Documentary

Listen to the latest news about groundbreaking documentaries, interviews with renowned directors and learn about the latest releases from audio broadcasts aired on leading talk radio shows and premium podcasts.

A highlight from How Indigenous people are strengthening fur traditions in an anti-fur world

Unreserved

03:22 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from How Indigenous people are strengthening fur traditions in an anti-fur world

"Of front burner, the CBC's daily news podcast. This is the first pandemic caused by coronavirus. The involvement that I'd had should have had me remove myself from those discussions. Every weekday morning, we bring you one important story in depth and detail, and we do it in about 20 minutes. Of course, we cover a lot of Canadian news, but there's a whole world out there, and we bring you those stories too. You can subscribe to front burner wherever you get your podcasts or get front burner on the CBC listen app. This is a CBC podcast. This one is the minx. Nope, that's a coyote. Like who's over there? What is that? Oh, okay. I have a patch. We're going to announce the winners of the bell preparation contest. You have to have the quality all the pelt you did. May I show that felt the most respect I can to try and get it to look as beautiful as it can. Just honored animal. Every year, trappers gather at the third table in Thompson Manitoba. They come to sell their animal pelts to buyers who travel from the south. Here at the Thompson regional community center, it's fur, fur and more fur. There's muskrat, beaver, Martin, and even Wolverine. At this two day event, you can buy cell and even compete for who has the best furs. But many here say there are fewer trappers every year. Some of the numbers that used to come through those doors, 175, 260 trappers. And this weekend we had, I think, I think we had 70. Fur has become a fashion faux pas in some circles. Aggressive anti fur campaigns with graphic images and slogans have made furs, feathers and hides increasingly unpopular and popular culture. Celebrities like Pamela Anderson say it is murder. Paul McCartney pressures people to stop wearing animal garments. Animal rights groups say fur farms are cruel, wild animals are trapped inhumanely, and fur just isn't necessary. It has brought international attention to a move to ban it altogether. But for these indigenous trappers and artisans who use fur. It's a way of life. My grandpa went all the time and he taught my dad and my dad's teaching me and my brother now. My family loves trapping. Like, we all go out together, trapping. People think that I'm trapping all these animals, but it's really I'm trapping the sick, the injured and the old, right? Because those are the animals that are hungry, starving, you know, that can't hunt on their own. All the super healthy animals. They're not eating frozen bait. A lot of the comments I got online are, you know, it's 2023, you don't need to use real fur. There's other options available. So I've actually created content to show why real first absolutely necessary in Arctic conditions.

CBC Thompson Regional Community Ce Manitoba Thompson Pamela Anderson Martin Paul Mccartney Arctic
A highlight from Ep. 90: Tecumseh - We Shall Remain (Part 2)

Bear Grease

02:24 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Ep. 90: Tecumseh - We Shall Remain (Part 2)

"Hey y'all, I'm Tyler Jones. And I'm Casey Smith. We host the element podcast. We are a couple native Texans that love to push the limits in all our outdoor pursuits. From Elk, the white tails, and everything in between. We share our hunting stories, tactics, and even some failures that have helped us continue to do what we love. If you can't get enough of the outdoors and are constantly trying to learn more about the game you pursue, you should listen to the element podcast. It's on the iHeartRadio app on Apple podcasts for wherever you get your podcasts. It was the largest Indian lions at the United States ever faced the most effective. The greatest threat that the United States ever faced during the entire westward movement from the alleghanies to the West Coast. This is the second episode in our tecumseh series where we'll look at his life from 1775 through 1812, originally I had planned to title this one uncommon genius, which is what U.S. president William Henry Harrison called the Shawnee. I decided, however, to use the declarative statement made by the panther crossing the sky himself. In response to intolerable encroachment, while many of his own tribe were leaving and heading west tecumseh said we shall remain. We're going to learn the details of tecumseh's involvement in the war of 1812. The most interesting to me will explore the worldview differences of the Indians and Europeans and how it was destined to fail. And we'll see that change is the only constant and predictable thing on Planet Earth. I wish I had good news for you, but the waters continue to be murky. But this time with blood. I really doubt you're going to want to miss this one. And suddenly, in the midst of the war of 1812, to come to becomes, he's still an enemy, but he's in heroic enemy. He's a hero. Already when the American American hero.

Tyler Jones Casey Smith United States Tecumseh William Henry Harrison West Coast Shawnee Apple
A highlight from Encore: The Midnight Crew | Civil Trial | 3

American Scandal

02:38 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from Encore: The Midnight Crew | Civil Trial | 3

"Another big sip of coffee, he gets ready to dive back into work. He has a lot to do, and a lot of clients whose rights have been violated by the government. Taylor opens a file cabinet and pulls out a folder. He begins paging through a legal brief when suddenly his phone rings. Hello, this is Flint Taylor. Hello. I'm trying to find a lawyer. Well, let me have the right guy. Who am I speaking with? My name is Andrew Wilson. I'm here at Pontiac correctional. I'm Pontiac's rough. Yeah, you can say that again. Well, mister Wilson, I'm sure your time is limited. How can I help? You probably remember my name, don't you? Andrew Wilson. Taylor searches through his memory when it hits him. Andrew Wilson was the man who killed two police officers during a traffic stop. He went on the run, and that led to a citywide manhunt, with police terrorizing black residents on the south side. Uh, I do remember you're on death row, right? Yeah, that's right. So what can I do for you? Are you trying to appeal? Did something happen? Well, something did happen. After the police caught me, they take your time, mister Wilson. I heard just to think about. It's okay. Whenever you're ready. Yeah, you. After they brought me in, they put me in this small room. You know, at first it was the usual stuff. They hit me, they kicked me, and mister Taylor, I'm just judging by your voice. You're a white man? I am. Yes. Well, you have to understand if you're black, and if you live in Chicago, you know it's coming at some point. Police are going to beat you. Beat you senseless. But this. After they've finished hitting and kicking me, they took out a box. A bunch of wires. They hooked them up to my face, and then they started shocking me. I'm sorry, mister Wilson, you sang the police electrocuted you? Yeah, not just my face. They shocked me. You know, down below in my private area. I did it until I started coughing up blood, and they pressed me up against a hot radiator and burned my skin. I couldn't hold out anymore, so I told them I did it. I confessed. Taylor pauses, stunned. This is a horrifying story, but Taylor wouldn't put it past the Chicago PD to do something so heinous. Still, Taylor is an attorney, and he knows that sometimes inmates can grow desperate. They make up stories, thinking it could get them out of prison. So Taylor has to probe a little to see if Wilson is telling the truth. Well, mister Wilson,

Mister Wilson Andrew Wilson Flint Taylor Pontiac Correctional Taylor Mister Taylor Chicago Wilson
A highlight from Ep. 89: Bear Grease [Render] - Tecumseh, the Black Bear Bonanza, & Misty's First Duck Hunt

Bear Grease

01:28 min | Last week

A highlight from Ep. 89: Bear Grease [Render] - Tecumseh, the Black Bear Bonanza, & Misty's First Duck Hunt

"Hey, winter is here. Like here, here, here. Like where I'm at, snow on the ground until spring for absolute shirt kind of here. That means ice fishing, maybe going out and filling some bee tags on doughs, who knows. Probably almost certainly a little bit of beaver trapping. Definitely going down to sonora, Mexico, pulling the can am down there for that trip, and also definitely the time of year in my neighbor uses my can am to do what I would describe as surgical grade snow plowing around his barn and weary park a lot of gear and stuff. My can am is great. Don't just take my word for it. Check out the full can am off road line at can am off road dot com. Get a rig, get it decked out just how you like it. Start loving winner. Born in the Midwest raised in the south black buffaloes everything you love about dip without the tobacco leaf. Here to tell you more, my buddy and colleague, Chile. I like black buffalo because I'm in smoking cigarettes in the service and I'm trying to get off that and I do like the blood orange, it's really good. It's kind of a toss up between the mint patches and the blood orange, but I'm pretty happy with both those products. It's new year you know you need to ditch the tobacco, but you love the ritual of dipping. What do you do? Well, you give these guys a shot. Authenticity matters to these guys.

Sonora Mexico Midwest Chile Buffalo
A highlight from The End of the Calorie (encore)

Gastropod

04:32 min | Last week

A highlight from The End of the Calorie (encore)

"Happy 2023 guest report listeners. I'm not sure. I believe it yet, but that's what the calendar says. And in terms of believing the number in front of you, we have an episode all about whether those official numbers are really what they seem, I'm talking about the calorie. This is an encore episode. It's one we both love because it's something that people are so conflicted about, but we just can't seem to quit them. Listen in now for the weird and surprising story behind the numbers. I don't really buy into this calorie the calorie thing. In the end, and I guess this is sort of treating it as a chemist. Calories a calorie is a calorie. It's a unit of energy. I think all calories are not the same when it comes to how satisfying they are. You can't count calories anyway. It's not really possible for anybody who's just an eater to figure out how many calories you're eating. The calorie is the only dancing we've got in this game at the moment, isn't it? But it gives us a sort of unfair sense of precision. The calorie is at somewhat dangerous item because it leads us to thinking that we solve the problems when in fact we haven't. This is gastropod, the podcast that looks at food through the lens of science and history. I'm Nikola Tilly, and I'm Cynthia graber, and I bet you listeners have no idea what we're going to be covering in this episode. Seriously, if you can't guess already, then go and get yourself a coffee and take this again from the top. Yes, that's right. We are not easing into things this season. We're stepping boldly into one of the thorniest food controversies of all the calorie, what the heck is it? If you've ever tried to lose weight. Hello, new year's resolutions. You'll know that the standard advice is you have to eat fewer calories than you burn, but we wanted to know is a calorie the same no matter what type of food it comes from, and as one calorie for you exactly the same as one calorie for me or me. We'll hear from all of the folks you just heard and more on this show as we visit the special rooms where calories are measured and the labs were scientists are busy proving that the numbers on our food labels are off, sometimes by quite a bit. So is the calorie broken? Listen in for all that and more, gastropod is part of the vox media podcast network in partnership with eater. Your favorite band is about to play a sold out show. You got in. Over here. With a friend and fought a spot close enough to see the set list. They're definitely playing your song. When you're with an axe, it's not if it's going to happen, but when American Express don't live life without it, have ever wrestled with counting calories, the guy you need to blame is santorio sanctus. He lived in the 1600s in Padua in what's now Italy. And he's a fun character. We would say a serious case of obsessive compulsive disorder. That's Marion Nestlé. She's Professor of nutrition food studies and public health at New York University. She's also co author of a book called why calories count from science to politics, and she wasn't kidding when she said our man santoro sanctoria was a little OCD. Well, he waved every single thing that he ate or drank. And everything that he excreted everything. Every day for 30 years. He developed a special weighing chair because these things were very difficult to do, and every day he sat in his chair and waited himself. I mean, he must have been extremely compulsive. And at the end of that, he kind of did a calories in calories out kind of thing. You didn't know what a calorie was. But he could see that what he ate had a big effect on what he weighed and what he excreted. That was really the first step towards understanding the relationship between what we eat and what our bodies use store and get rid of. But it was vague. There was no unit of measurement. No calorie in other words, more than a century later, French scientist Antoine lavoisier took the next step with a literal Guinea pig. Well, he looked at heat energy. I mean, one of the things about calories is they're measure of heat. Lavoisier had already figured out the chemistry of combustion, and he had a hunch that something similar was going on inside our bodies that we burn food as fuel, and it turns out he was right. It's a little complicated. You can't just picture a log fire in your stomach, but the chemical reaction that unlocks energy from food is equivalent to burning. The heat that you get when you burn a food in a chamber is the same as the heat that you get if you're putting a Guinea pig in a chamber.

Nikola Tilly Cynthia Graber Marion Nestlé Santoro Sanctoria Padua American Express New York University Antoine Lavoisier Italy Lavoisier Guinea
A highlight from Encore: The Midnight Crew | Manhunt | 2

American Scandal

05:12 min | Last week

A highlight from Encore: The Midnight Crew | Manhunt | 2

"And miles of concrete. And while sometimes the area can get a little rough, Wilson knows how to defend himself. He reaches into his coat pocket, and feels around for a couple stray bullets. Wilson doesn't have any immediate plans to fire these bullets. But he and his brother are about to pull off a risky scheme, and he knows he'd be a fool to come unarmed. Wilson and his brother are heading to the Cook County hospital. They're looking for one of their accomplices, a man named Edgar hope. Once they find him, two brothers are going to help him escape from the hospital on noticed. While the plan isn't nearly as dangerous as robbing a bank, the Wilson brothers have to pull it off successfully because a few days ago, hope was in a shootout with the police. He was injured and taken to the hospital to recover, but as soon as he's healed up, he's all but certain to face intense questioning from the police, something the Wilson brothers can't let happen. A month ago, the three men were involved in another crime. They robbed a McDonald's, and Wilson ended up killing a security guard. The police still don't know who was responsible for the murder, and Wilson needs to make sure they never do. He just got out of prison. After serving two and a half years for armed robbery, and he's not going to head back. So he and his brother Jackie have to do this right. They have to get their accomplice out of the hospital. They have to make sure the cops never get a chance to learn who robbed that McDonald's a month ago. Wilson's brother turns down another road. When suddenly there's a sound of a siren, Wilson looks over his shoulder, police car has pulled up behind them lights flashing. Their options are limited, so Wilson's brother pulls over and kills the engine. A minute later, two police officers step out of the squad car. Both of them are white. Wilson and his brother are black. They know the drill though. Things could grow volatile and fast. They're going to have to play it cool. You know why I pulled you over? Andrew Wilson leans forward. Officer, I'm sure this is a mistake. Sonnets no mistake. You opened your window and you threw garbage into the street. Uh oh, I'm sorry, sir. We won't do it again. That's right, you won't. Let's see some ID. The two young men exchange a look. Wilson's brother is driving without a license. This is a problem. Somehow, Wilson has got to talk his way out of this. Officer, if you just hear us for a minute, Wilson steps out of passenger door. Now we made a mistake. Hey, far enough. I'm not looking for any trouble. Then get back in the car. Officer look, it's bad toss a piece of trash out of the window. It was a mistake. But I'm sure you've got bigger things to worry about. Oh, and I'm sure you don't want to tell a police officer how to do his job. What'd you say? Nothing, sir. Oh, you said something, I dare you, say it again. No, sir, forget it. You know what? Hands up. No, no, no, we don't need to do that. I said hands up. As the officer approaches, Wilson suddenly remembers the bullets in his pocket. There's no way this cop is going to miss them. Wilson realizes that there are two paths out of this situation, and only one of them avoids the inside of a jail cell. So Wilson lunges at the officer, reaching for his pistol. The two come crashing onto the icy ground and begin tussling each trying to get the upper hand. Wilson looks and notices the officer's gun has slipped from its holster. It's with an arms reach. And then his instincts kick in. Wilson grabs a gun, and he fires. He turns to the other officer, staring in shock, fires again. For a moment, Wilson stands completely frozen, his ear is ringing. He can't believe the sight in front of him. Both officers are on the ground and bleeding. Then he snaps to. They have to go. He hops back in the car and yells at his brother to drive. As the car speeds away, Wilson tries to catch his breath, makes sense of what just happened. He might have just killed two police officers, there's no coming back from that. There's only so much time before Chicago police hunt him down and extract their revenge. Hi, I'm Alex krotoski, and for the last 6 months with tortoise, the newsroom that brought you sweet Bobby and hoaxed. I've been digging inside the crypto marketplace in search of a big sum of money. The twisted tail connects a child actor, a disillusioned plastic surgeon, the inventor of inspector gadget, and a Dutch ghost because they are the masterminds behind the most important cryptocurrency in the world. Search for real money, the hunt for tethers billions, wherever you get your podcasts. Hi, I'm Lindsey Graham, host of the wondery show business movers. In our latest series, an Intrepid lawyer turned fast food executive named George cohan, creates an ingenious and wily scheme to sell Big Macs behind the iron curtain in the middle of the Cold War. Listen to business movers and McDonald's invasion on

Wilson Cook County Hospital Mcdonald Edgar Andrew Wilson Jackie Alex Krotoski Bobby Chicago Lindsey Graham George Cohan
Plastic Surgery for Prisoners Goes Back to the 1950s

The Pulse

01:47 min | 1 year ago

Plastic Surgery for Prisoners Goes Back to the 1950s

"Science historian sharona pearl is interested in faces. She's researched physiognomy. Which is the study of facial features in their relationship to character. She's written about face transplants. She teaches at drexel university in philadelphia and she was working on a new book about face recognition. She was tracking down stories of people trying to avoid law enforcement taking drastic steps to change their appearance. Everything from people trying to dodge modern face recognition software to a famous british train robber ronnie biggs who got plastic surgery in order to evade the authorities after his massive train. Theft as she got deeper into this kind of research looking for more examples of people changing their faces using search terms like criminals and plastic surgery. She stumbled upon something else entirely. This whole other world turns up what she found. Blew her mind. All of these studies written from the nineteen fifties throws late as the one thousand nine hundred eighty s about programs in prison that gave people plastic surgery as a mechanism to lower rates of recidivism. That's right plastic surgery for prisoners nose jobs ears pinned chisel jolla lines tattoo removal all sorts of cosmetic procedures in an effort to give people a chance at a better life. Somehow if there looks were changed they would be less inclined to commit crimes and return to prison after they were released and this went on until about thirty years ago.

Sharona Pearl Ronnie Biggs Drexel University Philadelphia
The Stolen Indigenous Children

Unreserved

02:03 min | 1 year ago

The Stolen Indigenous Children

"It's a hot summer day in nineteen ninety emotions are high in boston. Independent nations today. This ojibway community is taking a stand. After decades of losing their children to the child welfare system they have come together to say no more. No more taking children by the busload from their homes. No more broken families. You aren't taking any more of our children get out. Stay out as a social worker. I'm responsible for the welfare of these children. My name is nicky. I can tell you being ripped away from my mother at six years old had nothing to do with my welfare look. I'm just doing my job. It's not your job anymore as chief of the wab soon nation. I'm here to tell you. We have passed a resolution. Banning the children's aid society from entering our community and taking any more of our children. You can't do that we just did. Yeah our children our future give sure give back our future. We did it teddy. You would have been so proud of us after the chaos of the rally. Nikki comforter her daughter at the kitchen table. It is a modest home. The sun streams through the windows colorful drawings of thunderbirds and pencil caller. Portrait's a woman and cad eyeglasses. A young shy smiling. Boy named teddy adorns the walls the pair sit together at the small table sipping tea and eating cookies

Boston Nicky Nikki
Dave Eggers: Is Limitless Choice a Good Thing?

Sway

02:15 min | 1 year ago

Dave Eggers: Is Limitless Choice a Good Thing?

"So let's start talking about this book the every so it's a sequel to your two thousand thirteen book the circle which is about a search company that bears its will essentially or possibly facebook. Tell me why you decided to write. This sequel in which the circle gobbles up in ecommerce company named after south american jungle so basically amazon and creates the every Which one character called the most monopolistic control hungry corporation ever to plague the world. So why do the sequel tell me how you thought about this. Well i think you know. When when i was done with the circle i had never thought about a sequel never written a sequel to anything and But i kept taking notes. And i sort of you know would jot things down over time and i remember at one point A friend of mine who She treats students at a college. She's that she was on campus psychologist and She was saying that the thing that her students came in with more than anything. The thing that problem that plagued them was choice. There were anxious about a lot of things but more and more students needed how more and more students were plagued with like unlimited choices unlimited. Input too much to think about on a given day and too many choices to make on a given day. And i thought that was really interesting because we would think you know at this sort of apex point of human evolution. We would want all these choices and sort of that would be some sort of glorious now plays to arrive at that we could order anything and have it arrive at our doorstep the next morning but these kids were far more anxious than they had been ten years before in fifteen years before and i thought well that's an interesting starting point and what if there were a monopoly that would not only sort of tell you which choices are correct which ones are the most You know beneficial to the environment and progressive in different ways and they would help you given your preferences and algorithm ick sort of determined personality. They'd help you become a better version of yourself and the ultimate version of yourself as a personal person and a member of the broader

Amazon Facebook
Where Juvenile Detention Looks More Like Teens Hanging Out

70 Million

01:31 min | 1 year ago

Where Juvenile Detention Looks More Like Teens Hanging Out

"A group of about three dozen excited teenagers listening to an announcement by apache county judge. Michael lethem this'll be something that'll be here for decades and you've got so it's early fall. Twenty seventeen in. This is the grand opening of saint. John's first center dedicated to teams. Letham is introducing. the people will be running it. Victor more news here pretty much every day as well as victor in polar smiling facing the energetic teens their probation officers in other words they work for the county but they dress in civilian year t shirts jeans baseball caps because they've been tapped by judge leith them to run this new facility the loft legacy teen center. It's a county run resource and activity center in the small town where kids often can't find much to do or people to talk to. It was like right at the end of my freshman year into the summer of my freshman year. I heard about it. I was like. Oh that's cool. I didn't think anything of it. I didn't think it would be this. Cool hannah wilkinson was there and then i walked. Tv's there's pool table. There's all this cool stuff for kids to do and it was really exciting.

Michael Lethem Letham Apache County Judge Leith Loft Legacy Teen Center Victor John Baseball Hannah Wilkinson
Ernest Shackleton: Surviving Antarctica

Against The Odds

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Ernest Shackleton: Surviving Antarctica

"It's midnight on may fifth nineteen sixteen. Ernest shackleton squats at the helm of james cared trying to balance himself on the rocking boat. They've been at sea for eleven days. He knew the eight hundred mile. Crossing to south georgia. Island would be dangerous. But he's never seen anything as fierce as the drake passage. The winds have been coming at them at one hundred miles an hour. The waves are almost twenty feet tall each swell grabs the boat lifting at higher and higher for the boiling surf into the air. One moment they're surrounded by hills of water the next there on top of the world overlooking an endless seascape of dark grey rollers and white horses. And then they're hurtling back down. Below water crashes over the sides and sends a small crew into a frenzy to bail before the next one hits one way was so violent it ripped the boats anchor. Clear away shackleton marches wars lee struggling with the rudder trying to control the boat through the gusts and the snowfall is only. Compasses dead. Reckoning and the occasional glimpse of a star they both know if they boat off. Course they could miss south georgia entirely. And never be heard of again skipper. Altaic take the rudder. You get some sleep ex-boss maybe i'll lay down for an hour. Shackleton is left alone at the front of the boat. He watches the angry black clouds. Churn across the horizon and suddenly sees a silver light in the sky. Weather's clearing boys. And then he. Here's the familiar hiss. It's not a break in the clouds. It's the foaming crest of a wave. The biggest wave. He's seen in his life and it's heading straightforward.

South Georgia Ernest Shackleton James Shackleton LEE
Who Was Ida B. Wells?

Made of Mettle

02:32 min | 1 year ago

Who Was Ida B. Wells?

"In today's episode we will be covering the impassioned the influential the inspiring ida b wells ida. B wells was born ida bell wells on july sixteenth eighteen sixty two in holly springs mississippi. Ida was the eldest. Born to james and lizzie wells. Who had seven other children. All were born in slaved as they lived on a plantation in mississippi whom or members of the confederacy during the civil war in the previous episode. We talked a bit about president. Lincoln's revolutionary decision to issue the emancipation proclamation on january. First eighteen sixty three during the civil war ida in her family were officially freed from slavery as they resided in a confederate state before either was one year old immediately following. The war was the pivotal reconstruction period with a divided territories of the union in the confederacy. Determine how they would begin to come back together as a single nation. Ida's parents were dutiful in diligence supporters of african american rights in particular the right to an education. Ida's father james was directly involved in starting in serving on the board of trustees for school for freed african americans that school rushed. College is still a notable inactive university. Today falling under the umbrella of historically black colleges and universities ida would begin her educational career at this school attending in her early teens. Sadly heartbreaking circumstances would find ida early on in life in eighteen seventy eight while visiting her grandmother. I learned harling news. Ida's mother father in her youngest sibling. Just an infant had passed away from yellow fever. Her parents sudden-death turn ida from a teenager with no children into a parent of six suffering from the grief and loss of one's parents. It would be understandable for a child to shy away in resist taking on a role with such incredible responsibility but did ida shy away from her obligation torture family. Absolutely not

IDA Ida Bell Wells Lizzie Wells Mississippi Holly Springs Board Of Trustees For School F James Wells Lincoln Yellow Fever
Why Doesn't California Build Big Dams Any More?

Bay Curious

02:15 min | 1 year ago

Why Doesn't California Build Big Dams Any More?

"Been talking about how most of our water comes from a system of dams and reservoirs set up to capture the states precipitation so one logical solution here is more dams right. Not so fast says jay lund a professor of civil and environmental engineering at uc davis story. I tell people is if you were the first engineer in california and you were going to build the first reservoir where would you put it. You had put it the cheapest place that gives you the most water. Where would you put the reservoir the next best place. We've done this fifteen hundred times. What do we have left. Expensive places that don't give you much water. He says with fifteen hundred dams in the state all the good damn spots are taken heck. Even a lot of the bad spots are taken but that doesn't mean that there aren't smart things we can do with our reservoirs as david romero takes it from here with four big ideas so the first big idea has to do with managing those fifteen hundred reservoirs differently. I learned how lake mendocino along the russian river. That's where i met. Nick mala savage in the middle of the mostly dry lake bed. He helps manage the lake for the us army corps of engineers in two thousand nineteen. The water was about forty feet over our heads. He says lake mendocino could go dry by the end of the summer mar lake levels here at lake. Mendocino are the lowest they've ever been for this time in the year even though this lake is nearly dry it's on the leading edge of science around reservoir management in the past. Water was let out of the reservoir whether or not storms were in the forecast. They wanted to make room for more water. They expected would come but because of climate change. Those storms are becoming less frequent malice. Savage is helping pilot a new approach at lake. Mendocino conserve wait until a major rainstorm is coming and then let water out of the reservoir. It's called forecast informed reservoir operations. We can sit on this water. We can continue to watch the forecast and then you see that big boomer of a storm conham then you can make the decision. Hey the sun's still shining. We need to put water into the river. Generate that airspace for the next storm. And we're good

Lake Mendocino Jay Lund David Romero Nick Mala Us Army Corps Of Engineers Uc Davis Summer Mar Lake Mendocino Russian River California Savage SUN
Why Offices Have Cubicles

The Pulse

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Why Offices Have Cubicles

"A couple of years ago. I got really interested in cubicles. Probably because i was spending way too much time in mind and those beige fabric covered walls. Were really getting to me. Giving me existential. Angst you know like in the movie office space. We don't have a lot of time on this earth we weren't meant to spend it this way. Human beings were not meant to sit and little cubicle staring at computer screens all day filling out useless forms and listening to eight different bosses drone on about mission statements. I wanted to find out how these little boxes got so popular. How did they take over office. Buildings around the world. And i found this amazing infomerrcial from the nineteen sixties. That touted the benefits of a whole new way to build workspaces. You and i are today. Living and industry's finest hour. An age of hurry. An era of efficiency period of productivity the likes of which the world has never seen and super fast smart effective age era. Millions of people who still working old offices and haven't stopped a realized they still work in old fashioned offices enter action office. The original lofty vision later became the pubic. It was designed by the herman miller company exactly is action often. I'm walking through it right now. It's a far better environment. Today's changing functions an instant flexible office facility the comparative in parallel the surging turbulent business life. It serves your business changing constantly. Your office should change with it. So the cubicle was born as a sleek looking shape shifting office space with hinged walls designed to create either small spaces or to open up wide for group meetings. The new buzz phrase back then was knowledge. Work and cubicles were supposed to facilitate this free flow of ideas and

Herman Miller
'The Inventor' Documentary Investigates the Rise and Fall of Theranos

Reality Life with Kate Casey

01:27 min | 1 year ago

'The Inventor' Documentary Investigates the Rise and Fall of Theranos

"Week. Marks the beginning of the elizabeth homes trial the case. Us versus homes began on tuesday with jury selection. One of my most favorite documentaries on my all time. Favorite list is the inventor executive produced by academy award winner. Alex gibney who also did enron the smartest guys in the room and hbo's emmy winning going clear scientology in the prison of beliefs this. Hbo documentary investigates the rise and fall of theranos the one time multibillion dollar healthcare company founded by elizabeth homes in twenty four elizabeth holmes dropped out of stanford to start a company that was going to revolutionize healthcare in twenty fourteen theranos was valued at nine billion dollars making her touted as the next steve jobs. The youngest self made female billionaire in the world but just two years later. Theranos was cited as a massive fraud by the sec and its value is less than zero so if convicted elizabeth holmes faces up to twenty years in prison plus two point seven five million dollars in fines as well as restitution to be paid out to victims drawing on extraordinary access to never before seen footage and testimony from key insiders. The inventor tells a silicon valley tale. That was too good to be true. It examines how this could have happened. And who is responsible while exploring the psychology of deception

Elizabeth Holmes Elizabeth Alex Gibney Theranos Enron Emmy HBO Stanford Steve Jobs United States SEC
Susupect: Neww Podcast Looks at Racial Profiling After Halloween Murder

In God We Lust

01:09 min | 1 year ago

Susupect: Neww Podcast Looks at Racial Profiling After Halloween Murder

"Residence of a redman apartment complex. Were throwing a big halloween party with dozens of people in costume mingling drinking and dancing but after the party started to quiet down one of them was murdered in her home. The police spent weeks piecing together. The night with hazy recollections spotty dna evidence and dozens of party photos eventually. They had a suspect. His story kept changing his. Dna was at the crime scene when he finally came in for questioning. The detectives felt like they were breath away from a confession but that didn't happen and so the police decided to focus their attention on another man. A man with a criminal record whose. Dna was also found at the crime scene and he just so happened to be. The only black man at the party suspects starts out as a compelling who done it and then becomes a story about cutting edge forensic science and mislaid justice. It's about race and policing and ultimately the kinds of weighty decisions that cops and prosecutors make every day decisions that once made change lives forever and are almost impossible to

Life Inside a Women's Prison: Life Jolt

Ear Hustle

02:00 min | 1 year ago

Life Inside a Women's Prison: Life Jolt

"My name is rosemary green and this is life jolt a. It's a podcast about the experience of women in the correctional system. Women like me life jolt prison slang for a life sentence but in a way every jail sentence is a life sentence. It doesn't really end. When you get out i know i've spent five years in a. Us prison for drug trafficking. It haunts me still. But i'm here to tell you that i'm so much more than my crime. We all are in this episode. We're going to focus on the first stage of a woman's journey through the criminal justice system. Let's call it the before times before you've had your day in court before you're convicted or acquitted that period between your arrest and your sentence when you really don't know what's going to happen if you'll be sent to prison or for how long the wait can be excruciating. If you're lucky you'll get bail. And at least she can wait at home. If you're not so lucky you have to wait in jail on remand like i did like diana did. There's alleged about it. Came home drunk. And i thought my husband friend was cheating because she was there and we had argument week before. Like i couldn't understand why she was there. I just i blew up by got mad and they take off. My husband went up the street to a friend's house and she took off. I don't know where she went at. First diana's one of roughly two thousand women in canadian prisons. You want actual detail well. I grabbed his guitar. And i started storming up the street so i went in there and i smashed guitar over him. She's describing the assault that landed her in jail.

Rosemary Green Diana United States
Endurance: Surviving Antarctica

Against The Odds

02:12 min | 1 year ago

Endurance: Surviving Antarctica

"January night. Nineteen o nine. Ernest shackleton groans as he trudges through the hard packed snow now. A bitter headwind cuts through his jacket freezing his breath among his hands. The temperature is minus nineteen degrees pulled by any standards but with the wind chill. It's closer to minus fifty shackleton's feet and ears are covered with blisters and the black char frostbite. He's weakened by hunger and head splitting altitude sickness. He and his crew have trekked over seven hundred miles south across the vast expanse of antarctic snow their goal is to reach beyond engine the known world and be the first humans to ever reach the south pole. An expedition the public had been calling the nimrod after the name of his ship. Their journey has taken almost two and half months still before them an endless white plateau of snow and ice. The poll is out there somewhere. Shackleton has been on this continent once before six years ago. It was his first antarctic expedition under the leadership of captain robert. Scott scott was brooding and temperamental. he ruled by bullying. An absolute authority. Shackleton was the opposite. he was optimistic. Open and warm as conditions grew more difficult on that eight month journey tension was deck when frost by and low rash slowed them to a crawl. Scott yelled keep going you bloody fools but they turn back from the poll. Nearly five hundred miles out by the time shackleton got back to the ship. He was coughing up blood now. He has another shot this time. His leading a four man through and he isn't going to make scott's mistakes. The last month has been slow going. He looks at his men's haggard faces for weeks now. They've had little to eat

Ernest Shackleton Shackleton Captain Robert Scott Scott Antarctic Scott Haggard
Snake Bit, the Original Fear

Bear Grease

02:11 min | 1 year ago

Snake Bit, the Original Fear

"The serpent was the shrewdest of all the wild animals. The lord god had made one day he asked woman. Did god really say you must not eat of the fruit from any of the trees in the garden. The lord god asks the woman. What have you done. The serpent deceived me. She replied that's why eight. Then the lord god said to the serpent. Because you have done this you are cursed more than all animals domestic and wild. You'll crawl on your belly groveling in the dust as long as you live. And i will 'cause hostility between you and the woman and between your offspring and her offspring he will strike your head and you will strike his. He'll this is from the bible in the book of genesis. chapter three. This ancient text is fascinating. It highlights the long standing relationship between mankind and a very particular wild beast one that has become a defining feature of the human experience. I believe the story has significant meaning. It holds within the foundations of the human worldview. And it's ripe with une bendable biological reality humans flip out when they see a snake well at least most of them. Well you know. I didn't really get into woods. Heavy till hours. Like twenty six twenty seven and so. I created a little bucket list of things that i wanted to accomplish. Turkey hundred deer. Hunter bow hunter and i wanted to get involved with a big rattlesnake. You know one way or the other. I just i heard so much battlement i. This is my dad. Gary nuclear in a lifetime of searching for the mythical black panther inside joke from episode one. He's kept his eyes on the ground looking for acres and big rattlesnakes

Hunter Gary
Route 66, the Mother Road

The Kitchen Sisters Present

02:19 min | 1 year ago

Route 66, the Mother Road

"From the first days we started working together. And i drove around a lot to gals in one thousand nine hundred seventy two green dotson roaming the tri county area like buzzing todd minus the corvette through santa cruz monterey and san benito counties in california we were doing oral histories and recording. Everybody who moved cowboys and fishermen farmworkers italian grandmothers. This was in the day of cassettes and as we drove around we always talked about how great it would be to document the roads inside roads. We were travelling so people could just pop in a cassette and listen to the people around them as they drove on through. We never quite pulled off that cassette idea on a large scale but when davy moved east for a while we decided to try the idea out on route sixty six. She'd be driving a lot so that was the start. It was the end of the road. It was the last days surf route. Sixty six as we were traveling. I mean just trying to follow it at that. Point was a you know you drive down. Affronted tro that was the old highway. And then it would just bottom out. And there'd be broken asphalt or cactus. So we're trying to get icon of people from each stretch of the road and mickey mantle grew up on route sixty six. He played baseball team. Known as the baxter springs with kids the scout for the yankees with dr along route. Sixty six looking for up and coming ballplayers and manel hits this home. Run across the highway. And that's part of how he was spotted. So we're going. where can we find mickey mantle. We started to kind sniff around joplin missouri. The mickey mantle holiday inn. And someone said. Oh yeah there's a golf tournament going. On and mickey mantle. One of his sons. Were playing so. I just called the golf course. Said ma'am please speak to mr mantle. Suddenly there was mickey mantle on the telephone. We explain the story to him. And what we're doing in route sixty six and agrees to meet us and poor mickey. He could hardly walk by that time has knees. Were just blown out. Sorta bandy leg walks up one flight of stairs gets in the room. He just gives me a look and he just goes hallo. Did you get my phone number.

Tri County Santa Cruz Monterey Mickey Mantle Dotson San Benito Cowboys Baxter Springs Mickey Mantle Holiday Inn California Mr Mantle Yankees Baseball Joplin Golf Missouri
Tourism Is Back but Businesses Are Overwhelmed With Insufficient Staffing

Nightline

01:31 min | 1 year ago

Tourism Is Back but Businesses Are Overwhelmed With Insufficient Staffing

"Good evening thank you for joining us. The people who were cooped up at home last summer have been ear to go on vacations this year but some businesses which were eager for the crowds are struggling. Now we welcome. Abc's deirdre bolton to nightline with this report on the worker shortage the morning july signing on the heels of a worldwide lockdown millions are flocking to the beach but with all that kant's up demand. There is a downside. Businesses are over wealth. It's been different. I've seen things. I've never thought i would see from my life. We are facing a shortage in every industry talked to any of the businesses in downtown with any of the beach areas during the exact same scenario. You don't have the help. Benjamin gray has called this stretch along the atlantic home his entire life working at the bell in and spine rehoboth beach delaware for the last seven years. Nothing compares to the stress. He sees this summer. we've seen unprecedented occupancy levels. The tourism industry in the past year loan has skyrocketed. What is it. Ben like then for you to meet demands. It's now finding the staff to be able to make vets to make the drinks to check people in to check people out to make sure that we have enough people here to take care of the occupancy levels that we're experiencing

Deirdre Bolton Benjamin Gray Kant ABC Rehoboth Beach Atlantic Delaware BEN
The Hate-Crime Conundrum

The Experiment

01:48 min | 1 year ago

The Hate-Crime Conundrum

"Okay so where do you wanna start. So why don't we start in march back in march there is this shooting atlanta. Think we all remember it. It was percents completely horrifying. Police in georgia are investigating a series of deadly shooting said took place in the atlanta area. Eight people were killed. Authorities say many of them were women of asian descent. Now police have arrested one man who is white. But they haven't said anything about a motive yet this guy. He wanted three different spas agent in spas in atlanta. He shot eight people. Six of them were asian women and one of the things that happened was that there was this press conference matter mayor where start off with chevron's from cherokee county police re talking about the investigation and the fact that they've been getting a lot of questions about you know. Was this a hate crime many. We've received a number of calls about. Is this a hate crime. We're still early in this investigation So we cannot make that determination at this moment. The detectives involved in this case. Were not coming out and calling it a hate crime and that was upsetting a lot of people. But i think what really set people off was when the spokesman said that the shooter told detectives that he shot these people not because of racial hatred but because he was struggling but sex addiction. We still early but he does claim that it was not racially motivated. He apparently has an issue what he considers a fiction and sees these liberal. How do people respond to that something. I think some people thought maybe the police department was giving credence to this claim and also the idea that it was a sex addiction does seem so ludicrous on its face

Atlanta Cherokee County Georgia Chevron Police Department