Careers

What's happening in the workplace? Listen here for the latest completely safe-for-work updates, advice on how to get ahead and office do's and do not's, aired on leading talk radio shows and premium podcasts.

A highlight from 373: DR. SHEFALI on How to Be A Better & More Conscious Parent

RISE Podcast

01:47 min | 11 hrs ago

A highlight from 373: DR. SHEFALI on How to Be A Better & More Conscious Parent

"We are told that we are selfish. Motherhood is selfless, now that is the biggest lie. Because the way we are doing it right now is completely self absorbed, right? We don't see how we are using our children to be all that we could never be, and the best versions of the best person that we could never even be. And how when that child is not, how we get so upset how we get so disgruntled, how we project onto them, right? And that's what conscious parenting teaches is, how are you using your child to complete yourself? How are you not seeing the child is completely their own ultimate sovereign authority? And they have really no obligation to you. They have no obligation to you and parents will go, but I waste them, and I go, yeah, you raise them. You did it. Now, if they do respect you, it should come not out of obligation. It should come out of a natural bonding and connection. Hi, I'm Rachel Hollis, and this is my podcast. I spend so many hours of every single week reading and listening to podcasts and watching YouTube videos and trying to find out as much as I can about the world around me. And that's what we do on this show. We talk about everything. Life and how to be an entrepreneur. What happened to dinosaurs? What's the best recipe for fried chicken? What's the best plan for intermittent fasting? What's going on with our inner child? How's therapy working out for you? Whatever it is, my guests are into, I want to unpack it so that we can all understand. These are conversations. This is information for the curious. This is the Rachel Hollis podcast.

Rachel Hollis Youtube
A highlight from Estonias Prime Minister Kaja Kallas on leading with strength and sincerity

WorkLife with Adam Grant

05:11 min | 16 hrs ago

A highlight from Estonias Prime Minister Kaja Kallas on leading with strength and sincerity

"What should I call you during the conversation? Prime minister? You can call me kaya as well. Because we know personally. We are very equal societies. So you can call me by my first name. I don't need any titles. That's very egalitarian of you. Yeah, it is. This is how we function here. But if it is for you, I mean, what are these more convenient? Well, I'm happy to do whatever you consider comfortable and respectful. Yeah, because I think the topic is not on one side also the work, but it's more like the leadership issues. So it's okay if you called me by my first name. All right. Well, I appreciate that. And if you want to restate anything or clarify anything, we can do multiple takes. No, it's better when we do it spontaneously as it comes. Normally, I feel like most of the political leaders I've interviewed over the years have been very scripted and very on message. And I love your candor. So this will be this will be exciting for me. Politicians are not actors. If you are not sincere, then people will know we eventually will come out if you play somebody else. So much easier to be yourself all the time. That's so true. And I guess the caveat on that is not everybody's self is equally likeable or respectable. So you have the good fortune of aligning your authenticity with what other people admire. And I think thank you. That's very nice. It's really been amazing to watch your leadership, particularly over the past year. I think it's been one courageous, but two also instructive on what it looks like to stand up to a tyrant and a bully. And that's part of what I want to talk about today, but I thought we'd kick off with a little bit of your personal background if you're up for it. Absolutely. So I guess for me, one place to start is I know that Estonia has one of the world's best education systems. And there are some unusual features of it, like kids don't start official school until age 7. So what did you do when you were 5 and 6? And what was school like for you as a child? We were playing. We were kids that was before the school, but we went to kindergarten. So you also have some kind of teachings there. But the school really starts when you are 7. Of course, I went to school when we were occupied by the Soviet Union and that was much stricter, much more related to the communism and all the ideology, which is a side, but the education is still still good. And of course, when we regained our independence, we have really boosted our education system. And what is maybe interesting about our education system, if you compare this to others, of course, we start very early make children love science. Math, physics. You know, children always try to align with their idols or which are the characters that they really like. And so we created years ago this cartoon of girl dog who was inventor and there are musicals about this and she's singing about math this good physics is fun. Chemistries and now it just this year when I learned that in terms of female scientists Estonia's ranking top in the world and I was just wondering, is the result of this that we have built this up from very, very small age. And also computers, IT education, from the very early start, because learning programming is also learning another language. And children take it up very easily. But also on the other side, we have such some obligatory lessons that the other countries don't have. For example, music is obligatory. And that's why we have the singing or song festivals and everybody knows we have a lot of musicians coming from the education system as well. But it is not putting or trying to keep the stress balanced for the kids so that they don't burn out. And school is also fun, not only very useful. So what was your schooling like early? Was there a formative experience that led you to say, I think I might want to run this country one day? Oh, no, absolutely not. It was totally opposite. When I went to university, I thought that I definitely want to be number one in what I do. And therefore, I will not choose a subject or a topic where my father or my mother or my brother is already there, and they will compare me to them. So my mother is a doctor so that was out of the question. Father is a politician, totally absolute no no.

Kaya Estonia Soviet Union
A highlight from Domonique Brown

Revision Path

01:14 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Domonique Brown

"Through in depth interviews you'll learn about their work, their goals and what inspires them as creative individuals. Here's your host, Maurice cherry. Hello everybody and welcome to revision path. Thank you so much for tuning in. I'm your host, Maurice cherry. I mentioned this last week, but a devastating tornado has ripped through my hometown of Selma, Alabama. That happened a couple of weeks ago, and I'm working to help raise money for Selma tornado relief with the United way of central Alabama. To donate all you have to do is text the word Selma to 6 two 6 four four. And give any amount that you can to help get the city back on its feet. If you want you can even say that you heard about it through revision path. Also, if you said to me proof of your donation, I will match it 100% up to the first $1000 donated. Again, text Selma, SEL MA to 6 two 6 four four. I'll also put this information in the show notes. Now let's talk about one of our sponsors, hover. Do you have something new that you want to launch this year like an art project or a podcast or your own website? Whatever it is that you're passionate about and you want to build online, hover

Maurice Cherry United Way Of Central Alabama Selma Alabama
A highlight from $24M performance from Beyonce for 1,400 people! BTS of the social media marketing driven trip to Dubai, the $$$ behind it, and insights from Blake Horstmann & Steven Tartick

Trading Secrets

04:40 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from $24M performance from Beyonce for 1,400 people! BTS of the social media marketing driven trip to Dubai, the $$$ behind it, and insights from Blake Horstmann & Steven Tartick

"Welcome back to another episode of trading secrets. Oh my God, this episode is jam packed. Last week, you might have seen that I was on this Dubai trip, and there was an iconic Beyoncé performance. Now a lot of people are curious about just influencer trips, this trip in particular. There's a lot of conversation of this tarte cosmetic trip last week that a lot of influencers were on. So whether it's this trip, whether it's any event or it's this specific device scenario, what we're gonna do in this episode is we are going to rip down the fourth wall. We are going to rip the curtains open and we are going to talk all things behind the scenes. The numbers, the dollars, the sense. The one O one questions that the curious Canadian asks. We also have Blake horsemen that is going to come on. He's going to talk a little bit about how he was connected to this trip. And with Blake horseman stay tuned because in a couple weeks, we're going to have a full recap with him and Heather McDonald all on one episode. That one's jammed. But David Ottawa and the curious Canadian asked me all the questions that he had as I was there. If you listen to anything in this podcast, anything. I need you to make sure you listen to the end of this podcast where I have my brother come on. He gives his perspective on Dubai. He gives his perspective as a gay man. Who's extremely active in gay rights. And his take on traveling to Dubai, where they have cultural rights completely holding humanity back. He talks about the ROI, marketing perspective from a marketing executive I never thought. And he'll give you trading secrets that you can take away today as you're building yourself in your brand. So this is an episode that I would strongly suggest, listen to the whole thing. But even if you do find yourself getting a little bored or your workout's gonna end early or you only have a certain amount of time. Definitely skip to the recap. This is an episode you can't afford to miss. You're going to also hear from some people from the money mafia. Our listeners, you guys are the money mafia. There is a money mafia trading secrets all access group. If you're interested, shoot me an email, trading secrets at Jason Tarek dot com. They were all there live while we did the podcast and they allowed us to either read their questions off or some of them even come on to ask the questions. So this is a jam jam packed episode. We're gonna ring in the opening bell quickly with Blake horseman's story and how his experience ties to the Dubai trip and then we are gonna get into the curious Canadians questions and then we're gonna have a recap like no other with my brother, Steven tartick. That you can not miss. Let's bring in the opening bell. To the Dubai trip recap with the one and only Blake horseman and of course, the curious Canadian. Dubai. So Blake calls me out of nowhere. He's like, hey man, do you want to go to this event that is a paid opportunity for me in beaver creek? If you want to share the brand, Blake, I'll let you share that brand. I don't want to put that out there that's your business. And I was like, I actually, man. that week. I think I'm going to go, there's a lot of question marks about this trip. Is this fight your fest two? Or if it's real, I don't know. But if it's legit, I'm going to go to Dubai. And Blake was like, oh shit. I forgot about this. Gee got an email about Dubai. And we didn't even respond. So me talking to hit that light in your head. Your switch went off. And you actually went through the process of talking to them and were offered the opportunity to come on Dubai. So tell me a little bit about what that process was. And what happened? Yeah, exactly like Jason said, we were on the phone and he mentioned, I was like, oh yeah, I think you gotta got an email about that and we looked and it was, I wanna say it was like mid December maybe. I don't really remember exactly when, but we honestly to God thought it was a scam. We were like, this is too good to be true. We get a lot of weird emails all the time. And I was like, this has gotta be a scam. And then when Jason said he was going, I was like, oh, it's not a scam. I'm like, if other people are also and then you mentioned a couple other people that have been invited. I was like, oh, this isn't a scam. I was like, GE, like email them now. This is amazing. This would be so cool. And so yeah, we emailed them. We went back and forth, just kind of being like, is this real? Like, what is happening? So I was like, you know, it's like this is a lot. So we went through the process, and I want to say, I can't remember exactly, it was like, maybe like a week, 7, 8 days before maybe even ten, they were like, okay, awesome, we got you send us all your info, your freaking flyer number, all of that stuff.

Dubai Blake Horseman Blake Heather Mcdonald David Ottawa Jason Tarek Steven Tartick Beaver Creek Bell Jason GE
A highlight from Choosing optimism with Jamil Zaki

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

01:50 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Choosing optimism with Jamil Zaki

"Our show about the changing nature of work and how that work is changing us. This year we set out to infuse optimism into our show. I'm talking to you now as I scroll through The New York Times app on my phone and see news of yet another mass shooting. It's followed here by a story about a corruption scandal in Ukraine. Now I look up and out the window and I'm wondering, why hasn't it snowed yet in New York City? It's the end of January is this global warming? The evidence to support pessimism all around me can be overwhelming. Even to our guest this week I have moments just like anybody where I feel hopeless. I mean, there's so much bad news. There's so much suffering in the world and so much of that is caused by us. And it feels unforgivable. It feels like we can never emerge from the pain that we're causing one another. And yet, again, I look when I can at what we can count. What the data show. That's Jamil zaki. Jameel is a psychology professor and researcher at Stanford. He runs the Stanford social neuroscience lab. Jamil's research focuses on how people respond to each other. How we influence each other and when and why we choose to help each other. His most recent book is called the war for kindness, building empathy in a fractured world. The research to meals conducted for more than 15 years reveals surprises. It suggests we have reason to be much more optimistic about our future than the headlines might demand. Today, we'll talk about trust and how it's changing. We'll explore the nature of the stories we tell ourselves. The Jamil will push us to embrace curiosity as we consider adjusting those stories.

Jamil Zaki Stanford Social Neuroscience L The New York Times Ukraine Jameel New York City Jamil Stanford
A highlight from ACP359 Would my time be better spent simply buying a plane and flying?

Aviation Careers Podcast

05:57 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from ACP359 Would my time be better spent simply buying a plane and flying?

"My wings, and leave the voicemail there, but I'd love you to maybe just record a little message on your phone and send it to us. We'd love to answer that. Let us know if we can use that in the actual podcast. But let's go listen to dean's voicemail. Hey Carl, it's dean showalter in Virginia, and today was my last day as a full-time employee at classic aviation. So I figured it was a good time for me to give you an update. I've been wanting to update you for a while now, so if you remember, I spoke with you back on Friday, may the 20th I had paid for an hour of your coaching, and that was just super helpful. Thank you so much for doing that. And that was just a very valuable time with you, and you connected me with some people that were really great to speak with, and you helped me sort things out. And I was headed to the airlines. I was thinking seriously about the airlines at that time, and then two days later, I guess that would have been may the 22nd, I went flying locally here with Richard, who was my previous boss at classic aviation years ago, and I got to go flying with him in a king air 200. And that was such a great experience and then two days after that, he walked in the shop one day and tossed out the possibility of me joining the pilot team for a king air three 50 that's based here at our airport. That is operated by a local company. And so I had to regroup and adjust my thinking there a bit because I had been thinking seriously about the airlines when I talked with you and I had been thinking about that for quite some time. I've always been fascinated by the airlines, so I had to regroup a bit, but I quickly realized that this was an amazing opportunity and my wife and kids and many friends and advisers have been very supportive of the whole thing. after I thought about it, I realized that this was definitely an opportunity to pursue, so on July 7th, this summer, I had an interview with this company, and with their pilots. And it went really well. That was on July 7th. And then August the second, I signed the paperwork to accept a full-time job flying in the king air three 50, and so it turns out that I will drive to, this is the plan. I drive to Concord, North Carolina, coming up on September the 25th to get ready to drink out of the fire hose of training for two weeks at a place called fly right they have a full motion king of three 50 simulator there, and I'll go through two weeks of sim training and then take the check ride for the type rating and come back and get flying with these experienced pilots in this airplane, and I'm just very, very excited about this whole thing. So I have a little over two weeks to continue studying and preparing and I'm very excited. I'm overwhelmed and I've had to face a lot of doubts and fears along the way, but I'm just very excited about the whole thing. And so in your recent podcast episode, you asked the question, is starting a professional career in flying at 55 worth the effort, and I'll just answer your question there from that episode with a wholehearted yes, absolutely. It is worth it. And in fact, I am 55 years old right now. So Carl, I just want to say thank you for all of your encouragement along the way and all the ways that you've helped me and so many other people. I just really appreciate it so much. So keep up the good work and I do hope to meet you sometime in person and maybe you'll end up in Virginia or maybe I'll end up in Florida who knows. But I also one other little fun detail I was just looking at your last episode and it was actually the aviation careers podcast number three 50 and I thought what a fun coincidence that your podcast three 50 that I was thinking about is at a time when I am getting ready to go to training for the king air three 50. So Carl, I just really appreciate all the ways you've helped me. Thank you so much. I just wanted to give you an update on how things are going on my end and I'll try to get back in touch with you and let you know when I am on the other side of the training and I'm up and running in the airplane. Thank you so much and I'll see you. Well, dean, thanks for that voicemail. First of all, I appreciate you sending that over to us. Dean has a great show. I'll put a link in the podcast notes airplane owner maintenance dot com. There's a little bio about him of a link to. But that was quite the coincidence there. And it's so cool that you rode in or actually sent us a voicemail. Dean, I'd love to have you on the show. He has a very inspirational message always on his show. And he's just somebody that I really admire as a mechanic and also in his a flying ability. So dean, thanks for that. And I love the fact that you talked about your pathways to the airlines and you decided to take another path and if you're listening right now, love to hear what you've done, possibly you did the same. The airlines are great for building time, but it sounds like this might be the job for him, which brings up the fact that you should always think about the next little juncture in the road. And think that is this the right way to go for me and my family. And it sounds like it is. Never discount anything. Never discount any job until you're in that situation and it's put in front of you and you make that decision. Because at that moment in your life, things could be different than they were. Just a few years ago, months ago, weeks ago. So hats off to you, dean, I really appreciate that. So let's get on to the question today. And this comes in from a listener who went to our aviation careers podcast dot com slash contact. Also use feedback at aviation careers podcast dot com. And we'll read your message here,

Hey Carl Dean Showalter Dean Virginia Carl Concord Richard North Carolina Florida
A highlight from 372: How to STOP COMPARING Yourself to Others: Tips and Tricks for Building More Confidence & Loving Yourself

RISE Podcast

06:22 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from 372: How to STOP COMPARING Yourself to Others: Tips and Tricks for Building More Confidence & Loving Yourself

"If I start comparing myself, it is the best trigger that I have to like, nope. Water your own grass. Water your own grass because right now if you're sitting here looking at someone else's life, looking at someone else's work and feeling like, oh, I'm jealous of that thing or I want that thing or I wish I had that thing. If I'm doing that, I'm not actually doing the thing that I'm saying I want to have. Hi, I'm Rachel Hollis, and this is my podcast. I spend so many hours of every single week reading and listening to podcasts and watching YouTube videos and trying to find out as much as I can about the world around me. And that's what we do on this show. We talk about everything. Life and how to be an entrepreneur. What happened to dinosaurs? What's the best recipe for fried chicken? What's the best plan for intermittent fasting? What's going on with our inner child? How's therapy working out for you? Whatever it is, my guess are into, I want to unpack it so that we can all understand. These are conversations. This is information for the curious. This is the Rachel Hollis podcast. Hi guys, welcome to my dining room table. I promise I really am working on a permanent studio space for the podcast. If you've been following this saga, Jack is actually coming tomorrow if you can believe it. He's going to come here, flying out from California to help me begin to build out the studio. But in the meantime, we're at the dining room table, and I hope that's cool. How are you guys? How's the year going? How's 2023 treating you? It is the 23rd day of 2023. And I mean, January has been pretty wild. I think that I always have these expectations about what's going to happen in my January, and then it sort of goes a lot of different directions, but I'm feeling good, I was in LA last week doing a bunch of podcast interviews, which you'll hear on the show here soon and I'm excited for you to get to hear some of these conversations, but one of my favorite things I did in LA was I got this sweatshirt. If you're not watching this on YouTube, then you just imagine a really good, I'm gonna call this color burnt Sienna. I remember that crown was one of my favorites when I was a little girl, burnt Sienna. So just imagine this brownish orangish, very light, one of those sweatshirts that you buy, brand new, but it looks like you bought it at a vintage shop. And I wasn't planning on doing shopping that day, which is my favorite kind of shopping to do. But there is a brand that I absolutely love called the great, which if I'm not mistaken, is Emily and Merritt, if y'all are familiar with them, their whole line of clothing is like vintage Americana for lack of a better word, but the reason I got into this brand is because the jeans fit so well. And then I just sort of fell in love with everything else. I've only ever shopped for it online and I was in LA and I was grabbing coffee on Melrose and lo and behold there's a store. And I had that moment where I was like, we're about to make some mistakes. We are about to do some shopping that we don't need, but I justified it by saying, well, this is my birthday present to myself, 'cause I just have my birthday. So all of that to say, this new sweatshirt is just fantastic. I am like the only person I know who does a big shopping spree and just ends up buying more sweatshirts. I can't help but though they're so comfy, I don't want to change. So I have this episode of the show that I've been wanting to record for a while and my intention today was to record this episode for you guys. But then, at a very human moment, that then inspired me to change the conversation that I'm gonna have with you today because I had some tools that I could reach for to deal with this very human moment and then I was able to talk myself back around and I thought, oh, I bet you guys would maybe glean some ideas from this encounter as well. I was having my coffee, I gave myself a countdown, just like I do for my 5 year old. I don't know if y'all have to do this, but I have to give myself a countdown because otherwise I'll just sit and have coffee for way longer than I should because I just love my morning routine and I love my coffee and the last bit of the routine was I'm gonna go get my workout in. I'm gonna get this done. So I said, okay, Rach, at 8 30, you're wrapping this train up and you're gonna go out to the gym and you're gonna do what you need to do. So that means I've got 20 minutes left. 20 minutes and half a cup of coffee and I was like, I'm gonna go see what's happening on the gram. I feel like and we're gonna get to this in a minute, but I feel like I have gotten my Instagram to such a beautiful feed that my feed inspires me. I don't go on it all the time, but whenever I do, it's like a lot of like animal videos, it's things like upworthy, it's stuff that just like makes my heart feel so happy. It's my Friends. It's just things that I get a boost from this. And I always say like, pay attention to how you feel energetically when you are interacting with any social media platform because if you're not feeling great, why are you continuing to take part in it? If you're not feeling great when you interact with YouTube with Instagram with Facebook with TikTok, if you're feeling drained, if you're feeling

Rachel Hollis Sienna LA Youtube Merritt Jack California Emily Rach Instagram Facebook
A highlight from Mark Dyson says highlight your essential skills when youre seeking work

Jazzed About Work

01:06 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Mark Dyson says highlight your essential skills when youre seeking work

"Hello, everyone, and welcome to jazz about work, where we talk about everything that might have an impact on your career. I'm your host, bev Jones. I'm an executive coach in my recent book is find your happy at work. Our focus today is how to stay prepared for and maybe to launch a job search. Our return guest is Mark Anthony Dyson. He's a career consultant and also a popular and very generous producer of inflammation about the job search environment. Mark runs the voice of job seekers, which is a blog and podcast that could help anyone who wants to explore the job market. Today, Mark will talk about 2023 trends in the world of work, and why a stellar resume just isn't enough. If you're facing a career shift, he'll discuss how to get ready for our career move and he'll share insights about the importance of soft skills which he calls essential skills, and the

Bev Jones Mark Anthony Dyson Mark
A highlight from 371: UNLOCK Your Creativity: Specific Tactics & Strategies for Unleashing Your Creative Potential with Liz Gilbert, Phoebe Robinson, & Gay Hendricks | Mastermind Series

RISE Podcast

03:20 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from 371: UNLOCK Your Creativity: Specific Tactics & Strategies for Unleashing Your Creative Potential with Liz Gilbert, Phoebe Robinson, & Gay Hendricks | Mastermind Series

"Hi guys, welcome to another episode of the show and another mastermind conversation. We tried this on a whim. To be honest, we were like, oh, we have all of these incredible teachers and guests over the last 6 years. And what if we combine them into a mastermind? What if we picked a single topic and let the best teachers we've ever spoken to teach on this unique thing? It turns out y'all are really digging these conversations. And I get it. I am just like you. I love when I'm looking for something really specific and I can hear ideas about it from a bunch of different angles. We've covered focus and productivity. We've talked about entrepreneurship, and today it's something special just for the creatives. Which, in my opinion, is basically every single person. It doesn't matter what you do. Whether you are a CEO or a CFO or a stay at home parent, whatever it is you're into, creativity is what helps us to think of new ideas to think outside the box, to take ourselves and our lives to the next level. And today, I have hand picked some of my favorite conversations about creativity from some of the most successfully creative people I know. You're going to hear from Liz Gilbert, who, in my opinion, has written the single greatest book on creativity. It's called big magic, if you want to give it a go. You're going to hear conversations from gay Hendricks, Phoebe Robinson, reshma sujani, Nick stone, these are writers comedians. Creators of really incredible work that has lasted decades. So whether you're just dipping your toe in your creativity or this is who you are, today's conversation is just for you. And if you dig it, if you get something out of it, will you please share it with another creative that you know, let's share the wisdom of these incredibly wise teachers and get the word out about how amazing their perspective is. Hi, I'm Rachel Hollis, and this is my podcast. I spend so many hours of every single week reading and listening to podcasts and watching YouTube videos and trying to find out as much as I can about the world around me. And that's what we do on this show. We talk about everything. Life and how to be an entrepreneur. What happened to dinosaurs? What's the best recipe for fried chicken? What's the best plan for intermittent fasting? What's going on with our inner child? How's therapy working out for you? Whatever it is, my guess are into, I want to unpack it so that we can all understand. These are conversations. This is information for the curious. This is the Rachel Hollis podcast. One thing I can tell you for certain after

Liz Gilbert Gay Hendricks Phoebe Robinson Reshma Sujani Nick Stone Rachel Hollis Youtube
A highlight from Amy Griffin on Stepping Back Into Her Career

Skimm'd from The Couch

02:23 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Amy Griffin on Stepping Back Into Her Career

"Teams, tools, and ideas together in one digital space. We'll explain more in a bit, but first, let's get into the episode. I think that it's a fallacy to say you can do everything well all the time. And so I think that one of the things I'm most proud of is that I stepped out and then I stepped back in. I'm Carly zakin, and I'm Danielle weisberg. Welcome to 9 to 5 ish with the skin. We've run into so many questions over the years and had so many moments where we needed advice and we got it from women who'd been there. And that's what we're bringing you with this show. Each week we're helping you get what you want out of your career by talking to the smartest leaders we know. Because we know your work life is a lot more than 9 to 5. All right, let's get into it. Hi, everyone. Today our guest is Amy Griffin, the founder and managing partner of G 9 ventures. G 9 invests in early stage startups focused on supporting companies that empower consumers to live, look and feel better. And she's invested in businesses you have probably heard of like bumble, goop, and athletic greens. In addition to her work at G 9, Amy's also held board positions for philanthropic and educational institutions, including the boys club of New York and the Virginia athletics foundation. Amy, welcome to 9 to 5 ish. Thanks for having me. I'm so happy to be with you all today. We have been waiting to do this interview for a while, and I'm really excited to kind of dig into the Amy behind G 9 and the first lightning round question I have is, why is it called G 9? That's a fun story. You think it's this investment firm G 9, it feels very formal. But in actuality, my middle name growing up, I made me Janine and my name is fell G 9 and as a child I could never remember that there were two ends in the middle. So my grandmother would always say to me, Amy, it's G 9 G 9. That's how you remember it. And so in the spirit of supporting women and being a part of women growing their companies and bringing women to the forefront, it just felt very natural and kind of hit me like it was like a lightning rod when I said, I've got to do, it's got to be called G 9 and it was actually kind of a chuckle into the table because it just made sense.

Carly Zakin Danielle Weisberg Amy Griffin G 9 Ventures Boys Club Of New York Virginia Athletics Foundation AMY Janine
A highlight from 370: GABRIEL IGLESIAS | From Dive Bars To Dodger Stadium: An Inspirational Interview  on Overcoming Adversity & Finding Your Voice

RISE Podcast

01:02 min | Last week

A highlight from 370: GABRIEL IGLESIAS | From Dive Bars To Dodger Stadium: An Inspirational Interview on Overcoming Adversity & Finding Your Voice

"Once I started working and doing my own thing, I try not to get involved in clicks and groups because there are clicks and groups out there. And so if you went to the comedy store, went to the laugh factor that was comics that it was groups, you know, and these were the people that would hang out together and same thing. Like I remember at the comedy store, there was the Android ice clay clip that Joe Rogan click, the Eddie Griffin clip. There was, you know, where you were an improv guide, where your comedy store got. Were you a laugh factory guy? You know, it's like, it was like, ah. And so I just love the fact that once I got out on the road and was able to stay out on the road, I didn't have to worry about being part of these groups where sometimes it's good where you motivate each other and that you push, and then sometimes I feel like everybody's sabotaging each other, trying to claw their way out of there. And so I never wanted to let anyone else's dreams or what they wanted influence me. Hi, I'm Rachel

Eddie Griffin Joe Rogan Rachel
A highlight from Breaking free of stereotype threat with Claude Steele

WorkLife with Adam Grant

04:52 min | Last week

A highlight from Breaking free of stereotype threat with Claude Steele

"Steele, what an honor to finally meet you. Well, it's a great pleasure to be here and right back at you with that sense of being honored. Pleasure to meet you even electronically. Same, I've been a big fan of your work since I was an undergrad studying psychology and I remember first reading about stereotype threat and finding it intellectually fascinating and just extremely practically important and I remember that being a defining moment where I first started thinking about maybe I could become a psychologist this work really matters in its endlessly interesting. So thank you for the enormous impact you've had on my life. I have never gotten to hear the backstory of how you discovered it. Was there an experience in your life that paid paved the way or a moment that opened your eyes? It was a long grueling process. But it was anchored the effort by a finding that was just an interesting puzzle and the puzzle was that at the University of Michigan where you too were a graduate student. By the way, when were you there? I was there from 2003 to O 7. Okay, we've missed each other by a decade, but I saw a chart which graphed out students grades as a function of the SAT scores they had when they entered. And the intriguing thing about the chart was that at every level of SAT score that a student had when they entered. African American students were doing worse than other students at Michigan. And the puzzle was if you'd told me that they weren't on average doing as well as other students, I might have found that plausible in that, you know, there are differences in preparation level and prior schooling and educational opportunity and so that could explain such a thing. But here you have them roughly equated by their SAT scores to the extent that that equates people in terms of preparation for college. But at each level of preparation, as measured that way, black students were doing worse than other students. And why would that be? That was the puzzle. I had a lot of conversations with thickness but in Steve Spencer and we went around and around and we tried experiments and we got a research grant and we did some studies and maybe four years later, Steve Spencer and I had a clear finding that later became stereotype threat. So stereotype threat was no flashing insight. It was the product of sort of a grinding pursuit of what could be causing this underperformance as the term was. That's the origin. Fascinating. This is a rare case where data actually led to a discovery, as opposed to something happened to you. And then you went to go and study it. Exactly. Every preconception that I had about what could be causing that underperformance was proven wrong by the data. So every idea we had, none of those seemed to work, but eventually we got a clear evidence, this was with women in math. Women who were really good at math and committed in advanced math. We give them a very difficult test. And if we just gave it to them as a standardized test of math skills, women did worse than men. We'd selected them for having roughly equal backgrounds and skill levels in math. But when you give them a really difficult test at the frontier of their skills, women were doing worse than men. The classic underperformance that we'd observed in the grades and college grade data we had. But we could eliminate that by making the stereotype about women's math ability irrelevant to taking that test. So we did that, Steve and I by just saying, well, you may have heard women don't do as well on standardized math tests. Men do. But that's not true for this test. To test you're taking today is a test on which women have always done just as well as men and with that simple instruction, their scores went up to match that of equally skilled men. So that was the day we had something. That seemed to account for this mystery of the underperformance. It's remarkable that on the exact same tests, right? Just randomly assigning them to decouple their ability or their performance on that test from stereotypes about their group was enough to elevate their ultimate results. Yeah. We know now, you know, 20 plus years, maybe 25 years later, we know a lot of moderators of that effect and conditions, but when you look at a group that feels the performance is very important. These are not women that are casually taking introductory math courses. These are women that are really dedicated to it. It's going to be part of their career path. They assume. So they're invested in it when they get frustrated on that test.

Steve Spencer Steele University Of Michigan Michigan Steve
A highlight from George McCalman

Revision Path

02:18 min | Last week

A highlight from George McCalman

"Through in depth interviews you'll learn about their work, their goals and what inspires them as creative individuals. Here's your host, Maurice cherry. Hello everybody and welcome to revision path. Thank you so much for tuning in. I'm your host, Maurice cherry. Before we get to this week's interview, I need your help. On January 12th, a tornado tore through my hometown of Selma, Alabama. You probably heard about it or seen it on the news. Now my family is safe, there's been minimal damage to my mom's place, my grandma's place. But overall, the city looks like a war zone and there have been significant amounts of damage. And Selma is an old town with a lot of old buildings and trees, so that's tornado came through and just really, really mess things up. I've seen pictures. I've seen drone footage. It looks like a war zone and a third world country. It looks really bad. I'm working to help raise money for Selma tornado relief with the United way of central Alabama. To donate all you have to do is text the word Selma SEL MA to 6 two 6 four four and give any amount you can to help get the city back on its feet. If you want, you can even say you heard about it through revision path. Also, if you send me proof of your donation, I will match it 100%. Again, text Selma SEL MA to 6 two 6 four four, I'll also put this information in the show notes. Now let's talk about one of our sponsors hover. Of course, it's the start of a new year, and you might have something that you want to launch like an art project or a podcast or your own website. Whatever it is that you're passionate about and you want to build it online, hover's got your back. Everything online begins with a domain name, and hover makes the process of choosing and using your domain name, a piece of cake. If you get stuck, they have a best in class customer support team that can help you out every step of the way. Not to mention free who is privacy, meaning you can keep your identity safe from hackers or anybody out there trying to find out where you live or something like that. You can get started today with hover by going to hover dot com forward slash revision path and you can get 10%

Maurice Cherry United Way Of Central Alabama Selma Sel Ma Selma Alabama
A highlight from Bachelor Nation alum Dylan Barbour reveals the $$$ behind his fitness startup Vizor, influencer marketing, & beyond!

Trading Secrets

04:54 min | Last week

A highlight from Bachelor Nation alum Dylan Barbour reveals the $$$ behind his fitness startup Vizor, influencer marketing, & beyond!

"Making that money welcome back to another episode of trading, seek. Today we are joined by entrepreneur turned reality TV and social media star. Dylan, I want you to know me saying that almost made me want to throw up. But it's the truth. Dylan barber. Many of you know Dylan from his time on the bachelorette and bachelor in Paradise where he met his now fiance, Hannah, Godwin. What you may not know is that Dylan is a cofounder of a fitness company more tech than anything that allows people to work out while donating food to those in need. It's an unbelievable app. Today we are going to learn what it is like to build a startup company from scratch. Here Dylan's thoughts on his experience in bachelor nation and where he sees it's going from here, but most importantly, what we're going to get into at Dylan is you guys most definitely probably don't know about his expertise in CPG investing. He's a brilliant investor, sophisticated, deep acumen, probably one of the most in the batch of franchise and we're getting into that Dylan. Thank you so much for being on train secrets. Thanks for having me, man. That was the first half of the intro is pretty brutal. A second half was good. The brutal part. That was being on the bachelor. Do you think you are a reality TV star? No. Why? Yeah, it's a good question. You were the star of Paradise? One of many, we're all stars in our own right. But yeah, I don't know. I kind of like, it seems like a fever dream. Okay. Do you have a good relationship with the show? Like, when you look back on it, are you like that was amazing? It was great, or you just indifferent. I had a great time. Like, obviously, but I think my, I don't know, there was like a 6 month span post show where I was a little reckless, cavalier, some might say, with a chirping with the chirping, which I was thinking about the other day, I was like, why would I do that? But 28 now I'm a man. Matured. Why do you think you did do it? Just stir it up a little bit. Yeah, I like to I like to stir it up. But you don't stir it up now like you used to. Yeah, I'm very tame now. Why did Hannah reel you in? I've been real them by multiple people. You can't wreck that massive career hers. Not anymore, no. I was a liability for a minute. I love it. All right, let's get into your career pre show. What were you doing? And what was the process like when you left to go on the show? Yeah, so I went to school on the east coast. If you go to school in the northeast, like especially a little art school, you're probably going to work in banking. So I did public finance investment banking at Citigroup for a summer. And then left that. As an intern? He has an intern. Yeah, yeah. It's an intern. What do you make doing something like that? I think it was like 20 grand? Okay. For a summer. And the goal with that, like anyone that's in banking, trying to get diabetic consulting. The big thing is you're trying to land an internship, right? Because you need the job. For the most part, you want that offer going into your senior year. Yeah, yeah, yeah. That's like that's a big thing. If you come into it with a job offer your senior, you can just do whatever you want. I didn't get the job offer. Which was probably deservedly so. Would work really hard, but I never asked questions. And I think I realized that that was I should know why I was doing something. I would be like, yeah, just tell me what to do, and I'll do it. So that was one thing I took with me after that. Question on that. The people that did get the offer. I'm just curious Citigroup, going to your senior year, how much were they getting offered? And where they're signing bonuses. It's 6 figures. I think to start and then I think around like maybe like a ten to 20 grand signing bonus. But then you have to pay it back if you leave after a year. Within a year. Okay, that dangling carrots always there in big corporate. Yeah, pretty brutal. But then, yeah, so I graduated, banking is like pretty intense if anybody has done it, you work till like 1 a.m., I feel like, and you have no social life. So I didn't want to do that. I did private wealth management, which is like the polar opposite at Morgan Stanley. So it was super tame, I would have like nothing to do, come like 3 o'clock. And so I would go home, take a nap, wake up, study for the CFA, because I was like, I need to be challenged in some capacity, and then work out for two and a half hours, and then just go to sleep and do it all over again. Wealth management in New York City or where we work in. I worked in Palo Alto, lived in north beach. Okay, gotcha. San Fran. And so how old are you at this time? 20 two. 22 first job out of school. Yeah. Alternate worth or what's the size of clients you're working with? It would range some people would have $10 million and $20 million and some people would have like a $1 million and if you didn't really have over 500 K 90,000 base plus bonus, how far off am I? Pretty far off, yeah. I think I was in like an associates program, so I always like making like 50 grand and it was like a 5 grand bonus and like living in the and if you can't like if you're not an adviser and you don't get any type of commission on anything, it's just like I'm just like capped. Got it. So I was like, well, I'm not really doing anything.

Dylan Dylan Barber Hannah Reel Godwin Citigroup Hannah Paradise Fever East Coast Morgan Stanley North Beach San Fran Palo Alto New York City
A highlight from Katherine Morgan Schafler on perfectionisms surprising gifts

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

07:47 min | Last week

A highlight from Katherine Morgan Schafler on perfectionisms surprising gifts

"The changing nature of work and how that work is changing us. I'm a perfectionist. I know this about myself. I can be exacting to a fault. And I come down too strongly when my very high standards aren't met. And the person I come down on hardest, well, it's not Sarah, in the production booth, although she may disagree. It's actually myself. Of course. Like right now, I'm just so annoyed with myself that I didn't send out our newsletter this week. I usually send out our newsletters on Mondays, and it was a holiday Monday. I was on an epic road trip with my toddlers. They wanted snacks and books, and to get out of the car, we were staying at a hotel, and I'm still kicking myself that I didn't just set the alarm for 5 30. Wake up before the kids at the hotel pull up my laptop to work for just 20 minutes. I think of perfectionism as a problem I have. I think to fix. Couldn't I just chill a little? But also, like, couldn't I have just gotten up a tiny bit earlier? Really, though. So I was so excited to talk to this week's guest. Catherine Morgan schaffler. Catherine is a psychotherapist, and she's developed a specialty in women who present outwardly as if they're doing it all. And often feel like they're crumbling inside. Perfectionists. Catherine is just published a book, and she's called it the perfectionist guide to losing control. And she takes a novel and empowering approach to perfectionism. It's not a beast to tame. It's a tool we can put to use. But first, we have to understand it. In this episode, Catherine asks us to rethink balance in our lives. She offers us a framework to better understand our own relationship to perfectionism, spoiler, there are a lot of different ways to be a perfectionist. And she invites us to identify what we want. Like what we actually want and move toward it. Just to make sure we're all starting on the same page here, I asked Catherine to define a perfectionist for us. Here she is. I think the colloquial definition of perfectionist is really reductive and oversimplified of someone who wants things to be perfect all the time. And that's simply not the case. And we are trying to squeeze this concept of perfectionist and perfectionism into this little ring box when it's such a kaleidoscopic topic. So for me, the way I define a perfectionist is somebody who, more often than not, notices the gap between the reality, plunked down in our laps, and this ideal. Unique to our species, we have the cognitive capacity to understand and see what's happening in real time, but also imagine this other world. Where things are happening in a better and improved way. And perfectionists are people who not only see that gap. But who feel a compulsion to try to actively bridge that gap. And again, I think we all have a little bit of perfectionists in us, but perfectionists are people who have that experience in a patterned way. I guess the first question I would have is, is this gendered? Because what you described to me feels like an experience that I could probably point out in all of my female friends. Certainly myself. I don't think perfectionism itself presents more in one gender or the other, but what I do think is the way that it's expressed and the way women in particular are pressured to be perfectionistic in certain contexts is highly gendered. Right? Makes a lot of sense for me, Catherine, because I think of my perfectionist tendencies as something to be fixed within me. How would you rethink that? Well, what's really interesting about having the identity of a perfectionist is that it's an enduring identity marker. And this I found to be true not just in my practice, but it's also backed up in the research world, which is like when you think of yourself as a perfectionist, you tend to think of yourself that way throughout your entire lifetime. So it's similar to calling yourself a romantic or an activist. It's much more of an integral part of your identity. And in the same way that I would never approach a romantic who perhaps needs to learn boundaries around love, relationships, their romanticism, et cetera. I would never say, you know what? Just like, believe in love a little bit less, just dial it down a little, be a little more practical, nor would I go to an activist and be like, I know you care, and that's good, but just don't care so much, you know? And it's like all these approaches towards perfectionism right now are telling perfectionists to not be a perfectionist in some way or another. And it drives me nuts because I'm like the eradication approach doesn't work nor is it even necessary because there's a whole branch of research that backs up and has for decades this notion of adaptive perfectionism, which is when you use your perfectionism to help you and heal you and it's not one or the other, right? I'm not here to be like, yay, perfectionism is shiny and golden and great. It's not. But it's also not some terrible pitfall that you need to run and scream for the hills towards, you know? Maybe one thing that you're exploring is this idea that there is no need to attach a good or a bad label to the idea of perfectionism, but the more you understand your own use of perfectionism your relationship with perfectionism, the more you can make peace with it and then use it strategically to move toward a state of being that makes you feel good. Jesse, I would like you to repeat that so I can write it down. Put it in all my interviews. Yes, that's exactly right. I think of perfectionism as a power and any power has an inherent dichotomy in it. And to your point, understanding what it looks like for you to manage perfectionism in a way that is aligned with your values and what energizes you and brings you joy and pleasure and a sense of feeling alive in the world. That's what this book is about. Talk to us about where you start. One of the things that goes along with this notion that's happening in our culture right now of telling women in particular not to be perfectionistic, a corollary to that is this message to find balance. And nothing boils my blood more than hearing people give that directive to women because balance has been stripped down from its original curative context, which is like an energetic equilibrium. And it's been turned into this thing that basically means being good at being busy, right? So when we say that a woman is balanced, we don't mean she's hit her energetic sweet spot of equilibrium, we mean she can balance a lot of tasks and do a lot of things and not drop the ball. And that has nothing to do with health, and yet there's been this conflation of a balanced woman is a healthy woman, and that's the goal is to be balanced, balance, balance, balance, and it's like, I talk about this in the book. It's just para preaching. Find balance, engage in self care, find balance, engage in self care, and I am so sick of that message, because in my view, balance is not real. It's not a real thing. We're sending women on this wild goose chase to find balance

Catherine Catherine Morgan Schaffler Sarah Jesse
A highlight from 369: How to Manifest & Attract What You Want In Life In 2023

RISE Podcast

06:37 min | Last week

A highlight from 369: How to Manifest & Attract What You Want In Life In 2023

"I am in Los Angeles. I came here because I have a full week of podcast interviews. And my podcast interview for today got sick. So I was in the hotel room, and I was like, okay, well, we have a couple of hours before the afternoon meeting. So what are we going to do with this time? And I am for sure should be writing, but I don't want to do that right now. I'm going to record a podcast instead. And hashtag avoid the thing. I'm supposed to be working on, but it's okay because this is also my job, so it feels fine. I am really hoping that the audio for this sounds okay because I forgot to bring headphones to be able to hear, but we're going to go for it and assume it's all happening the way it's supposed to. So when I found out my interview got canceled, I was a little bummed because it's someone I really am excited to talk to and I know you guys are going to be excited to hear from her, but I'll wait until it actually happens to tell you who it is. I was sitting here in my hotel room and I was like, what can I do with this time? How can I utilize this time that I have, what can I create a podcast about? And I have all sorts of ideas. It's the start of a new year, and I know the things that do really well. People tend to love productivity, episodes, you love goal setting episodes you love anything that's like, it's a new year, it's a new day. Let's conquer this thing. Let's do it all. But I feel really compelled to do an episode about manifesting law of attraction, the life that you're creating, the reality that you're creating all of those things. And I've definitely spoken about this before, but I just feel the need to do it for a new year because, well, one, I think it's a great reminder as you start your new year off. But two, there are a lot of new listeners. I'm really pumped and excited about how many new listeners are up in the mix. And I want to make sure that we've had this conversation. You and I, if you haven't heard me talk about it before, I go into a lot of detail in episode two 22 if you want to scroll back and go listen to that. But essentially I'm just sort of going to give you my perspective on what we're attracting and what that looks like and how to manifest a life that you really love. Now, I guess let's start with the fact that manifesting law of attraction, these things have been around forever, but they're really trendy. In the last couple of years, they're really trendy topic and kind of everyone has stories about them and YouTube is filled with videos and there's so many teachers who are more wise on this subject than I am. But even though I didn't have the language for what this was, I really feel like intuitive manifesting or intuitive law of attraction doing these things without knowing that's what I was doing is a big reason that I've experienced a success that I have. If you have read my books or even watch videos that I've made before, oftentimes I would say, oh, my imagination is a huge reason why I'm so successful. My imagination, my imagination. Since I was a little girl. Long before I ever had a nonfiction book like girl wash your face, I was writing fiction. I have been writing fiction since I was little. And I have a really vivid imagination for good or ill. I would always imagine like grand scenarios for myself. When I was little and my parents would be screaming at each other or there would be like dishes breaking against the wall, I would go into my room and I would hide. Not hide from them, just sort of hide from the chaos and how scary it was to be out there and I would go get in bed or I would go sit there was a spot between my bed and the closet and I'd like sit in this little nook and I would just take myself out of the situation that I was in. And I think a lot of you, if you come from homes where there was trauma, that it's possible you also did the same thing. What I didn't understand was that those visions that I had those my imagination, this idea of what's going to be next, what's going to be the future in the future, I'll have control, have my own home. I'll be able to create my own life, that was the seed that would take me on a path to lead me where I am today. That was the law of attraction. That was manifesting things into my life, but I didn't really have the language for it, even though I was doing it. And I want to talk about it as we start off this year because it really is a mindset. I know if it's not something you're familiar with, it might seem whoo whoo, it might seem ridiculous. It might seem counterintuitive to what you were raised to believe, but it really is this massive shift and this massive tool in changing the way that you interact with this world around you. Because I think a lot of people are like, if you read the secret a million years ago or you've seen that documentary, I think there's some parts of that movie or that concept that are interesting and then I think some parts are a little ridiculous. But just the kernel of the idea that is in that is a really good one for you to consider. And you don't have to buy into every part of it. But I don't know how a rational, logical human, could argue with the mentality that the energy and the attitude and the perspective

Los Angeles Youtube
A highlight from Emily Hikade on Going from CIA Agent to Entrepreneur

Skimm'd from The Couch

02:11 min | Last week

A highlight from Emily Hikade on Going from CIA Agent to Entrepreneur

"Tools, and ideas together in one digital space. We'll explain more in a bit, but first, let's get into the episode. My plane started to go sideways. And the lights went out, people started screaming, and the plane started spinning toward the ocean. We were losing altitude and all I could see were the faces of my three little kids, and I think that was my aha moment. I'm Carly zakin, and I'm Danielle weisberg. Welcome to 9 to 5 ish with the skin. We've run into so many questions over the years and had so many moments where we needed advice and we got it from women who'd been there. And that's what we're bringing you with this show. Each week we're helping you get what you want out of your career by talking to the smartest leaders we know. Because we know your work life is a lot more than 9 to 5. All right, let's get into it. Hi, everyone. Today our guest is Emily hakata. She is the founder and CEO of the luxury sleepwear brand petite plume. But before Emily started her business, she worked around the world from places like Africa, Asia and the Middle East as a CIA agent. A job that had her meeting with affiliates at terrorist groups and flying into war zones. But after going through a near death experience at work, what she wanted for herself and her kids changed. As she started to think about life beyond the CIA, Emily remembered the sleek cotton pajamas she had seen in France, which inspired her brand, petite plume. Emily started her business in 2015 from East Africa, while she was still working at the CIA. Eventually, the brand became her full-time gig, and now everyone from prince George to Gwyneth Paltrow, to Carly and Danielle, where her company's pajamas. Emily, welcome to 9 to 5 ish. We are so happy to have you. Thank you so much for having me to Danielle and Carly. I'm so excited to be here. I can not wait to learn more about you. Your story is just so interesting. Let's dive in with the lightning round. Quick questions, quick answers.

Carly Zakin Danielle Weisberg Emily Hakata Emily CIA Middle East Asia Africa Carly East Africa Danielle Gwyneth Paltrow France Prince George
A highlight from Pursuing Your Hobbies with Jenny Goh- CR92

Career Relaunch

07:55 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from Pursuing Your Hobbies with Jenny Goh- CR92

"In this episode, we're going to talk a little bit about how your hobbies outside of work can have a positive impact not only on your life, but also on your career. To kick off season 7 of the career relaunch podcast, I'm speaking today with Jenny go, who initially thought she would become a scientist, so she spent her university days studying biology and heading down. The research path. But when she was working toward her graduate degree, she realized that a career in research wasn't what she really wanted, and maybe wasn't exactly her natural forte. So she started soul searching and exploring things like event planning and eventually landed roles working in IT for companies like IBM. Now as a project manager and scrum master at Accenture, she's hoping to use the skills and knowledge she's gathered over the years to hopefully help and inspire others in their careers. Now, I first crossed paths with Jenny on medium, where we exchanged a couple messages about each of our respective career changes, and after we exchanged a few more emails after that, I discovered that her hobby of learning ballet on the side has had a direct impact on her perspectives while she's at work. So I wanted to get Jenny onto the show to not only explain her career transition, but also to share her thoughts on the importance of feeding your interests outside of work. You can get all the show notes from today's conversation at career relaunch dot net slash 92. Jenny spoke with me from Singapore. Okay, hello, Jenny. Welcome to the career relaunch podcast. It is great to have you on the show. I Joseph, thank you for having me here. All right, I am really happy that we are finally able to do this. You and I first crossed paths on medium actually, and I know we've been trying to record this for quite some time. What are you up to right now in your career in your life? What's been keeping it busy? I'm actually currently working on a government project here as a scrum master. So I'm kind of like a deputy project manager helping to manage the day today progress of the project. Basically running the project for the client, making sure it they have timeline and their expectations. So I'm actually really busy with work and I'm also busy with moving to a new place. So these two activities have taken up the main bulk of my time. Now you're based in Singapore, can you tell me a little bit about where you live there and what your neighborhoods like just so we get a sense of where you are there in Singapore. I think most of our listeners probably know that Singapore is like really small. I live in this township we call it township that's called saran gun. It's actually a rather matured and all estate, but very developed. So you can just stay here, you don't need to go out of this little town ship. And you can get everything here. If you've been to Singapore, it's not like Orchard or any downtown places, but it's kind of like just a very neighborhood place that has everything. I kind of like it here. It's very crowded, but I like it because it's very convenient. So I leave just 5 minutes away from the train station. So I've been staying here for three years now, and I'm going to move next month. Where are you originally from jenni because I know you haven't always lived in Singapore? I was born in Malaysia. I was raised there, and then I actually moved to Singapore when I was 19. And I have since then spent like 20 years here. Final thing before we go back in time and talk about your first role as a computer engineer, I know one of the reasons why we haven't been able to record this for some time is because you've been struggling a little bit with COVID and I was wondering if you could just tell me about what impact COVID has had on your life, both health wise and also just personally. I just caught COVID about months ago. Actually around 5 weeks and I was one of those people who had really serious symptoms, not just like asymptomatic, you can just chew out at home, right? I had high fever for three days. I'm nursing a persistent cough. It's been 5 weeks. I think people would say it's almost like a long COVID. I think that has a significant impact in my life because I've been starting to think like, should I maybe consider seriously this work life balance thing, not that I've never think about it before, but I think that it makes me even more conscious about my life because I'm struggling to get back to my physical activities because I'm actually quite active. But I have to cut my exercises by half. Thank you so much for doing this. I know you're not fully recovered and I appreciate you squeezing this in as you're trying to recover. And just hope you end up getting better soon. And we're going to come back to some of the importance of physical activity to you in your life toward the end when we talk about ballet. I was wondering if we could first of all just go back in time because I know you haven't always been in your current project manager role. Could you take me back all the way back in time and tell me about what you think you wanted to become when you grew up and what you ended up doing as your first role when you finished up in university? When I was young, you know I went to maybe grade 7 or 8 and at the time when we started having Internet, right? I thought it was cool and I thought I wanted to be like a software engineer or computer engineer, right? But you know, my last year in high school, I discovered genetics. And I thought, hey, that's actually way more interesting. At that time, there was a boom in the biomedical industry. And I was getting a lot of influence when, you know, when I was choosing what to do in university, right? I actually received two offers. One is engineering the other one is life sciences. And after a whole run of struggle, I decided to choose life sciences. And I devoted the first about 8 years of my life to it. Although I'm doing something vastly different now, I would say that genetics to logic extend biology is still my favorite. And how did you know whether you wanted to stick with biology versus going and trying something different? My career is slightly different. I mean, even if you study biology, you could pursue many career paths, right? You could be a high school teacher, you could be a lecturer in the college, you could also be a researcher. You could be a salesperson, what have you, right? And I originally chosen the academic path. I thought I would become a researcher and maybe someday teach in a university. But the path as a researcher is not for the faint hearted. And you know, after some years down the road, I realized that I am not super good at it. Like I love it, but I'm not going to excel in it. It was actually when I was halfway pursuing my doctorate and I was having this self reflection, should I continue or not? How did you know that you weren't good at it just out of curiosity? Because it takes a lot to admit that we're not actually good at something that we've already invested a lot of time into. As a student as a researcher, right? You do need to submit some papers, right? You need to publish your own paper, right? In comparison to my peers, I think I was struggling with it. I couldn't meet my own expectations or the benchmark that I have, right? This is where my peers

Singapore Jenny Jenny Go Covid Accenture IBM Jenni Joseph Malaysia Cough Fever
What Is the Value of a College Degree?

the NewsWorthy

01:15 min | 1 year ago

What Is the Value of a College Degree?

"Hi brian. Thanks for coming on the newsworthy fisher. I appreciate it. So i let me just ask. What's your take on the value of a college degree in today's world. Shoot we wanna value in having that college degree but when it comes to employment and job opportunities in some ways it's becoming less valuable because of how competitive the labor market is become as you look up and down the labor market from not just hourly employees retail employees but salaried up and down the continuum what companies are finding is that there's not enough people for all of the jobs that they want to hire for so one. They're relaxing a lot of the historical constraints that they've had on the jobs that they're hiring for and that includes things like previous experience educational certifications and different degrees. That people have had so a lot of companies in particular across the last two or three years have been relaxing many of those constraints. The other thing that's going on is that for people that might have some of those degrees or experiences or whatever it may be. They're also able to ask for more money in the labor market so the other reason why companies are expanding their horizon of who to hire. Is that for people without college degrees. They're able to find that job and they're willing to extend an offer them. But perhaps at a slightly lower compensation level than people who do have a college degree

Fisher Brian
How To Keep Your Job On Vacation With Hubspot's Pamela Bump

MarTech Podcast

02:14 min | 1 year ago

How To Keep Your Job On Vacation With Hubspot's Pamela Bump

"Pamela as marketers. Get a break as well. Some of us wanna take a vacation but you know marketing never stops how marketers keep their job while they're on vacation i think there's two elements to marketing teams keeping their jobs while on vacation. I you look at the marketer the marketer which i'll use myself as an example we've all been through a wild year we've had a lot of pivots. Twenty twenty was so wild and unprecedented. We all wanna break. I wanted a break. Everyone on my team definitely wants a break but we want to take that break without throwing any of our processes off so one of the things that i do is focused on really strong communication. I regularly have one on ones with teammates that i work with most often and at these one on ones i might give them a heads up saying. Hey i'm gonna take some time off at this time. If you're going to take some time off let me know. And then we'll come up with a plan of how we can best prepare each other for this time off so we make initial plans there and then on top of that. I will email my team. And i'll say just a heads up that next week. I will be off from this date to this date. Here is my out of office. Plan for example when i'm running emails. I usually schedule the blogs emails a week or so ahead of time. If i'm going to be out. But i will pick another responsible person. A. dr is what we call them. A designated responsible individual to take over the email of something needs to be changed or content. Isn't gonna go out that we've scheduled so that's one of those things l. Include in my out of office plan of who to reach out to. If something urgent happens. And i will also remind people of when they can reach out to my manager could she can make calls for me usually end. That's just a good way to remind people that i'll be out. Usually nothing urgent will happen in the summer. When i when i have taken time off but it's good to have that information and people know whether something is something they should email me about and i'll return the message as soon as i get back or if it's something needed to reach out to another teammate. About but i usually try to schedule as much in advance as possible and then make a little out of office plan.

Pamela A. Dr
The Theory Of Relativity in Consumer Decisions

Inside the Spa Business | Spa

01:45 min | 1 year ago

The Theory Of Relativity in Consumer Decisions

"All know about uncle. L. e. equals m. c. squared. But that's not the relativity calculation that i'm talking about what i'm talking about is a calculation that we pretty much all make before we make a purchase certainly before we make a non essential purchase and it goes a little something like this. Let's say i'm at the pub. And the price of a state is four dollars more than the price of a boo coincidentally. The price of a beer is also four dollars so now the relativity calculation. I need to make ease. Do i have a stake and one beer or do i have a burger and to bees. Pretty easy decision. Or let's say you booking a flight and the price of an upgrade to business class is two thousand dollars now you could use that two thousand dollars when you get to the other end to have two nights in the suite at a fancy swanky hotel in town so the relativity discussion and calculation. You need to have is. What's the relative value. Is that gonna give me more value at the other end or am i better off spending the two thousand now to sit in a slightly bigger box and maybe have metal cutlery. Instead of plastic utensils on the plane these are the sorts of calculations that you will consume as a making whenever. They're buying something especially when it is non essential so you need to be aware of that when you have both setting your pricing and also sending your marketing you need to make sure that you are conveying the values and the benefits of your product. Because you know damn well that they are making a calculation relativity calculation of what else they could be doing with their money so when you think about the theory of relativity you've got uncle. Albert's theory equals mc squared uncle trance theory. It's all about how many bees you can have with your steak

Albert
The Manager and the Vaccine

Manager Tools

02:08 min | 1 year ago

The Manager and the Vaccine

"Cain that pandemic of cove nineteen has made our lives much more interesting to say. The least interesting is the word we're gonna use for the purposes of this context and the roles of us at work and of us as managers at work have become much harder as we've been saying for years. Remote management is much more challenging then managing in person and most managers. Let's be honest. We're barely keeping up before they moved remote and now this new world the remoteness of it all the complexities. That come with all of this whole situation throws even more at us. Remote management the lack of communication zoom. Burn out with shop. Priorities supply chain disruption travel restrictions budget. Layoffs tension challenges. I mean there's a lot and here we are one more to add to. Our list of stressful items is vaccinations. What is the manager's role in terms of nations. And how do we do our duty and as always we've got the answer for you so we are gonna cover four things today. I private organizations are within their rights to mandate vaccines second managers. First responsibility is to the organization third. The manager must support organizational vaccine roles. Fourth and finally effective managers will communicate frequently with their directs. We start with the fact that a private organization is within their right here. Yup obviously we have suspect or we assume that you know this and in case you don't private organizations at least in the united states are entitled to enforce any reasonable precaution that is in the service of the organization's mission mission and

Cain United States
It's Time to Reconnect With Your Early Year Business Goals

Purposeful Social Selling

01:19 min | 1 year ago

It's Time to Reconnect With Your Early Year Business Goals

"A little bug. I want to put in your ear. want you to be thinking about the last ninety days of this year and i want you to ask yourself when you sat down and wrote out your goals january one this year. Are you where you wanted to be at this point this year and i want you to get honest with yourself of why you think that is and maybe what store you might be telling yourself of why you haven't either gone as far as you thought you would or you haven't hit your goals or may maybe why started to negotiate on your goals. But you know the last ninety days of the year. It's the last quarter of the year and it truly is a really critical time breda dig in create a lot of consistency and create your sustainable business habits now because the work you do now is going to position you for the fruit that you're going to see the first of the year because that's a lot of people you know. They have some christmas money. They're ready to buy of you know if you're in the wellness wellness industry. That's when a lot of people are ready to recommit to their health goals. The new year is a really big time of year for this industry. So i really want to encourage you to be thinking about that now and how you need to be serving and adding value to your audience. Because like i said the work you put it now is going to help. Create the results for the first of the

Breda