Education

Hear what's happening in the classroom with the latest news and analysis on all things academia. From remote learning to higher education, smarten up with audio broadcasts aired on leading talk radio shows and premium podcasts.

EVIT Criminal Justice Instructor Derrell Branch & student Sheyla Vazquez

Good morning, EVIT!

02:26 min | Last week

EVIT Criminal Justice Instructor Derrell Branch & student Sheyla Vazquez

"Her on Sheila. Could you tell me about your experience at Edith? Yeah, even I joined last year like, mr. Branch said I just wanted to get like criminal justice classes and even it was like a great opportunity to get those college credits without paying a lot of money for it. And so right now I'm on track to get my associates in me. He's really not aside from being a student in the criminal justice program. She also participates in the Mesa Cadet program with the police department so off your first domestic a dense program, what is that? So the Mesa Police Cadets is built with like fourteen or Twenty and a half year old. It's a transition from high school to log. Forcement we do a lot of Mesa PD like community service. So let's community service look like we did the drug take-back people would drop off they're expired drugs and we would help out directing traffic asking how they are just so they know it's not just law enforcement. It's high schoolers who want to go into law enforcement and just getting that face-to-face with a service member what a wonderful opportunity. So I'm going to switch back to our instructor and how you see this being important in terms of the cadet program and other programs like and I think it's an invaluable because none of the hurdles that are students go through is that they graduate from high school usually around 18 years old and then police departments won't hire them as sworn officers until Twenty-One. There's a little Gap Thursday but a program like this the cadets were experiencing that exposure to the criminal justice system so that she can decide when she's old enough at 21 if that's career. She really wants to go into age. Mr. Branch, I don't want to pay that back to your background being important Career and Technical education is always been something that I'm I think is really really important that I'm passionate about because not only do the students get off an education. They also get real world experience. So that transition between being a law enforcement officer and then now being an instructor I'm able to teach the students from that real-world perspective. And what does it mean to you to have an instructor with this kind of experience. It just makes life and class so much easier when I love how my sister Branch looks at it like he lets us know what he did in the field and it's so much better if that makes sense great. It sounds like it's very important

Mesa Police Cadets Mr. Branch Sheila Edith Instructor Career And Technical Education Officer
Choosing A College When You Don't Know Your Major

The Scholarship Shark Podcast

06:07 min | Last week

Choosing A College When You Don't Know Your Major

"It might surprise you to know that fifty percent of students enter College as Undeclared Majors undecided or Undead. Layered refers to an admitted or an enrolled student who has not yet selected a major now while there's nothing wrong with being Undeclared. It does mean that you have to ask yourself different questions about your building your college list. For example, you would need to think about which schools are best for undecided students. What makes a good college for undecided majors and should I go to a college with a lot of Majors or apply to specific schools many different types of schools. So what does it mean to be undecided again off when you apply and you haven't selected a major and a major is an area of study that you pursue through your course work. For instance. If you're a history major, you're going to take a majority took courses in history. And if you're an engineering major, you're going to spend a lot of time taking engineering classes and upper level math classes. So one thing I want you to know that job Being an undecided major is temporary. You don't graduate from college undecided the purpose of coming in as an undecided or Undeclared major is to get the student time to decide on what they truly want to major in before they have to declare it now different schools have different times when a student needs to declare their major and maybe at the end of their first year or the beginning of their second year and there are some schools that allow you up to your junior year to declare your major. Now, I do want you to know that being undecided wage doesn't mean that you can't build your list. It just means that you have a different checklist and a different criteria for picking your universities. So let's talk about things that you need to consider as an Undeclared major. So number one decide on the location. Do you want to stay close to home or are you willing to travel a distance to get your education wage? This could open up possibilities as you're thinking through your college list. So decide on the limits of how far you're willing to travel is a necessary First Step number to think about your in-game. So what is your ultimate career goal? And even if you're not very clear on exactly what it is you want to do think about a general area or some common themes about what it is that you want to do and then begin to write down a list of all of the majors that will help you get to that career goal. So, you know, if you want to start college Undeclared and you're thinking about, you know, various Majors many different majors and you can't just pick one then you might benefit from options provided by larger University so that you have more Majors from which to choose so try to find a school that offers a great number of authors. Ends that you're potentially interested in and then that way as you're taking some of your first year courses your core courses it gives you time to think through exactly what it is that you want to change number three consider an open curriculum college. Now, there are some colleges with what's called an open curriculum program is designed to enable students to develop their own program of study with the help of Faculty advisors. So schools like Amherst Brown Wake Forest vs are offer Open golf program. So you go in and you really go in Undeclared and you're allowed to build your course of study with the help of your advisor off. So, you know think again about those types of colleges on your list number four, and I think this one's really important but make sure you have support Wrap-around support services. So there are some colleges that have advising for Undeclared undecided majors and it's really important to make sure that you know the schools on your list do Provide support for students who check that box on their application as undistracted or Undeclared schools such as University of Maine and also USC University of Southern California. They have very strong Undeclared advising for students to help them begin to think about what it is that they want to do number five think about extracurricular activities, you know, you you're thinking of, you know, don't just focus on the program of study. But if you're as you're looking at schools, you want to take a look at the types of wage Opportunities and experiences experiences that you can have through society's through professional organizations. For example, let's say you'll enjoy writing but you're not exactly sure what you want to do with that. Well, maybe there's a campus magazine or journalism club or a college paper. Those are all great ways for them to explore writing a little bit more to see the type of writing a major you may be interested in pursuing. So it's important to get some of that real life experience and you can use the extra curricular activities as ways to do some Discovery as well as Co-op experiences research opportunities and jobs internships any kind of hands-on experience and positions that will allow you to discover a little bit more what it is that you may want to do Thursday.

Amherst Brown Wake Forest Advisor University Of Maine Usc University Of Southern Cal
The Pros and Cons of Study Groups

Next Up. Student Success!

06:41 min | 2 weeks ago

The Pros and Cons of Study Groups

"Our first take two topic is study groups are creating study groups. We talked a little bit about using study groups as a tool at 5th week grades with dr. Khadijah Miller in episode 19 of season, two age. So now we want to share a little bit more information. So trusting and I went online to see if we could find a couple of quick links that students could go to to get more information about this because life is more than just. Okay, let's get together. There are some ways that are more or less effective for organizing your study group, for example, so one resource that we found was foul to create an effective study group and it's put online by college Raptor. So what's that? Well, that's a website for high school students actually to five colleges. So what we're going to do is a part of this series is to let you know what we think about the sources of information as well because you can't always trust everything you hear or see on the internet. I like college Raptor as a resource because their focus is on helping students. So even though providing these types of tips is not their main focus. I do think the information they provide it is totally legit. So you can check that out. We will have a link to that on the post for this episode. The other link that we will have on the post is called how students are leveraging online study groups and birth provided by US News which is a reputable news source. And so there you go to links that you guys can go to and get more information about this topic. So trusting wage. I know because we've talked about this before that you are someone who uses study groups. So what are some of the pros and cons of study groups? Okay, we can start off on a bath. It's the weekend on a good note. Okay. Phil Collins for having a study group, I would say the level of dedication and each member if some people are saying oh, why are we meeting on the weekends, This house is until Wednesday. Why can't we just meet Tuesday night and then other people are saying well, we need to study together as a group and then I want to study on my own. So I want to meet on Friday. And then how many people are saying? Well, I work Friday is Less meat Sunday. It's a lot of personalities and it's a lot of different levels of dedication. I want a group where everybody cares about their grades. That will be the first con. Okay the first challenge, right? Okay. So the second challenge with having a study group would be the actual group chat for me personally. I'm the type of person. I don't want a lot of notifications about a bunch of random stuff. I barely like to text people as it is at rather someone call me or FaceTime me. If you're blowing up the group chat where it's for a study group for a specific class. You're not talking about the class you're talking about. Hey, what's on the menu at the CAF today Hagen as I won't be in class Q sign-in don't be in the study groups and stuff like that. So the second call of your boundaries because not everybody has them and not everyone knows how to set them. So that will be the second con for me in particular for study groups. Okay on a positive note on a positive note. I love study groups off. I am the one in all the classes if we're in person. I'm passing around and she did notebook paper saying hey everybody put down your name your number and your email we're starting a study group because I'm a pass this class with or without child, but you know a class that studies together passes together. So I'd rather it be in a team environment job. A big collaborator. I like conclusion. I like for everybody to be on the same page. If I don't understand the lecture notes one day I can put in the study group say hey guys take anybody take notes in class. I have a question about blah blah blah and then if someone took notes and understood it a different way than they could help but positives and prose for a steady group one way. Everybody has different notes. Like I said before so this different interpretations because people have different learning styles to it allows you to have an accountability partner because if they you see in the group chat. Hey guys, y'all know the assignments due tomorrow and you forgot about the Senate your then immediately reminded about it and you have a person to reference if you need help with it three. It's a support system. They say it takes a village to raise a child. Well, this is your village for this class. So there you go students from another student study groups pros and cons. Yep. Your chest and that was awesome. So I'm just going to sprinkle a few more factors and that you might want to think about listeners as you're forming. You're starting groups are not number one if you are shy and you think well, I don't want to study in a group or that's not your thing. Think about at least forming a group around midterms or finals or big projects number to Thursday. And then and some of this advice comes from the two articles that we mentioned you can have roles in a study group as well. So maybe one person is the person who provides the best notes, but one person is a person he pulls out the main topics that need to be focused on and somebody else takes notes or somebody else reminds people so you can set up a structure for the group and that can help to keep it going and part of that structure can also be agendas. So to trust his point about one of the cons you can organize this group as you sort of would a little organization and to help birth. To succeed and also another Point related to one of the cons and as mentioned in the articles that we link to our the numbers. So probably a good range of phone numbers is maybe three to five or six people and then that'll help you to have an easier time to coordinate and make sure everybody has a clear role and but enough people that again you may share those notes and get the benefit of the group The dressing as we wrap up here. Did you have anything else you wanted to chime in on relate to study groups my closer message for this trip would be Thursday not impossible and on the last set and you just have to be more dedicated posted on discussion board or email your classmates to set up a group chat, but it is not impossible just because you're virtual.

Dr. Khadijah Miller Us News Phil Collins CAF Partner Senate Hagen
Survival Tips for Unchartered Territory

My Two Cents with Towanda Harris

04:14 min | 2 weeks ago

Survival Tips for Unchartered Territory

"Hey Educators. Let me start off by saying that this is unchartered territory that no one has figured this out. There are many lessons that we're learning as the days go on as the weeks go by and as the months just fly through. We are reminded that first and foremost relationships matter. Now they mattered before yes. Of course, relationships with our students always matter but in this virtual space, it's important. That we are showing our students compassion that we are empathetic in their situations but also that it's reciprocal that as we show it to them. They are able to show it to each other and to us as well. Valuing off perspectives valuing of voices in this time is. Important. It's important that we acknowledged that all experiences are great experiences. Now, when I say great, not that all experiences are happy experiences but they are experiences for us as a school community as a classroom community as the educational community to just be able to talk about the things that are affecting us on our day to day basis. Another thing that we have to remember is that patience is a virtue patients with our students, as well as patients with ourselves as I said before we haven't figured this out and that there is no normal that we are actually on this journey together. So we have to be patient with ourselves. Understand that today might be a great day of learning, but tomorrow might be a So-so and the next day we might go right back to a wonderful day of learning. It's all about enjoying the I, cherish the moment and understand. That, we must be forgiving of ourselves as we are forgiving of our students. Next flexibility is key. Being flexible and allowing our learners to take the driver's seat. Yes I know that is a scary place to be. But they are brilliant. The things that they have been learning in this time are priceless. So we want to make sure that we are allowing for students to talk in a classroom that, yes the black box is a place to just. To, be able to express themselves as well as converse with each other and an us. So we want to make sure that we provide spaces for that to happen for their thinking succumb ally. And lastly, engagement engagement looks different. It looks different for us. It looks different for students it looks different for Monday as well as it does look different. For Friday, we want to make sure that we are not defining engagement by the student that gets off of mute and talks or the student that always turns their work in. But that we are looking through the lens of all of our students, all of our students are black and Brown. Students are white students. Are Asian students are Hispanic students all of our students we want to make sure that we are looking through the lens when we are determining or planning for our learning experiences from day to day as well as week to week, we understand that this is not a comfortable place for anyone, but we also have to acknowledge that we are in this together. So as we go through this school year, please be reminded that relationships matter that patience is a virtue flexibility is key and that engagement looks different for different students.

Brown
Reflecting on a New Report on the Experience of Disabled Students in Higher Education

The Wonkhe Show - the higher education podcast

03:58 min | 2 weeks ago

Reflecting on a New Report on the Experience of Disabled Students in Higher Education

"Start this week not with covid-19. Change but with a new report from the policy connect higher education commission arriving at thriving highlights the work that still needs to be done to support the full participation of disabled students. Thought she I'm already tell us more. Thanks Jim. And so this is a new report from policy connects h e commission. It is called very casually arriving at thriving it's a great Rapport and what I really like about is it's genuinely listen to student perspective. It's got 12 recommendations that right across the student life cycle and these recommendations really ensure that disabled students can fully participate in Haiti. And what's really interesting about. The report is that it's very clear that there's a benefit for all students when we ensure that we get it right for disabled students and it's interesting the report I think cuz there's a few moments in it where the recommendations she talked about a need to focus on outputs. But of course most of our regulations certainly in England focuses on outcomes. Absolutely. The report is is really interesting and actually it needs to be given much thought. Providence and I think it's likely to get to these in these times which is a great shame. The the point that I'm really just made in introduction there about the fact that all of us students benefit from from from making sure that we are properly accessible. I don't mean accessible in a just a physical sense, but but but thinking about that policies and procedures and the way in which we we look after each other and so on so it's really important and finally we need to give it more prominent than it's currently God. I married this thing about, you know, the kind of deficit model that it talks about. I mean should we spend more of our time helping disabled students just navigate an access h e or actually should our Focus be on sort of everyone around disabled students, you know administrators and support staff and academics because it doesn't have a picture of a sector that appears to not really understand the needs of this group of students. Yeah. I mean, I think what's really nice about the twelve recommendations is that they're sort of a balanced portfolio so some wage You know pointed it shouldn't behaviors and particularly around social belonging. It's fellow students who helped you to feel like you belong to an institution not necessarily that you know, the administrator that you interact with. So some of them around student behaviors, but I think the the bigger aim here is to really get institutions and the regulator moving on on some very clear improvements for disabled students. I think particularly for Professional Services listeners this idea around the burden of bureaucracy. I mean University Systems are hard for most students in in my experience. They're particularly hard for students who have disabilities. So I think there's a lot of valuable takeaways for institutions and I guess what's really nice is it's got joined-up approach outside of an institution as well as so it talks about these joined up plans for each stage of a student life cycle may be logged in is a pupil at school or college and then moving through to the labor market and that's really got to be the the ultimate aim of game rights have a joined-up approach across all those sectors and obviously we're in the middle of a pig. Global pandemic at this point are you getting any sense that you know, the the needs here particularly for disabled students in relation to access are changing cuz some people tell me that you know, things are getting actually much better for disabled students. Suddenly, you know, everyone is agreeing to lecture capture where some disabled students were lobbying for that for years, but other people are telling me that actually new needs a new disabilities are coming to the surface wage, you know, each time. We we make progress on on something we make progress in in One Direction or another what we need to really now do and I think the reporters saying is you think about it in in all of those directions to make you know, make sure that we understand the impact that one's going to have on on another. I think one of the first things that we really need to do and universities absolutely and not just universities. But Society more widely. We need to make it off absolutely the case that people feel able to to to be who they are and to and to discuss their

Administrator Haiti JIM Providence England University Systems Professional Services
Connecting with Learners  Learner Centered Approaches

Mayo Clinic Educator's Central

04:21 min | 2 weeks ago

Connecting with Learners Learner Centered Approaches

"Heard. You talk before a bit about teachers centered and Learner centered and I was wondering if you could maybe definer just Kinda. Let us know what that means to you or so yes, you're right. I do have a an interest both from my work and research even personal work on to the topic of connecting with learners and it's one that's important to me I i. think it's important to talk about what we mean by connecting and connection because that could have so many meanings. From me, I like the definition that's used by John Maxwell they. Miss Author coach. Leadership. Coach. Leadership. Development. where he talks about that connecting is really the ability to be able to identify with people and to relate to them in a way that's able to increase your influence with them. So I think that you know teaching and learning is an ultimate form of influence right between individuals and so to begin with this concept of teacher centered verses, Learner centered, which is again something that I've talked about. Before I really think of both as sort of a spectrum and they're both methodologies right of teaching and learning what they represent is more of a paradigm shift in education Today in approaching learning, that's really more based on needs and styles of contemporary learners. So if we take these individually, we can talk about Teachers Center at first what does that mean? Well, typically, that's when we have become from the perspective that the teacher is the authority in the classroom. So this is typically seen more in approaches that utilize more of the lecture style. So the teacher is talking to the students and the students role is more passive that role is to listen and to learn through listening to the teacher. The goal here in the educational setting or environment is for the teacher to transfer or impart their knowledge. Right. The teacher is their knowledge is seen as the most valued source high in the learning exchange. So like that sage on the stage phenomenon, right? So that's what that's more commonly referred to siege on the stage in contrast if we come from a learner centered perspective. That's where as the teacher or the faculty member we really feel more of a personal responsibility to have ownership for an active learning environment. So in a learner centered environment, the learners are actually encouraged to interact to even some cases challenged the teacher's knowledge perspective. But most of all, they're really encouraged to co create and construct meaning around the material along with the teacher. The teacher is not the only authority, not the only source of expertise what learners bring from their own experiences potentially can help in this sort of co construction of meaning around the material and learners are really encouraged in a more of an independent problem solving approach around the material so that they're learning is live and. Just passive not just listening receiving, but contributing and even on critical analysis right. So in this sense, the teacher is the guide who's providing them with Kayak on the side. From sage on the stage guide and the side are some Particular ways that people kind of reference these little broaches I love that. So easy to remember to that sort of shift with those two phrases sage on the stage to guide on the sides I love a lot for me. I think that a key concept in the framework of Learner centered approach is that you're valuing and therefore being very intentional about connecting with the learner

John Maxwell Teachers Center Faculty Member
College Application Month

The Scholarship Shark Podcast

05:25 min | 3 weeks ago

College Application Month

"About college application month what it is and how your family can get involved in your local area. So the American college application campaign is a national effort with middle schools hosting in school college application events, and this typically happens around October or November. So although college application Month Club. Hello for the most part in October It's Not Unusual to see a high schools do events in November and some of these events include workshops writing workshops workshops on completing the FAFSA understanding the financial aid process or actually writing your essays you I find a lot of public schools do this and their English classes where students are required to work on their personal statement essay. So they actually carve some time out for students to do this and it's also a time when many colleges offer fee waivers, whether it's for the entire month a week or just a day and so it's a great time for students to really focus on applying for college. And so the reason why this event exists its primary purpose is really to help High School seniors, navigate the college application and admissions job. Process and to ensure that they apply to at least one post secondary institution. So again these efforts occurred during this the school day with a focus on students who might not otherwise apply to school or for students who are planning to apply and typically do apply in a geographical region or for school to help the schools get very organized and focus on those efforts. So a college application month really does build excitement and enthusiasm around the college application and the echo rationed process. And what I want you to know is that sometimes for some schools they have college application month. They may have college application week or they may extended over several weeks or even a day or few days. So although the organization calls a college application month the way it looks in your school, maybe a live birth. Bit different but what I want students to do is to reach out their high school guidance counselor or go online for your school and I'm going to share another resource where you can find out as well, but find out you know what your school is doing what's happening in your area your region and in your state because again so many great things happened during that time in terms of information, but one of the big things that I really like is that many colleges offer fee waivers. So this is application fee waivers because here's the truth, you know, the most common application fee to apply schools about $50 and if students are applying to let's just say for colleges at $50 that's $200. And so anytime you can save money on this process cuz this is a cost that family's really don't think about kind of one of those hidden costs such as test scores and you know sitting down, Test and sitting your scores and if you do it after you sit for the test, you know, all these little fees can begin to add up. So if you're able to eliminate a fee all the better, so again often colleges in an area will wave after wave the college application or college admissions application fee that can save you money. So it's really important to find out what your your school the colleges where you're looking to apply. What are they doing and let me give you some examples of just how different it can look some states offer in partnership with their local colleges and these are public university and colleges and sometimes even private ones but they have waivers for the entire month. Sometimes students have to enter a code maybe in the Common App to get that fee waived. Sometimes they offer it for a week typically in North Carolina game. Have offered it for a week this year. They're extending it for two weeks. So students are able to apply to the colleges that participate in North Carolina without having to pay the application fee for up to two weeks. And then in Colorado, they actually have Colorado free application. So this year is going to be on Tuesday October 13th falls on a Tuesday and students who reside in the state of Colorado can apply to all 32 oz public colleges and universities and Colorado as well as a few private colleges without having to pay that application fee. So again, it's really important to pull ahead and see you know, if my school is offering or the school. I'm interested in attending if they're going to waive that application fee go ahead and get it in before that fee waiver expiry. Is very important

Colorado High School Month Club North Carolina Fafsa
Students return to campus in the UK

The Wonkhe Show - the higher education podcast

05:17 min | 3 weeks ago

Students return to campus in the UK

"Are packing their bags and moving into accommodation returning to campus. The term is getting up and running. The government is nowhere to be seen off on looking from your perspective. Oh, well, I've tried to keep my head down on it. Actually we've had it's been a you know, you as you can imagine an enormously busy time. We've been playing for this moment for four or five months. We have to keep adjusting the plans. We keep having, you know review government policy and advice that's coming in and local advice from northamptonshire. And I I find a lot of the media a distraction actually. I mean I did I did listening to you and yours that you were on earlier in the week marks. I thought would be really interesting to get the the perspective of parents families and students from all over the country and it was interesting but I think I found that the kind of the torrid frenzied pace of the media wasn't really helping a sink clearly through the issues where we had to take responsibility for things and make you know, birth. Decisions with a huge amount of uncertainty and lots of independent variables. So I'm really pleased to see if students come back onto campus. We've had teaching this week. It's been long distance that many students or staff indeed wandering around the campus in between times, but the rooms have been occupied and at that means I think that as far as I can tell all the plan to put in place for our lenders face-to-face and online teaching are going as well as we could hope at this point. We are we are dealing with high Flex that she may want to talk about cuz I know Jim came by Flex earlier, I think a few months ago, but we couldn't work out another way to do that where we had students who had to be off site and students who had to be on site and we didn't have enough rest and resource to teach them separately. So we are at the office trying to teach them synchronously and that's obviously challenging technically and and pedagogically course and you mentioned you and yours the thing that struck me about that and this thing into lots of popular dog. Pictures of the last week or so is that kind of cuz the concern of parents starting to cut through and and they're calling into radio for their writing to their MPS and that they're certainly making making Making Waves and I guess the government is has noticed that input really found a way of responding yet. But I've noticed that and that was that was kind of my take away from that. Are you seeing are you seeing kind of anxious parents as wage dropping effect of their children? Are they kind of talking to the university? I'm not getting it directly actually one of the things I find interesting about that you're you and your Christmas what I thought was actually rather infantilizing a month and the the presenter kept referring to you know, did you let your children do this and she kept correcting herself, but you know, obviously it's a very difficult time because I've got a seventeen-year-old and talk talking to a lot of parents and I do you know, I I fully appreciate what an anxious time is but my, you know, my my daughter says I said to her would you go and she was like, yeah, I'd really want to get started. Want to get stuck in and I I think I think one of the things we've we've done wrong actually in the whole representation of this is to treat it, you know Planet campus if it's different from the rest of the world and I think well, you know students been in they've been coping with all the things that would happen in the last five months six months. They don't expect University, you know to suddenly be this completely different world wear masks don't have to be worn or you know, there is some social distancing and I don't think we should compare this year necessarily to previous years as if we could wind the clock back cuz we can't wind the clock back. All we can do is make this here. It's good as it can be and I really think we're doing that simplifies to the parent who said there's an academic as well. And he said what we're doing is really hard. We're doing the best we can it's really important we do it properly and I totally agree with that. Yeah. Yeah, Joe. How're things on here Thursday. This week so our students were arriving this week. So all the majority of the undergraduate surviving this week. So could have lots of fingers crossed that it goes well, but just to kind of taught to transport with the past six months off. Of preparation that's been I've never seen anything like it in in higher education. We forget six months ago. We were working out how to do assessments online. So we could finish the last that could be Academic Year and then those kind of cheese contingency plans will be putting in place of have been meant that people work incredibly hard both are the teaching side of the learning technology side, but also on the operational side in terms of wage accommodation making sure that the the campuses can be as secure as possible putting testing and and tracing operations in place in short. So I think they're kind of paying for the office hoping for the best approach. Hopefully that that that will get us through I think just for talk to the point in terms of the student experience. I think we just have to do the very best we can for students to get the best education and birth experience that they can get under these circumstances. And as a Shaun said isn't isn't normal circumstances. We can't we can't pretend to teach but I think for these eighteen-year-old starting University now dead. I mean they've had a pretty challenging few months themselves with the with the results Fiasco, but also they've been locked down at home. They haven't been socializing with their the school friends. And in the same way that they would want to in the last year of school. So I think if I were a teen I'd be wanting to get to University irrespective of the of the circumstances.

Government Northamptonshire Starting University Academic Year Shaun JIM JOE
How To Teach Geography

Layers of Learning Podcast

05:26 min | 3 weeks ago

How To Teach Geography

"Michelle how do you approach geography first of all I teach as a separate subject in the United States at least geography is taught as part of social studies. So it's lumped together with history mostly social studies, history geography and government, and a little bit of economics. That's what social studies is, and it's taught is one subject but I like to separate those things out because I think that geography deserves a lot more time than it is given. Okay. So Michelle explained this. If you're studying. Ancient Egypt for example. How is that different in your mind than studying? Egypt. In geography what's the differentiation? Well, the difference is that history is the study of everything that's come before it's the hugh story of humanity but geography is the story of what is happening. Now, at this moment, what is going on in the world today it is the study of the world that we live in the people we live around the different countries and cultures that we interact with, and is also the study of ourselves today because when you study someone else, it helps you to see yourself more clearly. And you can make comparisons yes between the two. So yeah. Geography is really the now of history and a lot of ways in that it includes you know the physical geography land forms and landscapes and by oems and all that stuff. But I actually think we spend more time focusing on the people of the world and countries and cultures than we do the physical stuff but both are important. Well, often the physical helps shape. The borders, the boundaries exactly, and so they are really interrelated but. It is pretty fascinating when you start to study the people's that currently live in the world around you and you really begin to understand the cultures and the things that make people who they are. So? I think there are four. Big Aspects of geography and lots of I mean. Different people defined geography different ways and the different focuses. But there are four that that I like to focus on in my home school and the first is physical geography. The shapes of coastlines, the the continents, the ocean landforms, Selanne forms, the mountains, the desserts, all that kind of stuff. And climate, and the second thing is a map making Howard maps made and how do you make map and then how do you navigate with the map? Those are all. Part of geography, and then the third one is political geography, which means countries and capitals, roads, populations that kind of stuff, and then the final one is culture. So what is the religion of people? What is what are their holidays like what language do they speak? What kind of clothing do they wear? You know? What is what are their attitudes about family or? Different things like that. That's that's culture. So all those are the four things that really to mirror different of geography that I like to make sure we hit on. When I'm doing our home schooling with the kids. So by the time, your kids graduate. Ideally, what would they know in an overall way? I want them to have a map of the world in their head first of all, and that doesn't mean that they have to know exactly where every single country and capitalists, but they should be very familiar with the whole world. If they hear Judy mentioned in a news article, they shouldn't be wondering where in the heck is that I've never heard of it they should know, oh, that's an Africa, and hopefully they know, oh, that's over on the east coast of Africa. It's interesting as I've traveled a lot. I'll hear people talk about how. Many other people in the world. Know about the United States of America. But Americans. Know very little about most of the other countries in the world it's because our schools do not teach geography and and it's really kind of sad but it's very true but the other countries in the world have so much to offer. Then that's the second thing that I really want my kids to know the map in their head I think is important for context for understanding the world we live in but to understand the people who were in the world is even more important to have this concept of. This person who is from Africa is going to have a completely different world view than I do but that's not bad. It's just different and if I understand that their world worldview is different, I can probably have a better conversation with that person. We can understand each other a lot more clearly than if I'm assuming that they're just like me because people are the same everywhere in the world, but we're also different everywhere in the world. Yeah. Beyond just the country borders and you know that map in their head concept I also want my kids to know other specific parts of the map I want them to know the major desert, the major mountain ranges. Just it feels like part of being educated, right? Wing those here Andes Mountains and not be wondering wait wait Andes Mountains. Is that in Maine. Not Be thinking that you should know it's in south. America. You know I want my kids to be able to picture the world to be familiar with the places of the world, and then also to appreciate the places and people in this world and so that's kind of my goal you know before they graduate they don't have to know every single fact

Andes Mountains Michelle United States Africa America Egypt Maine Howard Judy
Jodie N. Mader, Thomas More University  The COVID-19 Pause

The Academic Minute

01:47 min | Last month

Jodie N. Mader, Thomas More University The COVID-19 Pause

"While the virus sent a direct path to remote teaching. The unclear direction is a scholarly research. What happens to those who had planned sabbaticals in the fall or spring of the next academic year? Faculty who have been awarded the right to research for a half or full term may have to reconsider whether they're sabbatical is viable. Now given the restrictions on travel and social distancing. Moreover, faculty who had planned to apply for tenure and or promotion may have to contemplate whether they're scholarly pursuits should continue or wait. Faculty, who are working to finish a publication. Possibly central to their application will have to decide whether it can be paused. Therefore. What does research me to a faculty member in Twenty Twenty? How can sabbaticals be reimagined such as the format location in time? How can scholarly research be re conceptualized in terms of the future of academia? Can Higher Education be more flexible and innovative in how faculty balanced teaching and scholarship given the current pandemic world While there are many unknowns in higher education. The hope is that colleges and universities will consider how to be innovative in transparent with faculty. Who will be balancing much more in the upcoming year In the faculty to. Bring to the table new solutions on research and writing to continue this component of higher education that was Jodi and mater of Thomas. More, university.

Faculty Member Twenty Twenty Jodi Thomas
Maximizing your sports opportunities: An interview with sports coach Patty Luu

Make the Grade with Dr. Steven Greene

04:37 min | Last month

Maximizing your sports opportunities: An interview with sports coach Patty Luu

"Shoot. Let's think from the perspective of appearance. Let's say we're apparent and we have a child his interested in sports and maybe they've got some talent and sports. It looks like they can take somewhere. maybe at the high school level entry level Middle School Level Navien College Level D Two d one would ever. What's the benefit of working with the sports psychology person like what sort of techniques? do you think they would gain by working with somebody with yourself? They were there. There's they would have more confident kids there will be less family drama due to not arguing over their sports performances so much you learn to effectively communicate with your child about their sports performance. And he basically have evasively. There's basically less family drama more confident kids less stress, less performance anxiety in. Their kid will be able to replicate the magic that they produce in practice through competition because a very common issue for athletes is that they're able to put on a magical performance in practice. However, when it comes to competition that seems to be like the roadblock, they're not able to replicate that performance in competition especially in crunch time. Yeah, well, competition obviously, there's more pressure. It's the same thing in academics where you Norman academic coach if you wanna use that term. And I work with kids all the time that can do all the problems in. Homework time or in practice time, but then it comes the testing. And it's a much more anxiety ridden situation. Without, giving away to shop here but what are you doing? Is there some specific things you can talk about? That you can do to help your your mentor, your proteges, your children, your work with. Get ahead when they're in a competition let's let's investigate that a little bit. Well if parents invest now fake about invest in a person such as myself now, they'll save down the road because I will get your children to the point where they are consistently performing at their best rather than randomly. spontaneously, you'll be consistent so they'll be able to get back. College scholarship have a better chance of getting that college ethics scholarship. Routine okay. So is this done? Is this in addition? To the, Pratt. Let's just pick A. I is there a sport you work with more than others? I wouldn't say that right now I'm in I I worked with athletes in a variety of sports. Let's just say a basketball. Okay for talking purposes. So, we have a child who's a town has made it not even a talent. They just have a big passion for basketball. So they're probably on a team, they may have a coach they may have an shooting code or dribbling coach I know. Is what you're doing in addition to that is it coordinated with that? how how, how, how does that work in terms of? Because I know a lot of parents I talked to their biggest one of their concerns they got lots of concerns and coding myself as a parent is just. Right now, things will wacky with school, but then there in this practice in his practice, then they go to discuss then that close times always at a premium. But So what are you actually doing to put the child ahead? What what's your process or what what are you giving them? Maybe they can't get anywhere else. Well. I help them with structuring their practice a little bit like outside of the mandatory practice in training skittles like if they practiced on their own I. WanNa to make sure that they actually practiced to improve their skills not just practice what they want and When they practice what they want, they work on their strengths that the skills that they light are their strengths and they don't work on their weaknesses. I helped them scheduled their practice sessions where they are actually working on their weaknesses so that they can actually really improves their skills. And they're not practicing same thing over and over again.

Middle School Level Navien Col Basketball Norman Pratt
Dosomething.org - Earning Scholarships Through Community Service

The Scholarship Shark Podcast

02:10 min | Last month

Dosomething.org - Earning Scholarships Through Community Service

"Often students struggle with finding unique and creative volunteer opportunities. And today scholarship tip combines two things in that is community service and scholarships end. So I wanNA talk with you about do something dot org. On they offer scholarships but the way students earn scholarships is through community service. So I like to use the page in two ways not just for the scholarships, but it's also a great resource to help soon, think through some service projects that they can be a part of me launch on their own or at least get involved to. Win. One of the do something scholarships. So the way they do something scholarships work for students who are twenty five years old or younger than they live in the US or Canada. They're going to school or planning to go to school. they're able to participate in this community service scholarship. There's no essay, no GPA requirements recommendations no. And the other nizing as you can enter multiple scholarships at the same time So the organization is very generous awarded over one million dollars in scholarships over the past six years with over three hundred winners. And you know if you win and you're not in school yet, they will hang onto that money for you until you graduate and go to college. So I did an episode where I interviewed a do something dot org that's episode Number One, twenty three and I'm going to include that Lincoln the show notes. So definitely check that out because you learn a whole lot more about this scholarship and the organization and how their scholarships work, but they have scholarships all the time and this is really good because often. Younger students will say you know maybe if sixteen or seventeen year old maybe ice will more junior may say you know I wanNA start applying for scholarships want to start. Working towards winning scholarships. What can I do? This is a great one. So definitely, check out do something dot Org and learn how you can earn scholarships through community service.

United States Canada
Johann Neem, Western Washington University: Higher Education Meta-Vocabularies

The Academic Minute

01:58 min | Last month

Johann Neem, Western Washington University: Higher Education Meta-Vocabularies

"Today on the academic minute Johan Neem professor in the Department of History at western Washington University discusses three men vocabularies and why the least dominant could be the most important. My research argues that our debates over higher education have three better vocabularies, the utilitarian, the pragmatic and the virtue ethical. The first two are dominant especially among citizens and policymakers too utilitarian colleges must satisfy the preference of higher education's consumers to pragmatists including many elected leaders. Institutions must consistently evolve to meet the changing needs of society and the economy. To Virtue. At this on the other hand, colleges have internal goods of their own such as the cultivation of knowledge and curiosity about the world and these internal birds require practices to sustain them including, valuing basic over applied research and teaching. To virtual emphasis, colleges must change the world rather than just adapt to fit it. That's how university is structured and what faculty members and students do while in college shaped the ultimate educational and scholarly outcomes. Many of today's most popular form seek to make higher education faster cheaper standardized but threatened the kinds of academic practices that cultivate intellectual virtues. By understanding these Meta vocabularies, we can make sense of the ways in which participants in the public conversation around higher education talk past each other. We can recover a shared language for Liberal Education I. Hope my research will help college students, their parents, voters, and policymakers. Makers understand the different perspectives that we can use to think about the purposes of college. Ultimately, in my research I wanted to understand why professors like me are uncomfortable with reforms that to many others seem to make common sense. By identifying these Meta vocabularies. I was able to see what was at stake for all who care about higher education's future that was Johann name of western Washington University.

Western Washington University Johan Neem Professor Johann Department Of History
Rebranding the PhD with Chris Humphrey

Papa Phd Podcast

05:19 min | Last month

Rebranding the PhD with Chris Humphrey

"Really happy to have you here especially given the years of experience you have helping people with masters and Ph ds like just mentioned finding their path and I think a word. That I think is really important is in the abundant number of career opportunities that are out there I think this one key thing that that people are going to. Wealth people need to understand to kind of break this this feeling that they may be failing at life or at least at the their professional life if the. End Up leaving academia after after graduate. School. Yeah it is. It is. So hard to describe when you see the light bulb come on somebody's head in new. People people just say. It. Yeah. And it. It is. What always of joys me on like just when somebody says down they felt or how lost or how they didn't know what to do, and then they say that you I when you're okay now I just. Found the way forward or hope or something you know you just why would why would have stopped? Doing what I'm doing I mean because that's the greatest thing you can do. Even if you change one person's mind or sometimes I talk to one hundred people you know I think if I could. Difference that many people but not like yourself day job what you're doing on your the more that can do it that more intense. We can have and we can reach more people in our own countries or in different languages. or different backgrounds. So yeah, it's it's cool to fail that there's more there's more of us than. Doing this doing this thing. You don't just listen think about being a PhD that just you just have this unique. Bonding Experience With With with anybody else like I just met you but you know it just. It's strange. We everyone knows what they went through, and then just you can just click with people and. It's powerful as powerful stuff. So as I mentioned, we talked before about Chris's PhD and you can find our full one hour and a half conversation on the Papaya she youtube channel. We eventually also talked about what led up to his post doc. Chris. Was Now considering after his post doc and after the his after applying to some lecturing positions and not having the materialize thinking. Okay. What am I going to do an end looking at the non-academic landscape and seeing where he was going to fit? How did you go about that? Were there appears around you who were also having that reflection. How. Was that process? How easy was that process or not easy? I was that that. Exploration. Let's say. He is kind of mixed because I think on the one hand. As I kept getting rejections from the academic jobs, Kinda go to feeling of. Like feeling of running out of time or this is this isn't going well. If I could just get academic job everything would be. Okay. So that was like a downside to it but on the other hand you know. I was really excited by the things that I was saying around me like like the Internet was something that was just really taking off in the late ninety s and I was just fascinated by the internet and this whole and. I mean I. I say Democratic Dissemination of information which is. Not. Disney triple the time easily, but the way. To access to information or study or learning the United. States can be quite elitist or privileged or and causal money and time, but just like the idea that. The anybody can just access any type of information videos and things as well. It was coming along time and could learn anything. They had the Internet connection did just Exchange. My view of the world and so excited me as an educator and as a scholar, this potential and always really enthused by that and could see this trans transformative potential of it and so that's when I kind of thought. Well, this could be an area where. You I would be happy and excited to work in, and then I had to try and figure out. Well, how do I get to that from medieval studies? kind of like the opposite. Of this new of this new techy technological thing. But then I figured out. There was this area of e e learning with a training where people were taking courses that which Clause three more even vote on a CD. You know we're not making it to the web and I just thought is dies That's what I'm GONNA do. I really had to look. For jobs and companies. looked. Learning companies read white papers and things are. Looking googling jobs, you know learning jobs based training and I saw that they were these jobs out Aaron. Didn't necessarily know how to do them. I felt confident that if I applied job I reckon I could I could do that and so that was my plan B. Really that. Stuff didn't work out then come at the end of my funding. This was going to be.

Chris Youtube Disney Aaron
Building Your Brand as a Student

Make the Grade with Dr. Steven Greene

03:25 min | Last month

Building Your Brand as a Student

"Know one of the things you think is important is. College Age students or students in general learning. How to brand themselves right building their personal brand. Normally, we think about maybe with movie stars or. Personalities or something but let's get into this. Why do you think this is important To me without giving away the shop how they can do this. And how you can help people do it. So let's let's let's hear what we got here. It's important for so many reasons and not just for college students for even students who are at the high school level or even at the middle school level thinking about why they are going to go to college. So the why is essential? So I don't know if you're familiar with Jeff Selene goes new book WHO GETS IN AND Y. But that book I think. It came out this week and I got a chance to preview the intro chapter and one of the So the basis of the book is that he was able to. Be in the admissions office of four universities One of them was emery in Atlanta One was I forget the names of the schools, but the example is from emory. So it was him going through the admissions office seeing how they pick their classes. So not the highest Yale's in the harbor is not the highly highly selective universities, but the you know somewhat selective universities and how they make the decisions. So he told the story of you know emory university going back and forth. With various students who are interested in going to the school and one of the examples that he used was a student who was, interested in microbiology however, on the student's application, there was no indication of any clubs, any volunteer work anything at all that would indicate that this was something that the suit it was really interested in had a true commitment to. So even at the middle school or high school level is important because if you're going to a college which is competitive with going you're going to be. Competing, with other students to get in, you want to establish what your brand is student. So if you are interested in, you know the sciences or stem or something in that regard, a highly competitive major you WanNa do things at in college or in middle school so that we use some at your college application You are standing out you're doing things that shows the university that you are truly. Committed and you have a history of being committed to whatever the major is whatever the industry is while you are an undergraduate's a consistent. Thanks. So they're looking at, you know not only your essay and your sat scores in your great but they're show it. They want to see that you are. You know you've done some thought you took in some you've taken some consideration about what you want a. Major an in why this is important for you. So that's the short answer. I know that wasn't that short but that's the short answer about why building a brand is important and as you said, is some you know you think of it as a business thing or maybe you know a celebrity may think of it but it's important throughout whether you're in middle school and even when you graduate from. College. You want to establish your brand as being someone who is. Expert or Going to be an expert in. In your major or in a particular field. So that's why building plan important

Middle School Emory University Yale Jeff Selene Atlanta
FASA Cycle To Open on October 1st - Here's What To Do

The Scholarship Shark Podcast

06:31 min | Last month

FASA Cycle To Open on October 1st - Here's What To Do

"About a week ago through October the first the facet. Has a planned outage? This allows for the new updates to load in the system and it will open on October first. Now, the fastest cycle lasts twenty one months from October one before the school year begins and it closes on June thirtieth of that year and each year their system changes and processed guidelines that can cause issues when logging in or when processing your paperwork, and that is why I always recommend waiting about a week or two because the irs website might be experiencing some technical issues and you really want them to work it out. there is no big rush to log on October one or even. October. Second to do anything the money's not going to run out in a day or two and I want to talk about what you can do two things to really important things you can do during from now until you complete your Fassa that will help get you moving in that direction. So I know a lot of times families here that you know the money is on a first-come-first-served basis and that is true. the funds that the schools received they allocate based on you know as their students submit their applications and acceptances or made. However, they're not gonNA run out of money in a week or two. So waiting is always in your best interest because. You know in the past, there have been issues with the data retrieval toll when the federal government went to a different shorter tax form, I believe that was twenty eighteen there were issues or with the two thousand eighteen cycle. So you just want them to work those issues out and you don't WanNa be the Guinea pig you don't want them working out on you so. No rush you know maybe put on your calendar for October fifteenth or even October thirtieth but no rush. So. Here's what you can do. Instead two big things. Number One, really start to gather all your documents. So everything in place ready to go so that you're just in all the data. So one of the first things you want to do is get your F- Essay I D, and you can create that at f. s. a. ide- dot E dot go the have this link in the show notes. And both the student and the parent will need to create their own FSI ID and you keep it private because it's your electronic signature. and you will use this. Your student will use this for all of their years of school and parents. You'll use the same idea for your current student and if you have other students after this student who use that same day. Also make sure you have all social security numbers, driver's license license numbers and alien registration numbers if you're not a US citizen. Now you'll want to gather your W. Twos, federal income tax returns, any other records of income earned. And for the parents income you want to have the most tax return. So for this cycle for the twenty, twenty, one, twenty, two, you're going to have your twenty nineteen tax return. So just having on hand even though you will most likely be using the data retrieval toll there's some cases where you shouldn't use it, but if you're using it but it's still just really good to have it on hand as well as ten forty forms If. The Student Is Independent Bank statements and records of investments and just records of untaxed income, and this leads me to my second thing that you should be doing and that is no the schools you're you're planning to apply to so. Begin to think through the list of schools you're interested in attending. sure. You add colleges you're considering even if you haven't applied yet most likely students have not applied by the time you know it's still September. So most likely applications are not in. An for many students are still waiting to sit for either the sat or act. So you know that application may not be in yet. or You may not have heard back. But even if there's a slight chance that you'll be attending, that are applying to that college you one to listed on the fast form you can always remove it later if you decide not to apply. But if you wait too long if you're waiting until the this spring or later to at a school, you could miss out on financial aid. So my number two point is really to think through your list to build your college list and get those schools are on your list on your essay on the Fassa form. So that they receive your results electronically when you do submit. To help them to determine the type of a that you would receive. Okay. Now, you can list up to ten schools at a time on the form if you're applying to more than ten schools, this is what you do. So you'LL WANNA give it like a week or two be a week or you know for the school to retrieve the data and pull it off, and then what you do is go log. Back in Click on the homepage log into your F s you're facil- account and you'll be given the option to make corrections. What you'll do is just remove a few of the schools on your list and then add the additional schools hit submit and then it sends it out again to those particular schools. So again, the two things that you can do while you wait and don't rush for that October one deadline. I'm number one, gather all your documents that you're going to need all your supporting documents and number to really think through the school list because just completing it that step one but part of that completion process is knowing where's the information going and what what I don't want to Excuse me what I don't want to have happen is you know students kind of complete it and forget about it. In terms of the later lying for school maybe November or December and forget Oh, I forgot to add that school to the list. So really keep a list of the schools at you're planning to apply to and make sure that they are on the list on the fast form.

IRS Guinea United States
How to help your student focus on homework

The Scholarship Shark Podcast

05:00 min | Last month

How to help your student focus on homework

"By now, school has probably started for most of your students. And It's a mixture of how soon going back to school some are going back as. You know as if nothing has really happened and they're going back to full days summer doing hybrid days based on their last name. some are. Partially online some days and in the school other days and some students are fully online but. No matter. How your student is going back to school. one thing that I wanted to talk about and I like to do this these kinds of talks in this series at the beginning of a school year kind of our back to school series today I, just really WanNa talk about helping your teen focus on their homework and when I share three tips because according to the act research students who spend less than six hours per week at home during homework are nearly twice as likely to be low achievers. Than students who are considered high achievers so I JUST WANNA share to some practical ways to help your students succeed and you know again, it's going to be a little bit more challenging but they either just general ideas and this is really important because what students often don't realize is that when they're applying for college in the fall of their senior year, schools are looking back grades in their ninth tenth and Eleventh Grade Year. So those first three years of critical you know. So you really need to think of it as sort of you know the Kind of the on ramp where they should either maintain their grades or improve their grades and having a plan in place to do that will make all the difference. So tip number one really say clear goals and expectations What are the expectations? For each class. you know and began to discuss those with your student in terms of you know what needs to be done when taking a look at over a big projects getting those on your calendar. And having a discussion around what's a typical amount of homework each night I would say sit down and really talk about it and carve out a schedule to make sure that your student is doing their homework and maintaining a a study schedule specially if again, if they're in their junior year and they had their psat coming up in October. You know that's another element that they're adding on top of their regular homework. Number two I would say set up a proper study area. So to really help your student, achieve their goals, they're going to need a place to study. It may be a kitchen table dining room table. but you know, well, let area quiet area. place where there are few distractions or the fewer the better I know can be a little bit difficult especially if some parents are home. But you know having a dedicated space with the supplies that they need to avoid any last-minute trips to the store or Any kind of delays is really helpful. So knowing you know what that study area is going to be what you need, and then having a few things for projects because even in the virtual environment, there are students who will still be required to do project. So get those poster boards, markers, glue sticks, scissors, tape. You know all those things that you're going to need to do those projects and to present them virtually. and. Then the third thing to really help your student focus on homework and doing well would be for you to step in when needed. So. Don't be afraid to step in if they're struggling especially, if they're online I mean it can be very difficult, very challenging and so making making it a point to check in regularly to see how they're doing and maybe scheduling additional time outside of the classroom environment where you may not have needed to do it for particular one of your students but if you need to step been. Definitely step in and what I find some of the ways were students routinely need. The extra support is with time management and study skills. It's really know how to manage their time in this this kind of either virtual space or hybrid, and then study skills just general study skills and these kinds of skills were carry them not just through high school, but into college and beyond. So again, you know if if your students help. Consider getting a tutor or some type of support to help them so that they don't fall behind again I can't stress enough but you know really doing well in the ninth Anthony Eleventh Grade will set them up well for their senior year as applying. For Colleges.

Ray Brescia, Albany Law School: Social Distance and Social Change

The Academic Minute

01:51 min | Last month

Ray Brescia, Albany Law School: Social Distance and Social Change

"One Sunday night fifty five years ago tens of millions of Americans gathered to watch television broadcast of judgment at Nuremberg dramatic depiction of the post World War Two trials of German judges for their behavior during the Holocaust. With star studded cast it promised ratings gold. Once underway news alerts interrupted the broadcast that showed civil rights activists including the late John Lewis being beaten on the Edmund Pettus. Bridge. Since judgment at Nuremberg addressed the culpability of ordinary Germans for Nazi atrocities. The juxtaposition of the images was striking and helped galvanize public support for what would become the voting. Rights Act. But the leaders of the civil rights movement were not the first to utilize the most modern means of communication available to them to bring about social. Change. Since the dawning of the American experiment, social movements have long captivated our attention to advances in communications technology. The sons of liberty utilize the printing press, the women's movement of the Mid Nineteenth Century the telegraph. But the technology itself has not brought about change no in addition to utilizing advances and communications technologies these and other successful social movements have also operated through grassroots networks built on face to face encounters and embraced positive unifying messages that stress shared interests over difference. Today we facing unprecedented public health crisis that keeps us out of physical distance must also confront dramatic racial and economic inequalities. As, advocates have done in the past though we can leverage technology to create community across distance to see that we are deeply connected and must work together to bring about lasting change that was very brush of Albany, law? School.

Communications Technology Nuremberg Edmund Pettus John Lewis Albany
The return to campus

The Wonkhe Show - the higher education podcast

04:02 min | Last month

The return to campus

"Start this week with the returned to campus. We're only a handful of days away from the annual internal migration of students to their universities and amid rising cases of covid nineteen in the so-called affluent, young. We are asking what the returned to campus looks like in two thousand, nine, hundred, ninety. What can we expect in the next few weeks? She thinks Ho- Well What can we expect in? Wish I knew and I, think that's basically the problem. We don't know what to expect. I think as we the great migration as it's been cold, the docking of a cruise ship in city center says. The comparing it to to cad high. We've seen all ladies, Mexico. But the reality is we just die I mean that's not to say that universities across land haven't worked incredibly hard to make that campuses as Covid ciphers that can onto put in place kind of set of programs and welcomes and whole semesters in years worth of a new curriculums and Goal See to. To make this year as good as it can possibly be the reality is you know we're crossing fingers and hoping the Hoping that things go as well as possibly can. And others on one K. of have. Really put a lot of actor into understanding that guidance. And, of course, we know that at eighteen minutes past one this morning. Or yesterday morning depending on when you're listening to the PODCAST. The updated guidance finally dropped into universities inboxes. Alongside kind of updated track and trace guide full effort universities are basically as you say, acting this weekend silence everybody I think from ministers, vice-chancellors to parents to students. Are Hoping for the best. And an an really none of them know what's going to happen and we'll just the systems put in place I can account with whatever does happen every obviously You know one of the things certainly, I put in the you know the blog rarely this morning when sucked them look at the guidance while. In truth. We the runaway train was already a runaway try by which I mean we're going to try and reopen campuses months some months ago. and. I. Think it's interesting. It still not really clear that that's a good idea. But to some extent we are going with and we're trying to make the best of it and I I can't recall can whether it still a good idea? I think it probably is I mean, if we consider the fallout from closing schools and stopping exams I think there must be a parallel. You know having a million mostly young people sitting around with nothing particularly to do. Doesn't feel to me like a good idea. I also just wanted to say I really hope that some inspiring commencement, a speeches, this term. Students are not only joining the scholarly community at their university, but they're also joining kind of scholarly covert, aware and covid responsible community university i. felt a bit that the coverage has been very heavily tilted towards what universities could and should do but the needs to be a bit of a balancing call to arms from students. You know after all who are adults even if some of them quite young adults but I think they're old enough to understand that we are we on the middle of the global pandemic I can't have everything might. Want or expect more normal times and they've got pull their weight to and I. Actually I've got huge faith in young people's ability indeed that desire potentially to moderate their behaviour and their expectations I really hope that universities will also concentrate on kind of motivating and inspiring their students to become part of the covert solution and not become part of the covert problem.

Covid HO Mexico
Extracurricular Activities During A Pandemic

The Scholarship Shark Podcast

04:57 min | Last month

Extracurricular Activities During A Pandemic

"As the coronavirus pandemic requires many schools to continue online students are wondering, how can they get extracurricular activities? And in our scholarships segment I'm GonNa talk about what is a scholarship weekend? Welcome to the Scholarship Shark podcast I'm Pam. Andrews your host as a college admissions consultant I believe that getting into college does not need to be complicated for confusing and paying for it doesn't need to be costly and you're here because you believe the same join me each week as I share advice on the college admissions process as well as scholarship tips. So let's get started with today's episode. The impact of Corona. Virus is not just limited to the classroom. For some students starting school this fall you know they're still going to be online doing classes virtually. A hybrid where it's a few days in the classroom. And a few days at home online. but many schools are choosing not to do their extra curricular activities that require gathering large numbers of students together, and it's easy to focus on what we can't do. But in this episode, I WanNa talk about ways, students can get involved. And although you may not be able to do some of your traditional activities I'm GonNa just share three things and three comic groups of things that you may think about doing. As we continue to navigate through this pandemic. So you know you may not be able to participate in school sport or in your marching band or be a part of your theater production. But you can still participate in extracurriculars while you're at home or even if you're doing a hybrid model, you just have to be creative and it's really important that you don't neglect this part of you for several reasons number one. It's a great way to distress to develop a friendships to strengthen your leadership skills to gain self competence Extracurricular activities have all kinds of benefits, and of course you know applying for college, you will want to list what you've done in this academic year on your college application. So along with your high school your grades your class rank if you've been able to sit for the sat or act. and you're your recommendation letters and your essay, your activities, your extracurriculars, what you do inside of scorn outside of school were really show how you spend your time and what are you interested in so think of it as initiative and interest. So I wanted to share. Three things that you can do if you're not able to participate in some of the things that you've done in the past. Because I don't want you to think while I'm not able to do what I would like to do or what I've done last year or the your prior. So really what can I do? Not Share three three things that you could possibly do so. Number One, I want you to think about what did you do in school? In the past and how can you either do it online? Or? If your school offers it. So if your school is currently offering something, how can you participate for example, maybe your school still has student government and you're not meeting in person, but you can still participate online. So don't neglect those in school opportunities that are happening virtually. So see if your school is still offering some of the club's activities that they would normally offer, but just in an online format. And you know again think through what you've done in the past what you looking forward to maybe participating on your school newspaper or language. Clubs Academic Clubs You know again, take a look at those and see what they're offering online. Now if your school is not offering it online. Why don't you lead it start the initiative may get with a couple of students and offer that particular club in a virtual setting just simply reach out. To Your School, the advisor who helps you coordinate your activities and maybe write something down and began to share your idea. Now. As, you begin to think about things that you do in your school, and if your school is having it, if you find that your school does not have it again, maybe you can offer it in a virtual world

Consultant Corona Advisor
Cinzia Pica-Smith, Assumption University Discusses Interracial Friendships

The Academic Minute

01:59 min | Last month

Cinzia Pica-Smith, Assumption University Discusses Interracial Friendships

"And today on the Academic Minute Chintzy Pika Smith associate professor in the Department of Human Services and rehabilitation. Studies at Assumption University. Examines the relationship between Italian children and non Italians because of migration patterns. Italian schools are increasingly diverse spaces in which children of different racial and ethnic backgrounds, religious beliefs and cultural linguistic. Practices Interact daily these spaces provide fertile ground for a continuum of interpersonal experiences from Intergroup friendships, two incidents of discrimination and marginalization in our study one, thousand, three, hundred, fourteen, middle school students, and multi-ethnic schools in southern Italy were surveyed to understand the extent of their Intergroup relationships, their perspectives on Intergroup friendships, and their Intergroup cooperative as well as discriminatory behaviors. A sixty three item questionnaire was administered to learn to what extent Italian students. Relationship with peers both inside and outside of the school context differed from those of non Italian students. Findings revealed that non Italian students were significantly more likely to have Intergroup friendships than their Italian counterparts. Interestingly, school his street gender and Italian language proficiency did not predict. Intergroup. Friendships for Non Italian students and neither did time of arrival in. Italy cooperative behavior was significantly higher participants who identified as girls. There was no significant difference between. Italian and Non Italian students in their views of how non-italian students should be treated. Non Italian students and Italian girls were significantly more likely to report getting along. Well with classmates. Findings are congruent with the literature on Intergroup friendships from parts of the world where classrooms have been racially diverse for decades, and where research has demonstrated that racially minority students have more Intergroup friendships than white children

Italy Pika Smith Associate Professor Assumption University Department Of Human Services
A Simple Equation to Help Kids Love Math

Parenting: Difficult Conversations

05:26 min | Last month

A Simple Equation to Help Kids Love Math

"We're going to the equivalent of flipping to the back of the book to look right at the answers because we know back by listening to this math, you had to overcome some anxieties I bet of your. Yes. So let's get right to our takeaways and number one. Don't let your math anxiety hold your kids back. Nothing's -iety. As you mentioned is a real phenomenon all over the world and it's pretty clearly related to how we teach math in school things like timed practice and memorization and high stakes testing and oh my gosh, I'm getting. Hot Flashes and sweaty palms, just thinking about tests. Can here's the really upsetting thing that math anxiety it's not equal opportunity. That's right. It's tied to stereotypes race, and especially gender research shows that mothers and Preschool teachers who are overwhelmingly women they can pass that feeling onto their kids especially to their girls but there is some good news children are not born with math anxiety. All right. It's passed onto them. So I think that's why we have to check out selves in when we're talking about math this. was kind of a surprise for me because I thought that you know if my kid had a problem with math I could bond with him by saying, Hey, you know it was tough for me too but actually rose Marie says saying, I. Don't like Math I can't do math that will get conveyed to your children and the solution. Instead we need to reframe math yet rosemary says think about the fun activities that can back up and reinforce what they're learning. In school math is very much an integral part of your life do you love music i? Do I love to sing. All right. If you love music, then you love math do like to cook and Bake I love to cook and be okay. Then you love math because she can't do music and you can't cook and bake without math so I can't cook or bake really and I definitely cannot sing but I love baseball for example, and my boys. And I we talk about baseball statistics all the time. So what's important Rosemary says is recognizing math as part of many things that we like doing together exactly and so to see more about how adults can we've math into our everyday moments of life even with really little kids you and I and our producer Laurent Mickey visited Really Special Preschool new first reported this episode. This is back in two thousand and nineteen when we could freely move throughout the world. Watch US light today. This is the center for Early Childhood Education. It's our research preschool at Eastern Connecticut State University. The lobby has this giant, super, realistic oaktree yet which I climbed inside. Very cool. We should also say about a third of the kids at this school speak Spanish at home. That's right and at the preschool, we sat down with one of the lead researchers. Suda. Swami not done and she helped us understand a lot more about how to grow children who love math the minute we say math with think of the big picture you know Bagel theorems beore geometry concepts instead swimming not says thinks small she's a professor in Early Childhood Education at Eastern Connecticut State and her special focus is on early math learning and Sudha And her colleagues have done lots of research to see what kinds of childhood experiences lead to better performance in math later on and one of their answers makes up our second takeaway take number to talk about math take this really ordinary moment you asked them to put their books away and and say, doesn't fit the shelf. So why disadvantage fit? Maybe it's the book is too tall too big Suda says you're actually talking about math process it's problem solving. Yeah, and we heard lots of this by the way math talk at the preschool. As the duck fit in there too. He did fit when he was standing up. So you decided to lay down does he fit now? That's Amy Lopez the lead teacher for the toddler. It's a sunny room with a cozy reading corner. There's a play kitchen and blocks, and you're the center of the room. There's this table and amy sitting with the children they're building together with magnetized calls, which are these colorful plastic blocks with different shapes that stick together and the little plastic farm animals, and one of the kids is kind of putting together a house. You're using triangles and squares unique. Naming the shapes in both English and in Spanish. When we played this tape for Rosemary she said what I heard. There is the teacher using descriptive math language and that is so key for children to understand math concepts. You can't understand the concepts without the language. Yeah, and aim is not building the box for the kids cheese actually making observations kind of narrating their thoughts in real time the more blocks you on the longer dad's Cohen I notice that when you added more your line got longer and longer when she said Moore blocks to make it longer. Longer is a complex word for children and they need to hear that language and they need to hear that language in a very concrete way. She wasn't even afraid to use really technical words like when this little boy was trying to make a little corral standup. Now you can put them all around the perimeter all around the edge Caribbean or.

Rosemary Early Childhood Education Eastern Connecticut State Univ Amy Lopez Baseball Rose Marie United States Laurent Mickey Cohen Swami Moore Producer Sudha Professor
How To Teach History

Layers of Learning Podcast

06:21 min | Last month

How To Teach History

"So, what what do you do with history? What's your basic? Approach, while I will say this, you're the one who taught me how to teach history in my early homeschooling years so I do it very much the way that you Michelle For sure we've always taught history in order when I was in school I was always confused about when things were happening and how things were related to each other. When I learned about historical figure, it wasn't in context of where they were or when they lived and I never knew how things connected I I remember in fifth grade we did this project about the Aztecs and. Each like our teachers split us into groups and each group was doing a different hands on project by the Aztecs and it was a great project. I remember vividly how the Aztecs built their village or town right on top of the lake and that that's what my project was about and I remember that but I also remember having no idea when the Aztecs happened in history, I had no concept of win. That was I thought they were very, very ancient people that was my impression. And that turns out not to be true they actually were. More. In the colonial era, they were much more modern. Yeah I think that was the problem with my early education history is it just lacked connections I didn't understand what history could teach me because I didn't have any contextual basis for the people, the places, the events, I didn't have a complete picture in my mind. So that's been one of my goals with my kids is to help them see the big picture of history and to be able to. Know when and where things happened. So, let's back up and just start with when we say history exactly. What do we mean? First of all history starts with the earliest civilizations and I think that's something that. People. Get confused about because we know that there were caveman and. There's this whole Earth history that happens before the subject of history, but the academic subject of history starts with the earliest civilizations. Well. And that's not because the people who came before weren't important. It's because the people who came before didn't write down their stories in any way we don't have an archeological record of them not much and we don't have. Any records at all of them, they didn't build cities that we can go back and excavate. The academic subject of history is just the story of human civilization. That's what is. I often tell my kids. This is why it's so important for you to write down your stories because anyone who didn't have a record of their people or their lives or anything that happened. That kind of. With time and so history we're looking at, Hey, let's look at the story of the people who have lived on the earth and it's totally find teach about cavemen but there's not a lot of actual information that we know when we don't have any written records. So so layers of learning starts with the earliest civilisation. Yeah. We start with Sumer and the Yellow River valley in China and the Norte Chico People in South America. That's that's the beginning of the subject of history and we're looking at how did people create the first civilizations as they began to settle down and be able to live in a place. How did that happen? What contributed to them being able to do that and so yeah, we always start there in history and then as we go along, it includes the story of human beings, nations, cities, especially the great figures in history the heroes, the even the villains civilians to definitely but we learn about those people who somehow contributed and made a difference in the world whether good or bad. And I think we look at those things because it teaches us lessons for now. It's important to look back so that we can be educated for our lives now. Right right now, we are living at a point in history. We're making history were part of that whole subject, and if we study history, we can study all of the things that led up to. Now we can see this progression and some of its progress, and some of it is regression. We human societies tend to go through these cycles and there's Warren Destruction, and there's also building in great art and looking at all of this together is the subject of history I think that's one of the really interesting things that I have noticed as I've taught my kids history. I think a lot of people believe that we started with almost nothing in the history of the world, and then we little by little built up to this point that we have the Internet and technology and invention, and actually if you look back in history, my kids were amazed when we were studying ancient Greece and ancient Rome and they were saying if they just had the internet, they probably had pretty much what we have today. Mom they were a pre industrial society they had factories so anciently. They were very much like we are, and then it collapsed. Yeah. Followed Rome even before the Roman Empire the Mojo Daro people in India where at the same level that Rome was, but you know thousand years earlier. So it has happened over and over through history. So it's really interesting. One of the things that we learned from that is hey. Next year tomorrow who knows we could be reverting back in the exact same way that they did we are not immune in any way. And it hasn't just progressed and progressed and progressed. It has gone through cycles of change over time, and so there are lessons all along the way if we learn history in that Lens. and. Partly for that reason, Karen that that we can see progression and we can see cycles partly for that reason, we study history in order, and partly for the reason, we already talked about that it's important to have context you need to understand. Things that are going on at the same time in history you need to understand that this person came before that person that this war led to this event. Those progressions are important in history. So to teach it in order, I think vital.

Aztecs Rome Yellow River Valley Karen South America Greece Norte Chico India China
A Work Schedule without Childcare

Best of Both Worlds Podcast

04:19 min | 2 months ago

A Work Schedule without Childcare

"Had a very interesting blog post. Recently, I thought that detailed away that A. Two Person. Could Alternate things like in a very structured way you want to go into that. So I got an interesting amount of feedback from this not so much in comments on the blog but I heard from people who wanted to share it with other audiences because it just hasn't been spelled out exactly how a split schedule with two working parents. Splitting fifty-fifty could, in fact, work in could give both parties approximately thirty hours a week of focused work time. Mostly during the workday. So none of these like get up at four. I, am and work till I am things which if you have today you have to do but you also wouldn't have to in this sap. So the idea is. that. You have two different shifts on during the workday one is eight to three. And one is one to six, and that is predicated on the idea that it young children who are home are napping from one to three those a rough nap window. We are recording this at two-thirty right genevieve napping and Sarah does not have childcare today. And you know older children could use that time for independent work or for screen time or whatever you wanted to do. The idea is that that is that could be double in terms of the parents. One Parent is on during distraction. So some of their hours are not pure hours but. Mostly, two of them will be able to work anyway. So one party takes eight to three Monday, Wednesday and one to six on Tuesday and Thursday the other party takes one to six on Monday Wednesday and eight to three on Tuesday and Thursday, and then they alternate on Friday who gets eight to three and who gets one to six. So each week it's butts off there and what works out to is then twenty nine hours during the weeks when you have the three one secs shifts and It works out to thirty one hours on the weeks where you have the three, eight, two, three shifts, and the key thing for this to work is that when you are on your job is not just to keep the children safe like being adults present in the house, you are also committing to keeping the children out of your partners office, right so that they can be guaranteed those hours being at eight to one one, the sex or whatever. are focused right like absolutely focused they are not on your they're not dealing with anything, and if you do this that each of you can, in fact, get the twenty five cure focused hours and then between four to six hours each week of. Most likely but could be interrupted because of naptime was or whatever. And both of you would have both some afternoon in some morning hours and so I know that that's an issue that some people be like well, we just split it that she takes the mornings when I take the afternoons. But then what you know, there are some teams that always WanNa meet in the morning because some other person has a different shift of their schedule and so this allows you to occasionally have morning meetings or occasionally have afternoon meetings as the case may be again, this has to be pretty much you are committed to this. You're committing to keeping the kids out of your partners office you can obviously arrange for A. Sub. Credit. On a day, if there was something like you have to pitch a new client, a huge project in the only time they can meet. Tuesday antenna at ten. AM technically Tuesday as the tae that you work on the sex like probably you could arrange with your spouse to get a sub credit that you would make it up for that person at another point but. You WanNa. Have that be relatively infrequently but you know working twenty nine or thirty hours a week with no pay childcare is. Pretty good. If that's a situation that a couple might find themselves in and if they need more hours, you can extend the swap idea to different times I mean. Maybe each of you works from six to ten pm one night a week and that gets you up to thirty four hours a week or you do six to ten am on a weekend or something you each get one weekend morning and you know what it is but. That is basically fulltime ours, and if they are plans, well, you will be okay.

A. Sub Genevieve Sarah
An Introduction to Bases

Breaking Math Podcast

04:39 min | 2 months ago

An Introduction to Bases

"So, WHAT IS BASE? All right. So when we count starting Zero we count zero, one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine. Book comes after nine ten, right. But how do we write down ten? We write down the number one followed by the number zero. The one in this case is next to zero to its left. So it represents ten times what it would usually represent, which would be one resulting in ten times one or ten total the Zeros added to this for a total of ten. If we had eleven, we would add one to ten for a total of eleven because we'd have a one in a one in a row another example of deconstructing the. Number system can be applied to some random number. Say Seventy Nine, seventy nine is written as a seven next to a nine. The nine is all the way on the right and since the seven to the left of the nine, it is an the tens place. So seven times ten is seventy plus nine, seventy nine the system continues like that one, thousand, two, hundred, thirty, four means four, plus three times ten. Plus Two Times one hundred, which is ten times a privilege multiplier, which was ten plus one times. One, thousand, which ten times the previous multiplayer, which is one hundred. which so as the total is one, thousand plus two, hundred plus thirty plus four is one, thousand, two, hundred and thirty four as you go left, the place gets ten times bigger with every digit. This is what it means. When we say we use base ten place value system. There are ten digits zero through nine and we use them in a row to denote quantities and the cool part is that in. A very short space. You can count all sorts of things you can count, for example, the number of particles in the universe the number of particles in the universe can be written down using only eighty characters for reference. The sentence that you just heard contains a total of ninety five characters. One, hundred four if you include spaces and if every particle were planet with around ten billion people on it, you count all. Those people with only ten more characters. Ninety toto is a perfectly optimized system for denoting exact imagers and with the ratings pointed to be used for fractional number as well. But more than that. Later, these numerals zero through nine that is are known as the Hindu Arabic numerals our developed between the first and fourth centuries ce by Indian mathematicians, they're introduced to Europe between the tenth and sixteenth centuries he interesting. So. So, in other words to summarize that in say one or two sentences don't don't quote me on that. Essentially when we talk about a place value system and basis, we talk about what is the fewest amount of symbols rather what what, what are the total amount of symbols that are used to in any sort of combination represent any arbitrary number up through infinity well, I suppose infinity would be its own symbol really. Number approaching infinity as we're seeing earlier in in our number system, which is the Hindu Arabic number system We have just ten symbols zero through nine that's it, and we represent every conceivable number using those symbols. I should probably add to that also irrational numbers like pie or e an infinity and things like that. But a very small number of symbols can represent almost a really an infant number of possible symbols can be represented by this finite system. And what's interesting is as we talk about different bases, it's just a different number of symbols and the most fundamental one binary. It's either a one or zero or an hour and honoring anything else whether it's are based ten or hex decimal or anything like that. It's just an arbitrary number of symbols to work with which you using. Yeah. Exactly. Am Binary since we have either one or zero, we have two different bases. Different symbols. So we are in based to yes. Yeah. Binary base two, and if we had sixteen symbols, we'd be Anna Heck's the decimal. So. Real quick. I'd like to say a couple of definitions here based on what we just said about basis in about symbols, bring us to our discussion about numerals versus numbers just for clarification numerals are what you write down. There are only ten. Sorry. My son is bringing a toy saw on a table. So with numbers versus numerals there are only ten numerals that zero through nine. However, those ten numerals are us to make any amount. So that's the difference between numerals and numbers any base system. The numerals are how many different symbols are included in that base.

Europe Anna Heck