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A highlight from 6 YouTube Community Building Hacks You Didn't Know About #1989

Marketing School

05:22 min | 15 hrs ago

A highlight from 6 YouTube Community Building Hacks You Didn't Know About #1989

"Welcome to marketing school, the only podcast that provides daily top level marketing tips and strategies from entrepreneurs that practice what they preach and live what they teach. Let's start leveling up your marketing knowledge with your instructors, Neil Patel and Eric Sue. Today we are going to talk about 6 YouTube community building hacks that you didn't know about. So with YouTube, there's a lot of really cool things that you can end up doing that a lot of people don't end up doing. The first thing is, did you know you can actually use YouTube live to throw a vet? Like think about your own conference, your own virtual event. And doing it on YouTube live. It's a great way to build an audience. You can have it run around the clock like 8 hours or four hours or whatever it may be and just keep going. Bring in speakers, it'll build a community you'll get tons of engagement. It'll help you get more subscribers. And it'll help your future videos get much more engagement too. All right, number two is actually using the post section. So if you click on the community tab in YouTube and you click on the post section, when you are posting a new video, well, don't link to the new video, but you could actually hit a button to actually within the native YouTube studio app or the YouTube app itself. You can actually point directly to a video. And by doing that, people will see it people interact and you're going to have more impressions that way. Not only that, when you're posting something, you can put up a poll. And whoever's engaging with that poll, they're more likely to see future videos that you have popping up. So polls are really good, posting memes or images are really good as well. But this is underutilized feature that we didn't know about and we had our YouTube consultant Darren who worked out on mine valley help us with that. For example, Eric's talking about is when I record some of my videos, I'll talk about this affiliate marketing. If you're looking to learn the basics of affiliate marketing, just click here. And then they can click and they can engage with that video and pop around. That makes it really simple and causes more engagement. Another feature that causes quite a bit of community building that a lot of people don't use. And I don't really know why, is doing partnerships with other individuals on YouTube. So we all do interviews. Eric does his leveling up. And for some weird reason, I don't see too many people do it. They all want to just create their own videos or shorts and problems on YouTube. But if you can create videos with other people who are on YouTube, they'll promote it, you'll promote it. You both will start getting each other's followers and it'll gain quite quickly. And it'll just grow your community quite fast. And if you notice with my point, Eric's points are amazing as well, but the point I'm going to give including the last one, I'm just focusing on how you can get more comments and how you can get more subscribers. Yeah, number four, speaking of comments, this is more of a do as we say, not as we do. So, you know, we both try our best to respond to comments. But when you're starting out, especially when you're growing a child at a hundred or a thousand subscribers, the more you're responding to comments, the better because you're building that community. And these people will start to, when you're posting on the community tab as well, they're going to engage with you more. So you're building you're looking to build that hundred or a thousand true fans. And on your way up, 1010 thousand, 100,000 subscribers or so just making sure that you engage with people. As you get bigger and bigger, like Neil's basically at a million subscribers now, maybe it becomes a little difficult to manage every single comment. Yeah, we actually respond to every single comment. I try to go in there every single day and respond to comments and try. I try. I actually do it most of the time. Sometimes it's a little bit delayed, but it's there. The 5th tip is within your YouTube videos, engage with people and ask them to engage below. And here's what I mean by that. So let's say I'm recording a video talking about Google's algorithm update the latest one and talking about what happened, how you can recover from it. I may ask in the comments below, say, hey, did you get affected by Google's algorithm update? Let me know if you did in a bad way or a good way. And let me know how much your traffic increase or decrease by percentage wise. And tell me what industry and we can see if we can help you out. And by doing that, we'll do this will get a ton of comments and people in the community will start helping each other and being like, hey, how can we end up doing X, Y, and Z to end up growing? Yep. And then last but not least, there's a bunch more from where this came from. But when you think about your videos, well, you can actually add a pinned comment. You can actually add the first link in the description helps a lot, whatever you're call to action is and also the pinned comment helps a lot. So if you're trying to push them into your whether it's the community section or you're trying to push them into maybe a Facebook group or something like that, you can utilize those areas and you can also utilize the call to action at the end of your videos to get them to engage the community more. And give them an irresistible offer, right? So maybe you say, hey, if you joined a community, I'm going to give you, I don't know, $50 or something like that. I'm just making things up right now. A lot of people tend to forget, hey, at the very end of the video, the call to action also the pinned comments description as well. And you're trying to move them, move them forward, right? Because what you're doing with your YouTube videos is in essence, you're building an audience. But to take it a step further, you have to build a community because the community is actually people interacting with each other, trying to figure out how to do that. So that is it for today. Please leave us a rating review or subscribe to the podcast because it helps us grow. And we'll catch you later. We appreciate you joining us for this session of marketing school. Be sure to

Youtube Eric Sue Eric Neil Patel Darren Google Neil Facebook
A highlight from Becoming a Marketing Influencer -- Vivien Garns // Upfluence

MarTech Podcast

08:12 min | 17 hrs ago

A highlight from Becoming a Marketing Influencer -- Vivien Garns // Upfluence

"So far this week, viviana and I have discussed whether you should build an influencer marketing campaign, how you can match influencers with your audience, some tips for getting the best work out of your influencers. And yesterday we talked about how to monetize your influencer marketing campaigns. And today we're going to turn the table and talk about how and whether you should become an influencer. All right, here's the last installment of influencer marketing week with vivia, carnes, from affluence. Vivian, welcome back to the last episode of influencer week on the podcast. How do we flew by really fast? Friday is here and we're almost done. And today, honestly, is one of the topics I feel the most comfortable talking about, which is not necessarily from the brand perspective. What should you be doing? How should you be monetizing influencers? How do you work with them, but hey, you've got something to say. Should you become an influencer? I went through this myself. You know, how do you think about the way of plain janes and Joe's becoming the next Kim Kardashians of the world, the influencers? That question is going to be asked more every year. I don't exactly remember if a pool that I've seen, but I think it was primary school kids in the U.S. and 52% of them wanted to become influencers. So this is really something that a lot of new generation aspires to become is there are some little bit more metro listeners out there who are wondering if they still can be a good career opportunity. It's funny that you call it a career opportunity, I was sitting around with a friend of mine, Jordan Cooney, who's been a guest on this podcast. He was one of the regular guests of the voices of search podcast, the SEO podcast that I host and produce. And his kids are sitting around making YouTube videos and they're putting in work trying to build a YouTube following. So I understand that you need to run a business if you're actually going to be an influencer. And I think that there's maybe a step before that where you need an audience before you have to worry about sponsorship. So step one, Cooney kids. Here's Vivian's advice for how you can actually build an audience. Vivian, what should my future influencers listening to this podcast or the Cooney kids at home decide that they should be doing to start building a big enough following to actually merit having a business? The answer resides in content. You need to be able to produce high quality content very regularly to the point where it can be a full-time gig at some point. But very regularly and to have the discipline to not only put the content out there and only make sure that the content is great, but also progressively to optimize it. And the optimization will look different on depending on which platform you are operating on. You know, on YouTube, you will be very different guidelines that you share on Instagram on TikTok or whatever it is. So not only do you have to figure out what content to produce when and how and how frequently you have to figure out what does the algorithm reward. So you can really write that wave and really piggyback on this. That being said, producing content for the sake of producing content will not get you very far. I suspect. What you need to do is find your voice, find something you either good at with very passionate about something that you have opinions about or go a different route, which is the entertainment rack. You know, do something super creative something that's entertaining to the audience and pick an editorial line stick to it and try to perfect yourself in better yourself every time you release a new piece of content out there. So to me, that's really the crux of what your success will be to your ability to produce consistent. Great quality content. And then to polish it in a way that's really complement the algorithms so that social networks themselves can bring you to a next level. What I'm hearing is, first, you have to have an understanding what channel you're going to be working in. And you're going to experiment. You're going to create some content. You're going to see what works, what feels authentic, where you're getting a signal. I created hour long podcasts when I first started the martech podcast and people listened to a quarter of them. So I cut them in half and people listened to half of them. So I cut them in half again and people listened to the whole damn thing. Turns out people only listen to marketing podcasts for 15 minutes. So why would I create hour long podcasts? Once I shorten them, I started to have more content. I started to basically get a better pulse on what people were interested in. And I was getting better results. So you're going to do a little experimentation up front to figure out not only what platform you should be in, what content you should be creating, but also the format of that content. And eventually with trial and error and with hard work and dedication, businesses are work, even if you're an influencer, you're going to start building a following just based on the repetition. Now, at what point do you consider an influencer and influencer? I know we talked about pico nano micro macro mega influencers. There's like a million different flavors of influencers these days. At what point does it become a business? The way we define influencers at influence, which is a very personal definition. We have the hard first rule that 1000 followers. At 1000 followers, clearly not yet the business, at least it don't necessarily fall into this full time. It can be a nice hobby, something good to do on the side. The ability to transform this into a business with vary depending on the kind of vertical you're on, some verticals are more lucrative than others. But I'd say in the 5800 K range, we start to see people who are making this full time. Sometimes who even have an assistant slash managers slash person who does the editing who's basically Jack of all trades, right? And as we keep growing, they start forming a team. But yeah, on Instagram, at least on Instagram, somewhat comparable in the 50 K plus, you start to have something that's monetizable and depending on where you live depending on what your cost of life is, that might be your business or not. But things start to happen. You start to be really noticeable by brands. And especially if you have a really smart strategy to go after brings yourself, you can make somebody. So if you're on the social networks, tens of thousands of people following you and you can start to think about monetization, not every channel is the same. If you're on LinkedIn, you have 10,000 followers. You're doing pretty good. If you're a podcaster, when I started somebody told me, if you have more than 10,000 downloads a month, you can make more than beer money. I think that that's probably about true. And then you look at YouTube, subscriber is very different than somebody who's a follower because they're getting all of your content so less subscribers. Those are more valuable than some of the other channels. You mentioned, okay, once you've built the requisite following, you've got enough eyeballs and ear holes that are paying attention to you, having a smart strategy to find your sponsors how easy is it to start monetizing and influence your business and how much money you're influencers are making these days. I would start to build a monetization strategy. I would start by reaching out to the brands I'm already a client of friends I like products I like that I use, I would start to discreetly or less and less discretely integrated into my content. And then use that as a piece of leverage to reach out to the marketing team of the brand I like to say, hey, let's partner. I've done this. This is great. This is the kind of response I got. These are the numbers. Now I'd like to be paid, please. And one way to do that is, I think it was a couple of years back. What's the fastest growing job title in LinkedIn, which used to be at least product marketing manager? Influencer marketing manager. Damn that in 2018 is something. So a job title that virtually didn't exist 5 years ago has been a growing extremely fast. So you know if you do some snooping on LinkedIn, finding the company page of the company you like going into the people category trying to type keywords influence from marketing manager gross market manager of these kind of people. And then do cold out to each thing a, I've done this with armor numbers. This is what I do, let's work together and see what they have to say. I think that's one way to yourself go get your first partners. And as you get your first brand partnerships, you can start having immediate, where you say, oh, these are the collaborations I've done with brands XY and Z even in the first few months could have been completely not paid for the prospects don't necessarily have to know that. But you know that starts building your track recording. These are the brands I've worked with is the performance I've delivered and try really to put yourself in the shoes of the marketers. So if you listening to the market podcast, you're doing extremely well, but you understanding what their day to today what their pain points are. So in that case, you can try to put forth a this is my matrix maybe CD. This is delivered as an output for that run for this and really try to take away the

Vivian Vivia Kim Kardashians Youtube Jordan Cooney Viviana Carnes Janes Cooney Instagram JOE U.S. Linkedin Influencer
A highlight from How to use NFTs as a Reward Mechanism with Lind Dai #1988

Marketing School

08:17 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from How to use NFTs as a Reward Mechanism with Lind Dai #1988

"A business most important thing is timing. It seems like you started this with crypto kitties, right? You start to really work on this. And then timing was perfect for this one. Can you speak to how you will learn what you've learned about timing over the years? Because in some cases, you missed in some cases you really hate it. But in this case, you got it spot on. Yeah, I think it's conviction, but also evolving. The NFT OG is definitely dapper labs on crypto kitty to NBA top shot. And crypto heady was stalled out very early on because if they're in throughput was just like, it wasn't taking up 90% of the processing only theorem. Can you explain what kitties are forever? So crypto kitty was the first example. So N of ts is just basically a technology that can digital digitally authenticate anything. It's easier to digitally authenticate like a digital item. So crypto kitty is this game that is developing 2017. This is a game where an NFT is represented by a unique cat. So the AI just generates this cat. It can breathe with other cats. So you put two N of T together, it became a new NFT. And it's all randomized. There's probability involved. So it's actually a game. And then if you get a super rare car, you can sell it to other people in the game for more eth. So that was super popular and it was the first example of every cat is super unique and it's recorded on the blockchain and it can never be changed and that is a probability gamification element where I can get a super rare cat and then there is a marketplace where other people want this cake and buy this cap on me and there is a digital currency that can be transacted. I can make money on this digital record, digital unique record. I want to talk about the business implications around NFTs. But with one of you guys have raised probably one of the bigger seed rounds I've seen $65 billion. And money's being put to good use right now, I'm sure. So can you speak to the implications around NFTs right now and how businesses can use them practically? And I'll give you an example. Last week at dinner, I was sitting next to work for me. Now he's GaryVee's brand directory. So we for GaryVee's new book that's coming out next month for if you buy 12 books will give you one NFT and they sold a million copies of the book so far. So that's a really practical business application. So if you have any examples that'd be great too, but if you want to speak to it, feel free. Yeah, I want to talk a little bit about the evolution of natives can be anything. So just take that away from right now. It doesn't have to be cat. It doesn't have to be just art. So if you're not like a 3D artist or if you don't have a famous YouTube meme, it's totally can still apply to your business. We basically thought about the way the first wave was crypto kitties and NBA top shops, which is gamified NFTs, which has caused all the sports car collectors already understand that behavior of opening a pack getting a few random cards in this case is digital cards that's represented by NFTs and some of them are rare, so there's a chance for you to get something that's very valuable. You can resell it. So the second iteration was like, all right, you proliferated with R because previous to the digital artwork is impossible to authenticate. You can just right click and copy the jpeg. Now with NFTs, you can, right? And digital artists has been starving for this. So we basically did the third way, which is music. Music is more complicated. There's a piece of digital art. There's usually one creator, so you can just get that person to sign over their rights to the owner and then you're good. Digital music. It's every song. There's especially songs these days. There's 14 samples and many different producers and I wrote the war two does and that and there's 22 rights holders. So we basically using blockchain technology to manage that better. Now, the next wave is really GaryVee is like way ahead on this. So Vayner is consulting with Anheuser Busch and Pepsi and tonsil major companies. Some have launched a project has not. If you think about NFTs is really about community. So this is how you should think about. So NFTs is not about selling a piece of media or a piece of psalm music. It's about how the community identity belongs. So if you think about passion points, people love our people love music, people love sports. That's why these areas proliferated already. People also love brands. Everyone's brands here are loved by your community. So now, what can you do with that? So NFTs is just a way of really rewarding your most loyal customers. And there's two things. One is rewarding your most royal customers identify who they are, so you can actually build a direct relationship ongoing with them, which is kind of cliche. But like the second thing, which has never happened before, is NMT is a way for your customers for your most royal community members to participate in your success. So if you think about the example in music, which can apply to brands and everything else too. Everything a musician do and everything that brands do up to this point is like a one way street pay me. I'll give you a concert experience pay me by my ticket. I'll give you my album, listen to my streaming, pay for all these services. And you get like a great experience or a product that you can use for a while and then it's done and you had to pay me a game for the next thing I'm going to do. So NFT changes that dynamic. MT basic is can I envision a longer term relationship where this is an artist can say, this is like a lifetime ticket to my concert. Every for as long as Doja Cat can say, or less like, do you know less of a drop right now? Doja Cat and all these artists. And say, hey, by this NFT, it represents a pair of tickets to every concert ever going to. And then somebody can pay like a $100,000 a $1 million for whatever. And two things. One, you identify. That's your biggest customer. That's somebody that I'll build someone or that's willing to pay a premium for the same product for the same product everybody else is doing. And they're paying ahead of time. But what's interesting, if they support your brand, they support this artist and an artist gets more famous. Doja Cat is going to win multiple Grammys in the next Grammy. She's going to be even bigger and at some point you're going to be like, I am so tired of going to Doja Cat consul, or I'm just too busy. I can sell the NFT. I can sell to MT for probably more than what I paid for because of my support and patronage. The brand and the artist got stronger. So now you're participating. You never were able to participate in the brand success before other than buying stock. But that doesn't really work for private companies. This is a way for your customer to actually participate in your success. And they become your biggest advocates. The people that bought the Doja Cat NFT on our platform, that bought a lesso N of T on our platform are out there telling everyone why this is the greatest artist ever. So you basically now have gotten yourself 10,020 thousand passionate ambassadors that are rewarded by not you don't have to pay them anymore. They pay you to be your biggest advocate. And then they are rewarded monetarily when they saw their empties. All right, so I hope you enjoyed the excerpt from the growth accelerator Miami and now you have a sense of what it looks like. So if you want to learn more about it and how to actually be a part of the event where there are 7 to 9 figure founders and investors hanging out sharing tactics, collaborating with each other, go to marketing school, the IO slash life that's our VE. And you can apply there and we'll catch you later. We appreciate you joining us for this session of marketing school. Be sure to rate review and subscribe to the show and visit marketing school dot IO for more resources based on today's topic, as well as access to more episodes that will help you find true marketing success. That's marketing school dot IO. Until next time, class dismissed.

Garyvee NBA Doja Cat Vayner Anheuser Busch Tonsil Major Companies Pepsi Youtube Grammys Grammy Miami
A highlight from How to Monetize Your Influencer Marketing Campaigns -- Vivien Garns // Upfluence

MarTech Podcast

08:39 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from How to Monetize Your Influencer Marketing Campaigns -- Vivien Garns // Upfluence

"Use technology to drive business results and achieve career success. Will on earth, the real world experiences of some of the brightest minds in the marketing and technology space, so you can learn the tools tips and tricks, they've learned along the way. Now here's a host of the martech podcast, Benjamin Shapiro. Welcome to influencer marketing week on the martech podcast. This week we're going to publish episode every day talking about how you can maximize your influencer marketing strategies. Joining us for influencer marketing week is Vivian carnes, who is the co CEO of upfluence, which is the only influencer marketing software with a dedicated offering for ecommerce brands, and they help brands drive online sales through organic influencer partnerships. And in addition to providing us with our guest today, influences also a sponsor of the martech podcast. So far this week, Vivian and I have talked about whether you should build an influencer marketing campaign. How you can match influencers with your audience and yesterday we talked about the tips for getting the best work out of your influencers. Today we're going to continue the conversation talking about monetization and how you can monetize your influencer marketing campaigns. All right, here's the fourth installment of influencer marketing week with vivia, carnes, from affluence. Villian, welcome back to influencer marketing a week on the mar tech podcast. Still a pleasure to be on. Thank you for having me. Always a pleasure to connect to glad to have you back on the show. Wonderful. Likewise. We've covered a lot of ground so far this week talking about who influencer marketing is for how to find the right influencers. And yesterday we talked about some of the operations of making sure that you're working with influencers and my takeaway is you got to look for people that have scale, you have to have people that are incented in the right way to do the best possible work. And you have to understand that cadence and the operations of how they work to make sure that they are delivering the right message for your brand. At the end of the day, you have to be able to evaluate and influencer marketing campaign to make sure you're not only getting what you set out to get, but that it's worthwhile investment. So talk to me about how you think about monetization. How do you think about conversion rate evaluation? What's the way to make the most out of your influencer campaigns? As always, the obvious metrics because at the end of the day it's the funnel. How many followers are likely to see that content towards their average propensity to engage with our content was suspected click through rates or whatever the destination is about campaign. So marketers are very good at seeing things that funnel. And I think that's a strength. And it definitely applies to people in marketing. That being said, there are also some lesser known metrics that can really bring home the bacon. I can drive a great number of conversions. And let me share with you a couple. One of the metrics in the industry tends to be engagement rate. So likes plus comments divided by number of followers that's metric that's marketers fits into like it a lot because it used to be a decent proxy between the number of followers, which doesn't really mean anything and you know the number of conversions, which is really hard to predict or virtually impossible to predict. That being said engagements are not created equal. And what we started to do is to decompose the like rates in the comment rate, which can be extremely different. And when you think about it, the implication from a follower to like a post versus to make a right to thoughtful comment is vastly different, right? One will only take a click and another one will take some thoughts will take some touches on the keyboard and it's going to show a lot more dedication from before. And what we've seen is that this is actually good predictor for an influencer's actual liability to a need for audience and to then drive cells at the end of the day. That's one thing that we've seen that has a direct impact on our eye. Another thing that has a direct impact rates a little bit obvious, but the rate at which you're following growth. What we've seen is that influencers who are rising stars. They're following these grain really fast. Even though fuller's per se does not have any direct impact on our it actually has negative impact because influencers tend to build the brands based on number of followers. They have and not necessarily to be in the home sales, right? So that increases the cost that does not necessarily increase the return. So that's a little bit counterintuitive based on that to see that a very fast rising influencer can actually have a positive impact on the right. And the reason is because they're not necessarily aware of how much we could charge based on their new flow accounts as opposed to prior. So other things being equal, they are going to be a little bit cheaper for the same or better performance that someone else would. So it's an oftentimes overlooked thing. Another thing that I like really very much is the audience overlap. So what's the overlap between the communities of a different influencers I'm going to activate in one specific campaign? Let's say I have ten influencers. There's two strategies you can have. A strategy in which you maximize reach and strategy in which maximize frequency. Because layman's terms, the greater view of the lab, the more the follower is going to see a post that talks about your brand. If there's a huge overlap between the brands, when I scroll through my Instagram feed, I'm going to see a number of times different posts from different. And what we've seen is that this increases the ability to drive conversions as opposed to the other strategy, which is to say, hey, you know, if I'm spending money, I want as many people as possible to see my content. So I want to minimize the overlap. In that case, it maximizes the reach, however, it does not necessarily reflect positively on an influencer's ability to generate sales. So these are little lesser known tips and tricks to really maximize your ability to monetize your campaign. That's interesting. A couple of the metrics seem counterintuitive, where you're talking about the engagement rates, which is likes plus comments divided by followers. And to me, you know, like, doesn't mean somebody's going to buy something in a comment, which is deeper engagement, doesn't mean somebody's going to buy something. So I would make the argument, it should be likes plus open parentheses, comments, times three close parentheses divided by followers were comments are weighted more heavily. But those are engagement with the post it didn't necessarily an indication that somebody has been influenced that it's not a click. It's not getting someone into the funnel, it's platform engagement to me. Those are the metrics that are good for the creator, not necessarily good for the brand. Obviously, you're looking at visibility and that matters the most. The second metric you mentioned follow a growth is interesting to me because this really is if somebody is growing your rates are, hey, we decided that you were going to be our influencer when you had a thousand followers. Now you have 10,000 followers. We paid the 1000 follower rate so we got ten times more than we bargained for good for us and we got in at the right time. That's sort of like finding the shooting stars. The third metric you mentioned is interesting as well. The overlap and to me, that's one of the things I feel like most people don't think about, which is frequency of the message. Everybody who's listened to this podcast knows, or if you don't, you have not been paying attention, that HubSpot is a very important sponsor for the show. As well. So if you're listening to this in January, February, you're probably going to be well aware of who upfluence is. But you know, if we had a sponsor that was only around for a week or two, our whole audience isn't going to be aware that that brand was a sponsor. It's just not a big enough frequency, even though we have large reach, it's like, you know, getting one Facebook ad across the entire globe doesn't mean that everybody's gonna be aware of your brand. So the question that comes to monetization and at the end of all of these metrics, there is no clear evaluation of like, hey, there's exposure. There's reach. There's frequency. These are all, let's call them brand metrics. We have a general sense of engagement. How do you figure out whether a creator is actually driving sales? How are you attributing the value that you're creating mostly if you're working on an affiliate basis with them you have to capture the sales? How are you thinking about getting actually into the funnel and moving beyond just like how much influence did we have to what sales were driven? Before I answer your question, just let me say that I really like absence to be comfort to hotspots. And I hope we can get to $1 billion in AR as well. That's the parenthesis is closed to get back to your question, which is a great one again. Two methods are generally used from social media to do attributable sales. One is track links. If you have one, it's coupon code. And you can not use track links on any social networks. This number of social networks do not allow you to embed links or at least not, for example, Instagram in a feed post, you can not embed a link in the description. So the link will not be clickable and the click through rates are going to be terrible because the person has to copy paste linking their browsers. You had now used to be the story swipe ups with allow you to do that. No, it's stickers. There

Benjamin Shapiro Vivian Carnes Upfluence Vivia Carnes Vivian Fuller Layman Hubspot Facebook Instagram
A highlight from Crypto and the Future of Business: A Primer

Social Media Marketing Podcast

05:13 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Crypto and the Future of Business: A Primer

"You forgot to mention longtime friend. I did say that. You did say, okay, 'cause we go way back now. Yeah, Joe and I go way, way back and for those that are listening to the social media marketing podcast, well actually you've been on both of those shows. We've known each other for a very, very long time. But for those that are listening to the other show that I'm launching, you probably know Joel because of his work in the crypto world. And today that's what we're here to talk about we're here to talk about crypto web three. What it all means for business and Joel, what I want to start with is a little bit of your story specifically as it relates to you getting into crypto. Because I remember, I don't know if it was 2016 or 2017. You'd tell me about this thing that I thought was crazy. So start wherever you want to start, how the heck did you journey into crypto and just kind of tell us the story? Yeah, man, well, thanks for having me on and happy to share with you and hopefully some will benefit from my story that which I've learned in the mistakes that I've made along the way. You know, I remember hearing about Bitcoin is early as 2012 for 13 and at that time there was other things happening in my life. And usually I'm drawn to the bright shiny objects. You know me. I like to play with all the toys and to me you would think the sound of digital money would have really captured my attention. And it didn't because I really didn't understand it. And I was preoccupied with other things. And so I kind of just ignored it. And it wasn't until 2016 that I started hearing about it again and some friends were asking me, you know, what do you think is Bitcoin? I don't get it. I don't know. During the 2016 elections, I would have a lot of conversations online with my friend Travis Wright, turns out we were very politically aligned and every day it was one question or another about what was happening in the elections and the political arena. And then of course the election happened and our attention turned to cryptocurrency and our daily conversation shifted from politics to this Bitcoin thing. And what do you think of this thing Ethereum? And I finally understood it. The lights went on. It was actually at a conference in Denver. It was Ken mcarthur's impact factor event. I was there and my friend Daven Michaels was there. And I go way back with Daven and Daven started talking to me about crypto. And I finally paid attention and he helped explain to me how Bitcoin mining works. For me, that was really a huge block to understanding the power of Bitcoin. And once I understood what Bitcoin mining was and how Bitcoin was created, the lights over my head just it was like fireworks went off because you know I was there in the beginning of the web. I built my first website back in 1995 and there was something in my understanding of Bitcoin and cryptocurrency that reminded me of when I discovered the World Wide Web. I thought, oh my gosh, this feels smells taste looks exactly like that that's happening all over again. And so I went down the rabbit hole and Travis and I would have these daily conversations around cryptocurrency and because the conversations were so frequent, one day in July, effect was July 16th, 2017. He sent me a message on Facebook Messenger. And it was half sarcastic. It was when are we going to start the Joel and TW crypto show? But the moment he said it, I said, I'm calling you right now, because it landed on me like a ton of bricks. I called him I said we should do this. You know, we're not experts. We're not financial advisers. We're not going to tell people what to buy. We're just learning about this ourselves. What if we made our journey together a public journey and brought people along with us? We learned they learned, we talked to people who are smarter than us. And let's figure out what this is all about. And so two days later, we launched the bad crypto podcast, not because crypto is bad, but because we didn't know what we were talking about and because we're not only seasoned broadcasters and speakers, but we're also adult children. And we like to make jokes. And so there's a lot of bad dad jokes and bad crypto. And it turned out the timing was really ideal because it was before a massive bull run happened in 2017 and into early 2018. And there wasn't anything like what we were doing out there because all of the shows were more technical and in high minded and we came into the space. And we're like just two dudes talking crypto in a really resonated with people. The show instantly took off and as of right now, we are four and a half years into doing the podcast and now we actually know a thing or two. Yeah, and it's amazing. I listened to the podcast pretty darn religiously. Sometimes you guys cover the news, sometimes you interview experts. What is this done for your perspective of everything? I mean, because obviously just started as a fun project, but it's clearly so much more than that now. So tell me a little bit more about what are you doing as a result of starting this podcast now?

Joel Daven Travis Wright Ken Mcarthur Daven Michaels JOE Bitcoin Denver Travis Facebook
A highlight from #429: 6 High Performance Habits To Transform Your Life & Business with Brendon Burchard

Online Marketing Made Easy with Amy Porterfield

01:15 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from #429: 6 High Performance Habits To Transform Your Life & Business with Brendon Burchard

"See any porterfield show up. Again, and again and again and again and they're influenced and empowered by it. Just by you doing you. And so if you want to influence other people, learn to shape their thoughts, challenge them and role model the way. If you do that, you have developed more influence. I'm Amy porterfield, ex corporate girl turned CEO of a multi 7 figure business. But it wasn't all that long ago that I lacked the confidence, the budget, and the time to focus on growing my small but mighty business. Fast forward past many failed attempts and lessons learned, and you'll see the business I have today, one that changes lives and gives me more freedom than I ever thought possible. One that used to only exist as a daydream. I created the online marketing made easy podcast to give you simple actionable. Step by step strategies to help you do the same. If you're an ambitious entrepreneur or one in the making, who's looking to create a business that makes an impact and a life you love, you're in the right place friend. Let's get started. I

Amy Porterfield Porterfield
A highlight from 5 Key Questions to Ask To Improve Your Content By 10x #1987

Marketing School

03:11 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from 5 Key Questions to Ask To Improve Your Content By 10x #1987

"To optimize your site for load time. And one easy way to do it is use the host that Eric and I use dream host to just go to dream host or Google it, find it, check it out, and it's a great way to improve your load time. Today we are going to talk about 5 key questions to ask to improve your content by ten X. So if you survey people and you understand what you can improve on, in theory you'll do better. And we're gonna get started and I'm gonna give you question number one. How can I make my content better? It's that simple. If you just ask them and they'll end up telling you a lot of people ignore it, but a portion of the people that you ask will respond and they'll tell you what they don't like and what you can improve. They don't always tell you how you can make it better. A lot of times they'll tell you what they don't like, but then you can just be like, okay, if I fix this interior making it better. That's the first question to ask. Second question is to follow up to this one. I always like asking this open ended question, which is, is there anything else you'd like to add? So maybe right after that question, and you'll ask, how can we make this content better? Is there anything else that you'd like to add? And that can be an optional one. You probably don't want to make it required, but that would be number two. Number three, who has the best content in your space, right? So let's say if you're an SEO, who has a best SEO content that you love. And if you want, you can also say other than me. List one of my competitors. And when people start telling you which competitors, you can check out their content and see what they're doing that you're not. And that'll help you make it better. Number four, what's something and this is if you can do this in person even better, but what's something you're uncomfortable with telling us about our content, right? So when you say something uncomfortable, they're actually getting to the roots of what they're feeling. Sometimes I ask this in person to people that are working directly with me or I'll say, hey, what's something you really want to say to me, but you're uncomfortable to say. And you can kind of phrase it that way. And they'll really hopefully they'll hit you hard. Another thing that I like doing, I don't do this constant, but every once in a while, I'll run exit pop ups surveys on my content that show up if someone tries to leave within the first 5 seconds. And I'll literally ask in their hey, why are you leaving? Why aren't you willing to read the content? What do I need to change to get you to read it? And a lot of times people say things like, oh, I could tell that the article isn't relevant to me, or it's not going to help me out. And what you'll typically find is they'll give you feedback that will help you improve your headlines. And what you'll find is 8 out of ten people read your headlines but only two out of ten will read the rest of your content. So you gotta work on improving your headlines, but that feedback will help you craft amazing headlines that can help people to stay and keep reading. Cool. So marketing school, the IO slash improve, we're actually crafting a survey for this one because someone left me a gem of a bit of feedback that Neil forwarded over to me. So I'd like to figure out how we can get better overall and then also how I can get better. Also have meal can get better. So marketing school, the IO slash improve. And we'd love to hear from you just to make this experience even better. So that's it for today. And we'll catch you later. We appreciate you joining us for this session of marketing school.

Eric Google Neil
A highlight from Tips For Getting the Best Work From Influencers -- Vivien Garns // Upfluence

MarTech Podcast

07:57 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Tips For Getting the Best Work From Influencers -- Vivien Garns // Upfluence

"About not only whether you should do influencer marketing, how to find influencers, but also how to get the best work out of them. Yesterday we talked through who to work with how to find them how to do the outreach and let's say you find your 5 or ten influencers to run your test campaign, and now you know who you're going to be working with. What's next? How do you figure out how to get the best work out of them? How do you keep them motivated? Will be some nuances depending on the kind of objective that you have for your campaign and the chemist strategy you're implementing, of course. But let's assume for the sake of this hypothetical conversation that we are trying to pursue conversions. We are an ecommerce company or a company that sells online can be retail can be a brand GTC brand, whatever it is. And we want to generate sales directly. There's one arbitrage what you need to make is how much control you want to exert other the entire process. And here is basically two extremities to that spectrum. There's the control freak extremity, which we see a lot into more traditional brands, especially in the luxury industry where messaging is very important branding is very important. And the control freak will say, I want to improve everything that will go live. I want my boss to approve this. I want his boss to improve it. I want my bosses Boston to approve it. And nothing gets published before that happens. So it's going to be a very long day to use brief ten pages plus with the do's and don'ts with everything that's expected from the relationship. And every stage of the way will be processed and will be approved. So the content will be collected approved. Then publication instructions will be given so that the right hashtags direct track things are very difficult. So that's great because you can have absolute mastery over your message. And everything will be on brand, which is not necessarily the case when you work with influencers. However, being very rigid in the way you work with creators, they tend to charge you for it. If they agree to a number of revisions, you have agree to really give in control to the editorial. That's something we're going to charge you extra for. The other downside is creators, they know what works. They know the audience. You know what works for them. So they're in a context where the content they naturally would produce tends to perform at a certain level, which is why as when you reached out to them. But forcing them into a certain type of creative will not necessarily work as well. So not only do you deteriorate your cost, the investment part of your right, you also deteriorate the return. So it could be a double negative here. On the other end of the spectrum, he has the full freedom meaning, I'm just sending a bunch of products to creators. We can do whatever we want. We can even speak in the negative lights if the one that will bring some degree of credibility to what I do and that's it. So it's a very fast process. You can really scale your programs very large volumes of influencers. But you can get some drug backtrack. You can get some countries who will not talk about your product. And then you wasted a $100 shipping occurs to that creator. Or some influencers might talk negatively about your product and so on and so forth. So you are more exposed to what goes like in that sense. All right, so there's a spectrum here based on the amount of control you have. And generally, if you are applying more influence on the creator, if you're basically telling them what they should post when they should post and how they should post, expect to pay more for that. And on the flip side, if you're giving the creator more creative control, you probably gonna be moving faster, but you're not necessarily going to be in control of what's going to be said. And so I guess it's kind of like anything. You could pick two, fast, cheaper, good. And in this case, it's not fast cheap and good. It's control pace and authenticity, basically. Where do you land on how much control a brand should have over what an influencer says? I've heard different opinions, you know, I understand the Louie Vuitton of the world wants their product to only be shown in a specific light because it's a luxury brand. And on the flip side for most brands, authenticity is what matters, right? Finding the right match for the right channel. Should you be controlling or should you let your influencers just do what they do? Obviously, the truth is somewhere in between, right? But to me it would be more to the freedom end of the spectrum rather than the other control. And there's a smart way to assert control as well. One thing that I've seen some of our clients do really successfully is to let the influencer do this thing, but to make available an expert from the brand to do a Q&A or to intervene in one of their stories or to actually add value to what the creator is doing. So that the creative is still very on brand wisdom, but the brand can make sure that any technical aspects of your product or anything very specifically won't know about their product can be said in addition, you know, by bringing additional value as opposed to basically beating up the influencer into submission. So I think that if you are a very control oriented company, because you have to, there are some good ways there are some smart ways to actually exert control over the narratives and also the talking points that you really want to be out there. I can tell you as somebody who works with brands as a creator, there's nothing more frustrating than a brand coming to you and saying, here's the ad that we want you to read to your audience, which you've spent your career building and we want you to say it this way in this tone because this is our brand guidelines. Now I understand brands want to be positioned in a specific way, but like I've had sponsors come back to me and be like, you didn't really influence these words while you were reading the script exactly the way that we wanted you to read it and look at some point you just want your sponsors to be happy and fine, you redo it and it can be an iterative process, but on some point, there's part of me that's like, hey, this is my audience I'm talking to. And I am the one who has the relationship with them. I should be able to say things in my own tone. What was me sometimes I have to re-record ads, but the moral of the story is there's obviously a balance in a working relationship that you need to strike with your influencers. There's also the question of incentives. How do you structure not only the content that you're going to be creating, but the incentives you have to have the influencers go above and beyond just actually producing the creative and really put in the work to build relationships and express the value of your brand to their audience. For instance, if it's a fantastic tool and we can really make or break your campaign. Of course, assuming that you want authenticity, which is a must, putting your product in front of the influencer is an absolute necessarily sometimes budget that you will need some extra inventory to be able to send to influencers so they can actually use it in situation and then document it in that way it's going to work best. That's usually a component that's not necessarily pure monitoring, but that definitely has to be accounted for in the way you want to build your campaign. Number one number two then is the topic of money. People do pure sponsored post campaigns. People do preor product, people do make some books sometimes. And the truth is, the more money you have to offer to influencers, the greater the response rate is going to if I reach out to influence, I am going to give you a $1 million, my activation rates is going to go through the roof. But at the same time, our eye is going to be absolutely awful. So again, you know, there's a neurons to find and the truth is somewhere in between. How do I pay something that's fair and to be incentivizing public creators to work with me to do his best and to go about and beyond as opposed to something that doesn't bankrupt my business in here? Something that we've seen work really well is commission based work. So you can add maybe a flat fewer split because that influencer is going to put into work is going to produce the content and it's not exactly a logical they would be compensated for that. But then for the successor, you can bring if this confident in his ability to bring conversions to bring new clients, you can always put an incentive at basically on an athlete. Any new client, but you can refer using this coupon code using this track links with clients that we can actually attribute to you as an influencer who will pay you ten bucks or will pay you $20 from the GMV that you generate. Or whatever it is, but something that really aligns the interest of everyone with the branding name filter. We've seen in our

Boston
A highlight from Why You Should Remove Yourself From The Business (And How) #1986

Marketing School

05:06 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Why You Should Remove Yourself From The Business (And How) #1986

"To optimize your site for load time. And one easy way to do it is use the host that Eric and I use dream host to just go to dream host or Google it, find it, check it out, and it's a great way to improve your load time. Today we are going to talk about why you should remove yourself from the business and how. So I've removed myself from most of my businesses, and I have one simple way of doing. You know, everyone's gonna tell you hire people better than you. And that's simple to say, but it's actually hard to do. The key to removing yourself from your business is hire people who have done it before and more successfully than you. That's actually the trick. And I know that's similar to what I said earlier, just hire people better than you, but it's not that simple. What you need to do is go on LinkedIn, find people who are doing what you are doing, whether it's marketing or whether it's being a CEO for your competitors. And ideally, at least two of the competitors, hopefully there are both successful if they were most successful than they're probably not the right candidate. And you want to see them climb in the ranks. What I mean by that is maybe they started off as a human manager, they became a vice president, then a CEO. That shows that the company found valuable to keep promoting him. Then the next company, maybe they start off as a CEO, the company grew, and then it sold. And then you would be the third company if you can convince them to join you. You're going to have to pay them well, potentially give them some equity and pay more than what your competitors are paying. But that's my model. That's how you reach move yourself from business. And just because someone successful in a similar industry doesn't mean they'll be successful in yours. So I have ad agency. It was called NP digital. My CEO used to be how to operations at eye crossing, which eventually sold to Hearst. And they had a good exit. I think was from $400 million. There's another ad agency in the digital marketing space. Then he was a CEO of kovari, that got acquired by densu. And he had a good exit there. And he grew the company from being small to around 50 million a year in revenue. Then he worked his way up all the way to the president of I prosecute, which is a division of densu. And they do supposely somewhere around 5, 600 million pounds a year in revenue, somewhere around there. But they're good sized agency with I think 4000 plus employees. So he worked his way up big agency again, three companies experience in my industry. He led up two of them, and we're just like, all right, four times a charm. But they don't even need to be at three competitors beforehand. If they did, well, at two of them, that's good enough. You can be the third time. Yep. So what I'll say, I'll try to go a little more theoretical here. What Neil says works. And I know those of you that are starting out are like, oh, how am I supposed to get there? Well, here are a couple of things here's how you should think about it to get to that level. So people talk about working in the business. People talk about working on the business. So when you're in the business, you're actually an agency wise you're fulfilling the work. When you're working on the business, you are really operating from more strategic level, and you're not dealing with client fires. You're not dealing with sales calls, that type of stuff, right? So there's working in the business, and then people talk about you want to work on the business. From our mutual friend, Roland Fraser, he talks about working above the business. And a lot of people talk about that, but this is where I learned this concept from him. But when you work above the business, that's when you're truly out of it. Because even when you're working on the business, you're still kind of getting dragged into the day to today a little bit. But you want to work above the business. And that's kind of what we're talking about here. And so in the early days, maybe let's say you get to 5, ten, 15, 20 people or so what I used to like to do at that level is say, hey, you know what, I'm just going to disappear and say, I'm going on vacation. So I've gone on vacation for like two weeks or so. I'm probably still working. But basically like no contact with me. And you just kind of see what breaks. And that tells you what the holes are. And so you slowly figure out how to plug those holes. This is where I'm kind of working in slash on the business. But again, keep in mind there's levels to it. If you want to get to that level. So you can go on vacation, or you can tell people, hey, I'm not taking any more scheduled meetings. I'm counseling all my standing meetings like that type of stuff works as well. And you just kind of, again, continue to see what breaks. And say, hey, just make sure you call me during an emergency, like you better call me during an emergency. But that's how you can get out of it. Eventually you get to the point where maybe you've transitioned from 6 figures to 7 figures, and then you're transferring to 8 figures or so. And maybe you can start to afford these other executives that Neil is talking about. And once you're able to hire these executives, they might cost you, by the way, 200, 300,000 at the lower end. I'm saying at the lower end. But super high level executives, we're talking 400, 500, $600,000 a year, right? But if you have the dough to pay for it, then you are okay paid for, right? Because they're going to take so much off your plate, then you, as the founder, or you as one of the one of the founders, could just focus on the super, super, super strategic, super high leverage things. That's going to grow the business even more. So that is it for today. Please leave us a review of rating, a subscribe. And we love you and goodbye. We appreciate you joining us for this session of marketing school.

Kovari Densu Roland Fraser Linkedin Eric Hearst Google Neil
A highlight from Matching Influencers and Your Audience -- Vivien Garns // Upfluence

MarTech Podcast

07:51 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Matching Influencers and Your Audience -- Vivien Garns // Upfluence

"The martech podcast is a proud member of the HubSpot podcast network to find great business podcasts like this one, visit HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. From advertising to software as a service, to data. Across all of our programs and clients, we've seen a 55 to 65% open rate. Getting brands authentically integrated into content performs better than TV advertising. Typical lifespan of an article is about 24 to 36 hours. We're reaching out to the right person. With the right message and a clear call to action, that it's just a matter of timing. Welcome to the martech podcast, a banjo, LLC production. In this podcast, you'll hear the stories of world class marketers that use technology to drive business results and achieve career success. Will on earth, the real world experiences of some of the brightest minds in the marketing and technology space, so you can learn the tools tips and tricks, they've learned along the way. Now here's a host of the martech podcast, Benjamin Shapiro. Welcome to influencer marketing week on the martech podcast. This week, we're going to publish episode every day talking about how you can maximize your influencer, marketing strategies. Joining us for influencer marketing week is Vivian garnes, who is the co CEO of upfluence, which is the only influencer marketing software with a dedicated offering for ecommerce brands, and they help brands drive online sales through organic influencer partnerships. And in addition to providing us with our guest today, affluence is also a sponsor of the podcast. Yesterday, Vivian and I talked about whether you should build an influencer marketing campaign and today we're going to continue the conversation talking about matching influencers and your audience. All right, here's the second installment of influencer marketing week with Vivian garnes from uploads. Vivian, welcome back to influencer week on the mar tech podcast. Thanks for having me on the show. Happy to be here. Excited to have you back on the show and to continue our conversation where yesterday we talked about the tradeoffs, the positives and minuses of influencer marketing. It's a up and coming marketing channel that allows you to disintermediate yourself from the performance marketing, the Google AdWords, the Facebook words, you don't have to go through the toll booth all the time, but it's also an art and a science in terms of its execution and its a valuation. So the devil's always in the details when you're cultivating a new marketing channel and often with influencer marketing, the first challenge is figuring out who you want to work with. Talk to me about influencer profiling. How do you match the right influencers with the people you're trying to reach? The way I see it, there are two routes, right? This is an outbound route, which is a little bit of a traditional way people have been doing influence marketing in an inbound right. The outbound route is where Iver brene will reach out to you the creator, you may or may not know my brand, maybe you'll know it if I'm Coca-Cola, but in all likelihood, if I'm an SME or a mid market company, you may or may not know who I am, and I'm going to try to sell to you a collaboration of some kind. I'm going to pitch you a value proposition. I'm going to try to convince you to work with me. And that has definitely advantages. There's a lot of scale because you can address an enormous pool of influencers that may be relevant to you. However, because these influencers tend to be solicited a lot, they may not respond if they're responding might charge you more, and they would have foreground they know. So that might be a less efficient process. There is scalable a little bit less efficient. The inbound route now, which is something we do have for instance we're very interested in very excited about is that we will connect to the system of records where your client's information resides can be your CMS can be your CRM can be your email marketing software or whatever it is. And we are going to do what we call influence reveal, meaning we're going to cross reference your database of clients and our database of influencers. And what will emerge how do these your influential customers? So your customers will happen to have a large social media following that you were completely oblivious to. And that when you will reach out to these guys, they will not only will they know you because they've known your brand sufficiently to spend their own money to buy all of your products, but also they are going to be 7 times more likely to work with you. That's what our data says. And they are going to charge you half as much on average when you work with them on the paid program. So on top of which you have access to all the purchasing information that they have. So you will know about influencer X as ordered 5 different products for total of $1000 GMV. So we can factor that into your decision whether or not you'd like to work with them and how much you can afford to give away and still being break even from the get go. And then this content is also going to be a lot more authentic. Because these guys will be credible to talk about your brand because there have been a customer for some time for a number of years. Your products have already been in the background of your Instagram stories for many months for many years. So it's a great opportunity for you as well to get some super genuine super authentic content, especially where in an industry where it's been criticized quite a bit. The lack of authenticity in some influence your content. So at the end of the day, just doing that in banner out, it allows you to play on both sides of the RI equation. Those are due to maximize the output to maximize the returns. And to minimize the investment. One of the things that we started doing here to try to figure out who the speakers on our podcast should be, was create a social syndication score. So when somebody fills out a guest application as a speaker for the martech podcast, the voices of search podcast, our revenue generator podcast, we look at a combination of how big their LinkedIn following how big their Twitter following is what their domain rank is what they say their email list is to try to gauge who has the largest potential reach. One of the things that I've realized in going through that process is the largest potential reach doesn't always mean that they're the best potential advocate for our content. We might have somebody who is a huge fan of the podcast with 5000 LinkedIn followers or somebody who we reach out to that's got 15,000 followers, but they're just creating content for everyone not specifically interested in our show. The former is going to be a better guess because they're going to do more social promotion. Just do it with a little bit more heart. I'm imagining that happens in influencer marketing too. So can you really solely rely on reach and basically the numbers or is there a type of product experience that you're looking for as a filter to understand who are not only going to be the influencers with the most potential reach, but also with the biggest amount of influence and heart and soul behind your campaign. Something we've measured is that an influencers level of performance will vary. And we have it at a point where we call the efficiency score where we measure the performance of the pose that mentions a certain brand versus the baseline of organic proofs for example. And we see that some influencers consistency over perform data baseline. So they are actually more convincing between more engagements when they mention a brand than when they don't. And some of them it's quite the opposite, right? So just there, offering the same amount of money to both influencers you are going to have a huge discrepancy in the returns that you get. So you're absolutely right in saying that numbers don't do everything. So now the question becomes, how can you know? And the answer in my mind is twofold. Number one is an editorial side of this. By using some specific keywords, some specific hashtags you can get a real good sense of what kind of topics does this influence you talked about whether you say what it is use what kind of brands as you refer to. So how do I align against these brands? Is that a good fit for my brain? Is that not? That's part of the equation. The other part is still numbers because by measuring how saturated is that influencers meaning out of the hundred posts how many actually you mentioned in brands? How efficient are the brain collaborations in so on? So for if you're going to be able to read out some of the potentially programmatic influencers and only reach out to influencers

Vivian Garnes Benjamin Shapiro Upfluence Vivian Iver Brene Hubspot Coca Cola Linkedin Facebook Google Twitter
A highlight from Getting In The Weeds On Identity With Merkle Global CEO Michael Komasinski

AdExchanger Talks

00:46 sec | 3 d ago

A highlight from Getting In The Weeds On Identity With Merkle Global CEO Michael Komasinski

"But first, let me take a moment to chill for at exchangers upcoming industry preview event. We've got a seriously good agenda for you. Industry preview will take place on a new date Tuesday, February 22nd, 2022 at the time center in New York City. Join us to learn more about what to expect in the year ahead in data driven digital media and marketing. We'll have executives from all the biggies, including Google and meta Nielsen, snowflake Instacart, Mastercard will have The Economist Hal singer, the hearts and science CEO and more. There's going to be a lot packed into this one day conference. So visit at exchange your dot com slash upcoming events to learn more and request your invitation. Hey Michael, welcome to the podcast.

Meta Nielsen Snowflake Instacart Hal Singer New York City Mastercard Google Michael
A highlight from #428: 430 Episodes, 9 Years, Over 34 Million Downloads & The Truth About My Podcast

Online Marketing Made Easy with Amy Porterfield

07:48 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from #428: 430 Episodes, 9 Years, Over 34 Million Downloads & The Truth About My Podcast

"Delivers you a personalized playlist for exactly where you are on your entrepreneurial journey. Listen, I realize that out of over 400 online marketing made easy episodes, it's hard to find the exact ones to help you move forward right here right now. Enter my brand new quiz. This 45 second four question quiz. Yep, that's all. We'll not only give you guidance on where you are right now, but it will give you the ten best episodes to download and binge so you can accomplish what's most important to you and your business. So head on over to Amy porterfield dot com forward slash playlist to find out if you are a bold beginner, a pursuer of passion and profit or a strategic superstar ready to scale. Okay, after you take this free quiz, you'll not only receive a curated list of online marketing made easy episodes, but you'll also snag a short and sweet pep talk from yours truly to encourage you to keep going and what to look out for based on the stage of business you're currently in. And insights into the next steps that will help you make your big dreams happen a whole lot faster. So that's Amy porterfield dot com slash playlist is free and will only take about 45 seconds to complete. I can't wait to see what you get. Now, let's get onto the show. For all my loyal listeners, I thought it would be fun to take you behind the scenes and share how I really feel about this podcast because after all, I've been at it for 9 years now. I've been hosting this podcast for 9 years. And I think it's safe to say, I have a few feelings about it. Okay, first things first, want to know what I absolutely love about it? I don't think this will be a surprise to any of you who know me well. I love that it is not video. I mean, let's be honest, right? I don't have to get ready. You know, the ladies know what I mean when I say get ready, but I don't have to be camera ready in order to create really amazing content. I'm Amy porterfield, ex corporate girl turned CEO of a multi 7 figure business, but it wasn't all that long ago that I lacked the confidence. The budget and the time to focus on growing my small but mighty business. Fast forward past many failed attempts in lessons learned, and you'll see the business I have today, one that changes lives and gives me more freedom than I ever thought possible. One that used to only exist as a daydream. I created the online marketing made easy podcast to give you simple actionable. Step by step strategies to help you do the same. If you're an ambitious entrepreneur or one in the making, who's looking to create a business that makes an impact and a life you love, you're in the right place friend. Let's get started. I wanted to take a moment and share my newest podcast obsession. It's called the female startup club podcast in its hosted by dune rache. And this podcast is also in the HubSpot network with me. Now every episode is bite sized and bingeable with insights and learnings from the world's most successful female founders and entrepreneurs. I loved her interview with glossier's community lead Kim Johnson. They chatted about the 5 steps to build an impactful community and you can bet I took notes and I am implementing these strategies. It was so good. So I know you're going to love this show. You can listen to the female startup club wherever you get your podcasts. Well, hey there a friend, welcome back to another episode of the online marketing made easy podcast. I am so excited for this week. And here's why. We created a fun brand new quiz that you can take. It's totally free to get a curated online marketing made easy playlist that is specific to where you are on your entrepreneurial journey. Maybe you're just getting started. You've got a dream, but no email list just yet. I've got you covered. Or maybe you're hustling your side gig still working your 9 to 5. You've got an email list. Maybe it's a small one, but you really want to go full-time into your online business. I've got a podcast playlist for you as well. Or maybe you're an old pro at being your own boss. You've got your email list and your business dialed in, but you're looking to grow in scale. Well, surprise, surprise. I created a playlist for you as well. So this is a really fun quiz and I love it because it takes less than two minutes to create and seriously, all you have to do is answer four questions and you've got your personalized playlist. Think of it as one of the most important resources that you can tap into to keep your business moving forward. So head to Amy porterfield dot com forward slash playlist to take the quiz and download the episodes that will speak directly to where you are right now as you grow your business. Amy porterfield dot com slash playlist. So since we have this quiz available now, I thought it'd be fun to do a little shorty episode all about podcasting and the online marketing made easy podcast specifically what I love about podcasting, the lessons I've learned and the struggles. If you've got a podcast, you'll totally be able to relate to this episode and hopefully walk away with some new insights, maybe some things I'm doing that you're not doing yet that you can apply to your own podcast. And if you've ever thought about podcasting, this is also the episode for you because I'm breaking it all down. I'm revealing it all and I'm really glad you're here for the ride because I feel like this is going to be a fun episode. And for all my loyal listeners, I thought it would be fun to take you behind the scenes and share how I really feel about this podcast because after all, I've been at it for 9 years now. I've been hosting this podcast for 9 years. And I think it's safe to say, I have a few feelings about it. Okay, first things first, want to know what I absolutely love about it? I don't think this will be a surprise to any of you who know me well. I love that it is not video. I mean, let's be honest, right? I don't have to get ready, you know, the ladies know what I mean when I say get ready, but I don't have to be camera ready in order to create really amazing content. I also love that it reaches people that I would never have access to. So my podcast over time is being pushed out to people who may not have found me any other way. And my podcast opens up a whole new world to them. The cool thing is that when someone lands on a podcast feed, they can scroll through all the episodes really easily, which makes all the work you put into an episode worth it because it's lifespan can be much longer than some other content that you put out there. It's also this one's a big one. It's an amazing list builder. Truly, online marketing made easy has filled up webinars promoted lead magnets. We recently put a pre roll on all of our episodes for a promo we

Amy Porterfield Kim Johnson
A highlight from Should You Focus In On Crypto Marketing for 2022? #1985

Marketing School

04:28 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from Should You Focus In On Crypto Marketing for 2022? #1985

"It, find it, check it out, and it's a great way to improve your load time. Today we are going to talk about if you should focus in on crypto marketing for 20, 22. So Neil and I have interesting perspectives on this, but I'd say we're a little biased here as well. But Neil, go for it. I don't think we really have interesting perspectives. It's more so we would both just say yes. I think that's an interesting perspective. But go ahead, you go first. Sure. So think about crypto as web three. There's web one web two web three. And you don't have to focus fully all your attention on it, but you should understand cryptocurrencies, NFT, web three, all that kind of stuff, because companies, even the companies you may be working on right now or for right now, or even the agency you're at right now, the clients that you have, they've adapted a lot of web two stuff, such as like the cloud, and you can bet they're going to adapt things like the blockchain. So you should focus on learning enough about crypto, so you can understand it. It doesn't mean you have to do tons of crypto related marketing next year or technically in this year. It's more so you need to understand it because it'll eventually become a requirement. It's like saying, hey, you need to learn how to market downloadable software. And web one, that's what happened. And web two, everything started moving to the cloud and you started having all these subscription based businesses. People had to adapt whether it was for optimizing for conversions or reducing churn. It was a lot of things to learn. Eventually you're going to have to adapt to blockchain technologies and make sure that your marketing fits in with companies that are leveraging blockchain technologies. I mean, I'll keep it simple. I mean, this is basically the future of the Internet. Eventually it's not going to be us talking about crypto. I've kind of talked about this part before. So last week was art Basel and a lot of NFT crypto people came. And I went to a dinner or a lunch actually with WhatsApp group called jpeg Morgan. It's a group that I'm in. A lot of NFT enthusiasts. And it's one guy came and he's like, dude, this feels like 1994. He was saying exactly the same thing I was saying except I was thinking this feels like 1995, where you have no idea what's about to happen, but you know it's coming. And you just look at all the developer activity that's happening right now. I use a tool called sentiment, so it's built sentiment instead of the E though, it's an a so sentiment dot com. And the compound annual growth rate or cagr for developer activities year on year is about 74%. So that's growing pretty quickly. And if that keeps compounding, it's just going to be nuts, right? And from the numbers I've been seeing, this is growing faster than the rate of the Internet. And this is a new layer to the Internet, right? So if you look at all that, this is not even just not even talking about marketing. We're just saying, this is the future. And we're talking about digital marketing right now. Well, this will be part of it, right? And when you think about to Niels point, what's going on in web two right now, sure, we can definitely continue to spend ads on alphabet or meta, Facebook, Google, whatever you want to call them. And what's going to happen though is these are web two technologies. I believe, over time, I don't think it's going to be quick. Maybe over 5, 7, ten, 15 years or so, these will slowly phase out. And there's going to be new ways of doing marketing, right? For example, right now, we see a lot of people, community is not a new concept, but what I would say is the way of doing community now, it's a lot more intentional and is a lot more about building something for the long term, which I haven't seen anymore. So it's going to be a forcing function for marketers to think long term. And so in my opinion right now, if you jump ahead of the crowd, I don't think it's too early right now because I literally funded a company that based on their notion memo, which is like a little like a written document. People are funding companies left and right right now. It makes sense to kind of just figure out how you can get involved in space, figure out what projects actually resonate with you, play around a little bit with money, not financial advice, by the way. But play around a little bit with what's going on with the world of DeFi right now, maybe the world of NFTs, right? This is changing so fast every single day that even if you just dip your toe in, you're gonna see pretty quickly what Neil and I are talking about. But I would just say this. Neil is pretty involved in the space right now as am I, I would just say, look, now is a good time to get in because if you get a now you're still going to be an early adopter, Neil. Just wait for tomorrow's episode because tomorrow we're going to be discussing NFTs. All right, that's it for today. Please don't forget to rate review and subscribe and we'll catch you later. We appreciate you joining us for this session of marketing school.

Neil Whatsapp Group Jpeg Morgan Basel Niels Facebook Google
A highlight from Should You Build an Influencer Campaign? -- Vivien Garns // Upfluence

MarTech Podcast

08:02 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from Should You Build an Influencer Campaign? -- Vivien Garns // Upfluence

"To drive business results and achieve career success. Will on earth, the real world experiences of some of the brightest minds in the marketing and technology space, so you can learn the tools tips and tricks, they've learned along the way. Now here's a host of the martech podcast, Benjamin Shapiro. Welcome to influencer marketing week on the martech podcast. This week we're going to publish an episode every day talking about how you can maximize your influencer, marketing strategies. Joining us for influencer marketing week is Vivian garnes, who is the co CEO of upfluence, which is the only influencer marketing software with a dedicated offering for ecommerce brands, and they help brands drive online sales through organic influencer partnerships. And in addition to providing us with our guest today, influences also a sponsor of the martech podcast. And today, Vivian and I are going to talk about whether you should be building an influencer marketing campaign. All right, here's the first installment of influencer marketing week with vivia, carnes, from uploads. Vivian, welcome to the martech podcast. Thanks for Ben. Thanks for having me. Happy to be here. I'm excited to have you here. I appreciate you staying up late. I know you are based in France and I hope my Friends pronunciation of your name was at least close enough to the truth. It was wonderful. And yes, we are in American company founded by French people because nobody's perfect. And I am in this coming from France. Well, I appreciate you staying up late. And of course, for your support of the martech podcast, and also excited to talk to you about not only a budding marketing channel, but something that I think is oddly become sort of the focus of my career personally, which is influencer marketing. You know, I started off as a marketing consultant and I launched the martech podcast to try to generate new business in the next thing you know, had a little bit of a following and an audience and now I am basically on the flip side of the influencer marketing strategy being the content creator, but I want to talk to you about why brands should consider influencer marketing who this type of marketing works for. Talk to me about how brands decide whether they should or shouldn't start an influencer marketing campaign as a strategy. The way I like to look at it is that any consumer oriented businesses not just brands any consumer Internet businesses can benefit from influencer marketing. They can benefit from working with creators to publish great quality content to track traffic direct conversion and all that fun stuff. Now, if phased out a little bit more, there's a couple of tailwinds that really have made a success of the industry in the last few years. You've been following the writing the way for the last few years. So I'm sure you know what I'm talking about. Especially in the recent past, what we've seen is, especially in newcomer space, a number of factors. Number one, we've seen that new gold rush towards ecommerce with COVID. Where on the consumer side, we've seen, of course, more and more people buying online, people who have never bought online pre COVID who had no choice about doing it. On the merchant side, we see that new gold rush with companies. Sometimes they've been business ten, 15, 20 years. They've never sold a single dollar of revenue online, and they were in a situation where they had tools. So then so we saw the numbers of companies like Shopify, who commerce weeks, what have you really increased since then? And what that cost is an increase in competitive intensity as well, right? If you combine that with what I like to refer to as the cookie apocalypse, the calculates increasingly harder for marketers to deploy their marketing dollars on display advertising and retargeting advertising because browsers and operating systems are less and less likely to support a third party cookies. We're not registration or not only, the competition is increasing. But possibilities for you to deploy your marketing dollars are being fewer and fewer every year. And the combination of both is that most people are going back to the usual suspects, the Google AdWords, the Facebook ads and so on. And those are great. Don't get me wrong with our scalable. They work really well. They're also a bit based, right? So in that context we've seen the acquisition costs really skyrocket. So in the last few years, we've seen tens of thousands of brands coming to supplementing a, I'd like to deploy my marketing dollars in the way that's all right positive. Can you guys help? And the answer has been, of course, the resulting yes. We've had sort of a world in which we operate. All right, so to read some of that back to you, what I heard you say is obviously there's a huge digital wave coming. COVID has turned everything online and that in combination with the cookie apocalypse means that marketers are faced with less data and so either they rely on the performance marketing channels, which are becoming increasingly more expensive, more competitive, or they start looking for other ways to start reaching their customers in a digital fashion. Now, you said crip, I'm writing the creator waves. I ended up becoming a creator. God knows how that happened. But those weren't the only type of people that have influence. There's creators like me who are regularly creating content and there's other people that have large social followings. There's your customers. How do you think about what is an influencer today as opposed to what an influencer was in the pre COVID time? One specificity I'd like to look at is people like Kim Kardashian used to be the embodiment of an influencer or what an influencer is. No, I think these kind of people are more celebrities, meaning the world knows about them without necessarily following them on social media. To me, an influencer is someone that you would not necessarily know if you were not feeling them specifically on social media. So people are more niche or if you imagine the distribution of influencers as sort of one over X curve where it's a very long tail of great volume of very small creators and only a handful of very large creators. I would say it's the mid tail in the long tail that tends to be really the heart and soul and the crux of influence marketing in that sense. So there's this notion of the Kim Kardashians the world being the most called them the macro influencers. Unfortunately for guys like me, we don't have to become influencers in the same way that Kim Kardashian did and I won't go into more detail than that. But there's your macro influencers who have these massive followings. You're sort of content creators who own some niches, probably your standard influencers, and then there's also this notion of micro influencers getting people who are your customers, your brand advocates. How do you define the difference between these three groups? One tiny bit of context before I dig in in the recent past not only have we heard about micro influencers we've heard about nano influencers and in the last couple of months, I heard even about pico influencers. So I guess we're doing increasingly small. And the reason behind that, I think is the following. At the beginning of the age of influence marketing when the term was coined, we only influencers that were actually reached out to, where the most visible ones, right? The mega influencers the macro influencers however, you want to call it. The head of the tail of the distribution of influencers. And what happened is the following. Number one, because only a small fraction of influencers were reached out to that created some completely artificial inflation of rates, because these people were very solid stated. They had all the bargaining power in the world. And they were asking increasing amount of money to rent. At the same time, as social media platforms kept iterating with algorithms, when App Engine the larger your community, the lesser your ability to generate high engagement rates, the opposite effect. So not only was getting increasingly expensive, it was also getting less and less efficient with time. And the combination of both really deteriorates our eye. So as a result, brand marketers try to go down the distribution to go to middle influencers nano micro that jazz. And it used to be extremely painful because at that time to work with ten X the amount of influencers you would take you to ten X other time. But what we've seen in the recent past, companies like influence offering technology solutions that were really streamlining the whole process, automating a lot of the processes being strictly strategic is very time consuming. And so the marginal cost to working with an extra influencer becomes very small. And so that's how we've seen all of these very successful brands trying to scale very large influencer marketing programs with this increasingly small influencers and

Benjamin Shapiro Vivian Garnes Upfluence Vivia Vivian France Carnes Covid Shopify Kim Kardashian BEN Facebook Google
A highlight from 91. The Virtual Experience with Leah and Kristi

Purposeful Social Selling

05:34 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from 91. The Virtual Experience with Leah and Kristi

"For you to enjoy from a couple of our mastermind members who have been in this round of the 2021. Gosh, what year is it now? I'm like already in 2022. This is airing in 2022, so I'm like, okay, they're in the fall 2021 mastermind group. So with me, I have Leah and Christie. And I brought them on to kind of share their unique stories and for them to share some lessons they have learned since being in the mastermind. At this point while we're recording we are just about to hit halfway through, not quite, but Christie and Leah were both unable to attend the live event, and they attended virtually. So I asked them both to come on and just share a little bit about their breakthroughs and their aha moments and what their virtual experience was like because I think some people might think if they can't make the live that the experience might not be worth it or maybe they're too afraid to invest, like, oh no, I have to have that event. So we're going to talk about that too. So what I want to do first is I want you ladies to introduce yourselves to share a little bit about what brought you into social selling, how long you've been in social selling and then what brought you to the mastermind. So Leah, I'll have you start us off. Go ahead and introduce yourself to my people. Hello, hello. My name is Leah O'Brien, and I live in metro Detroit. I have, well, I should back up. I'm a mom to a 20 month old. I have two puppies and a husband. I don't need to put him last. But he's very much at the top. And I have been a part of social selling now for just about four years. It'll be four years in April. And I had never done any social selling before. So I was thrown right into the loop. I had a friend. Reach out and tell me all about the company and I kind of jumped right in and it snowballed. I wasn't expecting any sort of success, really. And I just kind of fell into a really great team and opportunity and of course feel so blessed, but also with that comes I don't want to say anxiety, but I was like nervous. I felt like I didn't know how to lead a team. I had a team. I didn't know how to lead. And really, did a lot of selling, selling was what was comfortable for me. So building a team was something that I kind of shoved to the side and didn't feel that it was important. Until I hit a certain rank and I was like, oh, crap, you know? This is important. I need to know what I'm doing. And I think I've shared with Kristen before and the group that I invested in a mastermind previously. And it was just like a broad business mastermind. I think a lot of entrepreneurs that did health and wellness coaching, things like that. And I think the experience I'm glad that I had that experience because when I came to this and realized that this mastermind was focused on social selling, I was like, this is the right fit. I know it. And then yeah, it was unable to make the event live. Do you want me to go to that park? Sorry. Yeah, yeah, you can. Yeah. Okay. Yeah, so I was unsure because it is an investment. And I was like, shoot. I don't know, you know, this feels like the right time, but I don't know if it's the right time because I can't make this live event. So what do I do? And one thing that Kristen said right away was, you know, you get to decide what you're going to get out of this. So if you're going to invest and you can't make it live, then you get to decide, is it going to be worth your money? Because you can decide that upfront. And that's what I did. And of course, it was amazing and I couldn't be happier that I'm a part of it. Yeah. So what do you feel like you came to the mastermind most needing for your business? What were you thinking? I really need this. I think leadership because there's so many people that do so many different things. And I love having I really do love having direction and feel like I know what I'm doing and when there's so many things out there. Everybody's trying, you know, I don't want to say the next best thing, but what works for somebody doesn't always work for you and your personality. And I really felt like I needed direction and without having that and feeling confident in what I was doing, I felt lost and that confident, right? I didn't feel like I could be bold in my leadership unless I felt like I really knew what I was doing. Yeah, what do you feel like was a big aha moment for you about leadership with how it is taught in the mastermind? Versus how you might have heard it or understood it for yourself elsewhere. I think that what you teach and we talked about this before too. You know that it works and it's proven to work that if you do the steps or you invest in sell yourself on it, it's going to work. And I think in other situations, it's worked for somebody else in their business and so then they teach it to everybody else and it doesn't necessarily work in their businesses because they're all very different. And I think that what you teach really caters to what works for every individual in their business, and that in itself is worth everything to me.

Leah Christie Leah O'brien Kristen Detroit
A highlight from 295: What Should My Google Ads Budget Be? And Other Common Google Ads Budget Questions

The Paid Search Podcast

03:57 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from 295: What Should My Google Ads Budget Be? And Other Common Google Ads Budget Questions

"Hey, everybody. Yes, welcome back to the paid search podcast. My name is Jason rothman as always. I'm joined by Chris schaffer, but for the first time in a long time, I'm joined by Chris schaefer on YouTube as well. Chris, it's great to be back here on YouTube, it's great to see you again, how is it last week before you these weeks are flying by? I don't know if it's getting older, but it feels like we were just talking. How are you doing? That beard is still growing. I've noticed that. Yeah, I'm good, Jason, thank you for asking. All is well. It does feel like we were just talking about Christmas campaigns and managing campaigns for the holiday rush, and now here we are looking down into February, which is pretty crazy. So yeah, and for those that have some weird interest to look at those that you listen to, I guess we have that now. So I'm sorry, but it's there. But yeah, it's good to be here and I particularly love the topic for today because budget as we've said many times before is a very, it's the most commonly asked question talking about budget and I love going into these discussions about what are the things you think you know about Google ads and what's the truth behind it. Well, yeah, very important topic. One of the biggest questions you and I get and it only took us 295 episodes. To get around to it, but here we are, Chris, here we are. I'm proud of us. I'm proud of us. You know, I was looking through you too because we're back on YouTube and we've been doing that for years. We've been doing the show for years. We were on YouTube for years. I was thinking the different stuff in life. We both gone through how much older we are and more experienced and wiser and here we are back on YouTube, yeah. You're a YouTuber, your creator. No. Can we get the spin off vlog? That's what the people really want. Oh. Oh, yeah. Yeah, as much as much as I love my hobbies. I know, and I know you're a big hobby guy too. You always blow me away, like any time any time I sample into one of your hobbies, you're like the knowledge just flows like a river. It's amazing. I remember the one time I asked you about poker. Oh, yeah. You just blew me away with your analytical answer to some stupid question I had and I was like, oh, that's right. This used to be the poker master I was talking to. And now it's the Google ads master. So yeah, here we are. Chris, big episode. We're going to be talking about budgets. Thank you everyone for being here. Going to just kick it off with just a couple housekeeping things and then I'll hand it over to Chris and then we'll get into the show. So a couple housekeeping things. We're still here years and years later because of your reviews. That's the only reason we're here. That's what the success of the show is due to. And we appreciate you sending those reviews in on your every week. I say I quit and then Jason sends me a positive review and it reels me back in. Yeah, it's a nice pat on the back. Especially when they're from the United States of America, sorry, but just being honest. 5 stars, great resource from Josh, here in the USA. A good balance between basic info and more advanced techniques a good listen for folks who feel like they have a good grasp of what AdWords is but need some help taking it to the next level. I think we do a good job of that. No matter what stage of your Google ads, career or advertising journey you're on, I think we can help get you to the next level and that's what we try to do here on the show. So thanks so much for that review, Josh, and

Youtube Jason Rothman Chris Schaffer Chris Schaefer Chris Jason Google USA Josh
A highlight from Why Organic Social May Matter More than Any of Our Services #1984

Marketing School

03:27 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from Why Organic Social May Matter More than Any of Our Services #1984

"Welcome to marketing school, the only podcast that provides daily top level marketing tips and strategies from entrepreneurs that practice what they preach and live what they teach. Let's start leveling up your marketing knowledge with your instructors, Neil Patel and Eric Sue. Today we are going to talk about why organic social may actually matter more than any of our services. But first, Neil, we should talk about what our services are. Yeah, so Eric and I have ad agency technically two separate ad agencies. This is called single grain minus called NP digital. And when we look at our services, we both do SEO paper click conversion optimization, organic social email marketing. We pretty much do most performance marketing, which is digital based. Yep. So in terms of organic social, I mean, here's why take on it right now. I mean, when you look at a TikTok, the organic reach is strong. When you look at LinkedIn, I just talked about a couple of episodes ago. In some cases I'm getting like a 183,000 views on a post or let's say I do something really I write a really good tweet storm on Twitter. I could gain 20 30,000 followers and be invited to speak on CNBC. And so the work that we've been doing around SEO and paid media, you know, my take on paid media long term, maybe the next 5 to ten years or so as web three starts to mature a little bit, the way we do web two marketing with us paying a lot of money to alphabet or paying a lot of money to meta. That's going to shift a little bit, right? And SEO takes a long time to get going, sure you can buy websites. You can buy assets and all that. But organic social and if you hit sometimes, I had a I saw someone recently, they posted something from art Basel and they got like 32 million views and they shot from a hundred followers to a couple. Maybe a 120,000 followers or so, you could go quote unquote viral just like that. Neil? Yeah. And here's the thing, right? With organic social, you have to do it because it's one of the best ways to communicate with customers and everyone else is doing it. So you honestly don't have a choice. People these days don't want to wait on the phone to communicate with other people like support or companies. A lot of times they just want to be messaging them on organic social. So if you engage with those people, you can get them as followers, brand advantages, and then when you post your own content, you can do extremely well in the long run, assuming that you're managing the community correctly. And you're also doing what's best for them and trying to truly engage and help them out. Yeah, and by the way, let's not forget about if you're using an organic social do you have access to DMs too? TikTok's got DMs Instagram has DMs, Twitter has DMs, LinkedIn has DMs. I don't think YouTube has DMs, though. But that's another area, right? So anything else to add for this one? That's it. If you're not on organic social, go and do it. I know a lot of people ignore it now because it reads so bad, but you still need to be on it. All right, don't forget to rate review and subscribe to this podcast. We love you. And we'll catch you later. We appreciate you joining us for this session of marketing school. Be sure to rate review and subscribe to the show and visit marketing school dot IO for more resources based on today's topic, as well as access to more episodes that will help you find true marketing success. That's marketing school dot IO. Until next time, class dismissed.

Eric Sue Neil Patel Neil Linkedin Cnbc Eric Twitter Basel Tiktok Youtube
A highlight from Consolidation Of The Marketing Industry Will Continue -- Babak Hedayati // TapClicks

MarTech Podcast

07:51 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from Consolidation Of The Marketing Industry Will Continue -- Babak Hedayati // TapClicks

"Action that it's just a matter of timing. Welcome to the martech podcast, a Ben Jeff LLC production. In this podcast, you'll hear the stories of world class marketers that use technology to drive business results and achieve career success. Will unearth the real world experiences of some of the brightest minds in the marketing and technology space, so you can learn the tools tips and tricks, they've learned along the way. Now here's a host of the martech podcast, Benjamin Shapiro. Welcome back to the martech podcast. Today we're going to continue our discussion about the future direction of the marketing industry. But before we get to today's interview, we're going to kick off the show with a marketing minute where we invite a friend of the martech podcast to help answer a listener questions in 60 seconds or less. Here for today's marketing minute is Scott declarey, who is the host of the success stories podcast, where Scott sits down with leaders and mentors to unpack experiences and share tactical strategies for business professionals, entrepreneurs and everyone in between. And the success story podcast is also a fellow member of the HubSpot podcast network. And Scott was kind enough to answer a question from Ben Lynn, who was a digital marketing manager at happier. Ben asked, what is the difference in marketing's impact between product led and sales led growth? All right, here Scott's answer. Marketing when it's complimenting sales led has to complement a purchase that is only made through a sales led interaction. So everything has to be supporting what your sales reps are literally going to be saying on the phone in order to complement that conversation. So this traditionally would be large outbound B2B enterprise, even B2C industries have focused on outbound sales. Versus product led where the marketing should be focusing on creating demand on creating a flywheel that will generate awareness that will generate traffic that will turn into free signups that will turn into paid subscribers because with true product led. There isn't any interaction needed to try by expand and then renew versus sales where the purchases always through a sales that interaction. So marketing for sales lead, I don't think that's the way organizations should be going, but it should be focusing on supporting sales, conversations with customers versus marketing, that's product led, that should be focused on creating a demand generation flywheel that's driving people into your funnel to try your product and then eventually buy. Thanks Scott. If you're interested in hearing more from Scott on the success story podcast or any of the other great hosts in the HubSpot podcast network, go to HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. Okay, on with today's interview. Joining us again is babe. Who is the founder, CEO and chairman of tap clicks, which is a leading marketplace technology company for agencies, media companies, brands and enterprises. Tap clicks integrated marketing operations platform includes sales enablement workflow and order management analytics and automated reporting all within a single intuitive user interface on demand and in the cloud. And yesterday, but back and I talked about how AI will play a bigger role in the linking of meta level data for marketers. And today we're going to talk about some of the consolidation in the marketing industry and whether that will continue or not. But before we hear from today's guest, I want to take a moment to thank upfluence for sponsoring this interview. Are you looking for ways to boost your brand's visibility without over indexing on performance marketing? Whether you're looking for a professional creatives or if you just want to enrich your existing database to find your most influential customers, affluence will source influencers and create custom sequences to automate and influence our outreach campaign that creates long-lasting and profitable relationships with your brands ambassadors. The affluence influencers CRM makes it super easy to manage creators all in one place so you can keep track of your favorites, work with them across several campaigns, easily build list, and it also integrates with ecommerce platforms like Shopify and Wu commerce. So if you're looking for ways to diversify your marketing mix, it's time to start boosting your brand's influence with upfluence. Ready to tell a better brand story and drive more revenue from influencers, go to get dot upfluence dot com slash martek. That's get dot upfluence UP ENCE dot com slash mar tech. Okay, here's the rest of my conversation with babek. Founder, CEO, and chairman of tap clicks. But back, welcome back to the martech podcast. Thank you very much. Pleasure to be back. Very excited to have you. I feel like yesterday we talked a little bit about your bread and butter about artificial intelligence and aggregating data and just enabling marketers to make smart decision using services like tap clicks, which really does a lot of the data warehousing collection and aggregation for you. We talked a little bit about how the analysis part in marketing is going to be more of our future. I want to take a step back and talk about the broader marketing industry you've been running one of the leading companies in the martex space at tap clicks for roughly a decade. You've seen some things you've gone through some acquisitions. It's obviously a transitional time for us all marketers and everyone in the world going through the coronavirus and that's going to bring on a lot of change. Talk to me about how you think the industry is going to change. Have we been seeing a lot of consolidation? Do you think that's going to continue in the wake of what we're seeing on the global landscape today? Yes, Ben, I'm a firm believer that given the fact that there are thousands of players in the space, there's a couple of problems that marketers are faced with. And that's truly the reason tap clicks was created in the first place. We have a lot of marketing people in our team and I'm myself was a tech marketer for a long time. So I intuitively understand this problem, which is even back then when we started tactically, the question was, which channel do you pick? Which one is going to work for you, which one isn't going to work for you? Which one is going to drag in value? Which one has the trends and the legs right now to make an impact on your marketing campaigns to reach your audiences and customers better? And that problem has only been exponentially getting worse for marketers where they have to decide what to use and what not to use. Of course, if you do have a single tackling that has a lot of those channels already integrated then, and the majority of the channels that matter are already in it, like our marketplace, then we see that marketers simply don't move off of it and they choose if you have 5 or ten email solutions already integrated with our product. They're not going to go pick the 11th one. That's not with Catholics. So that has already occurred where our customers choose to stay within the ecosystem that we support. And of course, that's forever expand. But the second problem is if you look at how they have to do their work, they have to go learn these new systems. These are all on different databases, different types of technologies, different types of vendors, some are nicely funded, some are not some of profitable some are not. And the level of what I would say uncertainty about how to proceed is very, very high. And then you have to think about the cost of learning and new user interface. Every time you go with one of these new channels. So because the world has focused on solving this problem, very, very detailed way to the atomic level almost. There are many, many vendors trying to solve all of these different challenges that market or experience, but in the process there's a whole level of complexity associated with operating these tools,

Scott Ben Jeff Llc Benjamin Shapiro Scott Declarey Ben Lynn Tap Clicks Babek BEN
A highlight from Cut These Meetings From Your Week to Focus #1983

Marketing School

04:07 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Cut These Meetings From Your Week to Focus #1983

"Optimize your site for load time. And one easy way to do it is use the host that Eric and I use dream host to just go to dream host or Google it, find it, check it out, and it's a great way to improve your load time. Today we are going to talk about what meetings you should cut from your week to focus. The first meeting any meeting where there's multiple people within your department. And here's what I mean by that. Let's say if you're a marketing and someone's going over SEO, right? And you're dealing with the agency or internal. Well, if there's 5 people from SEO there, does everyone really need to be there? And yes, I know every once in a while. Everyone from the department needs to be there. But if you're getting update on something or someone's going over something, if someone can already cover it within your organization, they can just write a quick email, updating everyone else. It's not like you have to waste 5 people's time on the same thing just so everyone can get real time recap, right versus just getting an email hour later. Yeah, I'm gonna give more of a framework here because I think it's simpler and it's tough for Neil knight to know what meetings you have. But what I like to do is maybe every month or so, I'll take a look at my calendar. And in general now, I try to keep more of an empty calendar. I've been telling people I've been experimenting with not having a calendar. So I just tell people it's just text me when they want to talk or call me. And so basically, you want to think about auditing your calendar and saying, hey, like, look, of these meetings that I did in the last 30 to age, 60 days, 90 days or so. Which ones actually gave me energy? Which one did I think I actually contribute a lot to? And which ones do I actually need to eliminate? Which ones took energy away from me? Which one was I not productive in? Where I could probably better use my time. Because the meetings actually end up people end up stacking them up and they never think to kind of audit the meetings that they continue to sit in. And they don't eliminate. They just couldn't continue to leave them there. And by 12 months later, it's like you've been sitting in probably 50% of meetings that you probably could have eliminated. And it's kind of your fault because you didn't audit your time and you didn't take your time back, which is arguably your most important resource, right? So auditing your calendar, at least once a month, if not every two weeks or so is going to save you a lot of time. And from there, you can figure out which meanings to cut. But in general, kind of the goal here for me at least is to continue to try to keep more of an open calendar and have more time to think and move on more strategic things. I usually cut any meetings that could be done over slack or teams or anything like that. In other words, if you don't really need a meeting to go over it or hash things out and it's just like an update type of stuff, I tend to just cut all those out. I find that they're just really useful. Useless, and people can just send me reports that I can look at versus just being in another update meeting, which tends to be a lot of meetings that people in the paving. Neil doesn't give himself enough credit for this, so he probably doesn't realize this as much, but his frequency of just calling people. And getting on a couple of quick calls real quick. That is, I'd say he's pretty up there versus other people I've seen over the years. He'll just like straight up call someone who else should I talk to. So he doesn't do a lot of meetings because of that reason, right? He does default towards making a phone call, getting to the point very quickly and getting off. I think that's something people can learn from as well. Neil, anything else? No, you got it right. My philosophy is instead of meetings. I'll do quick updates. So a great example of this. As we're talking right now, I texted one of my VP of sales. I'm like, what are we at? And that was it. I saved myself from going to our meeting literally within the next 35, based on what we're recording this, it would actually be 15 minutes from now. So I saved a whole big time saw, right? And I got it done by just text. And I know what the number for the month is and what the goal is. And I know where they're at. I can already see that he's pacing. And that's it. I didn't need to go to the meeting. I know other people end up going to it. If there's anything important, they'll update me, but I just saved myself some time. Cool. All right, that's it for today. Please don't forget to rate review and subscribe. It helps us grow and we love you. And we'll catch you later. We appreciate you joining

Neil Knight Eric Google Neil
A highlight from AI Will Play A Bigger Role In The Linking Of Meta-Level Data -- Babak Hedayati // TapClicks

MarTech Podcast

07:28 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from AI Will Play A Bigger Role In The Linking Of Meta-Level Data -- Babak Hedayati // TapClicks

"The martech podcast is a proud member of the HubSpot podcast network to find great business podcasts like this one, visit HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. From advertising to software as a service, to data. Across all of our programs and clients, we've seen a 55 to 65% open rate, getting brands authentically integrated into content, performs better than TV advertising. Typical lifespan of an article is about 24 to 36 hours. We're reaching out to the right person with the right message and a clear call that action that it's just a matter of timing. Welcome to the martech podcast, a Ben Jeff LLC production. In this podcast, you'll hear the stories of world class marketers that use technology to drive business results and achieve career success. Will unearth the real world experiences of some of the brightest minds in the marketing and technology space, so you can learn the tools tips and tricks, they've learned along the way. Now here's a host of the martech podcast, Benjamin Shapiro. Welcome to the martek podcast. Today we're gonna debate the future direction of the marketing industry. But before we get to today's interview, we're gonna kick off the show with a marketing minute, where we invite a friend of the martech podcast to help us answer a listener question in 60 seconds or less. Here for today's marketing minute is will Barron, who's the managing director of salesman dot org and the host of the salesman podcast, which is the world's most downloaded B2B sales podcast and a fellow member of the HubSpot podcast network in his podcast will help sales professionals learn how to find buyers and win business in a modern effective and ethical way. And will has been kind enough to answer a question from Katie rose, who is the director of sales enablement at spark post, which is one of the world's biggest email senders. Katie asked, what is the best way to scale and enablement program for B2B SaaS companies with limited resources? Okay, here's well's answer. Hey Kati and thanks for the question. There are three things to consider when scaling a sales enablement program. Your influence, the software that you're using and your internal insights. So let me explain. Your influence because sometimes in the corporate world rightly or wrongly, return on investment case studies and data is just not enough to break through the status quo and to get things moving. And so I would focus just as hard on adding value and building relationships with your internal stakeholders as I would on the sales enablement itself. Next software tools. Now, they're all pretty similar. It's the resources within the software that's going to impact the numbers simpler sales movement software that gets used is way way better than complex software that no one bothered with. And finally, your internal insights. If you've got sales reps exceeding the sales quote right now, they should be defining what your sales enablement looks like. Don't give your sales team what you think that they need, give your top reps whatever they want and give everyone else what they require to become a top sales rep. Thanks, will. If you're interested in hearing more from will Barron on the salesman podcast or any of the other great hosts in the HubSpot podcast network, you can go to HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. All right, on with the show, here's today's interview. Joining us is babek. Who is the founder CEO and chairman of tab clicks, which is a leading marketing technology company for agencies, media companies, brands and enterprises. Tab clicks to integrated marketing operations platform includes sales enablement, workflow and order management analytics and automated reporting all with a single intuitive user interface available on demand in the cloud. And today, back and I are going to discuss whether AI will play a bigger role in the linking of meta level data. But before we hear from today's guest, I want to take a moment to thank upfluence for sponsoring this interview. Are you looking for ways to boost your brand's visibility without over indexing on performance marketing? Whether you're looking for a professional creatives or if you just want to enrich your existing database to find your most influential customers, affluence will source influencers and create custom sequences to automate and influence our outreach campaign that creates long-lasting and profitable relationships with your brands ambassadors. The affluence influencers CRM makes it super easy to manage creators all in one place so you can keep track of your favorites, work with them across several campaigns, easily build list, and it also integrates with ecommerce platforms like Shopify and Wu commerce. So if you're looking for ways to diversify your marketing mix, it's time to start boosting your brand's influence with upfluence. Ready to tell a better brand story and drive more revenue from influencers, go to get dot upfluence dot com slash martek. That's get dot upfluence UP ENCE dot com slash mar tech. Okay, here's my conversation with babek. Founder CEO and chairman of tap clicks. But back welcome to the martech podcast. Thank you. It's a pleasure to be here. Very excited to have you on the show excited to talk about some pretty meaty big broad topics some of the future trends in marketing. Obviously, the world is changing as we speak, we're living through the outbreak of the coronavirus. It's what's up is down. No one's really sure what the landscape is going to look like. One thing that we've seen prior to this outbreak is a rise in artificial intelligence, some of the biggest companies in the world relying on it and machine learning. It's a very inflated term. Tell me a little bit about your thoughts on why are we stand in terms of the usability of artificial intelligence and what role do you see it playing in the future for the martech industry? Well, I really would combine the concept of algorithms machine learning and artificial intelligence together when people are speaking about this topic. They're really talking about all of it. And really for the world of martech because there are so many different suppliers up to 6 or 7000 now. There's a lot of room for data management and operations efficiency and fluidity. And the real question is, at the end of the day, how do you bring all the data together efficiently? How do you bring actionable insights in play for people that are running marketing campaigns of different sorts? How do you help them optimize those campaigns? How do you essentially decide where the next dollar is going to be spent knowing the historical data and knowing what work done didn't work? A lot of the machine learning applied to the data really goes toward that. And then there are people that are really looking for consumer intelligence and understanding how to send the right app to the right person at the right time. So there are two different kind of areas where people are focused on to help. In the case of where we think this is going to contribute is really around that concept of automation, operational efficiency, reducing errors. And letting the human really apply their intelligence to the process by creating that fluidity, as well as managing data and bringing insights

Ben Jeff Llc Benjamin Shapiro Katie Rose Spark Post Barron Hubspot Tab Clicks Kati Babek Katie Founder
A highlight from 7 Reasons Accountability to Cultural Values Matter #1982

Marketing School

05:27 min | Last week

A highlight from 7 Reasons Accountability to Cultural Values Matter #1982

"To optimize your site for load time. And one easy way to do it is use the host that Eric and I use dream host to just go to dream host or Google it, find it, check it out, and it's a great way to improve your load time. Today we are going to talk about 7 reasons why accountability to cultural values matter. So that's a mouthful. Let's talk about what that means first before we go. So cultural values, for example, an organization, one of the core values would be keep leveling up. The other one would be defaulting to action. The other one would be open minded, right? Those are just a couple of examples. I'll give reason number one right now. This is not the number one reason. But accountability to these cultural values matters because it's these values are an operating system. It's an operating system to align the organization. And so reason number one is if people are not aligned on the values, they're going to be operating they're going to be going in different directions. So let's say meals in my org and he crushes with sales, but he's got a bad attitude and he's not someone that's very open minded. We're fundamentally misaligned. It doesn't matter if he's crushing sales. So in that case, that is alignment. That's going to totally tear a company apart. So that is the first one. The second reason to is, if people aren't holding themselves accountable, what you're going to end up finding is culturally, other people are being like, hey, you can do whatever you want. And you don't have to follow the rules and anyone can just be however they want. And what you're going to find is you're going to have a lot of bad apples in your organization. Just a lot of people who are lazy aren't getting anything done. And it creates a worse environment where more and more people just continue to do that then. All right, number three is when you have culture values and your accountable to them, what you're trying to hold people accountable to them. It's actually way easier to hire and fire. When you have something that's nebulous and you have a defined them, then people can start to make a bunch of different excuses. But let's say Neil does something that's just doesn't align with the values where it's like, hey, Neil, when you openly blamed someone else in public in front of everyone else, that wasn't really owning your wins and losses, right? And unfortunately, that's one of our core values. So you can just keep blaming it on the core values or pointing out things that way. It's really easy to align when you have those cultural values set up. Yeah, and number four, what you'll end up finding is this will actually create when everyone is accountable and not only does it keep the culture really great in the company. But what you'll find is they'll start bringing in other people who are like them. They won't want to work with other people who drop the ball. Don't get things done. And it actually helps quite a bit with recruiting and it'll allow you to get more a players. Remember, a players keep bringing on more players. And a players hold themselves accountable. Yep. And also, when it comes to cultural values, you don't need to set up a laundry list of values. Really, the best companies maybe have three, four maximum. You start to have too many. It's difficult to remember. And so this brings me to my other point. Because they're so simple to remember, ideally they are, it's easier to align an entire organization that way. Because if you don't, again, if you don't have these set up, then people are just going to go around marching to their own drum beat, right? You can't just keep pointing back to these values. And so there's a lot of companies out there that might have like ten, maybe even 15 or so, it's just way too hard to remember. So remember, if you're going to create these values, keep it very simple and to the point, but that simplicity is what makes it easy to lead a company from a much more simple standpoint. Number 6, if everyone knows the core values, they'll do what's best for the business in the long run. They'll be ethical. And they won't be short sighted. And that's super, super important because sometimes you have to take short term losses to generate long-term gains. And most people's core values include things like be ethical or do us right for others or some variation of that because companies have so many of them. Just make sure that people know them. And they practice them because if they do that, you're more likely going to do what's best for your business in the long run and not just short run. Cool. 7, last but not least, if you heard some of my values earlier. So I'm just going to repeat some keep leveling up as one of them. The other one is defaulting the action, be open minded, right? Those are just three. But you can see these aren't just like one word things, right? It's like honesty. These are actually, they're actionable. And so my point is, if you're going to do this, if you want to hold people to a certain level of accountability, make sure your core values are ideally actionable, right? Because that way you can actually say, hey, when Neil actually did that, that was an example of that was him leveling up. That was him defaulting the action. That was him kind of owning his wins and his losses, right? By doing that, and calling that out consistently, you're going to be ahead of, I would say 99% of companies out there. And I will tell you one more thing before we go. The books I've been reading over the years, I've just noticed that the top CEOs in the world, the number one thing that they all obsess over is culture. Culture used to seem like a bunch of baloney to me and used to be very intangible. It might be intangible, but when you think about culture, it's really alignment at the end of the day. So that's why CEOs obsess over culture because it comes down to alignment. So that is it for today. Please leave us a rating and review, maybe even a subscribe and we'll catch you later. We appreciate you joining us for this session of marketing school. Be sure

Neil Eric Google
A highlight from The Evolution Of B2B Customer Experience -- Michael McLaren // Merkle B2B

MarTech Podcast

08:11 min | Last week

A highlight from The Evolution Of B2B Customer Experience -- Michael McLaren // Merkle B2B

"The martech podcast is a proud member of the HubSpot podcast network to find great business podcasts like this one, visit HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. From advertising to software as a service, to data. Across all of our programs and clients, we've seen a 55 to 65% open rate. Getting brands authentically integrated into content performs better than TV advertising. Typical lifespan of an article is about 24 to 36 hours. We're reaching out to the right person. With the right message and a clear call to action, that it's just a matter of timing. Welcome to the martech podcast, a benjy sham, LLC production. In this podcast, you'll hear the stories of world class marketers that use technology to drive business results and achieve career success. Will on earth, the real world experiences of some of the brightest minds in the marketing and technology space, so you can learn the tools tips and tricks, they've learned along the way. Now here's a host of the martech podcast, Benjamin Shapiro. Welcome to the martek podcast. Today we're going to talk about B2B marketing as it exists in 2022. But before we get to today's interview, we're going to kick off the show with a marketing minute where we invite a friend of the martech podcast to help answer a listener questions in 60 seconds or less. Here for today's marketing minute is Scott declarey, who is the host of the success stories podcast, where Scott sits down with leaders and mentors to unpack experiences and share tactical strategies for business professionals, entrepreneurs and everyone in between. And the success story podcast is also a fellow member of the HubSpot podcast network. And Scott was kind enough to answer a question from Ben Lynn, who was a digital marketing manager at happier. Ben asked, what is the difference in marketing's impact between product lead and sales led growth? All right, here's Scott's answer. Marketing when it's complimenting sales led has to complement a purchase that is only made through a sales lead interaction. So everything has to be supporting what your sales reps are literally going to be saying on the phone in order to complement that conversation. So this traditionally would be large outbound B2B enterprise, even B2C industries and focus on outbound sales. Versus product led where the marketing should be focusing on creating demand on creating a flywheel that will generate awareness that will generate traffic that will turn into free signups that will turn into pay subscribers because with true product led, there isn't any interaction needed to try by expand and then renew versus sales where the purchases always through a sales that interaction. So marketing for sales lead, I don't think that's the way organizations should be going, but it should be focusing on supporting sales, conversations with customers versus marketing, that's product led, that should be focused on creating a demand generation flywheel that's driving people into your funnel to try your product and then eventually buy. Thanks Scott. If you're interested in hearing more from Scott on the success story podcast or any of the other great hosts in the HubSpot podcast network, go to HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. Okay, on with today's interview. Joining us is Michael McLaren, who is the global CEO of Merkel B to B, which is a data driven customer experience management company, purpose built to help companies succeed in today's dynamic B2B environment. With over a thousand hardworking individuals across the globe, Merkel B2B brings together the most effective B2B capabilities and competencies to architect modern day customer experiences. Yesterday, Michael and I talked about the rise of the millennial B2B decision maker, and today we're going to continue the conversation talking about the evolution of B2B customer experiences. But before we hear from today's guest, I want to take a moment to thank upfluence for sponsoring this interview. Are you looking for ways to boost your brand's visibility without over indexing on performance marketing? Whether you're looking for a professional creatives or if you just want to enrich your existing database to find your most influential customers, affluence will source influencers and create custom sequences to automate and influence our outreach campaign that creates long-lasting and profitable relationships with your brands ambassadors. The affluence influencers CRM makes it super easy to manage creators all in one place so you can keep track of your favorites, work with them across several campaigns, easily build list, and it also integrates with ecommerce platforms like Shopify and Wu commerce. So if you're looking for ways to diversify your marketing mix, it's time to start boosting your brand's influence with upfluence. Ready to tell a better brand story and drive more revenue from influencers, go to get dot upfluence dot com slash martek. That's get dot upfluence UP ENCE dot com slash mar tech. All right, here's the second part of my conversation with Michael McLaren, the global CEO of Merkel B2B. Michael, welcome back to the martech podcast. Thanks very much, Ben. It's great to be here. Excited to continue our conversation yesterday we talked about, you know, there's a new sheriff in town. He's a millennial. He's actually moved out of mom and dad's house. He or she, they, if you will, and maybe even married has kids. We're like old folk now and we're actually getting some respect at work with making some decisions. And that's changing how people are thinking about how to do their B2B marketing yesterday you mentioned millennial B2B decision makers generally are mobile first. They're very digital marketing centric, but also they could be very purpose driven, care about not only what they're buying, but who they're buying it from. Talk to me a little bit about the evolution of the B2B customer experience. How is the change in the buyer changed how we think about marketing B2B products and services? We think seeing a pretty profound transformation in the B2B customer experience, which has been fueled by a number of vectors. First of all, the technology landscape has changed fundamentally. The advent of the cloud, the growing capabilities of the connected marketing clouds and the ability to thread data and identity through the digital experience as opened up a wealth of opportunities. And honestly, in many cases, as being driven by customer expectations. So let me just walk through a little bit. First of all, customers expect you to recognize them when you engage with them. If you are an existing customer, there's nothing worse than being treated as an anonymous unknown individual. So that requires the organization to recognize them to apply some insight from the data that they have on them. And then to build a experience for them that's as relevant as it possibly can be based on what we know. So the key mandates of today's customer experience, is it relevant? Is it valuable? Is it something that is of value? And that will elicit an engagement from the customer. What we value what are typically what a database business values from a customer first is their name, their address, their details, their role. So in return for that information, what are you offering in return? And the key other dynamic is connected as a buyer or prospective buyer moves through the brand's digital ecosystem. Are they having a connected experience? Are they moving from an email exchange to a dot com experience to a commerce transaction engine in a seamless way a connected way where their data is flowing with them? And are they getting served content and experiencing brand experiences that are relevant to

Scott Michael Mclaren Benjy Sham, Llc Benjamin Shapiro Scott Declarey Ben Lynn Merkel Hubspot BEN Merkel B B. Michael Michael
A highlight from Lloyed Lobo Shares His Secrets to Building His 7-Figure Community #1981

Marketing School

05:11 min | Last week

A highlight from Lloyed Lobo Shares His Secrets to Building His 7-Figure Community #1981

"You can serve? With this community here. It's a mastermind. It's a group of people that can connect. There's this unique thing. A good way I figure out in terms of mapping that, apart from what their jobs are, where they work, et cetera. But it's like, who do they fund, meaning what tools they pay for? Who do they follow? Who are the influencers? And who do they frequent? What blogs they read, what events they go to, because once you map that out, then you can start when you start doing activity, you can start inviting them, like Niels and influencer in the tech community. He was one of our first speakers. And that drives the community even more. This rule is really important set aggressive goals. So last year, when the pandemic hit, we had 40,000 subscribers. And I had no keg and maybe some of you have heard of him. And he said, I challenge you to get to a 100,000 subscribers by the end of the year. And I said, I don't know how I'm going to do that, but I'll take you up on the challenge. By the end of the year, we got to 97,000. Now it's like a 115. But then you start doing deliberate activity. You start working backwards from that goal. And one of the key things I did was started hosting more and more events with partners and they would promote it and then more and I'd get more and more subscribers. Now we're adding thousands of subscribers every week. The other thing is I talked about this, figure out one channel, one offering. And this is a very important quote. It goes back to what he then had told me is if you try multiple things and your mediocre, you're doing, but if you nail one, it's going to blow up, right? We focused on community, and it helped us get to 10 million. Then we raised a 123 million in funding between debt and equity. We hired a hundred people in the last 6 months without any recruiter. We paid no recruiter if he's a hundred people in the last 6 months. It's pretty aggressive. We raise the money loss December. January, almost died of COVID, came back, then hired a hundred people in the last 6 months. We brought our CTO from aval era 13 billion market cap sales tax software company, our CMO came from four exits. We brought an independent board member who was the SVP and into it. And then build another company and sold for a billion. All from the community. All this from that, you start to build this sort of mini brand. Once you've built this massive community, and it's been great. And everyone else is like, how do you hire so many people? How many recruiters are you paying for? What is your recruiter Bill? And I'm like, and so coming back to the start with one and do one thing. A lot of people ask me, oh, you have a community? Do you have a slack group? Should I start a Facebook group? And I said, no, just focus on one thing and do it the world doesn't need the n-th Facebook group. The world doesn't need the N slack room. They just do one thing well. For me, it was events. I love events. I hosted my own wedding. My wife was a resident. And so I planned the whole wedding. She was in residence and didn't want to deal with it. And I've got an Indian background. I plan the whole Bollywood style wedding. I love hosting events. And so I started doing more and more events, higher relevance. And that started growing the community. Every time I do an IRL event, more people would show up. So pick one, and then from those events, we moved to a podcast. Now we have a YouTube channel, which is each Sessions getting 10,000 views. When you start with one and do it really well and then expand. I don't know if you guys heard of Mark Robert. He was the CRO at HubSpot. He's got this great framework where everything you do is in phases. The first phase is validation. You just need maybe 5 ten people to show up regularly pay for it. The next phase is product market fit. You're aiming for higher retention. Can you keep getting the same people coming back over and over again? After that is product channel fit. Can you figure out one repeatable scalable channel? Once you're there, then you are at a point of skill. Then you spend two thirds of your time scaling what you've nailed. And you spend a third of your time trying new things. And so that applies to community as well. I view community as an extension of the product. If a lot of people look at community as this sort of thing, a group of people and whatever. But if you treat it like your product, you'll actually build an engaging community that keeps growing. This one is an example from products. I get users to an aha moment of a value from the first interaction. Perfect example of this is Clubhouse. Although I don't use it. But when I signed up, they had one of the best onboarding experiences. I signed up for a Clubhouse. I got clubbed in with 5, 6 people, as soon as I joined within 20 seconds. And one person from Saudi Arabia, one person from Kuwait, one person from UK, one person from San Francisco, all Friends of mine. And I'm like, how do you guys even know each other? And before I even know it, we're having this conversation. And I'm like, realized, wow, that was a great experience. So whatever you do, if somebody comes to an event or an activity that you host get them to then aha moment right away, get them to experience the wow so that they want to keep coming back. This is really important. Try to incorporate multiple senses. So we started with building events. Now, if you look at it,

Covid Aval Niels Mark Robert Facebook IRL Hubspot Bill Youtube Saudi Arabia Kuwait San Francisco UK
A highlight from Rise Of The Millennial B2B Decision Maker -- Michael McLaren // Merkle B2B

MarTech Podcast

07:59 min | Last week

A highlight from Rise Of The Millennial B2B Decision Maker -- Michael McLaren // Merkle B2B

"In 2022. But before we get to today's interview, we're going to kick off the show with a marketing minute, where we invite a friend of the martech podcast to help us answer a listener question in 60 seconds or less. Here for today's marketing minute is will Barron, who's the managing director of salesman dot org and the host of the salesman podcast, which is the world's most downloaded B2B sales podcast and a fellow member of the HubSpot podcast network in his podcast will help sales professionals learn how to find buyers and win business in a modern effective and ethical way. And will has been kind enough to answer a question from Katie rose, who is the director of sales enablement at spark post, which is one of the world's biggest email senders. Katie asked, what is the best way to scale and enablement program for B2B SaaS companies with limited resources? Okay, here's well's answer. Hey Kati and thanks for the question. There are three things to consider when scaling a sales enablement program. Your influence, the software that you're using and your internal insights. So let me explain. Your influence because sometimes in the corporate world, rightly or wrongly, return on investment, case studies and data is just not enough to break through the status quo and to get things moving. And so I would focus just as hard on adding value and building relationships with your internal stakeholders as I would on the sales enablement itself. Next software tools. Now, they're all pretty similar. It's the resources within the software that's going to impact the numbers simpler sales movement software that gets used is way way better than complex software that no one bothered with. And finally, your internal insights. If you've got sales reps exceeding the sales quote right now, they should be defining what your sales enablement looks like. Don't give your sales team what you think that they need, give your top reps whatever they want and give everyone else what they require to become a top sales rep. Thanks, will. If you're interested in hearing more from will Barron on the salesman podcast or any of the other great hosts in the HubSpot podcast network, you can go to HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. All right, on with the show, here's today's interview. Joining us is Michael McLaren, who is the global CEO of Merkel B to B, which is a data driven customer experience management company, purpose built to help companies succeed in today's dynamic B2B environment. With over a thousand hardworking individuals across the globe, Merkel B2B brings together the most effective B2B capabilities and competencies to architect modern day customer experiences. And today, Michael and I are going to discuss the rise of the millennial B2B decision maker. But before we hear from today's guest, I want to take a moment to thank affluence for sponsoring this interview. Are you looking for ways to boost your brand's visibility without over indexing on performance marketing? Whether you're looking for a professional creatives or if you just want to enrich your existing database to find your most influential customers, affluence will source influencers and create custom sequences to automate and influence our outreach campaign that creates long-lasting and profitable relationships with your brands ambassadors. The effluence influencers CRM makes it super easy to manage creators all in one place so you can keep track of your favorites, work with them across several campaigns, easily build list, and it also integrates with ecommerce platforms like Shopify and Wu commerce. So if you're looking for ways to diversify your marketing mix, it's time to start boosting your brand's influence with upfluence. Ready to tell a better brand story and drive more revenue from influencers, go to get dot upfluence dot com slash martech. That's get dot upfluence UP ENCE dot com slash martech. All right, here's my conversation with Michael McLaren, the global CEO of merkle B2B. Michael, welcome to the podcast. Thanks Ben. It's great to be here. I'm excited to have you on the show and to talk a little bit about B2B marketing this week. We're going to start off with who's in charge. We're kind of getting out of the area where the old gray hairs are running the marketing department. The kids are taking over. The millennials. That's very true. It's not your grandfather's B2B. That's for sure. We're seeing the increasing influence of millennials and gen zs in the B2B buying process. And they're there both in terms of influence, but increasingly in terms of buying power. So they're becoming increasingly significant. There's an increasing importance to their role in the B2B purchase process. I remember when I was 24 years older, so I was living in Dallas, Texas. I was working a low to entry level job and me and all my Friends were scraping together our shekels and pesos to try to buy some light beer and have a good time on the weekend and this is back when people used to read magazines and I remember there was a Time Magazine cover that said millennials, when will they grow up and it was a 25 year old man in his childhood bedroom with his mom tucking him into bed with the picture on the front of the magazine. And I was so offended because I think I'm on the border of millennial myths. I was born in 1980, not to date myself, but I'm going to date myself. And the idea was we were the generation of millennials where the generation that wouldn't grow up that wouldn't leave mom and dad's house. Now nobody mentioned that we were riddled with college debt and that the job market wasn't great when we graduated. Now all of a sudden, hey, we're in charge of B2B businesses. So are you finding that people are taking their zoom conferences from their childhood bedroom at their parents place or do the average millennial move out, get some roommates? What are millennials stand these days? How do you think about the millennial buyer? Well, I think they're very savvy, very smart and very demanding. I think the data is showing us that it's a cohort that brings new expectations to their engagements with B2B brands. And a lot of those expectations are being informed by their experiences as consumers. This is a generation who largely grew up with all the digital tools at their disposal. Certainly from teenage John. So they've been used to a mobile first digital first kind of immersive experience that they have with different brands. And I think they're bringing that expectation with them increasingly to how they want to do business as they move through their careers. So that's one big change. And I think it's a significant difference. The idea of a digital native versus a digital migrant, someone who's immersed in all the tools and they're familiar with navigating digital ecosystems, they're familiar with searching for content, they're familiar with screening things that are not relevant to them and very frankly adept at it. So I think it's a really interesting audience. There's certainly not slackers, which is often how they've been painted but in the media. That's definitely not our experience there. Savvy smart, and quite sophisticated. Mom, if you're listening, we're not slackers. We're savvy. We're smart. We're sophisticated. All words that start with the nest. You mentioned the difference in not only the research, but buying behaviors of millennials. It's not a salesman knocking on their door, trying to sell them a vacuum cleaner. It's not a conference and cocktails. It's a website. It's content that's found in a search engine. Does that mean that millennial decision makers are less interested in personal relationships? When you think about what actually drives consideration, is it all fact finding in digital content or is there still a personal

Michael Mclaren Katie Rose Spark Post Barron Merkel Kati Merkle B B. Michael Katie Michael Time Magazine BEN Dallas Texas John
A highlight from Facebook Organic Marketing: What Works in 2022

Social Media Marketing Podcast

08:25 min | Last week

A highlight from Facebook Organic Marketing: What Works in 2022

"Show. This is your tenth appearance on this show. And you've been on my other show, the talk show, at least ten times, so you are definitely at the top of the list for the most frequent guest ever. Thank you so much for coming back. Well, my pleasure, I'm honored. That means I'm an old timer now. Well, you know, I guess we have experience. That's the good news, right? And it's super exciting to think that we're still in this game, all these years later. So we're here to talk about Facebook, your area of expertise, and what do you want to say to marketers who feel like Facebook is just a pay to play game right now and they're only focusing on the ad side of it. Why should they marketers really focus on organic marketing when it comes to what they're doing on Facebook? Because a lot of them have been kind of disenfranchised. What do you want to say to him? Yeah, yes indeed. Well, first of all, I completely and utterly empathize with the disenfranchisement because it's it can be crazy making Facebook's really changed a lot over the years organic reaches definitely tagged. It's roughly average of 5.2%, lost studies I looked at. And yeah, it's easy for us marketers to say it's all paid to play. However, if we stand back and say, wait a minute. Facebook is still, after all these years, you were just talking about this is my 15th year of being a Facebook expert. It's still the number one social network. And it's still absolutely perfectly feasible to get free reach free engagement. It's a wonderful place to connect with your audience, still very, very possible to get great results with organic. Besides all of that, it gets you some SEO. You get your video post and your regular post often will show up on page one of Google when people are searching for your business. So those reasons alone, I'd say you've got to keep doing organic. But as we get into this conversation here today, I'm going to give some of your I'm going to give you a list of some great tips and ideas on maybe what they might be doing wrong and what they can do instead. Well, yeah, let me add a couple of my thoughts on this. My first social platform was Twitter. And then it was Facebook and then it was LinkedIn. Kind of in that order and pretty darn close to session. I find that I get the most engagement on Facebook than I do on Twitter or on LinkedIn. I find that the people that I have known for a lot of years, yes, some of them have moved on to other platforms, but there's a super loyal community like me who just has become habitual checking Facebook, multiple times a day. And I think that's really important for a lot of people to think about. While it's true that Facebook tends to be like the 35 and older crowd, you know, the parents, if you will, of the younger generation, these people love spending time on Facebook and they spend a lot and they're in there a lot and one of the marketing principles that so many of us marketers need to think about is we need to go where our prospects and customers are. And I would argue it's still one of the biggest platforms in the world. So let's not overlook it. Absolutely agree. Yeah. There's different market segments, different demographics that have maybe using Facebook slightly less, but then there's others who are using a lot more and just definitely become part of our daily habit. I love that you said there's techniques and tactics that you can still use that work and if we think about what Facebook is as it's a massive, how many people are on Facebook right now? Combine total is over 3 billion if we include Instagram and what's happened messenger? Do you remember what the last official Facebook number was? 2.7 billion somewhere in there. Was it that big? Okay, yeah, it's massive. And they just released some data that there's 2 billion people on Instagram. I don't know if you heard that. It just came out in the last few days as of this recording. So you're dealing with a population probably most of the English speaking population in the world. My guess that has a computer or a phone is using Facebook. So let's talk about what we can do with organic content. Let's talk about what you're actually doing with organic content on Facebook because I think you're getting better than 5%. I know I'm not always getting better than 5%, but my guess is you're getting better because some of the things that you're doing. So tell us what you're doing on your profile. Absolutely. Well, to inspire hope today with your listeners, I will tell you that some of my posts get as much as 200% organic reach. Which is practically unheard of since like 2012 onwards. But it's still possible. And so hopefully after today's episode, your listeners will be empowered. So you're asking me what are some of the things that I'm doing? How is Maurice Smith? And we're recording this in late 2021, but it's going to be 2022 when it comes out. So in 2022, 2021, what is Mari doing herself with content on Facebook? Big focus on visual. I mean, Facebook is absolutely very similar to Instagram and so far. It's like visual posts that is images and video posts. And you can definitely still put a link in there. We'll talk about that coming up. Facebook Live. I used to do a lot more Facebook Live. I'd probably go live at least once a week if not twice. No, maybe every other week. Also events. Facebook's really built out of those events, whether it's free or paid, comp paid online events. So when you say events, you mean an event that's tied to a Facebook page. Absolutely. Yeah, it's a Facebook event. Set up on the page. So you're using that to do promotions for your webinars and stuff? Is that what I'm hearing you do? Well, I stream the webinar right into the Facebook Live, excuse me, the Facebook event. It's literally when you go to create event now. If you select that you're going to do it through Facebook Live, they call it a Facebook Live event. So you schedule the live. But there's also an event page attached to it where people can RSVP, you can boost it and promote it. You can see some insights, demographics of who's interacting with it. It's a great tool. And then they've had it all kinds of things like classes. You can do classes for your paid and you can use the rooms up to 25 people if it's a video or a zoom. But if you think you're going to have more than 25 people, you would just connect it up through Facebook Live or you can do an external system like Zoom. A couple other quick things that would absolutely have a very active linked groups or group that's connected to your page. And then two more quick things that I'm doing that people can learn from is do not be afraid to post less often. I was just the other day talking to one of my students in my classes and she works with a team of commerce and I looked in her the page was posting three times a day. Wow. And trying to help her understand nobody gets up in the morning, rushing to see what's my team for commerce posting on my news feed on Facebook today. So maybe once a day, maybe even once every other day, if you can, but okay, fine. Any small business, if you're posting three times a day, you're going to have probably even lower reach. Because that's a lot of competition to get your content into the news feed. And then the final thing that really want to underscore in this particular segment of our conversation is how radical it is to have a cohesive strategy. Facebook doesn't live in a silo. I know you know that, but I always drive traffic from other sources. So I'll put my weekly newsletter, put people driving back to an event or alive. I'm always driving people to my group from other sources and building it up. We can't just assume, okay, people are going to see our stuff because they're on Facebook. You got to catch them in other places as well and have this full on cohesive strategy. Just for a second, talk about the power of groups because it feels like they've done so much to improve the power of groups over the last year or so. Unquestionably, yeah. Over the last year, plus, for sure. It was like 2017 when Zuckerberg first had the community summit was in person community summit. And from there, they just keep evolving groups. They're even going to be bringing out where they're called subgroups, and even a way to have paid subgroups. So if you have a really large group and have to be large. But you have a group where there's maybe some niche topics that members might want to participate in that you'd have a subgroup, and it could be paid or not. Yeah, the Facebook's even gonna allow group owners to download the contact information the email addresses of people to sign up for these subgroups. So they're really building out the groups and all the admin tools and the metrics and student coming soon have heard this from good sources that you know when you go to join a group and you can ask questions. Right. One of which might be asking for their email address and adding it to your list with permission. Finally, Facebook was going to be allowing us to actually gather that

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