that kills her brother terrence crutcher. I think it's really hard for city leaders to stare at her in the face for county leaders for police officers to steer her in the face and say that justice has been served right. I think that's the hard part. And i think she makes it harder for them. So caleb how do you see this story. Playing out i think. Actually there's more hope than i would anticipate. I think the tendency of writing pieces that don't necessarily inspire that much hope but needing people like tiffany crutcher and others who are so active in the suv actually captured. What seems like the moral imagination. A lot of leaders right in the community. I think there's an opportunity to more than just as history museum. I think there's an opportunity really to hopefully inspire. People not just acknowledged. But then think carefully in creatively innovatively about what repair. Looks like and perhaps reparations. Exactly right i think why they repair i think restitution reparation repair the all. I think occupy the same space in my head for me which is to say that through city policy through legal suits through our educational system food the curriculum that we use. I think it's everything and the kitchen. Sink approach that needs to be taken right to see these reparation because you know to be perfectly honest we know for sure that all of these things exist in political dimensions right and so as such. There's gonna be some negotiations so if you don't bring everything plus the kitchen sink right if you don't negotiate is if you don't start really high even ultimately end with something even lower than you could even tolerated so i think to some extent going for everything plus the kitchen sink is the only way potentially to ensure that the survivors right can live out the rest of their days. Knowing that justice has to at least some extent been served kayla. Thank you so much for the.

kansas city terrence crutcher kayla street caleb alabama tiffany crutcher tulsa tiffany
"100 year" Discussed on The Diane Rehm Show

The Diane Rehm Show

07:35 min | 1 year ago

"100 year" Discussed on The Diane Rehm Show

"Tulsa massacre. It's one of the worst jackson racial violence in the history of the united states. But even those from oklahoma and tulsa little about the events surrounding the violence that began on may thirty first nineteen twenty one the course of two days his thriving greenwood district was decimated by a white mob. African american property was destroyed. Hundreds lost their lives and thousands were displaced despite the station event. Were from the history books but now there is a growing movement to change that. I spoke with gail on memorial day. He will up intel and broke this past. Sunday's new york times magazine cover story titled one hundred years. After the tulsa massacre one does just look like caleb if you would give us a sentence tulsa black wall street also known as the greenwood district before riot up. Nineteen twenty one. Yeah i think you know. Most people kind of mythology is white black wall street wise where nationality. It wasn't this. You know large a massive breeding ground for black billionaires right which i think it has become somewhat sadly mythology than it was actually a place where people specifically black people Had as much opportunity to succeed as they did to fail. So for instance. The you know dollar earned by black person circulated in the community twelve times before i left it There are people who own their homes. There were people who were yes incredibly wealthy and prosperous but for the most part it was a place that was somewhat Guarded and sheltered thought from kind of the rampant amounts of black hose and jim crow. And have you. The reality was at surrounding this community. Was this ongoing effort to try and limit black success in this very new state at the time oklahoma. If you can give me a sense of the geography Greenwood in relation to rest of a tulsa sure. Yeah i mean so to put even fire point on it. It was called the west. Right by the muskogee comment a small black newspaper at the time. it essentially sat directly to the north east of what we now consider downtown. So it's it abuts. All that is the rest of tulsa right to the south and to its west and now it's more so demarcated by a massive highway that was built through it but it is. It was effectively curve right there next to downtown which a lot of the white landowners developers and city leaders really wanted for the development and growth of a commercial district and a railroad. That would they hoped. Run right through it So it was very residential nature but also quite commercial kind of intermix of the both and it sat directly northeast of downtown. Can you get me. Zand said an american population. Yeah so there are roughly around eleven to fifteen thousand black family back people who lived in that neighborhood and Sally a good chunk of them of course had to vacate died so on and so forth homeless Post the massacre were in. They all pretty much middle. Were there poor. People were there homeless people were. They're very wealthy people. Yeah exactly. i think you're you're pointing to. What exactly was you saw. Black people along all levels of the social strata right. They were people who were living in boarding houses that were barely making ends meet. There were people who were solidly middle class. There who are incredibly wealthy. There were people who were teachers. And doctors and lawyers people were sanitation engineers Porters on down the line so over mix and variety of people at a variety of levels of social economic status occupied Black wall street. So on may thirtieth nineteen twenty one. How did the day began. Sure so dig roland Once the drexel building who's a shoeshine worker a black shoeshine worker and is an elevator with sarah page seventeen role white elevator operator of the drexel building. We don't actually fully know what happened right But it is assumed that there was some sort of tripping accident that was of course misconstrue albeit intentionally and a clerk. Nearby store reported that Decrease in had assaulted this young girl. The issue is is that while he was arrested. The next day v relatively unfair and unbalanced news papers the tulsa tribute in particular issued. Kind of a call. On their on their front asia said nab negro for attacking girl in an elevator. Right Calling for this boys lynching and what was what was scary. Was that though. The day might have begun as a simple tripping exit incident. The days that followed especially to roland was arrested. The next day It essentially became a powder keg that was ignited with essentially the the the conflagration of black men trying to ensure dick role safety. So the jail where the must being held. I gather a white mom came to the jail. With perhaps the idea lynching dick rowland assuming that he had made some kind of sexual advances or some sort of motion. That said this whole thing in motion. But i want to know whether if you know this. The person who originally called out the please was why are black. Yeah we believe the person who's white sarah page. Actually the girl who was supposedly assaulted didn't didn't cop to the charges or anything like that. Degrom ended up living out most of his days in kansas city into provide a quick final point on this. You know less than a year prior the tulsa had lynched. Someone named roy belton For who's happen to be a white man for hijacking a taxi and killing..

roy belton oklahoma Hundreds may thirtieth nineteen twenty Tulsa massacre jim crow Greenwood kansas city Degrom Sally may thirty first nineteen twen tulsa thousands Zand greenwood district two days one African american less than a year prior black