Road Trips

Deep dives for long drives, waiting rooms and passing time without wasting precious minutes. Chock-full of intriguing short stories from a far-flung range of topics - hear the latest in Artificial Intelligence, True Crime thrillers, lessons in Leadership and much more, to keep your inquisitive mind satisfied as the miles fly by.

A highlight from #258  Yann LeCun: Dark Matter of Intelligence and Self-Supervised Learning

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

04:35 min | 1 hr ago

A highlight from #258 Yann LeCun: Dark Matter of Intelligence and Self-Supervised Learning

"Yuko wrote the article self supervised learning the dark matter of intelligence. Great title, by the way. Willie Shawn misra. So let me ask what is self supervised learning and why is it the dark matter of intelligence? I'll start by the dark matter part. There is obviously a kind of learning that humans and animals are doing that we currently are not reproducing properly with machines with AI. So the most popular approach is to machine learning today are pi ions, I should say, are supervised learning and reinforcement learning. And there are two main efficient supervised learning requires many samples for learning anything. And reinforcement learning requires a ridiculously large number of trial and errors for a system to run anything. And that's why we don't have self-driving cars. That was a big leap for one to the other. Okay, so that to solve difficult problems. You have to have a lot of human annotation for supervised learning to work and to solve those difficult problems with reinforcement learning. You have to have some way to maybe simulate that problem such that you can do that large scale kind of learning that reinforcement learning requires. Right. So how is it that most teenagers can learn to drive a car in about 20 hours of practice? Whereas even with millions of hours of simulated practice self-driving car can't actually learn to drive itself properly. And so obviously we're missing something. And it's quite obvious for a lot of people that the immediate response you get from many people is well, humans use their background knowledge to run faster. And they are right. Now, how was that background knowledge required? And that's the big question. So now you have to ask, how do babies in the first few months of life learn how to world works? Mostly by observation because they can hardly act in the world. And they're on an enormous amount of background knowledge of the world that may be the basis of what we call common sense. This type of learning is not learning a task. It's not being reinforced for anything. It's just observing the world and figuring out how it works. Building world models learning world models. How do we do this? And how do we reproduce this in machine? So cell supervision is one instance of an attempt trying to reproduce this kind of learning. Okay, so you're looking at just observation. So not even the interacting part of a child. It's just sitting there watching mom and dad walk around, pick up stuff, all of that. That's what we mean by background knowledge. mom and dad just watch your world go by. Just having eyes open or having eyes closed or the very act of opening and closing eyes that the world appears and disappears, all of that basic information. And you're saying in order to learn to drive like the reason humans are able to learn to drive quickly, some faster than others is because of the background knowledge that we're able to watch cars operate in the world in the many years of leading up to it, the physics of basics objects and all that kind of stuff. That's right. The basic physics of objects, you don't even know you don't even need to know how car works. Because you can not very quickly. I mean, the example I use very often is you're driving next to a cliff. And you know in advance because of your understanding of intuitive physics that if you turn the wheel to the right, the car will veer to the right. We're running off the cliff. Fall off the cliff, and nothing good will come out of this. But if you are a Tableau rice, reinforcement learning system that doesn't have a model of the world. You have to repeat falling off this cliff, thousands of times before you figure out it's a bad idea. And then a few more thousand times before you figure out how to not do it. And then a few more million times before you figure out how to not do it in every situation you ever encounter. So self supervised learning still has to have some source of truth being told to it by somebody. And so you have to figure out a way without human assistance or without significant amount of human assistance to get that truth from the world. So the mystery there is how much signal is there, how much truth is there that the world gives you, whether it's the human world, like you watch YouTube or something like that, or it's the more natural

Willie Shawn Misra Yuko Youtube
A highlight from ACP339 Can I Remove A Felony Arrest From My Record ?

Aviation Careers Podcast

08:17 min | 3 hrs ago

A highlight from ACP339 Can I Remove A Felony Arrest From My Record ?

"You want a free scholarship guy. That's where you find it right there. All those coupon codes. All over a $120 million in scholarships that you can find there. If you're somebody that wants to help, go to aviation careers, podcasts dot com slash pay it forward. You can give many different ways through our Patreon account through helping us out directly through the pay it forward program. But all those monies, all those dollars, they go towards our scholarships guide, and then when we raise $10, we give away one scholarships guide, and that's how they can find it. At aviation careers podcast dot com slash free. So let's get on with this show. Today's show is from questions that I've received. Both are career coaching sessions and also from our feedback. If you have questions by the way, in the feedback at aviation careers podcast dot com, just put a little note there, say, hey, could you ask the attorney this? Over the years, I've had to consult with an aviation attorney and I've actually helped a lot of people get jobs who thought they couldn't get jobs after something happening. And you're going to see something in their background, maybe something that just happened. You're going to see that there's a lot of things that you can happen in your life, but you can still pursue an aviation career. So when you get into a few of those here, so don't forget, if you have a question, feedback at aviation curse podcast dot com and also let me know if you want us to do more of these. If you really enjoy this type of content, if we can ask the aviation attorney, these are mainly positioned towards people that are interested in aviation careers obviously, but these rules are most pilots, and most careers. So let's get started with the first question. So but before we do that, gosh, I forgot to even have Chris introduce himself. Chris is aviation attorney. So tell us a little bit about what you do at streamer and law and also how they can contact you. Well, of course, Carla, as you know, I started my career as a pilot and I actually still fly full time. But I also work at the logs as Robert strummer with my partner Robert. Of course, he goes by bob. And he was bob's out in Santa Fe. I'm in the Florida office. And most of what we do, all we do is aviation, but in particular, we do pilot issues. Anything from gear up landings to FAA medical questions, we are quite a few of those. And so that's been our area of focus has worked with pilots to address issues and hopefully resolve those in beneficial way. Awesome. Well, are you ready for the first question? Go ahead. All right, here we go. Our first question comes in from somebody who wrote in actually a feedback at aviation garage podcast dot com. And he writes, can I remove a felony arrest from my record, so the airlines don't see it when I apply. So Chris, can they remove that felony arrest so that the airlines won't see it when they does apply? That's a great question. We get that quite a bit. With the FAA and also with the airlines, a lot of times they will ask about prior convictions, particularly felonies, and the short answer is no unfortunately it does not come off the record. A lot of folks ask me about expungements. In expungement, is a removal of partial removal from the record at the state level. In reality, expungements are not a 100%. And they aren't always effective at the federal level, including aviation. So the short version is that even if it's been expunged at the state level, we would still treat it as an active or on the record event. And it would be better to disclose that and provide an explanation than to try to conceal it. And from a career counseling perspective, I usually tell people that they're going to find it when they do a lot of their background checks and it really it is something that I've had people say no, I didn't have a felony arrest and felony conviction, and they actually found it on their record and they were terminated. So from a career counseling perspective, I definitely would tell people about that and having an expunge though, just like you said, is something that I guess you can try, but are they going to find it? I think so. In my opinion. So let's look at the next question here. Chris, let's see. Oh, here's one says, can I apply to an airline with a felony arrest? And no conviction, meaning that there was either a withholding of adjudication and or they were actually found not guilty. So can you apply with a felony arrest with no conviction and what do you think of that one? Well, a couple notes, first of all, you can always apply, even if you have the felony conviction that doesn't mean you won't get a job. It just means that you need to disclose that and be honest when you apply for that job. Now a lot of these forms are very specific and they'll say conviction as opposed to an arrest or a charge. If you were charged in the charges were dropped or you were able to win in court, then in that case, if it says conviction and you weren't convicted, then you don't need to put that down. The one that we're wanting to more often hour what we call diversion programs. These are the withheld without adjudication. They have different titles and every state. But they're probably called diversion programs. And there are a way of addressing legal issue without really getting to a guilt conclusion or not, these are very sticky. So if you've got a case like that, I would call an aviation attorney and talk to them before you filled out the questionnaire or went to the job interview. And know exactly what you do or don't want to put down. Because those can get a little bit complicated. Yeah, absolutely. And to add to that in an actual interview if they ask you ever been arrested of a felony charge and you have to say, yes, if you have, but usually have you ever been convicted, have you ever been aggressive or felony or have you ever convicted? Is usually what they ask, but make sure you listen to the question. So that's really important because you don't want to call it line. That's a real important thing here, by the way, the underlying theme is you don't want to get caught in a lie. Be forthright with them. And just remember that you can get a job if you do have a felony arrest or a felony conviction. It depends on what it is. So the next question is kind of like the first one, but different, the next question is, can I have a felony conviction removed from my record again? A felony conviction removed from my record. So again, really not going to be a good way to get that removed that would be recognized by an airline or the federal level. So the short version is you are going to have to disclose that. So the best thing to do is to put some time on it or behind it. Learn from whatever mistake caused that and be prepared to talk about it on the interview. And almost everybody, especially later in career, it's going to have something in their interview. They don't want to talk about whether it's a check right failure, an aircraft incident. It happens. And the lines do find these. One of my clients discovered a few days ago that a pilot did not disclose a former employer and a check right failure at that employer. And so that's now an issue that's going through their HR and legal departments. While they tried to figure out what to do with this employee, and that's going to be very unfortunate because the employer might have hired him even knowing. But now that he's lied to them, they're not really sure they want to keep them. I will also point out that there are other ways that employers ask questions. One of my first interviews in the airline industry, I think it was my second interview. They asked me if I'd ever been fingerprinted. And that was their way of getting around the arrest versus conviction question was to ask, have you ever been fingerprinted? And at the time, I never had been. So it wasn't an issue, but that was their way of doing that. Yeah, good point. And by the way, on the fingerprint issue, I know a lot of folks that work with children and stuff like that are going to write in. So before you write in, yes, I've been fingerprinted many times, and that's because I work with children and et cetera. There are organizations that make you get fingerprinted. So just remember that isn't necessarily a bad thing, but that is one way, I guess they can assume from that. But you can't assume it, right? Because even if your fingerprint, it could be for a good thing. Well, honestly the way to go, actually, in my case, I had been fingerprinted as a kid. At the time they were fingerprinting kids in that area. And so I did this close that on the off chance that that fingerprint might be in some kind of a database and come back up later. And they didn't take any issue with that, of course, my explain that, well, this was when I was 7 and this was done for safety. So fingerprinting does all kinds

Chris Introduce Robert Strummer FAA Chris BOB Carla Santa Fe Robert Florida
A highlight from Weekend Woman's Hour: Tracey Emin, Ashling Murphy, Adult Literacy

Woman's Hour

04:30 min | 4 hrs ago

A highlight from Weekend Woman's Hour: Tracey Emin, Ashling Murphy, Adult Literacy

"Ashlyn's killing has also amplified calls in Ireland for more to be done to tackle violence against women. On Monday, Chloe Tilly spoke to Irish times reporter Jade Wilson and veteran feminist activist, alvis Smith, chair of the board of directors for women's aid island. She began by asking Jade about ashling. Ashleigh Murphy was a primary school teacher and county awfully in the Midlands of Ireland. She got first class students a class of children who would be about 7 or 8 years old in the local school. She was newly qualified and had started teaching at the school in March 2021. She was also talented musician and was involved with a choir and loved sports. She played camogie as well. An Irish stick and ball team sport played by women with a local club who said, you know, she'd been a much loved member of their junior and senior teams. Oliver want to bring you in because I know that you went to a vigil. You actually spoke at a visual over the weekend, Jade I know you also went to a vigil. Just tell me a little bit over if you would about the reaction in Ireland. Well, you know, it was an immediate reaction. It was absolutely countrywide. I think you certainly couldn't say that there was one section, not at all. There seemed to be this rising up in genuine sadness in the first place. But also, you know, real horror and a sense that this can't go on. You know, I certainly wouldn't, I think there is a lot of anger there, but it's not that people were rising up and rage. They were saying, this is horrifying. And we absolutely have to stop it. And it was very organic. I know the national women's council said that they started getting texts and phone calls and emails in massive numbers. And we know that this happened from previous experience in Ireland when people really feel that something has reached some kind of tipping point. There is simply no way that we will tolerate what is happening any longer. I don't think it's that surprising. I think that certainly in Ireland we've been extremely aware during the pandemic of the huge rise in violence against women in so called domestic situations, 43% rise in corals to women's aid, for example, so this comes at a moment when people's feelings are under awareness is heightened. And I also think it follows on 7 murders last year in Ireland. It also follows on our in Ireland, our understanding and our noticing and paying attention to what is happening what happened in the UK and the terrible murder of Sarah everard. And we noticed what's happening globally. And people are saying this really is an endemic problem. 30 50 years since I've been worked fighting on this issue 50 years, it is absolutely time. It is over time it has overdue here in Ireland in the UK elsewhere in Europe around the world that we need to make men against women and its prevention and ultimately hopefully it's eradication. And absolute priority. And well, this is the problem, isn't it? Every time there is a horrendous murder which reaches the headlines and let's remember for each one that reaches the headlines there are many more that don't. There is a huge outpouring of emotion. People are angry and say things have to change. I mean, I was reading that Leo verac the deputy prime minister in Ireland was saying that things have to change. We as a society need to face up to this as an epidemic of violence against women. It's been going on for a millennia men and boys, I think, in particular, have a responsibility to start to have a conversation amongst themselves about the kind of factors that kind of attitudes that give rise to feelings that engender men to commit acts of violence against women. The problem is Jade, these conversations always happen, but then these murders still happen. And thankfully, they are few and far between, we mustn't exaggerate this. But what is really changing Jade is is their legislation that's coming in island to try and protect women.

Ireland Chloe Tilly Jade Wilson Alvis Smith Board Of Directors For Women's Ashling Ashleigh Murphy Ashlyn National Women's Council Irish Times Jade Midlands Sarah Everard Oliver UK Leo Verac Europe
A highlight from AT#786 - Travel to Laos

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

05:38 min | 6 hrs ago

A highlight from AT#786 - Travel to Laos

"I got my bags back on the road I'm heading out there and I'm ready to go looking real good in my passport photo oh no 50 amateur traveler episode 786 to the amateur traveler talks about alms giving and rice growing, a slow boat, a night market, and a bamboo bridge, as we go to the nation of Laos. But maybe not maybe not till the day. Welcome to the amateur traveler. I'm your host Chris Kristen. Let's talk about Laos. I'd like to welcome the show Alexis Rubenstein. You can find Alexis an Instagram at a redstone Alexis and Alexis welcome to the show. Thanks. Good to be here. Alexis has come to talk to us about Laos. Alexis what your connection with Laos? In 2019, we found ourselves at a transition point in our lives. My husband, he retired from the air force and we sold our House and we were kind of between places to live. So we decided to go nomadic for a while. We ended up doing a big road trip across North America and traveled through Central America and Southeast Asia for a few months. And we decided to go to Laos just because we had heard good things and we went to some of the sort of more popular places that people go like Thailand and we wanted to mix it up with just some more unusual places. Excellent. And why should someone go to Laos? Well, it Laos is a really cool place to go. If you're interested in cultural travel, it's a really neat mix of Buddhist culture and French colonial culture and architecture. And it's just a really neat gluon. I didn't go to the rest of the labs. So we were in northern Thailand. You can actually take vote down the Mekong river from a small town near Chiang Rai in northern Thailand to Luang Prabang. It's an overnight trip, it takes two days and it's a wonderful way to get there. It's really peaceful and you're going through the most remote jungle inaccessible villages and stops that you can't get any other way. And the second day you pull into Luang Prabang and it's a city in the middle of the jungle and it's got so much wonderful culture and French colonial buildings and it's kind of a surprise after being in the remote jungle for two days. And you say down the river, that would be down the Mekong. Yes. Excellent. So what kind of itinerary do you recommend for us? So we spent about ten days there, but you could see almost everything in probably about a week. We based ourselves in long prong and took day trips. And there were several wonderful things that we did in the town and there's a few day trips that only take less than a couple of hours to get to from town. Well, let's back up and talk about the boat ride also because I think our listeners would be really interested in that. So you say you painted that up in Chiang Rai in Thailand? It's near Chiang Rai. It's about, I would say an hour from. There's a border town on the Thai side, and you take a little shuttle over to quayside, that's the town in Laos and you have to go through the customs and get your Visa and everything. And then you leave early the next morning on the slow boat. It's a tiny, tiny town. You just walk down to the port. The slow boat takes two days. It stops at a tiny little inaccessible town called Pok bang. We stayed in $7 hotel rooms right over the river, and it was beautiful. And then it makes a couple of other stops on the way to Luang Prabang, including the pack Al caves, which are these caves set up in the side of a cliff and they're full of over 4000 Buddha figures that people have left there. It also stops at a Hmong village where you can actually visit the villagers and kind of see how they live and they have handicrafts for sale and everything. So it was really neat introduction to Laos before we got to the city. Now, is this a tourist boat or a local boat? So you have a couple options. There's the local slow boat, and since I had my kids with me, we decided to do a slightly upgraded version. Okay. Where you pay a little bit more, but it's not like the local taxi where you're not sure if you're going to get a seat or not. It could be really crowded. They limit the number of people if you get the slightly upgraded trip, they also serve food on board. That's what we ended up doing. But it's not a you're not on Viking river cruise or something like that. This is a local provider, just a little. And when you say you've got the more expensive option, I'm guessing more expensive by Laos standards. Exactly. And it's the same boat. It's just a very simple wooden boat with kind of a deck and some wooden benches and blankets. That's about it. No cabins? No, no cabins. Okay, definitely the local boat. All right. But yeah, the slightly upgraded version you're just guaranteeing that you're not packed in with a bunch of people who are just using it to transport between villages. Do that way. That's supposed to be fun as well, but you're risking maybe not having a seed or missing the boat if it's not on time. And did you book that ahead of time or did you book it right there in quayside? You can book it the day of, but we did book it a couple of days out. Okay. We had heard that sometimes you can get different prices if you wait till the last minute. Okay.

Laos Alexis Thailand Chiang Rai Chris Kristen Alexis Rubenstein Luang Prabang Mekong River Central America Southeast Asia Air Force North America Viking River
A highlight from How to fix broken supply chains | Dustin Burke

TED Talks Daily

04:40 min | 10 hrs ago

A highlight from How to fix broken supply chains | Dustin Burke

"Price and coverage match law. It was a strange feeling walking into the local supermarket only to find empty shelves. And most notably, no toilet paper. We didn't have raw material shortages or manufacturing defects. And we didn't discover new uses for toilet paper. It was panic buying by everyday people, supply chains just couldn't keep up. And before we knew it, the rumored shortage became a real one. You remember that, don't you? Well, maybe not, because I'm not talking about COVID-19. I'm talking about the great toilet paper shortage of 1973. And it wasn't caused by a pandemic, but by a joke told by Johnny Carson. But today's supply chain challenges are no joke. Those problems are real. But their problems that we've faced and even solved in the past. A supply chain is the long and often complicated journey that any item takes before it winds up in your home. Raw materials are mined or grown and sold to various suppliers. Those suppliers sell them to manufacturers, who transform those raw materials into finished goods. And those finished goods are moved around the world by distributors and carriers who in turn sell them to retailers who sell those to consumers as a final step. Many supply chains are simple, like when you buy strawberries at a local farmers market. But some are almost infinitely complex. In my 14 years, working with companies on improving their supply chains, I've seen many disruptions from natural disasters, to pandemics, and geopolitical instability. And every time the media talks about how, from this point forward, companies can, and will make their supply chains more resilient. And the common prescriptions include diversifying risk, better forecasting the future and building buffers, like stockpiles of inventory or more manufacturing equipment. And this is good advice. But the question I keep asking myself is, I haven't more companies taking this advice. The reason is that it doesn't stand up against competing priorities and steep competition that occurs between the crises and shocks. So if we want to build more resilient supply chains that can withstand the next great crisis, then we need to bring new ideas. They can withstand competitive pressures. Let's talk about sharing risk, radical transparency and automated recommendations. These three ideas, if we take them together, have the potential to help break the trade off between resilience and efficiency. An obvious solution to supply shortages is to build more buffers so that if anything happens along the supply chain, the next recipient isn't waiting empty handed. Retail stores can never perfectly predict what will buy, so they carry extra inventory. They might run out of a particular size, or a particular color, but it's unlikely that they'll run out of an entire category, like jeans. But we know across industries, companies carry less of that backup inventory than they used to. And we have immense product variety. But much of what we buy is made in highly specialized or automated factories. And that makes it harder to repurpose that capacity when demand changes. That's why during COVID-19, those toilet paper manufacturers had enough capacity. But they didn't have the right kind of capacity. Commercial toilet paper is very different from what we consumers use at home. They could have met demand, but it would have meant shoppers lugging home roles that are 9 inches wide, and clearly designed for cost, not for comfort. Streamlining supply chains is a big reason why we consumers have incredible choices at low prices. And for many companies, warehousing, extra raw materials or keeping idle equipment on the factory floor is simply too expensive, competition is steep as it is. But buffers matter in a crisis. So how do we get similar benefits, but in a different way? We can share or pool risk. It's much like a well established industry that we all know well, insurance. It's unlikely that you'll ever get into a major car accident. But if you do, it will be horribly expensive. That's why for low probability, high impact events, we share risk. And in some instances, like

Johnny Carson
A highlight from Arsenio Hall: A Joke about Baby Toes

Netflix is A Daily Joke

03:02 min | 13 hrs ago

A highlight from Arsenio Hall: A Joke about Baby Toes

"God puts extra feeling in that baby. And no self esteem. You ever notice that no matter I see pretty ladies no matter how fine you are. Your baby told it's like this is depressed and shit. No fucking self esteem. The baby told me, leaned on all the toes. How y'all doing, y'all all that? Little ugly motherfucker, right? You can feel it in your shoe sometimes, you know. All the toes get your black ass off me hurt. Right man's baby don't look at motherfucker. Let me just stand up straight. No matter who you are. Your baby toe may be pretty in mind, but it's uglier than your other fault, right? Sometimes the lady don't know what to do when you go weekly, she just stand there with an emery board and like a tear in her eye. She looked like the Indian from the pollution commercial back in the day. I don't know what to do this other motherfucker. 'cause it won't die won't grow, it looks the same every week. You don't know what color polish to put on it. Right? 'cause you put red on the other photos and that would look dark crimson and shit. You don't know. Do I need a white base to put some pink in it? How do I make that little black motherfucker later? And I see pretty ladies laughing. You know what I'm talking about? One of the prettiest women in the world is from my hometown Halle Berry. Agree? Yeah. Halle Berry. I don't care what race you talking, what age you talking? One of the most beautiful women in the world. But I saw her yes. I saw her with flip flops on. This is true. Don't let this leave the room. Saw her with flip flops on her. And I ain't gonna go too far into this, but she's a perfect ten from head to ankle. But that's just between us. That's just normal. Everybody, your baby toe is. It's crazy looking. My woman is beautiful feet. But that baby told me. Her foot except for the baby toes is perfect. But maybe it looked like she had a transplant that went wrong. Or something. Like an episode of Stranger Things when you look at a baby toes. Look like somebody put the kimbe my tumbles told. One time I was gonna suck at toes and the baby toes said no, no, no. Shit. I wish I had that old video. Watch our hall, smart and classy. Only on Netflix.

Halle Berry Netflix
A highlight from Best of: Doggy Style Tricks & Performance Tips

Sex With Emily

01:41 min | 23 hrs ago

A highlight from Best of: Doggy Style Tricks & Performance Tips

"Their penis during doggy style. That is the most challenging position for men where there's been discomfort. The second is missionary and the third is woman on top. You're listening to sex with Emily. I'm doctor Emily and I'm here to help you prioritize your pleasure and liberate the conversation around sex. All right, let's cut to the chase. Doggy style is hot looking, but is it hot feeling? I can't tell you how many questions I get about this position. Mostly from people who are confused, wondering if they're doing wrong. Is there something more to it? Am I supposed to love it? Why do I love it? All the things. Well, you're not doing anything wrong. You just might need to tweak it a bit. Make it work for your body. So on today's show, I give you my favorite doggy style hacks because let's be honest, no one wants a broken penis, and just avoid the ER and give you the hot doggy style sex you deserve. No matter what your body part. Plus, I take your questions. Is polyamory more natural than monogamy? What should you do if you catch feelings for your Friends with benefits? Is it really cheating if you have a no sex kink situation with an old flame? And finally, body dysmorphia of the vulva. Do you have it? Friends, let me help you love it. Don't buy the hype by which I mean false standards. I tell you exactly how to make your vulva, a much deserved object of your affection. Intentions with Emily, for each episode, let's start off by setting intention, shall we? I do it. I encourage you to do the same. So what do you want to get out of

Emily
A highlight from Could the world become too warm to hold Winter Olympics?

Environment: NPR

02:43 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Could the world become too warm to hold Winter Olympics?

"Two weeks from now, the Winter Olympics will get underway in Beijing, but could we one day be saying goodbye to the winter games as we know them? Well, a new study by the university of Waterloo says that is a possibility thanks to climate change. NPR's Jacqueline Diaz has more. It goes without saying, the Winter Olympics need, snow, ice, and overall cold temperatures. Rosie Brennan is an Olympic cross country skier. So it's a wide ranging sport of endurance, strength, power, kind of all of it wrapped into one on snow. To do this, Brennan really needs that perfect snowy condition. You know, obviously we need snow on the whole course to ski. But researchers say a warming climate is disrupting Olympic sports like cross country skiing, as well as the cities that host these games. They say if greenhouse gases are not seriously reduced, virtually none of the previous 21 cities that hosted the winter Olympic Games could reliably do so again. Daniel Scott is one of the researchers at the university of Waterloo. Under the high emission scenario, it's a very different outcome. And late century, we're left with one climate reliable location being super on Japan. By reliable, he means a cold enough location that offers prime safe conditions for winter athletes to compete in. Athletes and their coaches have started to notice the changes. Here's Brennan again. You know, I think the thing that we see now is with warmer weather, there's less snowfall. So we're much more reliant on man-made snow, and man-made snow doesn't act the same as natural snow. It tends to be much firmer. It gets icier faster. It's faster surface. And that poses a risk for more injuries. Climate change isn't just affecting winter games. Last summer's games in Tokyo saw extreme heat and heavy rains. Scott says there may come appointment outdoor games may have to move indoors or be held at a different time of year, all together. Brennan says, if that happens, something is lost. Jacqueline Diaz NPR news. It took a long time. For Gabrielle Union to realize, she had the wrong idea of success. Because I was conditioned to believe you haven't really made it in Hollywood if you've only got essence covers. I'm Jay Williams. How Gabby are you getting changed her mindset and her career? I'm a bid my hand. Yeah, you know this. I'm a bid my hand. Listen, on the limits from NPR.

Jacqueline Diaz Winter Olympics University Of Waterloo Rosie Brennan Brennan Daniel Scott NPR Beijing Olympic Games Skiing Olympic Japan Npr News Tokyo Gabrielle Union Scott Jay Williams Gabby Hollywood
A highlight from 10 Trivia Questions from a Confidence Round

Trivia With Budds

02:37 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from 10 Trivia Questions from a Confidence Round

"Is it possible to breathe inside a cloud? The answer is, yes. Your third thing here, there are only three places on the body where hair does not grow, where are they? The answer is the palms, the soles of the feet and the lips. No hairy lips. Fortunately for most people. And what is American's least favorite month? What is the least favorite month in America? The answer on this card says January, I think because all the festivities for the holidays are done, you're back to the grind and it's the coldest most parts of the country. But I dig it. I like the rebirth of everything. Starting new stuff, resolutions, trying new things, et cetera and I'm trying to do a bunch of those right now. If you have some good ones that you're sticking with some resolutions, drop me a line social media at Ryan buds, would love to hear about those. Maybe I'll try and do some of the things you're doing, or you could do some of the things I'm doing. What am I doing? I'm trying to walk and hike every day, trying not to drink beer for a month or any alcohol and trying to do a little exercise YouTube thing every day for about 20 minutes. And so far, so good. Also watching a new movie and listening to a new album every day. So I get about 5 things. But we'll see how they go if I continue them all on into February. I will be happy with myself. Okay, confidence round trivia is starting right now. Here we go. It's the confidence round, and it's time for some random questions. Here's number one. What city has the oldest professional ballet company in the U.S.? What city has the oldest ballet company in the United States number one? Number two, what is Oprah's best friend's first name? Number two, what is Oprah's best Friends first name? Number three, what candy bar doubled in price in 1969 after costing a nickel for decades? What candy bar? Doubled in price in 1969 after costing a nickel for decades. Number four, what position do llamas hold at North Carolina's tell a more golf club? What position? Do llamas hold at North Carolina's talent more golf club?

America Oprah Youtube Llamas North Carolina Golf
A highlight from Home Cooking With Modern Family's Jesse Tyler Ferguson & Superstore's Nico Santos

Ask Me Another

01:39 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Home Cooking With Modern Family's Jesse Tyler Ferguson & Superstore's Nico Santos

"I'm Jonathan Colton, now here's your host, ophira eisenberg. Hello. Hello, Jonathan. How's it going? It's going pretty well. Let's go in pretty well. I have, I have a small, I have a small household complaint to share with you. Oh, can't wait. This makes me feel better about myself. It's fun. It's fun to hear other people complain about their households. Exactly. Yes. Well, let me ask you a question. Do you or your husband wear reading glasses? Yes. I should, but I refuse. Oh, okay. So good. Weird thing that I do. Out of vanity. No, I'm just on the cusp. So it's just what I'm really tired. I'm like, oh, I should put on those glasses, but for the most part, I can get by. So I fight it. Which I was told by my eye doctor is he was like, oh yeah, you can definitely fight it. You'll lose, but keep going. He keeps as long as you can. You know, I wear glasses all the time, so I don't have a reading glasses situation. But my wife wears contacts and wear reading glasses. And I think this is a common thing for everybody who's everybody that I know who wears reading glasses. Is that you get because they're cheap and you're losing them all the time. You get like a dozen of them, and you're just scatter them around the house. And so when you're like, where are my glasses? All you need to do is take a quick 180° spin and look on a couple of surfaces and chances are you will find a pair of glasses there. Put them on and then you realize your glasses were on your head or whatever. The whole time. Yeah. Well, you know how people have these fantasies of wilder sleeping.

Jonathan Colton Ophira Eisenberg Jonathan Wilder
A highlight from Health + Wellness: Mary Eliza Mahoney

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:37 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Health + Wellness: Mary Eliza Mahoney

"Hello, from wonder media network, I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is romantica. This month, we're talking about women who've made important contributions to the world of health and wellness. Today we're talking about a nurse celebrated as a pioneer in her field. She was the first African American to complete a professional training program as a nurse in the United States, and she spent her career dedicated to her community. Please welcome Mary Eliza Mahoney. Mary Eliza Mahoney was born in the spring of 1845 in Boston, Massachusetts. Her parents, Charles and Mary Jane Stewart Mahoney, were formerly enslaved in North Carolina before moving to Boston just before the Civil War. Mary was the eldest of three children. At the age of ten, Mary attended the Phillips school in Boston. After 1855, the Philips school became one of the first integrated schools in the country. At the time, black women were not permitted to attend university. But Mary knew early on that she wanted to be a nurse. She started working at the New England hospital for women and children when she was a teenager. For the next 15 years, Mary worked in many capacities at the hospital. She washed clothes, cleaned rooms, and worked in the kitchen before she was offered the opportunity to be a nurse's aid. This new role gave her the chance to learn the ins and outs of the nursing profession. The New England hospital for women and children also operated one of the first nursing schools in the United States. In 1878, at the age of 33, Mary was admitted to the hospital's professional graduate school for nursing. For each class, only one black woman and one Jewish woman were permitted to attend. The nursing program was intensive and lasted 16 months. During that time, the nursing students were in charge of wards of patients. Worked in private homes and attended day long lectures. They made morning rounds with doctors at the hospital who demanded the highest standards of care from the nursing students. By one description, students worked 16 hour days 7 days a week. Of the 42 students who entered the program in 1878. Only four completed it in 1879. Mary was one of the four to reach that finish line and became the first African American to earn a professional nursing degree. After receiving her degree, Mary didn't end up getting a job at a hospital. The discrimination toward black nurses made that nearly impossible. Instead, she became a private nurse. She focused on the needs of individual clients, many of whom were from wealthy white families. And she became well known for her patient and caring bedside manner. Up and down the east coast, this 90 pound ball of energy was praised for her work. Mary was also interested in organizing. She understood the need for nurses to work together to improve their situation. So in the 1890s, Mary joined what would eventually become the American nurses association. But as one of the only black members, she faced discrimination again, and she felt the group wasn't meeting the needs of the black community. So in 1908, she helped found what was then known as the national association of colored graduate nurses. Her goal was to break down the barriers, black nurses faced due to their race. The organization continued its work until 1951. Just a few years after black nurses were finally more openly permitted to join the American nurses association. Mary retired after 40 years in nursing. In 1923, she became ill with breast cancer. After three years of living with the disease, she died on January 4th, 1926. She was 80 years old. Mary was buried in Woodland cemetery in Everett, Massachusetts. In 1936, the national association of colored graduate nurses established the Mary Mahoney award. The award honored Mary's legacy as a nurse dedicated to others, who opened doors for other black women in nursing. The award is still given out today by the American nurses association. It's reserved for providers who, like Mary, advocate for more integration in the field of medicine.

Mary Eliza Mahoney Mary New England Hospital For Women Jenny Kaplan Mary Jane Stewart Mahoney Boston Phillips School Philips School United States Massachusetts National Association Of Colore North Carolina American Nurses Association Charles East Coast Woodland Cemetery Breast Cancer Everett
A highlight from Runoff after wildfires can contaminate drinking water

Climate Connections

01:07 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Runoff after wildfires can contaminate drinking water

"I'm doctor Anthony Liza Woods, and this is climate connections. Increasingly extreme wildfires are raging across the west, leaving behind baron chard areas and threatening drinking water. Jill oropesa is director of sciences for water quality services for four columns utilities in Colorado. She says in a healthy forest, trees and shrubs buffer the impact of rain on the ground. Pine needles in Detroit is on the forest floor help retain water. That is the sponge that soaks up and holds a lot of that moisture and allows the precipitation to percolate downwards. If this vegetation burns up, melting snow and rain run across the land instead of seeping into the soil. And as the water flows, it picks up ash, sediment and other debris. And those substances in the soil itself and the ash are dissolved and carried in the river and into reservoirs. Or it pays us as Fort Collins was forced to adjust its water treatment system to cope with influxes of

Anthony Liza Woods Jill Oropesa Sciences For Water Quality Ser Colorado Detroit Fort Collins
A highlight from AIAA SciTech SurprisesSustainability And Hypersonics In San Diego

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

01:08 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from AIAA SciTech SurprisesSustainability And Hypersonics In San Diego

"Our senior editor in the Colorado Springs bureau, which as I'm looking at him on the camera is his basement. Morning guy. Morning grave, yeah, given all the trade secrets away here. Yeah, sorry about that. Anyway, it's January. And every January, usually, go and I go to the AI tech conference, organized by the American institute of aeronautics and astronautics and probably the premier meeting of all the world's aerospace researchers and technologists. And if you've ever listened to us before going, I get quite excited when we go to site tech. But we've missed it for a couple of years because of COVID. But this year, they decided that they would have their first in person event for some time. I wasn't able to go because I was sitting freezing my butt off in the Woods of the shenandoahs, taking a break. But luckily guy was able to go in person. So guy, this was the first one for a while. COVID is still out there. How were things in San Diego? Well, first of

American Institute Of Aeronaut Colorado Springs San Diego
A highlight from Peter Boghossian | Beyond Woke & Having Impossible Conversations

Dose of Leadership

00:56 sec | 2 d ago

A highlight from Peter Boghossian | Beyond Woke & Having Impossible Conversations

"More on met pro later in this episode. On today's episode, doctor Peter bogosian. The first order of business is to just drill down on those terms. What do you mean by racist? And I do this in almost every conversation. What would it take for you to say they were a racist organization and they were not? Like what would that look like? What would it look like to you if they weren't? Because if you don't do that, you would just give them a piece of evidence. Like, oh, here's an article written by an expert that says they're not the Proud Boys or not racist. They'll say, well, that's just their ideologically captured too. That's bias. So then you have to set the conditions for the conversation before you have them. And in that context, the condition is, what would it take for you to change your mind about X? It's philosophy it's called the diffuser ability question. I am now convinced that's the most important question anybody can ever ask themselves. I used to believe the question was, why do you believe that? I no longer

Peter Bogosian
A highlight from Ayelet Fishbach || How to Motivate Yourself

The Psychology Podcast

00:50 sec | 2 d ago

A highlight from Ayelet Fishbach || How to Motivate Yourself

"It's important to understand that there are many ingredients and there are many factors that influence motivation. The idea that we can make least and only what's on the list counts. And everything that's on the list counts is a bit naive. Hello, and welcome to the psychology podcast. In this episode, I talked to award winning psychologist a yell at fishbach about the exciting science of motivation. How do we motivate ourselves to do anything? From her extensive research, I yell at shares with us for crucial strategies for successful behavior change. First, identify the right goals, second, avoid what she calls the middle,

A highlight from 44: Lost in the Wilderness Part 2: Hikers Found Dead

Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan

01:40 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from 44: Lost in the Wilderness Part 2: Hikers Found Dead

"Ago, my partner Kurt went camping alone at the hidden valley campgrounds at Joshua tree. In the middle of the night, he awoke to footsteps approaching his tent. He listened. It was definitely walking on two legs. It was definitely a person. Kurt called out hello, and the footsteps stopped. But after a few moments they started up again, getting closer to his tent. Kurt called out again and again, the footsteps stopped. And then started back up. Getting closer. Kurt, naked as a jaybird, scrambled to get his boots on, grabbed his knife, unzipped his tent and ran out wielding his knife. In my version, his manhood flaps about as he jumps up and down, whooping and hollering, trying to sound intimidating. There was no one there. Whoever it was who had been mere feet from Kurt's tent. Had somehow vanished. Without making a sound as they ran away into the desert night. The next day, as Kurt headed back to LA, he stopped at a local gas station. Behind the counter, there was a missing person flyer. A hiker had gone missing a couple weeks prior while camping nearby. I think I may have heard that guy near my tent last night, Kurt told the clerk who looked confused for a moment and then said, oh, I need to take that flyer down. They found him dead about a week ago. Where? Kurt asked. About a mile from his car at the hidden valley campgrounds. This episode isn't about ghosts. I've just been looking for an excuse to tell that story for 40 episodes.

Kurt Hidden Valley Joshua Tree LA
A highlight from Ep 37: Bear Grease [Render] - Waterfowlers, AGFC Director, and Guarding the Gate

Bear Grease

03:40 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Ep 37: Bear Grease [Render] - Waterfowlers, AGFC Director, and Guarding the Gate

"Hey guys, I want to take a minute and talk about something that I think is really important. Right now in the United States, the spring 2022 legislative agendas and public comment periods for state agencies are coming out. And as I hope you've heard, many have strong anti hunting and specifically anti predator hunting agendas. Washington state recently canceled the spring 22 bears season despite it being recommended by their fish and wildlife. Colorado bill SB 22 O three one is set to ban mountain lion bobcat and link's hunting, Arizona is experiencing a strategic push from the animal rights crowd to change current regulations about lying and bear hunting by flooding the public comment process. California has petitions filed to suspend bear hunting in the state until further population studies can be done. In Vermont, anti hunting groups are pushing for a full ban on the use of hounds in hunting and the list can go on. Years ago if you told me that hunting was strategically under attack, I would have called you an alarmist. Crying wolf when there wasn't one here. We all live in some version of cocoons with limited visibility of the wider nation. That cocoon is partly geographic, but mainly the cocoon is our own interest. When I started working with Barry Annie magazine in 2013, my eyes popped wide open when I saw bear hunting in the cross hairs of many states and I saw how the tools of bear management and the methods of take that make bear hunting viable had already been banned in many places, just as a short, non complete overview. California band, bear hunting with hounds in 2013 and mountain lion hunting in the 1990s. Washington state banned hounds and bait for bear in 1996, Oregon band bear hunting with hounds and bait in the mid 1990s. Colorado band bear hunting with hounds and bait in 1992 and 2021, New Jersey band all bear hunting completely on the basis of public opinion. Several years ago, we started saying that we've got to guard the gate. Guard the gate because predator hunting is the gate of the anti hunting community to come into the space of the North American model of wildlife conservation, which I might add is the most successful act of wild animal and habitat management on Planet Earth. Since the frontier days of America, there's always been a political and ideological divide between the urban and rural areas. The masses often have the attention of the politicians because of money and votes. And as I've always said, it's a one phase sale to convince someone with no history or knowledge of hunting that killing a bear or a predator is bad. It's a much more complex story to convince them that it's a good thing. And this is why we as hunters have to work harder than those that oppose us. And we should because we actually have stock in this thing. There is something that we've now seen work twice in the last year, and it's when hunters from all over the country, hunters of every stripe and creed participate in communicating with legislators and the powers that be. Last year, California Bill was submitted to ban bear hunting and the legislator was bombarded by people who love wildlife enough to know that hunting is good and it swayed the political process and the bill never made it to the floor, and just the last few months the public outcry hunters to reinstate the spring bear season in Washington, got the spring bear hunt back on the agenda, the commission and was recently discussed again. Inside of a democracy, the main tool that we have is our voices. We all know that and I urge us all to become more active participants in every way by

Barry Annie Colorado Washington California America Vermont Arizona Oregon New Jersey Bill