38 Burst results for "10 Years"

Fresh "10 Years" from WBBM Morning News

WBBM Morning News

00:41 min | 20 min ago

Fresh "10 Years" from WBBM Morning News

"Approaching 127th and Pulaski. This is due to a hazardous materials incident. The next traffic report. 8 48 news radio 7 80 a little five point out of WBBM Extra Janaki. Weather forecast clouds some patchy fog inland spots near the lake. The sun's out and we'll get him or so I think, this afternoon mid forties, clearing colder down to the twenties inland. Already wanted the lakefront tonight. Upper forties 10 Year 50 tomorrow and Sunday and then windy and turning colder. Some snow flurries. We could see some accumulations off the lake Monday into Tuesday. Right now, Lincoln Park 38 39 O'Hare. Midway the lakefront is well 39 degrees and thank you for the video. All the juicy divorce. Chicago's weather station use radio 7 80 In one of 5.9 FM on Wall Street, a positive start to a shortened trading day, the Dow up 136 points. The NASDAQ is up 82, the S and P is up 13 points 8 40 with a month left in the year, Florida's on track for its biggest year for rocket launches in decades. This year's highlights include the first two human spaceflight launches from the Kennedy Space Center since the last space shuttle in 2011. But they've been 25 other launches so far by privately owned Space X and United Launch Alliance with the Air Force slash space.

Kennedy Space Center United Launch Alliance Pulaski Lincoln Park Florida Chicago
James D. Wolfensohn, Who Led the World Bank for 10 Years, Dies at 86

AP 24 Hour News

00:14 sec | 4 hrs ago

James D. Wolfensohn, Who Led the World Bank for 10 Years, Dies at 86

"Who served as the president of the World Bank for 10 years has died. Wolfensohn worked on Wall Street for many years and was also chairman of Carnegie Hall. He was 86 years old. I'm Jackie Quinn. AP News CORONAVIRUS

Wolfensohn World Bank Carnegie Hall Jackie Quinn AP
Fresh "10 Years" from Steve Scott

Steve Scott

00:32 sec | 20 min ago

Fresh "10 Years" from Steve Scott

"Found then Wick at Queens Boulevard and delays on the inbound go. Juan is top of the world. No troubles at the crossings. The next traffic update is in less than 10 minutes on WCBS Now Brett Anderson with our forecast, increasing sunshine and turning mild for today, a high tech near 60 degrees. Partly cloudy and not that cold Tonight Low of 48 City 40 in the suburbs tomorrow. It will turn out mostly sunny that cooler by reaching 56 degrees. It looks like dry weather continues through the weekend. Sunday Sunshine high reaching 52. 56 degrees Sunshine in New York City. 53. Terry Town, 59 in Port Washington. It's 9 48 WCBS. It's a time of year for giving Thanks and where, For the past 10 years, we've looked at all of the reasons for optimism.

Brett Anderson Juan Terry Town Port Washington New York City.
Videogames Head for the Clouds

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:55 sec | 21 hrs ago

Videogames Head for the Clouds

"Are releasing pricey new PlayStation and Xbox consoles just in time for the holidays. But that isn't where the video game action is. It's all heading to the cloud. All the major players are looking at the cloud is the way to deliver gaming content and experience. Tech analyst Rob Enderle of the end. Early group says it video and Sony have cloud based gaming services Microsoft's is due soon now. Amazon is joining the crowd in the $150 billion video gaming market and early, says the video game. Mean future is there because you don't really have to buy expensive, hard word provides a much lower cost of entry. So why introduce new hardware is Sony and Microsoft are doing a lot of people won't have the network connection of the late and see they need below. Leighton. See, they need to play in the cloud. He figures give it 10 years in the Xbox and PlayStation will be like eight tracks or your CD collection and for players will open up the door for really mass gaming games with thousands of players at once we check your

Rob Enderle Sony Microsoft Amazon Leighton
Fresh update on "10 years" discussed on Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:54 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "10 years" discussed on Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

"Day that belongs to NASA. And they use it for mostly part, But that's a 7 47-100 I believe, which is the first serious 7 47, and it belonged to Pan Am originally I believe, In fact, it still says Clipper America by the nose, and this is where plane tags come into it A few years ago, Dave wanted to come up with something that anybody could afford, and he came up with plain tags, little oval pieces of airplane skin with the original paint to be used his luggage tags or key chains. He never expected the response it would get when I was working. Gosh, this would have been about 15 years ago. It's very early on in the when I started. Moto are but we were working with a P 51 Mustang. And which is really kind of a gray area right there, But it was a piece that was never usable of destroyed and I'm like, Well, let's just take the skin off this and make like and I felt like a dog tag, you know, be able identify, but I'll call the plane, Tak. And so I made myself a little prototype laser etched into it when it Woz and I put it on my key chain, And I used it on my keys for literally 10 years. 15 years how long Awas And finally, one day one day, I'm like, you know what I'm gonna do do this, So I bought an old punch press machine, and I made myself a dye. And for Christmas, you know, I came out with six different.

Dave Clipper America Nasa Moto
Iran says British-Australian academic freed for 3 Iranians

Not Too Shabby

00:49 sec | 1 d ago

Iran says British-Australian academic freed for 3 Iranians

"Iranian state television has announced that a British Australian academic Collymore Gilbert, has been released after two years in detention. It said that miss more Gilbert had been released in exchange for three unnamed Iranians imprisoned abroad. Sebastian Usher reports images have been shown on a rain television of Collymore Gilbert in a his job and wearing a face mask in what appears to be footage taken after her release, the academic who specializes in Middle East politics at the University of Melbourne. Was detained in September 2018. She was subsequently accused of being a spy and sentenced to 10 years in prison. Australia has campaigned strongly for her release. Iranian state media says that this has been achieved by a prisoner swap with three Iranians held abroad on the website linked to state television described as baseless charges.

Collymore Gilbert Sebastian Usher Gilbert University Of Melbourne Middle East Australia
Local Teen’s ‘Big Year’ Breaks Chicago's Cook County Birding Record

Chicago's Afternoon News

05:33 min | 3 d ago

Local Teen’s ‘Big Year’ Breaks Chicago's Cook County Birding Record

"At all. But I have to say one of my favorite things of the fall, and it's It's happened for 10 years or so now. Are they both up there? Well, the so is is when the sand hill cranes fly over and I can hear them and they sound like this count to me. Sounds like turkeys, but they fly high in the air, and I was out for a walk it Ryerson Woods over this weekend. And heard them and was able to see them. I just think it's one of the coolest things. Carl Giammetti is on phone line. He is with the board member of the Chicago Order, Ornithology logical society. There's a story behind that I was too long to tell. And also on a phone line is issue. O'Brien, who set the record for most birds, identified for this year in Cook County for a year, I should say And issue is 17 years old issue. Welcome to W G. N Thank you so much for having me. You bet. Okay, so I didn't know you know what I'm talking about? What? Sandhill cranes. I'm sure right? Yes, I do. And this is the time that they're flying overweight. They fly way up above us. And but you can hear them. They're incredibly loud. Yeah, There are some incredible birds and they will migrate in really huge flocks. They make a lot of noise, too. So I think they definitely stand out to a lot of people whether or not your burger. But anyway yeah. Some of the most incredible migrating birds that passed through this area without a question. Okay, So you have identified well as of the copy I read in the Tribune 282 Birds. Is that where we're standing still? Um, I've actually gained a few more sense than, um I'm hoping that maybe I'll be lucky enough to hit the 2 90 marks, but we'll see one of the most recent ones you've seen. I'm sorry, but I think that I've added a couple. Um, some nice winter finches have been a highlight about it. Evening. Gross speak as well as the white Wing Cross. Still, another one has been spotted Toey and I'm blanking on other 10. The other one. How could I forget? Um, a cast in Sparrow, which is actually Um, one of the very few records of the species in the steak s. Oh, without question one of the most notable birds on my year list for sure. Sandhill cranes sound like for everyone. I'm glad you're okay. And it's just one of those sounds When I hear it. I just look up and I'm always raking leaves or walking somewhere in the fall, So that's pretty cool. Carl Geum Eddie is on the phone line as well from the Ornithological society in his Carl. So my producer Jeff Garlin. All day was mispronouncing and I said, Don't do it again because I want people to do it on the air, and then I screwed it up. But so issues having a quote unquote big year explain what a big year is for me. So essentially what a big year is that Ah Burger will choose a geographic area can be something that small is just your yard or could be something is largest the entire world. But county and state levels are usually probably the most popular ones to do because they're more manageable. And basically from January 1st at you know, at 12:41 A.m. 2 December 31st 11 59 pm You try to see his many different species of bird as you can. The nice thing about this story that I read in the Tribune, um, written by Morgan Green is the cooperation that's involved with other burgers to help someone in their big year. Can you tell me about that? Absolutely. Yeah, it's who did an incredible job, and especially with the added complication of covert closing a lot of like front sights. Hey, really discovered a lot of areas but really tol have a successful big year requires a lot of people sharing information about what birds they're seeing, and that's why I like to kind of say It's obviously issues achievement. He is deserve all the credit. But it also says something about the health of Ah local birding community that they're able to support new, big your records and things like that. So it's really a great thing to see. So is to explain that so you're a home watching TV or having dinner with your family, your phone chirps and all of a sudden, well chirps. How's that for upon you've got to get in the car and chased down the bird. Yeah, that is pretty much how it goes, I think Right now. We're very lucky to live in a time where we have technology at our fingertips. And I think with it a lot of birds as well because people are able to get the word out so quickly. So as soon as I get a call from a friend or a text message from our local Rare bird alert group chat. I will be in the car soon as I possibly can. And how? What's the further you? Did? I read your live in Evanston. Yeah. Okay, So if you're going to Southern Cook County or even Northwestern Cook County that's quite a hook. What's the farthest you've gone to wreck your to identify a bird? I think this year. I mean, I think I've gone is pretty much as far as the boundaries of cook County could take me. Um I'd say probably an hour and hour and 15 minutes is about as far as I've gone you've identified you said about 288 birds so far. You'd like to get to 300 Carl, how many different bird species are in Cook County? Well, you know, it varies based on you know, kind of weather patterns and the type of your it is some years we got more vagrants, Other others we don't but generally believed the cook list is somewhere close to 400. I think a few short of 400 here. So, Yeah, I

Carl Giammetti Chicago Order, Ornithology Log White Wing Cross Toey Carl Geum Eddie Cook County Brien Morgan Green Jeff Garlin Tribune The Tribune Carl Southern Cook County Evanston
How Often Does The IRS Make Mistakes?

The Frankie Boyer Show

08:34 min | 3 d ago

How Often Does The IRS Make Mistakes?

"Welcome back. It's always a pleasure. How often Does the iris make mistakes? It happens. But How often Huh? Well, Frankie and thank you for having me on Hello to your listeners today. Um You know the left statistic I saw that actually was published. By the I R s is, um National taxpayer advocate who has to issue a report. To Congress semi annually. Good updating what's working and what isn't and recommendations as to how the I R s is performing in practice and On behalf of the taxpayers and Well, whether they're taxpayers air having receiving service. On. How long is it, taking to resolve things and just Oh, kind of Areas that the taxpayer advocates office is tracks and by the way that national taxpayer advocates were poor. Is posted on the Irises website. It's published on the Iris was website. Um Semiannually. The last one that was done of, I believe was at the end of march of this year, so We may be seeing Another one shortly. Um, probably just updating what's been going on during Cove it and I'm sure get back to your question. It's been done in a while, but that I've seen a statistic. But the statistics about Notices the ire. Rest. Issuing notices that are in error was 58% and that was probably within the past. Happened. Dozens 10 years at most, that that statistic was published by the irises, National Taxpayer advocates report that about 58% of Iris notices that we're going out to people were in a river. Wow, that's pretty high. That's a pretty high percentage actually. And now my experience of representing, uh, taxpayers in responding Of these notices my experience since that statistic is that I would say it's safe to say that it Z at least at this 0.40 to 50%. Still, that's just my virus. But of course, wow! Cover. Right? I don't cover, of course, the whole population. My point, though, that are receiving my My point, though, for asking That question was very simple is because most people As I am are shocked that the numbers so high because one assumes that if the IRA sends it out his courage and we talked about this in our previous I arrest numbers that we've done and s O number eight is today's the right. Confidentiality. Now it sounds silly, but wouldn't want assume that that is an important rite that we don't even have to mention is part of the bill of Rights, Patricia That's a great question, Frankie. That is a great question. You right? You were just assume that that is, um Just a given I I agree with you on that. But if it's not In black and white. And stated in our 10 taxpayer bill of Rights. Um You know nobody's going to be made accountable with the IRA arrest. You know if For example, what what the right to confidential Elia's Tech Fair bill of right number eight. Is that a taxpayer's that that attacks there has a right to expect. To expect than any information they provide. The I arrest will not be disclosed. Unless it's authorized by the taxpayer or by law, and by law can mean that if there is a, uh It's a procedure or a court case happening so such things have to be disclosed in a court of law. But taxpayers have the right to expect the I arrest to investigate. And take appropriate actions against its employees. Um or tax return preparers and others who wrongfully used or disclose a taxpayer's return information. And, uh You know, An example is A lot of people right now. Refinancing. Our mortgage because mortgage rates are very low and also, uh, the residential market, the buying, selling and buying of residential homes in our area of New England. It's just fast and furious. Um yes, There's not enough inventory on the market. It Z seller's market right now. Buyer demand, But well, how this a slice the right to confidentiality is when you When you apply for a mortgage or or an application to refinance your loan. Um, you get tons of closing documents to sign, but I want to put out there for people to be aware. That there is a form Iris formed 45 06. That you signed at your lender wants you to sign because they want to submit that to the I arrest with that form is is a request. For a copy of a tax return. Laura Tax Return transcript Transcript of the test return that that you filed and, uh so you have given at that point. Permission for the I arrest now to disclose to your lender, your bank your or mortgage company who's ever lending you the funds to buy a refinance that mortgage To disclose the information such as a copy of the tax return that was filed or the tax return transcript because they want to make sure what you're saying. When you give provide the mortgage company. A copy of the return your most recent return tax returns you filed. They want to make sure that's exactly what you filed. With the I arrest so there is a form and so the I arrest cannot disclose your tax information to a third party, a mortgage company or bank lender, unless you give a permission, and here's the form form 45 06. So if anybody out there is listening, and they're about ready to refinance ER, or they put an offer down in a home to buy a home. Look for that form. Iris form 45 06, and you're closing documents and now you'll know This is how you authorizing, given the iris. The authorization or permission to actually give your lender copier return or your tax return Transcript. Um, is this the tax return preparer? Uh, Cannot disclose or use your tax information for any purpose other than for tax preparation, They may be subject to civil penalties and it's the tax return preparer. Discloses or improperly uses that knowingly and recklessly. The prepare may also be subject to criminal fines and imprisonment. And you know, just all I could do is I don't know personally of any tax return preparers. Um, that A real that they have done this to either A client that I've represented or heard of any criminal case, But I will tell

Frankie Patricia That Congress IRA UM New England Laura
Philadelphia Police: 12-Year-Old Boy Dead After Gunman Shoots Through Door Of East Frankford Home

KYW 24 Hour News

00:48 sec | 4 d ago

Philadelphia Police: 12-Year-Old Boy Dead After Gunman Shoots Through Door Of East Frankford Home

"12 year old boy is dead after being shot in the head Sunday morning while attempting to answer a knock on the door of his home in the Northeast. Least say the boy identified by neighbors as the Deke was home with his grandmother and 10 year old sister when the shooting occurred, Deputy Police Commissioner Melvin Singleton says that the family got a knock on the door of their home on the 5000 block of Bittman Street and East Frankfurt. For the boy could even open that door, Singleton says. A bullet came through it. Hitting him in the head could not have had any idea of who was on the other side of that door. Definitely the child appears not to be the intended target. However tragic situation. Singleton says police arrived within minutes pronounced the boy dead. Seen officials there. Working to get surveillance video from nearby homes as they search for the person responsible.

Deputy Police Commissioner Mel East Frankfurt Deke Singleton
Report: John Wall wants to be traded away from the Wizards

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:06 min | 6 d ago

Report: John Wall wants to be traded away from the Wizards

"As now. Several reports have Washington Wizards guard John Wall asking to be traded out of D. C. He does not want to be here anymore, does not want to play for the franchise that drafted in 10 years ago. He had many very good seasons. All Star in fact. But he's missed basically the last two years because of AH knee injury, and there were reports that the Wizards were shopping in for possibly was the Westbrook of the Houston Rockets. There was also discussion. This is Bradley Beals team and on the same night that Darvis Burton signs of five year $80 million deal with the Wizards. John Wall, says he does not want to play for the Wizards anymore. Also wizards reportedly signing free Agent center Robin Lopez too. A deal so much coming at you fast. But we do know this again, according to several reports, John Wall, former number one overall pick by the Wizard said so many good years in D. C wants out and has demanded a trade. To the organization. This is just probably the start of an ugly separation of Frank and

John Wall Wizards Washington Wizards Bradley Beals Darvis Burton Houston Rockets Robin Lopez Wizard Frank
Phil's BBQ in San Marcos Permanently Closed

Sean Hannity

00:41 sec | 6 d ago

Phil's BBQ in San Marcos Permanently Closed

"From the Pandemic continues for San Diego County restaurants. This time it hits what feels like a pillar and our community. Phil's BBQ with five locations in San Diego has closed its 10 year old San Marcos location permanently due to the pandemic owner Phil Pace, saying the decision to close truly was heartfelt. But if he stayed open, he'd be losing 10 to $15,000 a day, he says most of the San Marcos employees These have been transferred to other fills locations. Nationally renowned Phil's barbecue started out 1998 in Mission Hills. Pace hopes to add another North County location in the future when the virus is under control. Pace has been vocal in trying to gain more local control over the state's reopening plans. Zachary Barnes Kogo News, another victim

Phil Pace San Marcos San Diego County Phil's Barbecue Phil San Diego Mission Hills North County Pace Zachary Barnes Kogo
Judge says border agents can't use COVID-19 order to expel migrant kids

Here & Now

05:27 min | Last week

Judge says border agents can't use COVID-19 order to expel migrant kids

"Trump Administration can no longer use a public health emergency to justify deporting migrant Children who cross the border. The U. S border alone. That's the ruling of a federal judge in Washington, D. C, who struck down a policy from the CDC that the White House had argued with prevent migrants from spreading the coronavirus, an immigration detention. But the judge wrote in his ruling that the government overstepped its authority and trying to undo immigration laws passed by Congress. League Alert is an attorney with the A. C L U one of the organizations who sued the administration and Lee. What's your reaction to this ruling? We're ecstatic. You know for that, for these Children who are fleeing danger coming here all by themselves and had been Routinely expelled by the Trump administration. This was a cruel policy, not unlike other Trump administration policies directed it, Migrant Children. It was also unnecessary. We've always viewed it as a pretext. The medical professionals have all said you could bring these Children and test them as needed Quarantine them as needed, but you don't expel them. And I think recent reporting has shown that CDC did not want this. His policy in place that they were over, ridden by the White House, so we're thrilled. We hope that the administration will not appeal it. But we're not holding our breath. Given how the Trump Administration has Enacting the immigration area for the past four years. Well, I want to ask you more about that. I mean, unaccompanied Children would normally be placed in shelters how many Children have been expelled since the rules went into effect back in March at the start of this pandemic. And what happened to them in Mexico? So the amazing thing is that the administration is not actually even providing numbers of Children who have been expelled in this policy. We know from recording and leak sources. That it's over 13,000. And that was as of a month ago. So we expect that the number when we finally get a new number will be over 14,000 possibly 15,000. Who knows, But thousands 1000 Children and their expelled to Mexico if they're Mexican, and if they're not Mexican there, put on a plane to whatever country they came from. Usually Central America. They were being hidden in hotels on the border, sometimes detention centers. The policy was largely in secret. And then they were just put on a plane without an asylum hearing and Children as young as 10 years old. Thousands of Children, some as young as 10 years old. But these explosions weren't limited to just Children are our expulsions of other immigrants continuing and is that legal? So that's absolutely right. We believe that over 200,000 adults and families have also been expelled pursuant to this policy, this particular case involved on Lee unaccompanied minors. We hope the Trump Administration will get rid of the policy. But obviously we're evaluating next steps in the litigation because we're acutely aware that many adults and families are being harmed by the policy as well. You know, we've been talking for several months about family separation. Is that still happening as the border under the Trump Administration? So the family separation tragedy is still ongoing, but there are very few continuance separations, but the reason for that is because of this title 42 policy no one's even being allowed in the country. So therefore they're not being separated. The real issue now with family separation is that we still haven't found hundreds and hundreds of families who are separated at the beginning of the Trump administration were searching for them. And we would like to see the Biden administration do four things in particular with family separation when they come in. We would like to see them allow parents who have been separated for years and are in Central America to rejoin their Children in the United States. We'd like to see all the families separated by the Trump administration, given some form of legal status, given what they've been through what I think many people don't know is that the Trump administration right now is trying to deport All of these families who were previously separated. The third point is, we'd like to see some kind of fun created to help the families with medical needs. But beyond medical needs, and finally going forward, we want to make sure that separations do not occur. Unless a child welfare experts signs off on it. There's judicial oversight, but the immediate thing is to provide run provide relief for the families who have previously been separated. Lee. Immigration is very much a partisan issue. I mean, these four asks of the Biden administration. Sound really ambitious. Have you gotten any indication from the Biden incoming bite an administration that they would take on any of these four asks from from you. So all we know at this point is that vice President Biden has said this is an issue. He is very concerned about it and is going to create a task force. We haven't got the specifics. I think there's just some things we don't do in the United States, and one is making Children pawns toe score political points. League alert is a civil rights lawyer with the A C L U Thank you so much. Thank you for having me.

Trump Administration D. C CDC LEE Mexico Biden Administration U. Central America White House Congress Washington United States Biden
U.S. drops drug charges against Mexican general, clearing way for transfer

The World

04:03 min | Last week

U.S. drops drug charges against Mexican general, clearing way for transfer

"Unexpected move by the U. S. Justice Department has thrown the US Mexico relationship into the spotlight. Last month, former Mexican General Salvador sent Frago Cepeda, who was arrested in Los Angeles and face charges of drug trafficking and corruption. Today, though a U. S District Court judge allowed prosecutors to drop all charges against sent way goes opening the door for him to return to Mexico and allowing Mexican officials to investigate. Walk us through this eyebrow raising move. The world's Jorge Valencia joins us from Mexico City, Jorge What was the Justice Department accusing sent way goes off remind us prosecutors were saying that he was using his position as the former defense minister of Mexico. He was the head of the Defense Ministry from 2012 to 2016. He said he was using that position to allow an organized crime group known as H two to traffic drugs to United States without interference. Now prosecutors appear to have a very solid case. They spent more than a year on this. So it was a very big surprise when none other than William Barr, the U. S. Attorney general himself issued a statement yesterday saying that prosecutors were going to drop all charges and return General Sam Fly goes to Mexico Mexico's foreign relations Minister Marcelo and gave public remarks about this yesterday. Would out here is saying that he doesn't see this as a path toward impunity, but rather his way in which the Department of Justice is showing respect to Mexico and showing respect to Mexico's military. This feels like such a 1 80, especially considering sent for egos was arrested. Just last month s O. What kind of reaction has there been? Shock? Bewilderment? Uh, I mean, for people who are involved in efforts to fight organized crime here in Mexico. They're very surprised by this because this isn't just about the charges that Cienfuegos was facing in District court in New York, but also about other crimes that many people believe that the government was involved in while he was the defense minister. Most notably the case of 43 University students who went missing in the southern state of Guerrero and were never found. I spoke with Mike the hell he is the former director of international operations at the D E. A. And he was based here in Mexico for more than 10 years, quite frankly, in my 31 year career with the Drug Enforcement Administration I had never seen anything like this. This is outlandish and the most repulsive thing that I've ever seen in the history of U. S. Justice. Marco. One important piece of context to have is that Mexico's courts are notoriously challenged. Some estimates find that nine out of 10 crimes in Mexico go unpunished. So when you have somebody as powerful as the former defense minister general of Cienfuegos if he actually did commit any of the crimes that he was being accused of in the United States There is a good chance that he could walk away without ever facing trial. Are there any theories as to why the U. S. Justice Department would drop these charges? I mean drug trafficking. Mexico remains a high priority for us national security. There seems to be more to the story. I should be clear that it is speculation. But the prevailing theory is that by returning General Cienfuegos to Mexico, the Trump administration is returning a favor to the administration of President Andres Manuel Lopez. Laura Laura. Mexico has done a lot of work to prevent people over the past couple of years from migrating from Central America toward the United States. It's very difficult to tell because by releasing General Xin flag goes, one question is answered. But many, many, many more questions are being asked the world's Jorge Valencia in Mexico City. Thank you very much for this. You're welcome, Marco.

Mexico U. S. Justice Department Frago Cepeda Jorge Valencia Defense Ministry William Barr Department Of Justice Sam Fly Mexico Mexico United States Cienfuegos Salvador Mexico City Jorge Marcelo Los Angeles Guerrero Drug Enforcement Administratio
Lil Wayne charged with firearm possession

Doug Stephan

00:34 sec | Last week

Lil Wayne charged with firearm possession

"Up to 10 years in prison if convicted on a federal weapons charge. Music correspondent marches are a letter reports. Whoa. Look at me when I'm talking to you. Court documents in Miami show Lil Wayne has been charged with possession of a firearm by a convicted felon. Authorities say they found a gold plated handgun and ammunition in his luggage as he arrived in Miami on a private plane last December. They say low, Wayne said it belonged to him, and it had been a father's Day gift. His lawyer, Howard's, Remnick says Lil Wayne is not dangerous and did not threaten to use the gun. Lil Wayne was convicted more than

Lil Wayne Miami Howard's Remnick Wayne
Conan O'Brien ending late night talk show in 2021

Broncos Country Tonight

00:28 sec | Last week

Conan O'Brien ending late night talk show in 2021

"Time late night talk show host saying goodbye. Here he is. There he goes. After 28 years with the nightly talk show, Conan O'Brien is leaving for another gig, a weekly talk show on HBO. Max. His TVs Talk show will end next June after a 10 year run. Previously, he hosted The Tonight Show and Late Night with Conan O'Brien for NBC. And while he's leaving TBS, he's not leaving his company. TBS and HBO. Max are all part of the Warner media family. Jason Nathan's an ABC Notice Hollywood. Next

Conan O'brien Late Night With Conan HBO O'brien TBS NBC Warner Media Jason Nathan ABC Hollywood
Rapper Lil Wayne charged with federal gun offense in Miami

Todd Schnitt

00:16 sec | Last week

Rapper Lil Wayne charged with federal gun offense in Miami

"Could be facing up to 10 years in prison. The U. S attorney for the Southern District of Florida charged him with federal firearm charges after agents allegedly found a gun on the rapper's private airplane while it was stopped in Miami. He's due in court next month with Florida's

U. Florida Miami
Penn to donate $100 million to the School District of Philadelphia for environmental repairs such as asbestos

KYW 24 Hour News

01:16 min | Last week

Penn to donate $100 million to the School District of Philadelphia for environmental repairs such as asbestos

"The University of Pennsylvania has pledged to give $10 million a year to the Philadelphia school district. For the next 10 years. That's the largest gift in the school district's history. Cave RW City Hall bureau chief Pat Lobe reports of a be used to address environmental issues in school buildings. Pen President Amy Gutman says she sees the total $100 million contribution, having both an immediate impact on student and staff health. And a long term value by enabling the school district in the school board to move forward with the rest of their agenda for education, which you can't do without public health and safety. District spokesperson Monica Lewis is the gift will go a long way to containing lead paint and asbestos, which is present throughout most of the district's 257 schools. Some of which date back to the 19th century. It was very tremendous gift and we're very grateful for 10 Support Council member Helen Gim, a public school advocate. Welcome to the gift and ought to be commended for taking this first step forward but most importantly for focusing its investment on the condition of our schools, says she hopes other nonprofit institutions which don't pay taxes to the district will follow pens lead. The district estimates it would take $4.5 Billion to fully address its capital

Philadelphia School District Pat Lobe Pen President Amy Gutman Monica Lewis University Of Pennsylvania Helen Gim
Conan O'Brien ending late night talk show in 2021

WTMJ Nights

00:28 sec | Last week

Conan O'Brien ending late night talk show in 2021

"News and a long time late night talk show host is saying good bye. We'll sort of hearing on there. He goes. After 28 years with the nightly talk show, Conan O'Brien is leaving for another gig, a weekly talk show on HBO. Max. His TVs Talk show will end next June after a 10 year run. Previously, he hosted The Tonight Show and Late Night with Conan O'Brien for NBC. And while he's leaving TVs, he's not leaving his company. TBS and HBO. Max are all part of the Warner media family. Jason Nathan's an

Conan O'brien Late Night With Conan HBO O'brien NBC TBS Warner Media Jason Nathan
Lil Wayne facing federal gun charge in Florida

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:31 sec | Last week

Lil Wayne facing federal gun charge in Florida

"New gun charge could send rapper Lil Wayne to prison for years. More from ABC is Jason Nathan Seuin rapper Little Wayne hit with felony weapons charges at all dates back to December of last year, when his private plane was searched by federal agents in Miami. They said they found drugs, guns and ammo on board and that Wayne admitted that a gold plated pistol found in some luggage was hiss. Miss Wynn is on parole and not allowed to have guns, You know, faces 10 years in prison if convicted, his lawyer says. The rapper plans to fight the charges. Jason Nathan's an ABC Ners

Lil Wayne Jason Nathan Seuin ABC Miss Wynn Miami Wayne Jason Nathan
Dow ends down over 167 points as stocks retreat from records

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:41 sec | Last week

Dow ends down over 167 points as stocks retreat from records

"Today on Wall Street stocks eased off their records as investor focus shifted to the surgeon cases. Along with new lockdown measures, including it'll annoy that overshadowed optimism that covert 19 vaccines will eventually and the pandemic s and P 500 index down 17 a drop Today of 5/10 of 1% the Dow Down 167 down 6/10 of 1% and NASDAQ fell 24 points lower by 2/10 of 1% Tenure up 14 30 seconds. 10 Year Yield 100.85% Gold down 4/10 of 1% 18 80, the on Sam, West Texas intermediate crude. Lower little changed out two cents. 41 32 a barrel. I'm Charlie Pellet.

Charlie Pellet
Dow ends down over 160 points as stocks retreat from records

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:44 sec | Last week

Dow ends down over 160 points as stocks retreat from records

"Hank Waters, I'm Charlie Valadez, and he remains lower. The Dow was well, pulling back from records and as stank on the plus side now NASDAQ of 18 again thereof. Just about 1/10 of 1% stocks, easing off records with the Corona virus inside the S and P down five, a drop of 1/10 of 1%. The Dow is slumping 89 points lower by 3/10 of 1% should point out that NASDAQ has been swinging between gains and losses. NASDAQ 100 Index Up today by 1/10 of 1% for Russell 2000 up by 5/10 of 1%. 10 you up, 9 30 seconds 10 Year Yield 100.87% Gold Now down 2/10 of 1% 18 85 The aunts and West Texas intermediate crude down two cents little change their 41 31 barrel. I'm

Hank Waters Charlie Valadez Russell
"10 years" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

11:15 min | 9 months ago

"10 years" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"Take additional steps and continue to address problems in our health care system those would require legislation. I would think from Congress and action by the White House you know the Senate at least is controlled by the Republican Party in the White House. For the past. Three years of the ACS life has been controlled by the Republican Party. Hhs Health and Human Services Department kind of administers the affordable care act. Can you talk about what we've seen in the past three years from the trump administration in terms of how it administers the ACA its approach to the ACA? Absolutely we've seen it administration that is very hostile to the affordable care. Act across a whole bunch of different fronts. Starting with legislative efforts there was of course a major legislative push to repeal the affordable. Care Act during president. Trump's first year in office much of two thousand seventeen was focused on conversations about repealing. The law that was ultimately unsuccessful at the time but Republicans continue to say that if they come back into control of both chambers of Congress that they'll continue to think about legislative repeal. That's when we saw John McCain's famous thumbs down vote. That's that's absolutely right. But beyond legislative efforts we see trump administration ability the affordable care act a period in lots of other places that annual. White House budget continues to propose enormous cuts to Medicaid and the affordable care act coverage programs. They've become a little bit less specific in the budget about what they WANNA do. But they still are proposing removing a lot of the money that the affordable care act put into our system to support these coverage programs beyond sort of hypothetical proposals. We've seen really important administrative actions. That are focused on undermining or undoing. Parts of the affordable. Care Act through rulemaking and other tools. That don't require Congress. So the trump administration has lifted regulations on some of these unregulated market segments. That have allowed them to proliferate and peel consumers out of regulated market segments and into these unregulated plans. There's been a weakening of regulations related to benefits have to be covered and how consumers interact with enrollment systems. We've seen the trump administration cut funding for advertising and outreach that brings people into the coverage programs. I mean we've seen small changes like changes to technical formulas that mean the tax credits the financial assistance available under the ACA decrease in value by about two percent and people's deductibles are about two percent higher because of these technical changes so really across the board. You've seen administrative actions focused on undermining the ACA but perhaps even more prominently. We've also seen efforts to undermine the through litigation trump administration is currently asking the Supreme Court to strike down the entirety of the affordable. Care Act. A court will hear that case this fall but it is a full frontal assault to the healthcare law. But I will note that even as we've seen all of this hostility to the from the trump administration we've also seen them relying on components of the ACA in some of their priorities at times so the trump administration has been really focused on issues around healthcare transparency and some of their signature issues to bring transparency to healthcare pricing have relied on components of the ACA to move that agenda forward. We've seen this Medicare policy. We've seen it in components of the response to Kovic nineteen and sort of across the administration's Healthcare Policy Agenda. Uc places where they do rely on ABC authority. Even as they're asking the court to strike that authority down and I think that really speaks to the way in which the affordable care act has become part of the fabric of our healthcare system and why attempts unwind it could have such far reaching impacts Do WanNa follow up with you on the Supreme Court case. Just a moment but first. I'm going to go back to the Republican Party. I mentioned earlier in this conversation. That you and Matt fiedler did a podcast interview and you also have a paper on policy twenty twenty website that looks at some of the Democratic candidates policy proposals for healthcare. We've heard about Medicare for all and others so I'M GONNA ask. Does the Republican Party itself that say Republican Senators have a alternative health? Care plan or vision if they're thinking about dismantling the ACA what would they put in? Its place yeah so they absolutely have a vision and you can piece together from a whole bunch of different actions that they take fundamentally. I think the Republican Party looks at our current healthcare coverage system and sees as the primary problem that we spend in their view way too much federal money on healthcare coverage programs and so what their proposals are focused on doing is scaling back. Some of that federal investment in either asking states or households to step up with additional investment or for more people ultimately to be uninsured. And you see that in the legislative proposals that they floated during the affordable. Care Act. Repeal fights also see that in the White House budget so the White House budget has in past. Years proposed zeroing out certain. Aca related accounts and replacing that with smaller block. Grants to steets to support some of these same initiatives but that would reduce the federal footprint in this space they both have been focused on reducing regulations that increase the cost of coverage for healthy people by covering people with preexisting conditions and by ensuring coverage of a relatively broad set of benefits so all of these themes are prominent in the way. Republicans talk about healthcare healthcare policy. They don't have the same sort of plan documents that we have seen from some of the Democratic candidates. But there's absolutely a vision and sort of a through line in these policies. Let's turn to the Supreme Court now. Can you talk about what's happening with the legislation to challenge affordable care act in the court now and also I mean? I know this is not the first time that the fobel character has been under challenge in the Supreme Court. And you kind of explain what's going on there. Yes so in two thousand seventeen. Congress was not successful in repealing the entire affordable care act but Congress did decide that they wanted to get rid of the Individual. Mandate the penalty for people who go on insured. Congress did this by reducing the amount of the penalty two zero dollars so the penalty statute was still in the law but instead of the penalty amount that existed prior to passing bill. Now the law says you have to pay zero dollars if you don't have health insurance coverage the lawsuit that Supreme Court is going to be considering in the fall argues that because the penalty is zero dollars. That means that the individual mandate can no longer be thought of as a tax. And if it's not a tax than that means it's unconstitutional because Congress doesn't have the power to put in place a mandate like that if it's not going to be considered attacks then the lawsuit takes the rather extraordinary step of arguing that because the mandate is going to be struck down on unconstitutional in their view. That means Congress would've wanted the entire affordable care act to be struck down as well this is. I think pretty obviously preposterous. We know what Congress wanted because Congress did it. They got rid of the mandate but they left the rest of the law in place. That's the choice that Congress made and that's where we find ourselves today but nonetheless trump administration and a group of Republican State Attorney Generals are arguing that what Congress really wanted in. Their view was for the entire. Ncaa TO BE STRUCK DOWN. That's the view that is going up to the Supreme Court if the trump administration and the Republican Attorney General's where to be successful in that lawsuit it would mean that everything about the ACA would be sort of stripped from the US code effectively overnight it would immediately eliminate the provision of the law that helped millions of people gain coverage estimates adjusted. Twenty million people could pretty rapidly lose coverage it would eliminate the benefits we've talked about it and employer coverage that require employer health plans to include the key protections it would also have sort of unsettling and destabilizing effects across our healthcare system because the ACA did so much it's woven into so many parts of our healthcare system it would require changes in Medicare payment rates changes to the Indian Health Service operates it would affect the FDA's authority to approve certain kinds of new biosimilars drugs because that approval pathway was contained within the ACA so it really would have far reaching effects across our healthcare system that would immediately take coverage away from people and caused chaos in other places seems to me that the ten year anniversary is really key here because at its five year anniversary it only been about a year since the was becoming fully implemented. It took a few years for it to come online. But now we've were ten years into this and so many regulations and rules have been written insurance. Companies have change their behaviors. People have come to expect certain kinds of behaviors from insurance company. So I think the ten year anniversary is a really important market at be having this conversation. Absolutely there's so much that has happened in the. Aca has just become a part of the way so many Americans receive coverage and interact with the healthcare system. That it's very difficult to imagine. Unwinding it let me ask you about the timing of the Supreme Court case. Has the court heard the case and will they be making their decision in the current term or is it something that will happen in the next term which I believe would be after October? Which is very close to the twenty two thousand presidential election. It's a great question so the court has only recently agreed to hear the case. They have agreed to hear the case during the October term. That means briefs from the Party is we'll be due in the spring and summer and we can expect the case to be scheduled for argument sometime in the fall so we don't know what the argument eight will be but typically we'd be looking at sort of early fall. October or November for the argument date for a case like this but then their decision would come out for probably months afterwards absolutely long after the election. That's right a little gift. Perhaps to the next president if it's not donald trump either way. Let me turn to Kobe. Nineteen I'm thinking. We can have a conversation now about health policy without mentioning. Cova nineteen and you. You brought up a few minutes ago. How is respond to cope in nineteen being impacted by the affordable? Care Act. I think the best way to think about that question is to imagine how repealing or striking down the now would impact the cove in nineteen response if the lawsuit was successful. Sort of what would that mean for the way we are responding to this disease so most prominently? There would be about twenty million more uninsured people pretty suddenly so we would a major gap and health insurance coverage on top of the folks who are already uninsured. We would be dealing with a bigger population who no longer has sort of stable reliable access to the healthcare system. You could also see increased fiscal pressure on states as we talked about the affordable care act provides generous financial support to states that expand their medicaid programs. Some states may want to try to keep some of that coverage expansion plays particularly in the face of a pandemic but without the generous financial assistance in the ACA. You'RE GONNA have a pretty significant pressure on state budgets coming at a time where the state is also looking at potential recession. That is also GONNA pressure on state budgets. So it's a pretty inconvenient time for states to be facing kind of fiscal pressure associated with.

ACA Congress Supreme Court Republican Party White House donald trump Hhs Health and Human Services president ACS John McCain assault ABC Senate Medicare Ncaa
"10 years" Discussed on Marathon Talk

Marathon Talk

04:51 min | 11 months ago

"10 years" Discussed on Marathon Talk

"Right about it for this week's show Tony what you're up to well. I'm going to be doing more ruining. Hopefully I've got a few things on this summer. That timber well let's eat. Let's eat drink more. Ruining that'll help. I should do that. Anyway I just saw of ate meat sometimes and then sometimes not giving an impressive title. We mean yeah. That's that's how we normally live isn't it. Isn't that just normal. You think so. Yeah but I'm sorry I've got. I can monitor Saudi. I'm seeing some old school friends which I have not seen to my shame free. You're used to live with these people you know and I'm looking forward to going out for me with Saturday. I've got a night shoot another day. which is something that always thought because so obviously at work I'm an actor and If you shoot not nice outside you've got to use the hours and it don't go out of our force for Finney. The only got an hour enough so I'm starting at six o'clock on Thursday going to in the morning. Mitch always messes up your clock alert obey always find that I finding difficult to get out and run the next day so I'm planning on on Friday being arrested this week and I'm working on a song that she is well at the moment which is quite nice. We've got a local couple who raised funds that you noble children and even though it's years ago the you know the radio activities still quite hi around the carbon. The exact research with kids a week away from the environment the health improves markedly. Wow now in that time. And so obviously living the district the video fund raiser every year and what they did was they asked if I could donate some in in our band. Donate donate to song. What we said we'd write a song about anything? Some dog someone's cat whatever. Some of the Carnival Committee requested Song About New Mills Carnival. And so. We've got this tune that matrix in an average in some words and we get together on Thursday is when you start working on a song you it's a bit of an earworm it really gets. You hadn't accounts up thinking about this chewed out that we are we. Are we allowed to play it when you when another I got this grand idea about the actual car in allies devotees giants in Spain with great big ADS and I've been local shopkeepers. These heads made it for the local shopkeepers off off people walking through some quite inspired by reside. So have you been googling where to get joined joint heads made a have above not not where where to get the made but how to make them to make these joint head yeah. You don't give money to get me. Nobody now I pay my wife rain an expert. No yeah that is one way the problem is it always rains. You Account Massive Grace Sake exactly so paper. Marcia is one option but I think around a wire frame. At least it's GonNa stay in in one pace there's also foam options sort of glue them together so I'm stage of researching the moment and I think the best ways of a confined. Look the words in Spanish because they do a lot in Spain more than knowing how rich over here the these these big heads and they lend them up got no actually keep them. Nobody wants it was in the local paper. And how we're going up. I'm problem so that incoming great big heads of shopkeepers. And then have some kind of ceremonial burning. Be Fantastic. You finish the carnival-like chuck him on the Bonfire Command. I have a training event for the Stephen. Lawrence charitable trust in and then Uh Marathon Monday of a virgin money under math and facebook live on Friday. This week. Barrows Akiko and then Saturday we've got storm. Eighteen Day off. I one title. What a involve is? It's a bit of celebration of every body. That's helped in the first year of student break all getting together and spending the day together learning a little bit about what we've done this year kind of passing each other on the back of their looking forward to planning next year. It's kind of I. US Little Mini Conference. Really be right and hope your should be running anyway right. I think that's about it. Thank you to this week sponsors. Let's do this. And thrive a thank you to our production team our interviewees. That's us this week and you our listeners for bringing you another marathon talk. I'm Martin Yelling. He's eastern you wouldn Shaw Marathon Talk.

Spain Martin Yelling Finney Tony Carnival Committee New Mills Carnival Barrows Akiko Mitch Stephen Marcia virgin money Lawrence facebook
"10 years" Discussed on Marathon Talk

Marathon Talk

11:23 min | 11 months ago

"10 years" Discussed on Marathon Talk

"This week's training to his sponsored by thrive driver or a finger prick blood tests that allows you to track everything from cholesterol liver function vitamin D B twelve diabetes indicators and will you take the test at home and get GP and lies results with personal recommendations based on medical research comment on hand to improve within forty eight hours as a runner. It offers a great way to chat Qui biomarkers and provide data that helps to ensure your body's performing optimal level. Stop Twenty Twenty twenty with marathon token thrive and get fifty percent off your first personalized thrive at Kit using the code marathon. Fifty at thrive ver- dot Co on this week's training talk. We're going to talk him sessions. This time of the year is a fantastic time of year to build build up strength from hill sessions and building. Strength is probably the main reason why people drop in and he'll work into their regular training. So do you doing some hills. At the moment I do hills a lot I do. It's my main intervals. I don't know why but I find it easier especially if I'm on my own to go out and do a hill session than do a flat session and I live in a hilly area. Yeah so it's actually a can't avoid the hills really where I am but what about where you are you. You don't suppose this half you to find a year. Well we've got we do have some heroes does but I. I can't remember the last time I went back to specifically do hill session like to go or you know what I'm going to go and do eight times. Ninety Second Hill repeats. Yeah no they're good for you. I do know that they're great for building strength. I know they're great for you form. You might think they're not but they are they because when you're running a hill session well focusing on your technique up the hills really important alter like it focuses in on your knee drive and yet in your hip flex and your drive off your for your arm action. You know really if you don't think about those things you don't run the hill hard enough to you know and do you think Obviously they're gonNA help in hill races. Hilly races do you think the server purposes while in flat races to prepare for flat races. I think they do and they're put in the right time in training so now for example. Ah If you're doing some hills now running a marathon in March or April then so good for for being strong you know you know if your strong up a hill while you're going to be strong in her flat. He's preparing your body better on you. Although I do think that there's a need to drop in some specifics. Sure if all you you do is hard uphill running then. You don't have doesn't replicate the same intensity of flat like one one MORE LINEAR focused running. 'cause you tend to change a formerly obese it to go up the hill right. You work a little bit different particularly doing. In short hard hill efforts whereas on the flats all about repetition the same for a long period of time so I do think you have to transition to do some specifics on the flat. So if you're sitting up on the hill session and there's different sorts. A hill sessions. How much hard stuff they need to be doing within that session? Would you say going going off minutes or Robin wraps because obviously if you're doing like little short reps when you do two of those it's very different effort to due to massive long reps isn't it. So what's another I used to be at Stockport Harriers. This offset by eighteen minutes was rise. Do you know what I've never thought about now. No because I always always do the hill sessions based on the purpose of the hill session. So you know instead of thinking aren't gonNA run hills so the time I'd do it too duration. Yeah because as if we doing like a marathon build up half marathon or an. We're thinking right. Let's do a hilly Fart Lek for example like mixed hill kind of intervals random random randall. Park a random cross country loop and you say I'm GonNa do this really hard constantly for twenty five minutes but don't put the time together. Gather if I was to do a focus sessions rice. Yeah the session might be. Let's say out in our eight times ninety seconds eight times forty five seconds as a hill. Oh set repeat run fast turnaround jump back down again so if you're doing say two-minute repeats found a hill. It was too many Tisch to to go. How many of those would you do? It depends on training for so if you're not paying for anything I okay Auger that I'm going to go somewhere I would depend on. I'm training for because the intensity of you know. I would probably do more a lower intensity if I wanted to build strength here and I would do lesser higher intensity if I was really after that speed endurance and empower empower. Yup You know actually I. It was a mixed session specifically think about probably some to get me into it. Takes me he asked to warm up into a hill so might do some two-minute hill reps are good strong tempo pace and then drop it down and do some sixty second reps and then thirty second reps and try and keep thirty second reps fast right because of course the more you do that more. Tidy get didn't you. Yeah I read so I read something a session Joe. Pavelski does where she did. I think he was probably four or five seconds. Six hundred forty five sectors are probably all wrong with this and then you do like six times thirty seconds and then along with the harder but at the end she really really mix the different F supremacy. Well I tend to do is I'll just. I'll find the hill to nine minutes. Roughly together then. I'll do like six those and if I'm doing the Fox Hill that we talked about earlier took me seven minutes. Today's did three of them. But maybe if I a mixed it up a bit more. I'm up Gabbay more benefit. Yeah I think it does. One of the things with heroes is is keep doing the same hill session. You get really good at running. That hill session ness it. You don't translate the being really good at running the hill session to being really good at running. He's just can run a really good hill session. Not because it say me yeah to break up and doing different types of hill sessions is is really good isn't it. Yeah you know really good and the things I think people forget sometimes is to run over the top of the hill. So they kinda stop before they get to the top. Yeah all the end of the rap. If you're not using the top of the hill so you might focus on tree and it's halfway up the hill and you know you slow down before before we get to it yeah and whereas the end of the REP is the end of the red. Are you wouldn't stop at three fifty seven if it was a four minute rep but so you're stopped three seconds before you get the top of the hill or the time of the hill supposed to run right through the hill here and the other thing which is which does make a massive difference Prince on hill training is recovery. Time right so you can like if you give yourself a long recovery and doing some short hills you can repower up as soon as you start to play with the recovery and run downhill a bit quicker like on a constant hill effort and becomes a much harder session much harder yeah really upset that stamina and endurance when you're running so you getting recovery because you're running. The Dan Hill's faster but then he got hit the uphill so it's a completely different session to really recovering like walking awoke jogging Dan to keep the momentum going and recovering Dan Hill. That's a harder session. About actual downhill sessions. Is that something that you ever do know. Do well have done in the past this line. Power which a lot of people know through Lyme Park Park run very scenic role is a lot of tourists to it and I used to do yours ago. A two mile loop add some weeks. I do them up. And so makes ado the largely largely down with a bit of up to the cage at the end and when I made that part of I did it once a week for five six weeks or something and I got my best time at the Great North L. Thrown that year. I think because right now is such a a lumpy half marathon so open down that it really helped and we tend to run up and don't know much flatwork actually felt really natural for me to get me. Legs moving faster by working hard and going downhill and so it was something that I didn't normally do and probably improved because of that. I think I should should should have done that a two because I am not that great running downhill places. A lot of pressure from courts. Yeah and after the race is hilly. It's not the appeal that does meets the dams. And you know because when I run downhill I'M A. I'm quite likely. centric loaded so hen to be a Dan Hill Heel striker and and I'm trying to break all the time. So you know I'm running downhill am heel striking. And that he'll striking puts a lot of force through rumer leg and I'm really notice it in mccord's downhill running so that you know then. Of course you end up females later thinking I'm Mocatta shot to pieces. Why is that? Because you've been breaking striking when you've been doing. The Dan Hill runs and I should. Maybe I should do some ups and downs but that all sounds a bit too seaweed series instruction for me remember during a foul race was follicle John Local Foul Ronan as you to pass him on the ops and he always pass me on the down slightly different because you've got risk of rabbit holes and all that sort of thing by always break on the downhills and remembering going possibly just shouting. Disengage the brain uh-huh actually a really good for letting your legs move as fast as the coun- unknown to worry because that's what does the damage in. It's just just relaxing on the downhill. Yeah I'm about if you're a beginner and you've not done an interval session rehill session before we recommendations for I think keep keep it short. Don't you so like the thing that destroys you as a as a beginner if you haven't done at the hills before is over committing to the hill whether that's the effort the duration ration- or the recovery. So if you're having shorter up the hill don't run completely Fatai and have a nice long rest you more likely to be able to gradually agile build up getting used to the hills because you're sore afterwards aren't you. Yeah you know it's like Ooh that's does make you more sore A Hill session. So I'd say gently does it begin.

Dan Hill Dan Hill Heel Fox Hill Twenty Twenty twenty ver- dot Co Stockport Harriers Fart Lek Lyme Park Park Robin Tisch Auger Pavelski Gabbay Joe randall mccord Dan
"10 years" Discussed on Marathon Talk

Marathon Talk

08:20 min | 11 months ago

"10 years" Discussed on Marathon Talk

"Never raise your less than now eight year old daughter and five year old son. We're both pretty committed. Stayed in pretty serious on mantra athletes. I was about to do my seven th and Helena dumb has sixth We saved by Jones. Paul I was working as a lecturer and scored Excise Science University of Leeds. And you know he's a pretty pretty established path really and then we saw two thousand and two thousand eleven. I gave up my job at the University of Leeds to work. Full time apart run That took some to me. Journey to cost on a journey docket never ever ever dreamed of. I'm recording based on the way back from a global a board meeting trustees where we'd be discussing. The twenty one countries is that we operate in the six and a half million people that are interested countries which eat starting in the future. Goals and Ambitions Park on imprisons shifted our practices. Today's junior Paul Ryan and putting run projects engaging female participants younger participants people from disadvantaged communities mutates and we just never dreamed this need eleanor. I now really have any insurance goals. I did come rate last with Madonna and I felt like that probably probably chopped off. Capped off the end of my German spall passion which lasted fifteen years from first running a serious marathon and trying to break three hours. I was getting through. I take that pretty seriously and then trying to break five minutes for mile which I didn't do and then finally went income range of Matab which is kind of that was it for. Maybe I think and and here we are right. Maybe time to answer questions. You guys are sitting in. Thank you so much for listening to show by the way over the allows ten years. It's been it's been great. I think you know possibly the most powerful thing for me about the show is being able to chat to meet once a week for ten years and that's being great. I think as a as a mental health initiative think we'll committed to phoning one friend up once a week for a year for an hour time. Let let's chat got for one hour once a week For Ten years in this case I think most people out help along and make them feel a lot that even without anybody listening I think he would be right for me. Thank you so much for listening in supporting the show and you know when things happen and things about you send us an amazing messages of support and love and we really appreciate that and when you guys meet up outside and do things together and achieve things you know. Find some way influenced by awesome. Last night feels amazing using to question seven Mac Lisa toward if money was no object. Where would you like to run? So many places silent I think for me one thing that crops up my mind all the time is is we have run event in a place where Skin Siberia which is eight and a half thousand kilometers east east of Moscow and as one hundred degrees centigrade swing between the coldest and the hottest every year. I just would love to spend some time there from that those people and understand what it's like to live in such an amazingly different part the world so far away from the from the lives we lead I mean. Of course there's so many other other places that would be great to that. One always comes back to me when I when I think about that. Question David Lynch says. What's your favorite funniest? Most irritating fan hero worship Can I get a Selfie. Moment since becoming megastars you know what they say. Never Heroes and Sometimes that's true. That's not be lucky enough to meet some amazing people. People become learned anything over the course of the ten years of marathon talks the people who are amazingly quicker running a no different whatsoever to people who are not amazingly quicker running and say some really nice and some of them are not so in some of them love what they do and some people they do some of them are really passionate about sport and some of them on at least you know. It's no different. Whoever you're speaking to you really whatever group of people and you know of course has been some amazing ones? I was fortunate early today. I spent partly take more crossed Who eats feed on the show and he's being just the most absolutely most amazing person when you get to know him and I'll be lucky enough? Spend time again through PA rum with Christy. Wellington we've interview on the show up see amazing but of course our great friend who wrote to his first in early January twenty ten right when the show it stopped him and he said I love the show. It's inspired to be shoes up again. Thanks so much and We talked to me and said would you mind doing view and he did and and Nolan and and families have just become incredibly good friends over the last ten years and now it's taken us take a no tonight together. All the way to Japan set apart running in Tokyo in a country where the nose incredibly passionate about and I was really excited to go visit and was amazing and so I think think nice. Maratha talkers allow me to meet. Some people who are empowered enabled me to meet some people who are just absolutely incredible individuals. Joel's at the same time it's it's it's it's reminded me that we shouldn't make heroes all of people don't know personally we shouldn't fan A. and worship people. We don't know person we can. We have my their achievements. We can keep choking amazing achievement to run to one in illegal marathon all one fifty nine in the in in this project. We say that's amazing but at the same time we I don't know Elliot so you know I too often. I've seen people heartbroken when they're heroes of of being exposed Maybe not being quite what they seem. And I think that I think I'd already negative tape and say you know don't believe in anybody that way you get your heart broken but at the same time I think you hear your true heroes all out your true heroes some of your family members and some of your close friends some of the people you spend time with work or pod and then normal people doing normal things you know them really well and you can stand by them and trust them and believe believe in them and they're absolutely amazing and I think you know if I've learned one of the things I've learned from Africa visas for some reasons in society we make heroes it was of people we've never met and we nor the heroes that we that we with every single day You know in a fortune people at Notre Chrissy Day Eva Doc. Somewhere heroes. But they've become that threw me getting to know them really well not through winning five Paralympic medals or winning four on them world championships running thirteen minutes flat. Five thousand meters Betsy Babington Who you interviewed the full before? Had You knew the toad doc action during their interview boom. She's as magical unexpected tricia. Also many keep coming back to the comfort. Needs to be the Martin did I. Just I wasn't I didn't know anything about curt merely and I wasn't expecting much. And you know I tend to solve when we have guests on us. As as with podcasts. I think I've read. Let's listen to that L.. I'm not interested in that person. Or whatever and actual bookmark these are the ones on my on my listening. Listen to you know. I hadn't really expected to get much from cuts for it to be not studying in in and he was. You know life changing exaggerating when I say just for me personally. Some of our compete life. Changing some lessons I take from them. You know I am apply almost every day of my life and I just thought Kerr was absolutely incredible and so I just amazing and I thought it would of course have been loads of others Chris Oya hope was the most important one thing running is giving you think in general is friendship. And that's been great and I think it's really important loads of friends I think I just personally for me. It's giving me the understanding can achieve so much more than I thought possible. So you know I just under four hours in two thousand nine hundred ninety. Nine hundred is a charity runner. Who'd never trained.

University of Leeds Excise Science University of L Paul Ryan Paul I Jones lecturer David Lynch Ambitions Park Skin Siberia Japan Matab Madonna Betsy Babington Africa Selfie eleanor Kerr Chris Oya PA Nolan
"10 years" Discussed on Marathon Talk

Marathon Talk

06:16 min | 11 months ago

"10 years" Discussed on Marathon Talk

"Seems maybe in a made for a marathon. Yeah yeah it was the top Brit That we griffiths to a nine four nine to see him making a comeback as well. Yeah but it was. Houston marlins well over the weekend. Was it yeah. Yeah Belfast Athletes Stevens Scalia. Ace is earned. His place actually got mixture of Jackie Newton over the weekend saying Stephen Scullions in. He's into Tokyo. How which is fantastic news finished fifth in the race and he looks absolutely in the Irish Times elated? Crossing that line brilliant. What did he learn? What Iran to eleven fifty two and? It's just outside to eleven thirty. which is the qualifying time ball? So apparently who still was given a gold label status by world athletics which means that is automatically qualified. Because I I think that means if he finishes in the top. If you've finished in the top five in a gold label marry an automatic qualification nation. Yeah I'm not good isn't it because twenty two seconds. It's not Mortiz it. I don't know how that works. Does that mean you get automatic qualification regardless of your country of qualification. So does that mean. He qualifies as a team member or do you. I mean I don't know I don't know the official rules actually. So what about if there's fought so let's say there's ten Kenyans who've you know and they finished top five Ya yeah into gold label marathons all five of them. Go to get automatic qualification. I don't know how it works. Interest trusting everybody says this piece now it says either way completes the journey and transformation of the thirty one year old from Belfast. Two three years ago Scoglio was still smoking smoking well over his natural running weight and admittedly getting drunk almost every weekend on the couch or else ending their this show that we did Eddie. Brilliant character absolutely we need to. He finished forty third in Doha. Away ran two twin. T not one thirty one. Yeah Not Feeling great but it did run Dublin. Three weeks off to that way ran to twelve. I one That that was the fastest cost is time by any Irishman in seventeen years. Wow Rocco's thumb of money Al L. Gourmet recently returning doping ban. I remember talking about on the show and they. They weren't happy happy button and said look you slip through the net. It was a mistake about it so but also a is often said he needs. He'd need both hands. The candidate scully. Early in this is the number of times. quit the sport in recent years only to discover some irresistible urge to start back brilliant honest only chevy brilliant really needs to be done actually for as well good good work and also this weekend in Houston John McCain is reported on twitty's at Stutman John a couple of British guys broke a world record today in Houston at Matt Leitch. An Art Andrew are late. Ready for this ran the fastest ever father and song on combined time for a half marathon to fourteen. o seven watt clogs worn out to fifty six an Andrew. His Dad aged fifty sakes ron one. Eleven and wow that is Matt Eli Veve Land. I think eventually peppering Cantina CNN. And I think he's coached by mail. Coach Philadel- right but we smash the record shops over five minutes off. It is that looking administered piece NAPATA. Then go to go. I'm looking at photographs of the moment like I could barely tell which one the data really isn't it. Well done something out of the war sick. What's this from length life life would do in the you're GonNa make me click a link? I'm not supposed to look at no Burnley woman now. Barely Woman Burnley woman. Just a burly women to run ten K in a Koala bear fear to raise money after the Australian bushfire. That's nice. Is that new. I think he's news. It's like when we do the thing for Japan after this anomaly isn't it he's GonNa run around just like all around Preston. Well I did see something funny on the news about a drop bear. Have you seen that. A group of a group of zookeepers in Australia wind up a I think I TV news correspondent a battery. Ah type of Koala Barracuda drop their. And they were saying they're very vicious and big fangs and load like big claws because non-existent no such thing that they called him a bear because they drop have bears and land on people who wrote the TV news correspondent. Gordon was dressed up to handle drop bear in a load of protective equipment. Nicole they gave her. They were wetting themselves in the background. They're just handed a Koala a bear to a and she was petrified. Oh anyway slightly off the subject but good luck running. What she running hospital Tomato Karen Holland forty-nine Jeez oppressed in ten K? Yeah best to look at the phone rising mountain well last week. Marathon talk celebrated a decade. What about that ten years and so we thought to be a nice idea for you the listeners to ask some questions and also just a reminder really picked up lawlessness over the years just tell you a little bit about ourselves so his four monologues golden from each of us answering your questions.

Stephen Scullions Burnley Nicole Houston marlins Rocco Jackie Newton Stevens Scalia Ace Irish Times Andrew Matt Eli Veve Land Doha CNN Belfast Houston Iran official chevy Scoglio Gordon
"10 years" Discussed on Marathon Talk

Marathon Talk

09:15 min | 11 months ago

"10 years" Discussed on Marathon Talk

"I ran for four hundred meters and forty four seconds about that four hundred meters forty four. That's eleven seconds owned automates. Yeah I know that's why I thought downhill. No I think my style of playing up so I did run this morning and got back. I thought ooh look at that. That's good I've set a new record. You know and it produces one of those little fancy achievement batch things so Philip brilliant are looked down four hundred meet in new four hundred meter. Pr Four seconds. As how I mean that's impossible sociable. Record well not like I think that's a British recold. Congratulations thanks so just take it. Service says it's true it must be true. I can't quite. I was trying to work out like where I did that. On my run given the average pace was seven minutes and seven seconds. Three point eight nine eight miles. The runners knew who got a bit very cheesed off as well aren't there you're gonNA have to delete it. Not Deleting this is serious stuff you're gonNA have a wreck you're going to have the best record for that segment or is it a segment as he just the phone deletes. No it's just my four hundred meters our two hundred. Yeah I've got the best improve my four hundred meters down to four seconds. I just can't quite work at. Where did it did you own your own phone from meters? What flat I do? Four four seconds apart from that rather speedy blip most of running's been chugging along Of wanted to do a little bit more but we paid. I picked up in a busy. Like with stone. Don't break staff and leases new interior design. Business that she started she started taking on a few people. Yeah I know it's exciting well. She's got an art degree. C and g went back so she when I first met. Liz may not know this she was this doing on and she could do up but also run fast and she was actually a first job was in an art teacher and then she got faster at running so she spent a lot of doing that and then she finished her running and the children all these things she just went back to arts university birth and did an interior design course following up all her creative star side and ner she's brilliant. We're talking about this last year. Is it called two birds. was you say yeah yeah. That's IT Shanta State. And and she's doing it so she's not doing that but it means we're a little. It'll be busier so I've had less time to go to go jogging fortunate but I do a bit. More addicted to London ended on Saturday doing that. I did a workshop for outside Moore's research. UK which was we had or a big group of marathon as well. Let the Royal Geographical Society on Hyde Park which is a lovely locations. We went and did a run in the sunshine. If you need the serpentine we. We spoke about marathons day and then come home. That was about. It really was a little nervous. People were there. Yeah Thomas Must Yup Yup pilots and fascinating facts about brain health without Siamese research and then we did a spin round and then came back the train long long day for me good and also this is good. I'm helping a lovely lady. Could San Mahan Braun her first ever virgin did you. Money on demand the first-ever marathon actually and we're going to make a project for the London. Marathon is like Sam runs London kind of thing and we did our first little video together on Friday last week. What's GONNA follower progress here? It's GonNa follow her. Yeah well she's she's first time marathon and she got really excited when she found out she can be doing it. Under Maratha see she did a bit more running the norm when it. She's only gone and got injured off to a great start to what happens to a lot of times doesn't it. It does kind of why we're telling the story of the journey a little bit. So they go. That's how interest is this all the interesting stuff I've been up to where you been stuck. Do that's drips at four hundred and four second phone to two points in for second feels like it. Was it type of Stag do well. We went to Barcelona made some mine. Oh you know. He's he's fifteen. Fifteen of us. Thirteen of US went and luckily I was on early. I didn't know if I could go for the weekend. Because there's a lot earning Janu it's been a birthday reuss. Mom's ninetieth and all sorts has been going on. I didn't go so I couldn't commit it first. So Andrew Gain in flights on their own. It was a bit of a bonus because Andrew e go in half an hour early but from a different terminal so I landed to all these pictures of this big group allots lots already on the beers at five o'clock in the morning. Oh Yeah and then the London the airport more Biz and I thought even though I've been up After three in the morning to get the boss to go to the airport a really want to get a run in because I know what these are like so I know bacelona Rib. I've run along the front I've ruined module can never enough to. There's no theme park called Tibidabo which is right at the top there and Where we're staying? I looked in there was a a park. Just north of the city the all green and countryside so metro up to there and around the top tail beautiful view it was a fantastic gorgeous day and ran longlist ridge line and then I thought well dropbox into Barcelona and see how it goes and we'll see how far from where I'm staying. It's really hard to judge when you're at the top of it and you're looking down the found just office is this riverbed it's got great psychopaths on low cyclist down there. LOADS OF PEOPLE RUINING RONALD AFRICA PLA miles. Then run of a couple of miles was thought the place was most become insane. You know w nine mile. Let's six nine miles. Yeah now miles. North six miles to go the place. It's awfully I'll get a metro. Had this forty hour metro card. I've got a metro. Look to the Metro Map. It was another half hour to get back so just kept on rolling. Luckily I got down the front. And all the lads down the front avenue meal so just mobile the Loudon. How To mail did eleven miles so it was a really good start to the end? Yeah Yeah that's a brilliant like thing to do in a stag do because normally everyone's sloshing around for a run. I'm fifty five now. Oh and I've learned is taking a long time. I don't have to do where everybody else has to do. And I'm quite comfortable now. Go enough cinema. This sites have in Iran. You still laugh or hours up. The next day I went out and did the next day. Still about two o'clock in the afternoon o'clock in the morning. It's ludicrous. Yeah arrive is is quite nice. That's really important. Part is an sometimes. When you you feel the pressure of aggrieved dynamic and you know sometimes is like I know when I sounds away the group actually even though you're away with the group and it's lovely the as you think I just just GonNa Pat and do me own thing for a bit and you know when the groups are good group where and nobody really minds? Yeah that's fine. Yes do ever you know. Just can I ask you a question. You come wash that Fox in that funny thing glasses on your session. You did today. Pitcher Oh is Fox Hills Fox hills so we've got hill heroes at the top of the hill. Is the Fox in right so I call Fox Hill even though this segment is called station to Fox. So I've done that three times times today from the I love the picture. Yeah much stronger but was little Hula. hooping kind of what's that got to do with it in plug flow known. We sunglasses on PLO. Aw Man I did do not mcglasson amount to. Oh I beg the photograph. Yeah the photo. Righto is a Fox and then little man or like well outside the pub. It's a lovely our contract. They have Morris Dancing Nola outside aside there. It's quick place. Proper old school English pub an outside. They've got all these little gnomes of.

London Barcelona Fox Hills Fox hills miles Fox Royal Geographical Society Philip Fox Hill just mobile UK US Andrew e San Mahan Braun Metro Map Liz Moore Andrew Gain Thomas
"10 years" Discussed on The Current

The Current

11:44 min | 11 months ago

"10 years" Discussed on The Current

"Quebec politician Dominique gloves parents. George UNGLOVED in Mealy Neptune. I'm glad we're among those killed in the earthquake. She also lost her uncle and her cousin last month as the tenth anniversary approached. She spoke in Quebec's National Assembly and told the story of her sister calling her twenty four hours after the quake Zepa Mama. That's my Malacca School because you've been the dominique ungloved is saying and I said Dad and mum and it was at that moment that I understood that in one blow. I had lost my father my mother. My uncle and my cousin Domenico glove is the liberal member in the National Assembly for the Montreal writing sent Santan. Good Morning Good Morning told me about that moment in the National Assembly this incredibly powerful Oh was It was very emotional national and I you know a today's beforehand. I didn't know whether I was going to do it. Or not I didn't know whether I was capable of speaking about this The National National Assembly. But then I I also have the responsibility to do that. My parents were due to Friskin Indians to be identified the aftermath of the earthquake and I think This story is not only my story but it's the story of hundreds of thousands of people have been acted by this earthquake. So I thought I I had to do it and I didn't know exactly what I was going to say. How was going to come out but I just shared the story like it happened And how I felt and remembering my sister calling me and my sister not being able to tell me dad and mom had passed away she was only able to tell me Who was my aunt? She's alive and Nick is alive and then I was saying and dad and she was an me is alive and sitting repeating all those lanes the people that were alive. He was incapable of telling me who was who had passed away. And that's how I understood what was going on you make that speech And then what happens. Politics can be a pretty divisive Participation to be in we know that people have different sides that they're involved in what happened happened in in that moment after when you go in regardless of what party you're from You go in because you think you can change the oil change things and I think we all human the the end so I had people from different parties coming to me and hugging me and and I could see people being emotional across all parties. Although it was a very sad moment it was also a very moving moment because as people were were all touched touched by the story and you know we have significant is for our patient as ranked Quebec. It's very hard to be quebecer and not to know one percents. That originally comes from Haiti eighty took me back a decade ago. When you first heard that their head burn earthquake in Haiti what did you think what went through your mind you know? I was restaurant and I was having dinner and somebody call into earthquake in Haiti. I'm like okay my parents out there because you're on vacation but All later it was it was nothing for me because earthquake is not something that is necessary. Terrible so I but almost like five minutes later somebody called I said. Did you see the earthquake. Oh did you hear about it and then I started realizing okay. It's more serious than I thought. And we started making phone calls all didn't have used but it was not surprising. The lines were caught and I had to wait until the next day to have news. We thought we had good connections. Some people giving us information and it was all all it was all wrong. In in from members of my family yet had died so Twenty four hours of not knowing of certainty the of stress fear and And then the news. I was going to say what were those twenty four hours like. I can't imagine seeing images hearing about it but not not knowing the state of your family. What was it was terrible? It was it was terrible. But you know we have very We're very resilient family. So he's trying to stay very active calling people finding solutions reaching out so it was also very a busy so you did have time to think too much about all this. You're trying to I was emotive trying to find solutions. But you can only imagine what a what it's like and then to us But then few hours later spoke with my aunt who had lost her her son Mike. My cousin who was twenty four years old passed away as spoke to to his mom. My aunt my aunt and she said you know dominate the dead. And there's nothing we can do about that. There's so many more things that you need to did you for the people that are alive so she was so strong that I told myself I'm here here. I am in Montreal and able to a half a positive influence despite everything that we're going to try to find solutions for the other people that are in need will deal with all this afterwards but if if we can actually get some food get people over there to help out and get back on the get back on their feet that this will will be contributing so it's a a personal tragedy within national or international catastrophe. Told me about your parents. They sounded like remarkable people So both my parents were from Haiti. the move to Quebec nineteen. sixty-nine was born in seventy four. And the reason why I was born and raised in Quebec is because my father was a was as a political prisoner under underdeveloped and He he had to leave the country and he came to Quebec in. co-founded the University of Montreal mom became a teacher and they were very involved in their communities. And when I say community for back he shouldn't communities in in Montreal. We all My mom was very involved with them. Female female groups and And my dad always invited some some kind of politics because he ended up being a minister Mr in the end in in Haiti And I think it's their engagement values that have That I've really they were able to transfer that aura to conveyed those values to us. We are with following we we walking in the footsteps. Your mom wrote a thesis. What what was the thesis? The thesis was the work of women. or how men become rich so basically defunct communism in infringing Basically illustrating that a lot of the men in he Had some money. But because of the work of the women supporting them she she was a feminist and The the book was all about the impact award jump women in the in the country. How did the work you talked about the impact that they had on Quebec Society? How did their work shape who you are now because you were involved in engineering before their death right? That's probably the reason why I mean politics today because they've always encouraged me to think about what difference I can make in the world and Politics is one way of doing that. So that's the certainly the reason why I'm doing what I'm doing today. And that that advice that motivation that your aunt gave you about The the work that you can do to help the living. What did that mean to you in terms of where you are now? It's something that I carry with me all the time. And even the National Assembly I share the fact that he had After exile after being sent to jail and finally he was a he was sent to tinker Acre back but He wrote a letter to my mom. And he said you know we're going to go and build I'm just going to translate it as a As I can right now but we're going to build tomorrow's at that look like our dreams so I thought disin- exactly what they've been able. STU gives us as values despite what's going on you always have to stand up and and fight for what you think is right we he also With the with the singer rocket fire outage in session Stein founded a foundation called copy which which means stand up inquiry all and to support people in Haiti. So I think these are values that are very very alive and that I'm trying to convert my own children that that cushion that you mentioned from your father. I mean that was that was in a letter that you found that he that he rotate your mother. Yes I mean told me about that letter. So the ladder The letter was written the year of I was born and it's also the year where he was sent to jail in that sent back to Quebec and After after they had passed away I was looking at all the papers and documents and I found that card For Chris it's on December. Twenty four th. He's writing this letter. My mom is pregnant. He goes to a nearby. My mom too tim unique and to you who doesn't have a name and he writes this card and at the end he said despite everything the wheel bill bill tomorrow was that looked like our dreams. it's very moving. It's it shows the strength that he had in the in the courage and I think we need to be inspired by this every day. When you look at the situation now in Haiti a decade after the earthquake What do you see? Of course. Haiti is going through difficult situation right now. Too Complex country a because of the dictatorship Because of everything that went wrong afterwards. A Haiti is in is in this current situation. That is very hard. The there are some initiatives that are clearly working being at the local level and copies a good example of that when you see communities are Becoming financially independent creative a standing up for themselves working agriculture working in education But at the end of the day like in any place in the world you need a stable government to make things happen and so if you think of those words that were in the letter that your father wrote to your mother that idea of building days that resemble our dreams or building days as that resembled our futures. What are your dreams for Haiti? They finally get A government that is table in they can actually focused focused on building. This new generation of leader kept population is under twenty years old It's a wealth unbelievable believable wealth. And and I really hope that there is a leader or group of people That will be able to Create opportunities for this new generation. It's a real pleasure to talk to you about this if I wanted to say. Thank you in Creole holiday. Say That you would say Miss Yuppie. Dominique Messina appeal. Thank you so much. Domini ungloved is the liberal M._N._A.. For the Montreal writing a centenary Santan for more C._B._C.. PODCASTS Goto C._B._C.. Dot C._A. Slash podcasts..

Haiti earthquake Montreal Quebec National Assembly National National Assembly dominique ungloved George UNGLOVED Dominique gloves Malacca School Domenico Quebec Society University of Montreal Dominique Messina Domini ungloved Creole holiday Nick Mike
"10 years" Discussed on The Current

The Current

11:44 min | 11 months ago

"10 years" Discussed on The Current

"Quebec politician Dominique gloves parents. George UNGLOVED in Mealy Neptune. I'm glad we're among those killed in the earthquake. She also lost her uncle and her cousin last month as the tenth anniversary approached. She spoke in Quebec's National Assembly and told the story of her sister calling her twenty four hours after the quake Zepa Mama. That's my Malacca School because you've been the dominique ungloved is saying and I said Dad and mum and it was at that moment that I understood that in one blow. I had lost my father my mother. My uncle and my cousin Domenico glove is the liberal member in the National Assembly for the Montreal writing sent Santan. Good Morning Good Morning told me about that moment in the National Assembly this incredibly powerful Oh was It was very emotional national and I you know a today's beforehand. I didn't know whether I was going to do it. Or not I didn't know whether I was capable of speaking about this The National National Assembly. But then I I also have the responsibility to do that. My parents were due to Friskin Indians to be identified the aftermath of the earthquake and I think This story is not only my story but it's the story of hundreds of thousands of people have been acted by this earthquake. So I thought I I had to do it and I didn't know exactly what I was going to say. How was going to come out but I just shared the story like it happened And how I felt and remembering my sister calling me and my sister not being able to tell me dad and mom had passed away she was only able to tell me Who was my aunt? She's alive and Nick is alive and then I was saying and dad and she was an me is alive and sitting repeating all those lanes the people that were alive. He was incapable of telling me who was who had passed away. And that's how I understood what was going on you make that speech And then what happens. Politics can be a pretty divisive Participation to be in we know that people have different sides that they're involved in what happened happened in in that moment after when you go in regardless of what party you're from You go in because you think you can change the oil change things and I think we all human the the end so I had people from different parties coming to me and hugging me and and I could see people being emotional across all parties. Although it was a very sad moment it was also a very moving moment because as people were were all touched touched by the story and you know we have significant is for our patient as ranked Quebec. It's very hard to be quebecer and not to know one percents. That originally comes from Haiti eighty took me back a decade ago. When you first heard that their head burn earthquake in Haiti what did you think what went through your mind you know? I was restaurant and I was having dinner and somebody call into earthquake in Haiti. I'm like okay my parents out there because you're on vacation but All later it was it was nothing for me because earthquake is not something that is necessary. Terrible so I but almost like five minutes later somebody called I said. Did you see the earthquake. Oh did you hear about it and then I started realizing okay. It's more serious than I thought. And we started making phone calls all didn't have used but it was not surprising. The lines were caught and I had to wait until the next day to have news. We thought we had good connections. Some people giving us information and it was all all it was all wrong. In in from members of my family yet had died so Twenty four hours of not knowing of certainty the of stress fear and And then the news. I was going to say what were those twenty four hours like. I can't imagine seeing images hearing about it but not not knowing the state of your family. What was it was terrible? It was it was terrible. But you know we have very We're very resilient family. So he's trying to stay very active calling people finding solutions reaching out so it was also very a busy so you did have time to think too much about all this. You're trying to I was emotive trying to find solutions. But you can only imagine what a what it's like and then to us But then few hours later spoke with my aunt who had lost her her son Mike. My cousin who was twenty four years old passed away as spoke to to his mom. My aunt my aunt and she said you know dominate the dead. And there's nothing we can do about that. There's so many more things that you need to did you for the people that are alive so she was so strong that I told myself I'm here here. I am in Montreal and able to a half a positive influence despite everything that we're going to try to find solutions for the other people that are in need will deal with all this afterwards but if if we can actually get some food get people over there to help out and get back on the get back on their feet that this will will be contributing so it's a a personal tragedy within national or international catastrophe. Told me about your parents. They sounded like remarkable people So both my parents were from Haiti. the move to Quebec nineteen. sixty-nine was born in seventy four. And the reason why I was born and raised in Quebec is because my father was a was as a political prisoner under underdeveloped and He he had to leave the country and he came to Quebec in. co-founded the University of Montreal mom became a teacher and they were very involved in their communities. And when I say community for back he shouldn't communities in in Montreal. We all My mom was very involved with them. Female female groups and And my dad always invited some some kind of politics because he ended up being a minister Mr in the end in in Haiti And I think it's their engagement values that have That I've really they were able to transfer that aura to conveyed those values to us. We are with following we we walking in the footsteps. Your mom wrote a thesis. What what was the thesis? The thesis was the work of women. or how men become rich so basically defunct communism in infringing Basically illustrating that a lot of the men in he Had some money. But because of the work of the women supporting them she she was a feminist and The the book was all about the impact award jump women in the in the country. How did the work you talked about the impact that they had on Quebec Society? How did their work shape who you are now because you were involved in engineering before their death right? That's probably the reason why I mean politics today because they've always encouraged me to think about what difference I can make in the world and Politics is one way of doing that. So that's the certainly the reason why I'm doing what I'm doing today. And that that advice that motivation that your aunt gave you about The the work that you can do to help the living. What did that mean to you in terms of where you are now? It's something that I carry with me all the time. And even the National Assembly I share the fact that he had After exile after being sent to jail and finally he was a he was sent to tinker Acre back but He wrote a letter to my mom. And he said you know we're going to go and build I'm just going to translate it as a As I can right now but we're going to build tomorrow's at that look like our dreams so I thought disin- exactly what they've been able. STU gives us as values despite what's going on you always have to stand up and and fight for what you think is right we he also With the with the singer rocket fire outage in session Stein founded a foundation called copy which which means stand up inquiry all and to support people in Haiti. So I think these are values that are very very alive and that I'm trying to convert my own children that that cushion that you mentioned from your father. I mean that was that was in a letter that you found that he that he rotate your mother. Yes I mean told me about that letter. So the ladder The letter was written the year of I was born and it's also the year where he was sent to jail in that sent back to Quebec and After after they had passed away I was looking at all the papers and documents and I found that card For Chris it's on December. Twenty four th. He's writing this letter. My mom is pregnant. He goes to a nearby. My mom too tim unique and to you who doesn't have a name and he writes this card and at the end he said despite everything the wheel bill bill tomorrow was that looked like our dreams. it's very moving. It's it shows the strength that he had in the in the courage and I think we need to be inspired by this every day. When you look at the situation now in Haiti a decade after the earthquake What do you see? Of course. Haiti is going through difficult situation right now. Too Complex country a because of the dictatorship Because of everything that went wrong afterwards. A Haiti is in is in this current situation. That is very hard. The there are some initiatives that are clearly working being at the local level and copies a good example of that when you see communities are Becoming financially independent creative a standing up for themselves working agriculture working in education But at the end of the day like in any place in the world you need a stable government to make things happen and so if you think of those words that were in the letter that your father wrote to your mother that idea of building days that resemble our dreams or building days as that resembled our futures. What are your dreams for Haiti? They finally get A government that is table in they can actually focused focused on building. This new generation of leader kept population is under twenty years old It's a wealth unbelievable believable wealth. And and I really hope that there is a leader or group of people That will be able to Create opportunities for this new generation. It's a real pleasure to talk to you about this if I wanted to say. Thank you in Creole holiday. Say That you would say Miss Yuppie. Dominique Messina appeal. Thank you so much. Domini ungloved is the liberal M._N._A.. For the Montreal writing a centenary Santan for more C._B._C.. PODCASTS Goto C._B._C.. Dot C._A. Slash podcasts..

Haiti earthquake Montreal Quebec National Assembly National National Assembly dominique ungloved George UNGLOVED Dominique gloves Malacca School Domenico Quebec Society University of Montreal Dominique Messina Domini ungloved Creole holiday Nick Mike
"10 years" Discussed on The Current

The Current

11:44 min | 11 months ago

"10 years" Discussed on The Current

"Quebec politician Dominique gloves parents. George UNGLOVED in Mealy Neptune. I'm glad we're among those killed in the earthquake. She also lost her uncle and her cousin last month as the tenth anniversary approached. She spoke in Quebec's National Assembly and told the story of her sister calling her twenty four hours after the quake Zepa Mama. That's my Malacca School because you've been the dominique ungloved is saying and I said Dad and mum and it was at that moment that I understood that in one blow. I had lost my father my mother. My uncle and my cousin Domenico glove is the liberal member in the National Assembly for the Montreal writing sent Santan. Good Morning Good Morning told me about that moment in the National Assembly this incredibly powerful Oh was It was very emotional national and I you know a today's beforehand. I didn't know whether I was going to do it. Or not I didn't know whether I was capable of speaking about this The National National Assembly. But then I I also have the responsibility to do that. My parents were due to Friskin Indians to be identified the aftermath of the earthquake and I think This story is not only my story but it's the story of hundreds of thousands of people have been acted by this earthquake. So I thought I I had to do it and I didn't know exactly what I was going to say. How was going to come out but I just shared the story like it happened And how I felt and remembering my sister calling me and my sister not being able to tell me dad and mom had passed away she was only able to tell me Who was my aunt? She's alive and Nick is alive and then I was saying and dad and she was an me is alive and sitting repeating all those lanes the people that were alive. He was incapable of telling me who was who had passed away. And that's how I understood what was going on you make that speech And then what happens. Politics can be a pretty divisive Participation to be in we know that people have different sides that they're involved in what happened happened in in that moment after when you go in regardless of what party you're from You go in because you think you can change the oil change things and I think we all human the the end so I had people from different parties coming to me and hugging me and and I could see people being emotional across all parties. Although it was a very sad moment it was also a very moving moment because as people were were all touched touched by the story and you know we have significant is for our patient as ranked Quebec. It's very hard to be quebecer and not to know one percents. That originally comes from Haiti eighty took me back a decade ago. When you first heard that their head burn earthquake in Haiti what did you think what went through your mind you know? I was restaurant and I was having dinner and somebody call into earthquake in Haiti. I'm like okay my parents out there because you're on vacation but All later it was it was nothing for me because earthquake is not something that is necessary. Terrible so I but almost like five minutes later somebody called I said. Did you see the earthquake. Oh did you hear about it and then I started realizing okay. It's more serious than I thought. And we started making phone calls all didn't have used but it was not surprising. The lines were caught and I had to wait until the next day to have news. We thought we had good connections. Some people giving us information and it was all all it was all wrong. In in from members of my family yet had died so Twenty four hours of not knowing of certainty the of stress fear and And then the news. I was going to say what were those twenty four hours like. I can't imagine seeing images hearing about it but not not knowing the state of your family. What was it was terrible? It was it was terrible. But you know we have very We're very resilient family. So he's trying to stay very active calling people finding solutions reaching out so it was also very a busy so you did have time to think too much about all this. You're trying to I was emotive trying to find solutions. But you can only imagine what a what it's like and then to us But then few hours later spoke with my aunt who had lost her her son Mike. My cousin who was twenty four years old passed away as spoke to to his mom. My aunt my aunt and she said you know dominate the dead. And there's nothing we can do about that. There's so many more things that you need to did you for the people that are alive so she was so strong that I told myself I'm here here. I am in Montreal and able to a half a positive influence despite everything that we're going to try to find solutions for the other people that are in need will deal with all this afterwards but if if we can actually get some food get people over there to help out and get back on the get back on their feet that this will will be contributing so it's a a personal tragedy within national or international catastrophe. Told me about your parents. They sounded like remarkable people So both my parents were from Haiti. the move to Quebec nineteen. sixty-nine was born in seventy four. And the reason why I was born and raised in Quebec is because my father was a was as a political prisoner under underdeveloped and He he had to leave the country and he came to Quebec in. co-founded the University of Montreal mom became a teacher and they were very involved in their communities. And when I say community for back he shouldn't communities in in Montreal. We all My mom was very involved with them. Female female groups and And my dad always invited some some kind of politics because he ended up being a minister Mr in the end in in Haiti And I think it's their engagement values that have That I've really they were able to transfer that aura to conveyed those values to us. We are with following we we walking in the footsteps. Your mom wrote a thesis. What what was the thesis? The thesis was the work of women. or how men become rich so basically defunct communism in infringing Basically illustrating that a lot of the men in he Had some money. But because of the work of the women supporting them she she was a feminist and The the book was all about the impact award jump women in the in the country. How did the work you talked about the impact that they had on Quebec Society? How did their work shape who you are now because you were involved in engineering before their death right? That's probably the reason why I mean politics today because they've always encouraged me to think about what difference I can make in the world and Politics is one way of doing that. So that's the certainly the reason why I'm doing what I'm doing today. And that that advice that motivation that your aunt gave you about The the work that you can do to help the living. What did that mean to you in terms of where you are now? It's something that I carry with me all the time. And even the National Assembly I share the fact that he had After exile after being sent to jail and finally he was a he was sent to tinker Acre back but He wrote a letter to my mom. And he said you know we're going to go and build I'm just going to translate it as a As I can right now but we're going to build tomorrow's at that look like our dreams so I thought disin- exactly what they've been able. STU gives us as values despite what's going on you always have to stand up and and fight for what you think is right we he also With the with the singer rocket fire outage in session Stein founded a foundation called copy which which means stand up inquiry all and to support people in Haiti. So I think these are values that are very very alive and that I'm trying to convert my own children that that cushion that you mentioned from your father. I mean that was that was in a letter that you found that he that he rotate your mother. Yes I mean told me about that letter. So the ladder The letter was written the year of I was born and it's also the year where he was sent to jail in that sent back to Quebec and After after they had passed away I was looking at all the papers and documents and I found that card For Chris it's on December. Twenty four th. He's writing this letter. My mom is pregnant. He goes to a nearby. My mom too tim unique and to you who doesn't have a name and he writes this card and at the end he said despite everything the wheel bill bill tomorrow was that looked like our dreams. it's very moving. It's it shows the strength that he had in the in the courage and I think we need to be inspired by this every day. When you look at the situation now in Haiti a decade after the earthquake What do you see? Of course. Haiti is going through difficult situation right now. Too Complex country a because of the dictatorship Because of everything that went wrong afterwards. A Haiti is in is in this current situation. That is very hard. The there are some initiatives that are clearly working being at the local level and copies a good example of that when you see communities are Becoming financially independent creative a standing up for themselves working agriculture working in education But at the end of the day like in any place in the world you need a stable government to make things happen and so if you think of those words that were in the letter that your father wrote to your mother that idea of building days that resemble our dreams or building days as that resembled our futures. What are your dreams for Haiti? They finally get A government that is table in they can actually focused focused on building. This new generation of leader kept population is under twenty years old It's a wealth unbelievable believable wealth. And and I really hope that there is a leader or group of people That will be able to Create opportunities for this new generation. It's a real pleasure to talk to you about this if I wanted to say. Thank you in Creole holiday. Say That you would say Miss Yuppie. Dominique Messina appeal. Thank you so much. Domini ungloved is the liberal M._N._A.. For the Montreal writing a centenary Santan for more C._B._C.. PODCASTS Goto C._B._C.. Dot C._A. Slash podcasts..

Haiti earthquake Montreal Quebec National Assembly National National Assembly dominique ungloved George UNGLOVED Dominique gloves Malacca School Domenico Quebec Society University of Montreal Dominique Messina Domini ungloved Creole holiday Nick Mike
"10 years" Discussed on The Current

The Current

11:23 min | 11 months ago

"10 years" Discussed on The Current

"Haiti has been trying to rebuild for ten years. After seven point. Zero magnitude earthquake left leftist capital in ruins close to a quarter of a million people died in that tragedy. Many more were injured and in the days that followed doctors from around. The world rushed to Haiti to help. Alexandra Dolphin was among them. He's an anesthesiologist who works at Saint Joseph's healthcare in Hamilton Ontario. Dr Good Morning. Good morning when when you first arrived in Haiti in two thousand ten a couple of days after the earthquake. Describe to me what you saw well first of all in getting there. It's a aw wasn't possible to imagine what would see except picking through the window of the of the plane all the landmarks. I knew going out there. We're gone and there was a kind of a dust in the yeah. The Cathedral National Palace. The government buildings all those. Thanks for a gun so when we get there then you discover the city you knew no longer existed and it will just rubbles you know pals or concrete everywhere. How did you process that knowing that city as well as you did and as you said not seeing the landmarks that anybody would expect practic- as they fly into the city? The first approach is that you haven't sense of being overwhelmed but at the same time the call of duty is there that you. That's the reason for coming. I'm from Haiti originally so it's very close to home. And they are my brothers my sisters and right now. That's really hard but we had to do what we had to do. And accept the reality of what we had. What do you mean call of duty? What what was it that drew there in the first place? Well the first question. What can I do? How am I going to help this? And how to approach this as an anaesthetist. We are good at critical appraisal and Setting priorities tapis and trying to process and priorities but the limitation also. It's what do you have to work with. Everything has been gone. So it's tough to imagine onsite insight how to solve this. Describe the scene that you encountered when when you got to. The hospital was no longer hospital. It was a building parts absolutely badly damaged and people in the field where they're attentive aware seep people everywhere but one scene I can never forget is on. There was a young lady there and as I'm passing by. She called me. She clear both arms were broken and she had chest tube and covered with. Flies is and she tells me. Please try to call for me because I'm not dead yet. I don't want to fly to EMU life. That's the kind of first thing you get and see how we're going to deal with this when you when you see something like that. I mean what goes through your mind. The first thing is immediate care and her do. What can you do to have the people immediately? We're here and we're trying to do some triage whom you can help for him with what and tried to set up things and also being part of the whole team that would dad ed. There's another difficult things. Because the Haitians themselves they were physicians nurses and so on the only been affected by this and somehow being overwhelmed they were not necessarily drawn into being part of this. Likes the world sticking get all of them. Push to decide so I had to say. Hey wait a minute here. I belong to this thing here. And how can I just bring this together and please give the sense of purpose by setting up some place for them to work which we did to that point. Where did you find space to work in a building that has been destroyed by the earthquake and where there is such chaos kind of all around you? How where? Where did you set up your your base of operations operations? So what would you was at the university hospital. They're attentive From builder nations but there was none Haitian so what I did was to find a building one of the building that was to standing and to set up uprising rooms for the Haitians and by the end of the first day we got there which is about three or four days there we managed to have at least a comprehensive approach Haitian approach to it which interestingly enough that that room lasted for Over six months afternoon of Greek for fighting the same. You're also there at a time when there is great loss and so there are people that you can help at. There are a lot of people who have been affected because loved ones friends. Family have been killed By the earthquake or the effects of the earthquake what was the mood like but also also just the sense around the hospital at that time well it was very hard because people even on a first name basis and remember one of my colleagues there who lost his wife is sure John Lewis his wife lost children and the hospital where he works collapsed. He's home he's gone. He's Gone Day a student in the hospital with nothing left in to look at him and see how stoic was in pushing dot and on. You can't do just be there but one thing with Haitians the resilience. They have to do so with the natural environment of Haiti. Not having much to start with but also belief system very spiritual religious people. But all you have to do is just can do more than being there within and NBA support. You were there for two weeks initially. Yes did you did you sleep at all. I mean I could imagine given the scale of things that that and the fact that you're there and you can offer valuable resource insistence that you would be wanted to four seven. Well the first thing when I couldn't sleep inside the homes because there was that panic with the after show so we we sleep outside but after a week Going to two weeks I started decided not to feel well. I started to cry and a lot and in being very emotionally connected with the people by that time I was fortunate enough to recognize this. And that's what would be called pitches deal things like this so I just left eighty. I took the plane came back into Hamilton and slept for two or three days or so. And then can you tell me about when it hits you when the reality of what what you were seeing hit you and as you mentioned Would start to cry well. I think it's it's a process that build up with the exertion of working all day and entering the cruel reality of sometimes. You can't do anything for the person would could help. If we're another place it builds up up to to a point where really crack after leaving and as you said sleeping for a little while returning back to Hamilton you decided to return to Haiti. Why would did you do that? Well first of all I've been going to deceased nineteen ninety so the the earthquake was just a bump along are scheduled. DOC ID program and after the earthquake I personally continued to go and I'm still going now right to now with times a year and I spent three months there. I'm on at a time and the reason I go is because the job is not finished and I'm not sure that anything was done to help help. Should something like this happen again. And we know it's possible because of the location of eighty four quake. Tell me about the work that you've been doing in the time that you've been returning well immediately. Eighty left another quake What we did was we stayed in cuddle prints and for two years we? We built a hospital where we will invo with McMaster muster. Ns Andrews System with the Minister of Health. We're going to create a hospital that would be a model for University Teaching Hospital in Haiti after the earthquake we continue with this program and with the help the Fund headphone Hamilton area. We rebuild the hospital that was forty percent destroyed destroyed and brought it to a good standard and create other programs. What are the difficulties being faced in trying to make the I mean that sounds like real progress but in trying to make make further progress in in your visits there well? Presently we no longer in Puerto Prints and this has to do with the political instability of Haiti with change of political Michael regime. So we're no longer welcome to that hospital so that you know just to be longer welcome at the hospital. We were no longer welcome to that hospital. Despite by despite the fact that you helped rebuild the hospital yes yes and that's okay. That's fine we we move on and and what what have done. I've I've mostly the northwest part of Haiti presently in the area where I was born in the same hospital where I was born. We were building up to become a hospital that would be good regional hospital catchment area of eight hundred thousand and there's not really much care there so we building that up and what I liked with that hospital is whoa religious affiliated hospital. It has a Canadian flavor to it. We provide care to everyone coming whether they can pay or not. And and that's the only hospital there with the twenty four hour emergency care so we were thankful for that as a very good thing and we're hoping to develop their and and continue with that what we couldn't finishing buttocks you talked earlier about how this is personal for you yes. It's a calling as a physician to go in and I and save people and ensure that suffering is alleviated but but as a Haitian that this is personal for you and I'm just wondering how you see the country now personally personally not as a doctor but personally a decade after the earthquake. Well IT'S A. It's a country. Still struggling to define itself politically socially economically comically. And Somehow. I'm saddened by the fact that we all rate mind that have come from Haiti. That are in Haiti. That hasn't been a sense sense of where people can sit down and reflect and for the whole to embrace that a comprehensive approach to help this country thank on the the most of the head that counted country has been disappointing in that because they've never delivered truly a good out something that will be helpful to the people and the people themselves are still in the similar. They've been forever when you heading back willing First Week of March I wish you the best of luck. It's a great pleasure to talk to you doing important work. Well thank you very much for. We'll give me the opportunity to thank you for what you do and Continue the good work itself as well. Dr Alexander define is an anesthesiologist with Saint Joseph's healthcare in Hamilton Ontario. How do you take down criminal network hidden in the shadows? I tell them that. I know that they're the ones who are running the largest child abuse website on the dark nets the journalists working to expose the darkest corners of the Internet. That's your playroom for that's your baby's clothes. That's my house. The police who hunt down online predators dewick right involved Ormoc. They're using no we didn't we didn't make it. They made hunting moorhead. Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.

Haiti Hamilton Ontario University Teaching Hospital university hospital Dr Good Alexandra Dolphin Saint Joseph Ormoc John Lewis NBA Cathedral National Palace practic Minister of Health EMU Dr Alexander McMaster Puerto Prints Michael regime
"10 years" Discussed on The Current

The Current

11:23 min | 11 months ago

"10 years" Discussed on The Current

"Haiti has been trying to rebuild for ten years. After seven point. Zero magnitude earthquake left leftist capital in ruins close to a quarter of a million people died in that tragedy. Many more were injured and in the days that followed doctors from around. The world rushed to Haiti to help. Alexandra Dolphin was among them. He's an anesthesiologist who works at Saint Joseph's healthcare in Hamilton Ontario. Dr Good Morning. Good morning when when you first arrived in Haiti in two thousand ten a couple of days after the earthquake. Describe to me what you saw well first of all in getting there. It's a aw wasn't possible to imagine what would see except picking through the window of the of the plane all the landmarks. I knew going out there. We're gone and there was a kind of a dust in the yeah. The Cathedral National Palace. The government buildings all those. Thanks for a gun so when we get there then you discover the city you knew no longer existed and it will just rubbles you know pals or concrete everywhere. How did you process that knowing that city as well as you did and as you said not seeing the landmarks that anybody would expect practic- as they fly into the city? The first approach is that you haven't sense of being overwhelmed but at the same time the call of duty is there that you. That's the reason for coming. I'm from Haiti originally so it's very close to home. And they are my brothers my sisters and right now. That's really hard but we had to do what we had to do. And accept the reality of what we had. What do you mean call of duty? What what was it that drew there in the first place? Well the first question. What can I do? How am I going to help this? And how to approach this as an anaesthetist. We are good at critical appraisal and Setting priorities tapis and trying to process and priorities but the limitation also. It's what do you have to work with. Everything has been gone. So it's tough to imagine onsite insight how to solve this. Describe the scene that you encountered when when you got to. The hospital was no longer hospital. It was a building parts absolutely badly damaged and people in the field where they're attentive aware seep people everywhere but one scene I can never forget is on. There was a young lady there and as I'm passing by. She called me. She clear both arms were broken and she had chest tube and covered with. Flies is and she tells me. Please try to call for me because I'm not dead yet. I don't want to fly to EMU life. That's the kind of first thing you get and see how we're going to deal with this when you when you see something like that. I mean what goes through your mind. The first thing is immediate care and her do. What can you do to have the people immediately? We're here and we're trying to do some triage whom you can help for him with what and tried to set up things and also being part of the whole team that would dad ed. There's another difficult things. Because the Haitians themselves they were physicians nurses and so on the only been affected by this and somehow being overwhelmed they were not necessarily drawn into being part of this. Likes the world sticking get all of them. Push to decide so I had to say. Hey wait a minute here. I belong to this thing here. And how can I just bring this together and please give the sense of purpose by setting up some place for them to work which we did to that point. Where did you find space to work in a building that has been destroyed by the earthquake and where there is such chaos kind of all around you? How where? Where did you set up your your base of operations operations? So what would you was at the university hospital. They're attentive From builder nations but there was none Haitian so what I did was to find a building one of the building that was to standing and to set up uprising rooms for the Haitians and by the end of the first day we got there which is about three or four days there we managed to have at least a comprehensive approach Haitian approach to it which interestingly enough that that room lasted for Over six months afternoon of Greek for fighting the same. You're also there at a time when there is great loss and so there are people that you can help at. There are a lot of people who have been affected because loved ones friends. Family have been killed By the earthquake or the effects of the earthquake what was the mood like but also also just the sense around the hospital at that time well it was very hard because people even on a first name basis and remember one of my colleagues there who lost his wife is sure John Lewis his wife lost children and the hospital where he works collapsed. He's home he's gone. He's Gone Day a student in the hospital with nothing left in to look at him and see how stoic was in pushing dot and on. You can't do just be there but one thing with Haitians the resilience. They have to do so with the natural environment of Haiti. Not having much to start with but also belief system very spiritual religious people. But all you have to do is just can do more than being there within and NBA support. You were there for two weeks initially. Yes did you did you sleep at all. I mean I could imagine given the scale of things that that and the fact that you're there and you can offer valuable resource insistence that you would be wanted to four seven. Well the first thing when I couldn't sleep inside the homes because there was that panic with the after show so we we sleep outside but after a week Going to two weeks I started decided not to feel well. I started to cry and a lot and in being very emotionally connected with the people by that time I was fortunate enough to recognize this. And that's what would be called pitches deal things like this so I just left eighty. I took the plane came back into Hamilton and slept for two or three days or so. And then can you tell me about when it hits you when the reality of what what you were seeing hit you and as you mentioned Would start to cry well. I think it's it's a process that build up with the exertion of working all day and entering the cruel reality of sometimes. You can't do anything for the person would could help. If we're another place it builds up up to to a point where really crack after leaving and as you said sleeping for a little while returning back to Hamilton you decided to return to Haiti. Why would did you do that? Well first of all I've been going to deceased nineteen ninety so the the earthquake was just a bump along are scheduled. DOC ID program and after the earthquake I personally continued to go and I'm still going now right to now with times a year and I spent three months there. I'm on at a time and the reason I go is because the job is not finished and I'm not sure that anything was done to help help. Should something like this happen again. And we know it's possible because of the location of eighty four quake. Tell me about the work that you've been doing in the time that you've been returning well immediately. Eighty left another quake What we did was we stayed in cuddle prints and for two years we? We built a hospital where we will invo with McMaster muster. Ns Andrews System with the Minister of Health. We're going to create a hospital that would be a model for University Teaching Hospital in Haiti after the earthquake we continue with this program and with the help the Fund headphone Hamilton area. We rebuild the hospital that was forty percent destroyed destroyed and brought it to a good standard and create other programs. What are the difficulties being faced in trying to make the I mean that sounds like real progress but in trying to make make further progress in in your visits there well? Presently we no longer in Puerto Prints and this has to do with the political instability of Haiti with change of political Michael regime. So we're no longer welcome to that hospital so that you know just to be longer welcome at the hospital. We were no longer welcome to that hospital. Despite by despite the fact that you helped rebuild the hospital yes yes and that's okay. That's fine we we move on and and what what have done. I've I've mostly the northwest part of Haiti presently in the area where I was born in the same hospital where I was born. We were building up to become a hospital that would be good regional hospital catchment area of eight hundred thousand and there's not really much care there so we building that up and what I liked with that hospital is whoa religious affiliated hospital. It has a Canadian flavor to it. We provide care to everyone coming whether they can pay or not. And and that's the only hospital there with the twenty four hour emergency care so we were thankful for that as a very good thing and we're hoping to develop their and and continue with that what we couldn't finishing buttocks you talked earlier about how this is personal for you yes. It's a calling as a physician to go in and I and save people and ensure that suffering is alleviated but but as a Haitian that this is personal for you and I'm just wondering how you see the country now personally personally not as a doctor but personally a decade after the earthquake. Well IT'S A. It's a country. Still struggling to define itself politically socially economically comically. And Somehow. I'm saddened by the fact that we all rate mind that have come from Haiti. That are in Haiti. That hasn't been a sense sense of where people can sit down and reflect and for the whole to embrace that a comprehensive approach to help this country thank on the the most of the head that counted country has been disappointing in that because they've never delivered truly a good out something that will be helpful to the people and the people themselves are still in the similar. They've been forever when you heading back willing First Week of March I wish you the best of luck. It's a great pleasure to talk to you doing important work. Well thank you very much for. We'll give me the opportunity to thank you for what you do and Continue the good work itself as well. Dr Alexander define is an anesthesiologist with Saint Joseph's healthcare in Hamilton Ontario. How do you take down criminal network hidden in the shadows? I tell them that. I know that they're the ones who are running the largest child abuse website on the dark nets the journalists working to expose the darkest corners of the Internet. That's your playroom for that's your baby's clothes. That's my house. The police who hunt down online predators dewick right involved Ormoc. They're using no we didn't we didn't make it. They made hunting moorhead. Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.

Haiti Hamilton Ontario University Teaching Hospital university hospital Dr Good Alexandra Dolphin Saint Joseph Ormoc John Lewis NBA Cathedral National Palace practic Minister of Health EMU Dr Alexander McMaster Puerto Prints Michael regime
"10 years" Discussed on The Current

The Current

11:23 min | 11 months ago

"10 years" Discussed on The Current

"Haiti has been trying to rebuild for ten years. After seven point. Zero magnitude earthquake left leftist capital in ruins close to a quarter of a million people died in that tragedy. Many more were injured and in the days that followed doctors from around. The world rushed to Haiti to help. Alexandra Dolphin was among them. He's an anesthesiologist who works at Saint Joseph's healthcare in Hamilton Ontario. Dr Good Morning. Good morning when when you first arrived in Haiti in two thousand ten a couple of days after the earthquake. Describe to me what you saw well first of all in getting there. It's a aw wasn't possible to imagine what would see except picking through the window of the of the plane all the landmarks. I knew going out there. We're gone and there was a kind of a dust in the yeah. The Cathedral National Palace. The government buildings all those. Thanks for a gun so when we get there then you discover the city you knew no longer existed and it will just rubbles you know pals or concrete everywhere. How did you process that knowing that city as well as you did and as you said not seeing the landmarks that anybody would expect practic- as they fly into the city? The first approach is that you haven't sense of being overwhelmed but at the same time the call of duty is there that you. That's the reason for coming. I'm from Haiti originally so it's very close to home. And they are my brothers my sisters and right now. That's really hard but we had to do what we had to do. And accept the reality of what we had. What do you mean call of duty? What what was it that drew there in the first place? Well the first question. What can I do? How am I going to help this? And how to approach this as an anaesthetist. We are good at critical appraisal and Setting priorities tapis and trying to process and priorities but the limitation also. It's what do you have to work with. Everything has been gone. So it's tough to imagine onsite insight how to solve this. Describe the scene that you encountered when when you got to. The hospital was no longer hospital. It was a building parts absolutely badly damaged and people in the field where they're attentive aware seep people everywhere but one scene I can never forget is on. There was a young lady there and as I'm passing by. She called me. She clear both arms were broken and she had chest tube and covered with. Flies is and she tells me. Please try to call for me because I'm not dead yet. I don't want to fly to EMU life. That's the kind of first thing you get and see how we're going to deal with this when you when you see something like that. I mean what goes through your mind. The first thing is immediate care and her do. What can you do to have the people immediately? We're here and we're trying to do some triage whom you can help for him with what and tried to set up things and also being part of the whole team that would dad ed. There's another difficult things. Because the Haitians themselves they were physicians nurses and so on the only been affected by this and somehow being overwhelmed they were not necessarily drawn into being part of this. Likes the world sticking get all of them. Push to decide so I had to say. Hey wait a minute here. I belong to this thing here. And how can I just bring this together and please give the sense of purpose by setting up some place for them to work which we did to that point. Where did you find space to work in a building that has been destroyed by the earthquake and where there is such chaos kind of all around you? How where? Where did you set up your your base of operations operations? So what would you was at the university hospital. They're attentive From builder nations but there was none Haitian so what I did was to find a building one of the building that was to standing and to set up uprising rooms for the Haitians and by the end of the first day we got there which is about three or four days there we managed to have at least a comprehensive approach Haitian approach to it which interestingly enough that that room lasted for Over six months afternoon of Greek for fighting the same. You're also there at a time when there is great loss and so there are people that you can help at. There are a lot of people who have been affected because loved ones friends. Family have been killed By the earthquake or the effects of the earthquake what was the mood like but also also just the sense around the hospital at that time well it was very hard because people even on a first name basis and remember one of my colleagues there who lost his wife is sure John Lewis his wife lost children and the hospital where he works collapsed. He's home he's gone. He's Gone Day a student in the hospital with nothing left in to look at him and see how stoic was in pushing dot and on. You can't do just be there but one thing with Haitians the resilience. They have to do so with the natural environment of Haiti. Not having much to start with but also belief system very spiritual religious people. But all you have to do is just can do more than being there within and NBA support. You were there for two weeks initially. Yes did you did you sleep at all. I mean I could imagine given the scale of things that that and the fact that you're there and you can offer valuable resource insistence that you would be wanted to four seven. Well the first thing when I couldn't sleep inside the homes because there was that panic with the after show so we we sleep outside but after a week Going to two weeks I started decided not to feel well. I started to cry and a lot and in being very emotionally connected with the people by that time I was fortunate enough to recognize this. And that's what would be called pitches deal things like this so I just left eighty. I took the plane came back into Hamilton and slept for two or three days or so. And then can you tell me about when it hits you when the reality of what what you were seeing hit you and as you mentioned Would start to cry well. I think it's it's a process that build up with the exertion of working all day and entering the cruel reality of sometimes. You can't do anything for the person would could help. If we're another place it builds up up to to a point where really crack after leaving and as you said sleeping for a little while returning back to Hamilton you decided to return to Haiti. Why would did you do that? Well first of all I've been going to deceased nineteen ninety so the the earthquake was just a bump along are scheduled. DOC ID program and after the earthquake I personally continued to go and I'm still going now right to now with times a year and I spent three months there. I'm on at a time and the reason I go is because the job is not finished and I'm not sure that anything was done to help help. Should something like this happen again. And we know it's possible because of the location of eighty four quake. Tell me about the work that you've been doing in the time that you've been returning well immediately. Eighty left another quake What we did was we stayed in cuddle prints and for two years we? We built a hospital where we will invo with McMaster muster. Ns Andrews System with the Minister of Health. We're going to create a hospital that would be a model for University Teaching Hospital in Haiti after the earthquake we continue with this program and with the help the Fund headphone Hamilton area. We rebuild the hospital that was forty percent destroyed destroyed and brought it to a good standard and create other programs. What are the difficulties being faced in trying to make the I mean that sounds like real progress but in trying to make make further progress in in your visits there well? Presently we no longer in Puerto Prints and this has to do with the political instability of Haiti with change of political Michael regime. So we're no longer welcome to that hospital so that you know just to be longer welcome at the hospital. We were no longer welcome to that hospital. Despite by despite the fact that you helped rebuild the hospital yes yes and that's okay. That's fine we we move on and and what what have done. I've I've mostly the northwest part of Haiti presently in the area where I was born in the same hospital where I was born. We were building up to become a hospital that would be good regional hospital catchment area of eight hundred thousand and there's not really much care there so we building that up and what I liked with that hospital is whoa religious affiliated hospital. It has a Canadian flavor to it. We provide care to everyone coming whether they can pay or not. And and that's the only hospital there with the twenty four hour emergency care so we were thankful for that as a very good thing and we're hoping to develop their and and continue with that what we couldn't finishing buttocks you talked earlier about how this is personal for you yes. It's a calling as a physician to go in and I and save people and ensure that suffering is alleviated but but as a Haitian that this is personal for you and I'm just wondering how you see the country now personally personally not as a doctor but personally a decade after the earthquake. Well IT'S A. It's a country. Still struggling to define itself politically socially economically comically. And Somehow. I'm saddened by the fact that we all rate mind that have come from Haiti. That are in Haiti. That hasn't been a sense sense of where people can sit down and reflect and for the whole to embrace that a comprehensive approach to help this country thank on the the most of the head that counted country has been disappointing in that because they've never delivered truly a good out something that will be helpful to the people and the people themselves are still in the similar. They've been forever when you heading back willing First Week of March I wish you the best of luck. It's a great pleasure to talk to you doing important work. Well thank you very much for. We'll give me the opportunity to thank you for what you do and Continue the good work itself as well. Dr Alexander define is an anesthesiologist with Saint Joseph's healthcare in Hamilton Ontario. How do you take down criminal network hidden in the shadows? I tell them that. I know that they're the ones who are running the largest child abuse website on the dark nets the journalists working to expose the darkest corners of the Internet. That's your playroom for that's your baby's clothes. That's my house. The police who hunt down online predators dewick right involved Ormoc. They're using no we didn't we didn't make it. They made hunting moorhead. Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.

Haiti Hamilton Ontario University Teaching Hospital university hospital Dr Good Alexandra Dolphin Saint Joseph Ormoc John Lewis NBA Cathedral National Palace practic Minister of Health EMU Dr Alexander McMaster Puerto Prints Michael regime
"10 years" Discussed on Not So Standard Deviations

Not So Standard Deviations

03:55 min | 11 months ago

"10 years" Discussed on Not So Standard Deviations

"I don't know what's going on under the hood with impure but I know they're doing something under the hood to make these queries very performance like the founders like said these words words in front of me that I just did not retain blink. I'm like what they do to the like makes special but yeah so I guess. You're yeah like if our in hyphen and I think they both will not dabble in like this type of database manage like friendly database management Yup and so and it has to be very hone to the use case leg like compares various specifically a digital asset manager reading than lookers very specifically layer on top of like traditional like Bi. Tool I dunno like you. The tables have to look a certain way for look to work. Well I don't like the way. Yeah so yeah so yeah. Maybe it'll be smaller. I just a I making predictions like this is a little bit absurd but I think but I I think I I guess my only I found the question interesting is just to think about what are the conditions that would have to exist for a major shift to occur. Even that's a hard question I think but I just don't yeah it's not gonna be like a faster version or something like that or not going to be. I mean I think if it's going to be something like Julia and it has to be because like Julia. Fill some like a massive kind of gap gap that are does well. There's the whole lake. I know less mckinney's present on. This may be other people is like it's like the great decoupling which is a different decoupling. The one you're talking about. No actually maybe not where it's like. I mean the part that's relevant to me. Well it's like decoupling the Ui from the storage from the compute. So like you have the uniform Eli. That's the language but any sort of performance stuff is not in the language anymore which is already what's happening. Yeah and so the so like I think the people who are writing these front end quote unquote front end programming tools. Like already get that that it's just a Ui choice at this point. And so then yes. I don't think like are will be faster because I don't think I think I think our won't even be something that you associate with performance anymore in some ways right. It's not worth investing really in in making are specifically faster. I mean maybe here and there but like It's probably worth investing in having some kind of like modular like orthogonal ogle component that that could be optimized right so yeah which again is like the. I'm just using the pure example because I'd like neck deep in Senate right now it's like yeah there's like a Ui and the UI interfaces with this like computer will but I've never be like oh they call Iq Iq so fast it's like now it's like the part I even think of is just like they've optimized for this use case that queries in this way are fast. Yeah Yeah I know. Our is thinking a lot about performance. Because I was at at that meeting this summer Oprah and like it is true that the tighter stuff can be like really slow running lean into that lately too and then I usually hit a cliff where I'd like. Okay time to leave our and like figure out of the nine sequel syntax for the stuff. There's always table right.

Julia Senate Oprah mckinney Eli
"10 years" Discussed on Not So Standard Deviations

Not So Standard Deviations

14:13 min | 11 months ago

"10 years" Discussed on Not So Standard Deviations

"Do one on our in ten years yes to people wrote in live almost the same question it was like a coup. I think it was a coincidence. So Peter Peter Peter Rowe tweeted you know are in ten years so that's all is in and then Powell wrote in with an email saying essentially essentially. WH- what do you. What do you think will? What will this question is more like what will replace the current are and they're talking about like you know? Is it going to be a faster version of our or is it going to be something like Julia or whatever or maybe our studio will fork are and focus on doing something the else and whatever. So what's going to happen. Let's say on the ten year timeframe For Our I want you to answer that. Yeah so so my thoughts on this are it's not going to be like some facet version or whatever like that. 'cause it's going to depend critically unlike a what kind of a problem being solved that this totally kind of orthogonal. Are you know if you think about like what. Why did our come to be in the first place right? It's because it was a number of reasons. One it was open source that was critical right and it was three at the time. There was nothing really sophisticated that was also free terms of like a programming language and very high quality graphics and there was nothing nothing right so that is a huge thing and it filled a huge gap and other elements of what made are kind of grow and become popular. There are the kind of community built around like the package development and the extensive ability of our Yeah and that didn't really exist. In the data analysis else's world there was no like equivalents. I can't think of it equivalent software package GONNA eat my words on this one but off the top of my head a little of it I can't think of it equivalent offerpad ahead like a very clean like a mechanism for extending the system and that was kind of like maintainable and consistently high quality that for data analysis and then later on. I think okay If you think of these maybe in terms of epochs that was like the initial epoch and then later on I think obviously you know the tidy verse in our studio kind of contributed a lot to his popularity which obviously built on the package mechanism. Yeah so I think I think that's going to go on for while. Obviously I think there has to be a gap identified for something to replace our there has to be a gap identified. That isn't filled. I think And I could speculate. Do you want to speculate on this Well now I do thanks. You're citing all up. I am no I actually. I mean I think that's why I'm so enthusiastic about there being now a sustained effort with our studio like something it seems like a more sustainable effort of course like our city is a startup. I guess I don't actually know that. Eight more time blonde PERSTORP's they have an exit one way or another and like stays private suggested all private companies startups CBS. Yeah well it's I guess even defines the startup. Because usually that means you took Veasley money and I'm not sure that our CEO took a lot of you see money took any. I think they might have taken a small amount at one point But either way it seems like the minute I feel like it's been a consistent. Drumbeat premiums like the mcnall. There is now a system in place the is making are situated to be sustainable in a way that it probably wasn't before Although I don't know I guess core I mean then there's not that many people who like core are is like aging and he's GonNa come in you know continue ask. There's yeah I think there are people who can kind of continue that but I I do think I do know that. That's a real concern. 'cause like less thus people understand the core functionality through and I think that on top of that I think that you know the the role Our studio plays might even make that worse. 'cause people who might have Learned more about like this type of that. Core are works on are now working our studio or whatever but I don't know yeah I'm optimistic about the future of our has it's like. Actually people are happy with their jobs writing software and like evolving language in a way. That's a little more professional than most open source projects graphics. Yeah Yeah I one of the things that I wonder about is whether ours kind of programming programming language nature. I I think fundamentally even with all the changes that have happened in recent times like. It's fundamentally a programming kind of tool I wonder if that will all kind of be. It's kind of Achilles heel because it depends a lot like wh how data science changes and how did analysis this evolves over time. Yeah the fact that it's a programming language. I think can be a critical problem for for some cases and I think it's GonNa be hard to evolve that out of out of that situation if ever like you're not saying go back to drop down menus or whatever right you know I think Whatever the next version of that is going to be? I don't know it's like I. The statistics type stuff like a decision making. Maybe well I mean I'm thinking of things like I just think that like the fact. Act that you have to essentially program you know in our could become a real limitation and I think there's a kind of a base level level of complexity there you can't really get out of. I actually disagree disagree. Yeah rare it would be worth the time hold on a second well because I think that I think that people I think. The paradigms of programming is becoming so seen as a core skill but it's being taught more in high school and you now grade school I don't know but like I think there's a general acknowledgement that. This is the literacy that we need to teach people at a younger age age. And you hit even make the case kind of like the design thinking that it is a form of intelligence in itself merits it's not just vocational And because it is a way of dealing with abstraction and structures in certain ways so yeah I feel like that's not an Achilles heel as well I think I I understand what you're saying and that definitely teach coding in third grade now so it's not like it's everywhere now but I see what you're saying. I I think it's not that I think that coding is going away. I wonder though if coating may play a different role in data analysis because It's you know it's I guess this is maybe not the perfect analogy is but it's like nobody writes with the pen and paper anymore right. Yeah but everyone civil rights. Yeah I think So I wonder if there are. There are tools being developed like Air Table for example and stuff in there are kind of like and other things that are like some dashboard tools. Like tableau like that What temples were like those tools start at a stage? That's that's Kinda like after. The data wrangling has been done in a way and And I think those tools could be. I'M NOT GONNA try to endorse either I'm just saying that tool team developed one of these could hit you know. Sometimes I'll endorsed air table. Okay I love her tail. I haven't used it much but entire. Entire Wardrobe catalogued in air table India. I've been shining people at work. People are like you're insane blatant ladies and I don't disagree but anyway I actually. I see what you're saying and you've talked about this. Before of the fact that excel was sort of its own data management system and data now system and visualization system. Like all in one. And how in some ways really wanting to go back to that like everything got decoupled. Maybe it's all coming back together again. Rose bundling unbundling. Yeah but then. I can't see those will succeeding. Well Okay I think that are is way more cognizant the other languages and like actively so of earth like a fundamental design principles in some ways of like literate programming are having things be map abol the English Russian. You know the like I mean. That's like the Big Tigers thing of like. Hey this looks like a recipe. You know wrote And you can kind of figure out what's going on in the code without knowing it. So that's like way better than Python for example where I just don't think there's as is consistent and effort or acknowledgement of the importance of that And then I guess what I want to say but maybe this is actually more wishful thinking is that like like looker is another company. I really liked also endorsed Lucre. They they're like this kind of UI layer on top of existing databases. And then a lot of these places. Actually and there's another working with this company impure now that is this this digital asset manager And that's been really interesting because managing images is like no fun. I I did not have a full appreciation creation for how hard that is until I started needing to manages I've like produced images that go out in that game style shuffle from our our company and alike create image so I take existing imagery and I like crop it and divided in half and whatever and so I have to store that stuff stored them better data needed to map it from like the original image to outfits to the images that create with just one outfit outfit and then sometimes I do the white like the white space for one. Application can be slightly different than the late streets for another like you have to optimize for the and use and so then it's like Oh God like like the Iden- for this gets really hard really fast and so anyway anyway. The point is this company is also another like they come from like a database world. I can't remember trying. And then they're building this fairly sophisticated vindicated digital asset manager. And then and then all these company like looker and Imperia and then I assume airtime. Although I'm not sure have have their own languages like sequel like Languages Lazier at like imperious case. I really it's it takes a second to pick up. Because it's just it's like sequel is is relational Algebra but just would like better syntax syntax basically and and the reason why is because it's something that you can then parts into a url and then the API is the Like all the like. It's like a a fairly you know he can hit the API with like logic in besides just give me all these results than ours. I leader Anyway plays these languages usually eventually have escape valve. That is some sort of dialect. And then I thinkin lookers case you can event like that can be our python at some point. Okay so the whole point is thing is like I can't see a world existing where does types of tools don't eventually lead to our python But they don't WanNA cliff they don't want to be like oh you use this but then if you're too advanced Nance do you go to a totally different thing. I see what you're saying but you realize as you describe it. I think one thing that I could see happening is are are or a python getting pushed down the stack. Tiny immerses done until your are exactly right and I think I could see that happening multiple times or again again at least and I think some of these tools have the potential to kind of push down the stack one more level whereas like Oh yes some people still use it but most most people will do this other thing. Yeah and and like the tiny verses one attempt at doing that within our yeah. It's kind of like an eighty twenty. Any rule right like eighty percent can live with tidy verse but then twenty percent need to know the whole thing right. Then you could just keep going up the stack. Basically I think and it is. The advantage of the one stop shop is that you optimized performance in a way that you just can't i..

Peter Peter Peter Rowe Julia Powell India younger age CBS Veasley Nance CEO Big Tigers Iden
"10 years" Discussed on Reset

Reset

02:48 min | 11 months ago

"10 years" Discussed on Reset

"I mean I can't imagine saying that to a romantic partner on your wedding night of all things or ever but I also think it speaks to some of the stuff. We were talking about a little earlier about how he needs to constantly be in control. And what is that phrase if not you know. I'm in control and as the two of them are getting divorced. I'm GonNa Watch the exact phrasing so this is a paraphrase but you know she says something about not being happy in the relationship and he says something like if you were my employees. Yeah I would have fired you what that story indicates to me. One is not just his desire for control but also a misogynistic streak yeah. There's you know I'm trying to think about how to phrase this because there's certainly a streak of misogyny Nia among his fans It's something that especially women reporters who cover Elon. Musk counter a lot. I personally told that I must be quote unquote obsessed with them but there is this sort of culture that he comes from that is not especially women. Friendly like Silicon Valley of that period is not especially women friendly and it's still well not women friendly now so there is kind of a casual misogyny and a lot of the areas in which he's operating And like that's true of aerospace. That's true of cars. That's true of software These are all extremely dude turf places where dudes tended to defend their turf. So how exactly did things end between paypal and the other co-founders and Elon. Musk so Pay Pal goes public in two thousand two and after a couple of months is bought by Ebay and I think must get something like one hundred and sixty five million dollars out of this transaction the overall transaction is something like one point five billion okay. So what's the pay pal money. He does chew things first of all. He founds a rocket company. Space Exploration Technologies SPACEX. You found that in two thousand and two but the other thing that he does is he invests in this a car. Companies Company was making electric cars. He's the series investor Fester for Tesla Inc And that takes place in two thousand four and later Must becomes credited as a CO founder of Tesla after the break picks up speed.

Musk Elon Tesla Inc Space Exploration Technologies partner paypal Nia Companies Company Ebay CO founder
"10 years" Discussed on Reset

Reset

07:07 min | 11 months ago

"10 years" Discussed on Reset

"Lisboa Plateau deputy editor at the verge and reporter on the. Musk beat how did he long become the person he is today. Can you tell me a little bit about his childhood. Oh Yeah I could definitely tell you about his childhood. So he's he's born in South Africa his parents split. He stays with his dad after the divorce. His Dad by all accounts counts is not a great guy and so he has kind of this rough home life and he's not doing that well with his peers at school either. What do you mean by that at one point? He was beaten so badly by his schoolmates that he was hospitalized. I mean. He was bullied so he grows up in South Africa. I mean he now lives in the. US How did he end up there. I moved to Canada and then he moved to the US and in both cases it had to do with going to school. He went to college essentially and his family is actually actually Canadian right. I think his mother might be Canadian. Sorry I like plugging that in. Their people should know so i. He goes to Canada Canada and I think he's at Queen's University which is in Ontario and from there he moves on to the University of Pennsylvania. where I think. He got dual degrees in economics. Physics all right and at this point is he already thinking up businesses that he wants to Creator you know whereas whereas my net yeah I mean so. There's I mean the economics degree suggests to me that he's already thinking about business but there's also some anecdotes in leave ANZUS biography about him like hosting parties where he didn't necessarily drink but he sold people drink. Cups made a bunch of money that way so it seems like you know this is something that he's he's been thinking about from the jump so anyway he he leaves Penn in Nineteen ninety-five and gets accepted it into a PhD program at Stanford University in California in physics. But as he's going out there you may remember around this time. There's the internet boom and so he's in this program for. I think like two days like literally. Today that's before he drops out uh-huh decides to launch his first company which is called Zip to okay. What's too so it was sort of an early? The attempt to get newspapers online. Believe it or not but anyway This gets acquired by Compaq for something like three hundred million dollars. There's in nineteen ninety nine and with this money must goes on to co found x dot com an online financial service and a payment company. What exactly was launched vision for that company? It was one of the first online banks as far as I can tell. Musk wanted to challenge the banking industry he wanted to disrupt banking so this is an ATM. We're going to do is transformed traditional banking industry. I do not fit the picture of a banker. Raising fifty million dollars is a matter of making a series of phone calls and the money is there you know. It wasn't a a small scope type of deal that musk was working on. But what happens is x dot com winds the merging with infinity. which is the startup by guy? Peter Thiel you might hurt him anyway. conformity has a money. Transfer Service called. Pay Pal. They this is where there's some friction Because you know you on mosque really has this idea for an extensive banking service US and he. He wants x dot com to be something much bigger than that. And there's sort of a fight about branding because he wants the branding for pay pal to be. I pay pal brought to you by acts and pretty much everybody else is like people like and recognize. Pay Pal they don't know what acts is Let's just let's just make it pay pal so at this point. It must doesn't like the fact that that the company that he was working on the name is getting a raced. Yeah I mean basically. It's a sort of a question of scope right like do you want to focus on these online payments or do you want to do something much bigger and must get pushed out so that they can narrow the scope and focus on these online payments. And I from the former. CFO OF PAP- house at something like it would have killed the company if you had stayed on as CEO for six more months must got kicked out of pay pal. Essentially is what you're saying. I mean he was still on the board but yes he was he was fired as a CEO. How do you think that impacted him? I think that getting kicked out had a pay pal was a formative experience for him because it seems to speak to the way that he controls his other companies. There's a bunch of anecdotes of him. I'm talking about how much he doesn't like public companies. Because you can't really control things and you can't really have a long-term vision and I think that after his experience at pay pal it must decided okay like I need to be in charge of my own companies in such a way that I can't be removed like this again. How was Elon? Musk perceived at that point like who was he in the world of of business in the world of tech I think he was sort of perceived in the way that most executives are perceived. which is you know you're known within your own circle but you're not necessarily a household name so he is not the guy that we know today? No He's definitely not and you can see. There are some mm early interviews with him where people are talking to him. He's like doesn't have the same kind of media savvy he later develops and it's like seeing A Proto Yulon. Musk ask a lot of the stuff that we see later is already there But it hasn't quite developed. Do you have an example of of guests his media media clumsiness at the time I'm I'm thinking of a specific interview and I wish I could remember. There's one with him and his then wife and they're you know talking about how their life hasn't really been changed that much by this money except that they bought a nice car and its him showing off his car Which is called McLaren F one? It's a million dollars for a car. It's it's It's Oh yes yes I know exactly what interview you're talking about. This is actually a pretty famous interview. Where where he just seems like kind of I don't know he hasn't doesn't fully settled into his new life? He's a little bit awkward. He just seems like he's also beaming right. He's really proud of this car. He's thrilled thrilled out of his mind. Nine completely. It's actually pretty well but just three years ago. I was showering and the at the Y.. And Sleeping on the office floor and now obviously GonNa Millionaire car and quite a few creature comforts. Okay so I'm glad you actually brought up his wife and everything so musk also got married in two thousand for for the first time right to just steam..

Musk US Lisboa Plateau South Africa Canada Peter Thiel deputy editor Compaq CEO ANZUS reporter Canada Canada Stanford University California Cups CFO Elon
"10 years" Discussed on Marketing Secrets

Marketing Secrets

07:08 min | 11 months ago

"10 years" Discussed on Marketing Secrets

"Everyone So we packed up right now. Taking the kids downtown for new years Here in Boise. They have a potato drop it literally this huge potato. They have a big detractor. Come out and they hooked the tractor up to potato and then the potato drops just like you New York City. The ball drop panel job. So we've never seen it. We're going downtown Boise to experience the potato drop or pre pumped about that in a really weird way so That's GonNa be really fun and then we'll see how the kids make it to midnight or not. So that's what's happening tonight and it's interesting. I was like thinking about two to share kind of for the last podcast That'd be fun to do like the top ten things. Leonard this this decade or this last year whatever I may do something like that but It's a we're kind of packing up the house down and get ready to leave. Will he wants to. My mind is just is actually simpler. It's not it's not a whole bunch of things is one thing I think about so I wanNA share that. Hopefully it'll it'll help somebody right now in in whatever you're looking at so It kind of stems back to and probably seven eight years ago. I was in New York. Joe Polish Genius Network Event and Tim Ferriss there never seemed fair. Speak before it's kind of excited. And he's going to say he's talking and He doesn't Q.. And stuff and um I remember at the end. Some of the some question like like what's question. We should ask him that. Yeah we haven't asked you yet or something like that. He has offers second. He said he was interesting. He said I got reporters all the time. Who Want to follow me around all day and And they get a day in the life of Tim Ferriss like I was told no because if people actually saw my life was like they'd be really bored. He's like I wake up in the morning in drink some coffee or tea and then I sit and I read a book then I think and I and I you know all these things like he's also there's days or weeks or sometimes even months just trying to identify what are all of the Domino's out there and then what's the one big domino that if I knocked down that domino lock down all the other domino's or make them obsolete he's like because I don't do a lot of suppling undo something I execute on a perfectly. It's this huge so anyway after after. He said that I thought a lot about that. And I think most part I'm not. I'm not really that way. I'm more more like I'm moving. Forward all the time you see moving forward idea after idea for And I've been executing on this on this side and this book and this thing and we're we're moving fascinating I think that's that's good especially when you're getting started. I think it's good to be trying testing a lot of things until you kind of identify what your thing is and and really figure it out but something that has been interesting over the last couple of months. I've been writing these books doing these things One thought he's coming back up. It's like you know I knew a lot of things that incrementally tremendously helping to grow the company but I was like is there is there a thing is a big thing if we were to do it or execute on or knock this domino down that would that would shortcut cut US five years or ten years or more and gets there faster and it's funny because I thought I was thinking about that like there was not like a fun like like this. This is the final little ten x closes the funnel that will speed up the time. This is the book I need that and so I I I was like I guess. There's not there's nothing I can do shave off ten years of of our success you know ten years You know further down line faster and and and so while we thought it wasn't possible because we're looking through the lens that we normally look through them so because that we weren't able to see that but then looking lenses and different people's perspectives and people people that are smarter than me and people that have done things in industries and looking at that and started looking all of a sudden it became apparent that there are a couple of paths that would literally take off a decade of growth. We get where we would take ten years going the direction and the right now you can get there within a year from now and I like that can't be possible doesn't make any sense but because we should ask that question looking through different lenses outside of our own perspective started opening up all these opportunities I Disney's whole all new world of of things that are possible so I'm not able yet to tell you what the answer was for me and that shouldn't matter because the answer is probably going to be different but you will see it play out over the next twelve months of my life and life of quick funnels and you'll be like. Oh my gosh that was Russell shows. That's interesting that is how short you're cutting a decade get an ear. And so you'll see you'll see the strategically that we're making. They're exciting. They're fun and they're they're awesome and I'm sure we'll talk about it as the pieces. Come Out I'm able to share more. But more so when he has to start thinking about that my guess is when you start thinking like what can I do right now. That's going to propel my business for a decade in next next year. You probably GonNa see it right away just going to be hard for you to you because I think given the tools you have the answers. Aren't there for me. Give them the tools like what's the next fun and what's the next book was actually the thing the answer was there it was it was me keeping continuing to ask. That question is and the people who have different frame remove reference to different Lens that opened up these possibilities to me and to us as a as a team at click funnels and so encourage Aslam questioned an and then started looking for the answer. 'cause they're somewhere it's not within your immediate ability to execute on it but is there somewhere she started looking for. And if you if you search for my guess is you're going to find it so anyway that's the thing. What's the begun? No what's the big nominal for you guys this year that's going to propel you for a decade Think about about that and then watches we execute on ours. I'm excited I'm so grateful for all you guys and the fact that you listen to this podcast fact use our software. The factory my books folks the fact that you care means the world to me and I just grateful for you guys during this New Year season and appreciate. You can't wait for the upcoming year to see what we're doing why we're doing it and it's going to be fun so they read along for the ride. Appreciate you all have an amazing New Year and I will talk to you all next decade by everybody pay Russell again and really quick wanted. Thank you so much for listening to the Marketing Secrets podcast episode. And if you did you imagine what it would be like experienced this for four days with five thousand other insane funnel hackers people who just like you who think like you who believe like vision like you. If you'd like to do that then you need had to be this year's final hockey live. It's coming up very very soon. If you'll ever take shape and go to follow hockey live dot com and it gives you the ability to leave your home. Leave where you're when you're trying to create and dream and come to a place with a whole bunch of people who think like you who believe like you see visions like you of what they can create what they can become. The life is not just a marketing event person development event. It's both of those things wrap into one and as an experience that will change your life forever so make sure you get your tickets. You don't have me. I go to funnel hockey live. Dot Dot Com near tickets sold out five years in a row. We will saw this year as well. And the actor. You tickets you will be there with five thousand other insane crazy fund the funnel hackers akers talking to how to grow their business sharing all marketing secrets. Things are working today. You gotta go your tickets now at funnel hacking lab dot com much. And I'll see you in Nashville..

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