Arts

Listen to the latest news, interviews and analysis from the world of visual and performing arts. Sourced from leading podcasts and talk radio shows.

A highlight from 597: Facelift

The Slowdown

03:58 min | 7 hrs ago

A highlight from 597: Facelift

"A decision has been made. Whether it's a move or a new job or a new love, and even the end of love. There's something there that is difficult to name. Something like the elation of change. I remember once sitting on a park bench with a friend who was going through a divorce, and everything was so hard for her in that moment. I gave her an apple out of my bag, and she cried, while eating the apple, because she said she had forgotten how to take care of herself. Forgotten to eat. A year later, though, she was triumphant. There was a glow around her. There's a Leonard Cullen's song lyric that says, there's a crack in everything. That's how the light gets in. And that's what she seemed like to me. Build up with light. It's not that the divorce was easy or without its dark cavernous days of recovery. But it's that a decision had been made, and for her, that decision meant one thing. Freedom. I'm someone who has never believed people should stay married. If they are unhappy. My parents are divorced, and they are both tremendously in love with their spouses. I think sometimes the risk of falling in love is mirrored by the risk of ending love. Neither of them are for the faint of heart. I remember once finally ending a relationship that had been toxic for some time, and even though I was sad, I was also lighter. There was no longer a voice in my head, telling me that I was doing the wrong thing. Telling me to have less fun being who I was. Have you ever had a relationship that ended and afterwards, everyone tells you they never really liked the person? Or at least they didn't think they were the right fit for you. That was that relationship. Here I was thinking we were a good match, and when we split, my Friends basically a party. After that, I remember thinking for one brief shining moment. How good it was to be in my own skin. Today's powerful poem speaks to the release that can come after a relationship has ended. How sometimes it takes an ending to realize you're just getting started. Facelift by Jennifer L Knox. I met the woman whom I hadn't seen in years at a bar with many happy friends around her. I could tell right away she was different. Flushed as a flower, showing more leg and what legs smiling with her teeth apart, breathless, as if she'd just run her first marathon, and some one kind had thrown a shiny silver blanket over her shoulders. I'm getting a divorce, she said tugging down the corners of her grin, like a two short skirt. It's a hard time. She looked away. But a little exciting, right? I asked. Remembering the relief, not knowing what would happen next, but knowing what would never happen again. My begging to be loved, the way I thought I could, but had no proof. What he said didn't exist. I was all the proof I needed.

Leonard Cullen Apple Jennifer L Knox
A highlight from A Journey Through The American South

Fresh Air

05:36 min | 21 hrs ago

A highlight from A Journey Through The American South

"This is fresh air. I'm Dave Davies in today for Terry gross. Our guest Princeton African American studies professor imani Perry was born in Birmingham, Alabama. Though she moved away with her family as a child and has lived in Cambridge, Chicago and the Philadelphia area, she's always considered Birmingham home. Perry has a new book about the American south, written as a journey through its state cities in rural communities. In each chapter she focuses on a place and reflects on its distinctive relationship to the region's history of slavery and racism, drawing on her own extensive knowledge of literature, music, art, and folklore, as well as her own family history. Imani Perry earned a bachelor's degree from Yale, then a law degree at Harvard, where she also received her PhD in American studies. She's currently the Hughes Rogers Professor of African American studies at Princeton and the author of 6 previous books, including looking for Lorraine, a biography of playwright Lorraine hansbury, and most recently breathe, a letter to my sons. Her new book is south to America, the journey below the mason Dixon line to understand the soul of a nation. Imani Perry welcome to fresh air. Thank you, delighted to be here. You are as I said a child of the south, the native of Birmingham, now teaching in an Ivy League institution. What made you want to take this journey into the south? Where did this come from? It has a couple of different origin points. One, of course, is my home, but I have spent my life in some ways and exile. Much of the time, next, I love the south. And I have been traveling back and forth the majority of my life and I've had this experience of being both an insider and also seeing how the south is seen. And from a young age experiencing some frustration about the misperception, but as an intellectual and a scholar over time, it just became increasingly clear to me that the misunderstanding of the south, the depiction of it is this sort of some other backwards different place. And other regions is actually part of the way in which we mischaracterize the nation. So that's sort of the heart of it. It both comes from frustration and also wanting to share and illuminate something. The frustration that people see this south as some as you say a distant backward place. Yeah, distant backward, that's where racism is. That's where social dysfunction is. That's where people are uneducated and there's all these stereotypes of the south that I think are because the south in some ways becomes the repository for the nation's sins. That's the bad place down there. And then it allows the rest of the country to conceive of itself as relatively pristine when in reality the south is so often not only not been backwards but really the Vanguard of the way the nation would develop, you know, from the very outset, right? It's where it begins. A huge proportion of the founding fathers are southerners. It's where D.C. is located because the south paid Revolutionary War debts and then it's where the prosperity of the nation developed through king cotton and its oil. It's cold. They're so many of the things that sort of made the nation possible that come out of the south and the conditions that made it possible are the very things that are part of the painful history of the south that we try to sort of excise from the mythology of the nation, but are really key to understanding it. You start in Harper's very West Virginia where in 1859 people will remember that the abolitionist John Brown led this band of armed men hoping to spark a slave revolted didn't happen. They were all captured he was hanged. Was it a conscious choice to begin there? I mean, it was a conscious choice to begin in West Virginia because it's this unusual place that was separated from Virginia over the cause of slavery and then became the most whitest of the southern states and seen as a place that is, you know, people use the term hillbilly and the kind of stereotypes of Appalachia there. So that's one reason I started there. I also saw people warned me not to not to go to West Virginia as a black woman. So I was sort of intrigued by people suggesting I'm not go to West Virginia. And then also kind of nervous. And I said, well, Harper's ferry given its history felt like, okay, this is a place that I can probably enter into relatively comfortably, though I went beyond Harper's ferry. And it was one of those moments where I could come to a place and then understand that the simple historical association John Brown is a much more complex story there. In so many ways, it's about industry. It's about the Shenandoah. It's about all of this abundance of that particular region and why John Brown was there and these intersecting history. So it's a really rich place that so much more complex than a stereotypes or just the image of John Brown in the stereotype of Appalachia or the image of John Brown. So I loved that trip. And it's interesting that in 1859 it was in Virginia, western media didn't exist.

Imani Perry Birmingham Princeton African American Stu Hughes Rogers Lorraine Hansbury Dave Davies Terry Gross Mason Dixon Lorraine West Virginia Ivy League Cambridge Yale Perry Alabama Princeton Philadelphia Harvard Chicago
A highlight from 596: Prayer of the Palo Verde Beetle

The Slowdown

03:48 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from 596: Prayer of the Palo Verde Beetle

"I have always been interested in how we see ourselves in other animals. The way someone can glimpse a horse or a bird and suddenly be reminded of themselves, or maybe be reminded of what they are not. Just before the weather turned, and when it was still nice enough to do yoga on my screened in porch, I saw a beetle, cross my yoga mat. He was a small beetle, nothing scary or intimidating. And I watched him for some time, careful not to crush him, accidentally. I do my best not to harm bugs, if I can help it. Though some spiders get the worst of my surprised fear with a quick whack without thinking about it. But that day I was content to let the beetle be. Multiple times the beetle crawled on my mat, until once when it nearly crawled on my face, and without thinking, I flicked him off, as gently as I could. To my horror, he landed directly into a spider's web that I hadn't seen under the patio bricks. I had worked so hard to save him, and then before I could even realize it, the spider got to work. It felt like some disastrous metaphor. But it also seemed a much more natural way to die. I didn't kill the beetle, but I'm pretty sure that spider did. Life is like that sometimes. You are both the beetle and the spider, and the web is the world we live in. Perhaps it was inevitable. What happens is what happens. In today's imaginative poem, we see what happens when the speaker witnesses a beetle at a gas station. Prayer of the palo Verde beetle, by Felicia, zamora. I watch a palo Verde beetle on its back. Flail, tibia spurs, and tarsi, and antenna, next to the gas station pump. Heat of crude oil, of carbon atoms in absorption, heat, of desert in August, suffocates my thighs, and sweat runs course of my legs in frozen witness. I am sphericals, pin pricking, a body, trying to breathe. I am a to cement. I carry migration in my scutum, a song unraveling over generation after generation, and yet a border ways on mine, and mandible. A bull's eye on my back. On the backs of those of us who sing across imaginary lines with inherited wings. Goose flesh exists before ticker tape before the shooter before brown bodies agape and words consume and images consume, and we look to the sky for semblance of song, and a wall becomes a scalpel in rip across abdomen of continent which first born an entrance of womb. I am compound eye, meeting Brown, irises, in firmament, I am cloud covered prayer, foot and reach to turn over and I collapse in a nation's hesitation. I am pupils in drill, aghast.

Palo Verde Zamora Felicia Brown
A highlight from The Genius Of Buster Keaton

Fresh Air

04:26 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from The Genius Of Buster Keaton

"This is fresh air. I'm Dave Davies and today for cherry gross. If you know the name Buster Keaton, you probably think of him as a guy in old black and white silent movies known for slapstick and sight gags. It's true he had a gift for physical comedy, but that doesn't begin to describe his talent or his influence. In the 1920s, Keaton starred in and directed a string of silent films that are cited by a long list of great American filmmakers as inspirations. Orson Welles to name one called Keaton a supreme artist and said his film the general is one of the greatest of all time. 7 of Keaton's silent films are on the National Film Registry. Apart from his influence on American cinema, Keaton's story is a fascinating one. Born in the 19th century and vaudeville star by the age of 5, his life took some hard turns after his burst of creativity in the 20s. He felt from stardom and battled alcoholism, then regained his footing and had a long career in show business as a writer and performer. Our guest Dana Stevens is a veteran film critic who's written a new book about Keaton, Stevens is the film critic for slate and co host of its long running podcast called culture gab fest. She is also written for The New York Times The Washington Post, the Atlantic and other publications. Her new book is cameraman. Buster Keaton, the dawn of cinema and the invention of the 20th century. The Dana Stevens welcome to fresh air. Thank you so much for having me. I'm excited to talk. I have become a Buster Keaton fan, in part because of the director of our program, Roberto has been sending me videos of his stuff for years. And they make me laugh out loud. But I'm guessing a lot of our audience has never seen a silent film beginning to end. It kind of don't know this world. Let me just begin by asking you why you think he's an important figure in the story of American cinema. I mean, not just in American cinema, but as this book is sort of trying to pull out the camera in order to talk about of American history, I would say his films, first of all, as you said very well in your introduction, have just become these monuments of world cinema and often now when there's these crowd sourced lists of the greatest films of all time where critics from around the world contribute their titles, he will be the only silent filmmaker, not always, sometimes it's chaplain pulling just ahead of him, but one of the two of them will often be the only silent filmmaker that makes it into that top ten or top 25 or whatever it is. So silent cinema, it still plays a very small role on the periphery of the imagination, even of big xenophiles. You know when film critics, I think. And it's understandable why. So many of those movies are lost forever. You know, something like 75 to 80% of silent films that were ever made are now gone because they were not valued by the generations that came right after. And we're just essentially discarded after they made the rounds and were shown. And silent film really fell into a period of decades where it was just simply not a concern. Not coming to anyone's attention and not being preserved or promulgated in any way. And that's been changing slowly in the decades basically since Keaton's death in the 60 70s, 80s onward. But I feel like his legacy is something that's really just a beautiful and important part of American history. You know, not just American film history, but American history and the history of American art. Right. He kind of came into the 20th century as so much was changing. He was born in Kansas, 1895, and at a young age got involved in his family's vaudeville act. And I thought we'd listen to an excerpt of buster himself talking about this. This is later in life, and you'll hear a music underneath his voice. This is part of a documentary called a hard act to follow, Buster Keaton, here you're talking about his parents and their vaudeville act. For the time I was four years old, I was a regular member of the act wearing slaps shoes and protests closed with a ball headed wing and Irish beard on my dad was a comedian and a great eccentric dancer and tricks. He wasn't exactly a knacker about. But darn near. And my mother played musical instruments, and passed within them. Of course, when I came into the act, then he got the idea of trying to show the audience how to bring up children correctly. And every time I did something, he didn't like he took me with the back of the neck and throwing me through a piece of scenery. I grew up getting knocked around.

Keaton Buster Keaton Dana Stevens Dave Davies National Film Registry Orson Welles The Washington Post Stevens Roberto The New York Times Atlantic Buster Kansas
A highlight from 595: Pegasus Autopsy

The Slowdown

03:59 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from 595: Pegasus Autopsy

"When I was a teenager, I fell in love with the movie, wings of desire, by vim vendors. It was perfectly dark and romantic, and 1987 film shot all in black and white and made just shortly before the fall of the Berlin Wall. It is deeply moving. The film is in German and features angels who can listen in on people's thoughts and fears. It's also a love story. I held that movie close to my heart all through my teenage years, and even watched it in Germany when I moved there for love in 1993. So when I saw that vim vendors was going to show the film with an artist talk afterward in Seattle. I immediately made plans to attend. I was just 19, but I was determined to see the film and listen to the questions and hear what a great filmmaker might say about his movie. I even wore my black trench coat, which was what the angel played by Bruno ganza wore in the film. The audience waited in line for tickets and then watched the film that's over two hours and wrapped silence. I had never seen it in the theater. Only on a rented video tape on the small screen. And then there he was. Vim vendors, and icon of new German cinema. And I found myself too frozen too awestruck to ask questions. He gave a brief and brilliant introduction to his process, and then what followed was something that always stuck with me. The questions from the audience were more like a dissection. Each question about the process went deeper and deeper until it seemed that the magic of the art itself was being sucked out of the room. It seemed to be an intellectual interrogation, when what I wanted was more rapture. That afternoon was the first time I realized that as much as I loved talking about art, experiencing it, feeling it. There are times when I just want to let the mystery be. I don't always want to know every single thing the artist means with every move. What I love about art is the way it could be interpreted, so uniquely by every human being. There's an immense power in that. I watched as vim venders answered questions and part of me with delighted every time he would evade something for the sake of preserving the heart of the film. He knew just what to say and just what to keep for himself. I'd never forget it. In today's imaginative poem, we see what happens when, in our rush to understand something to completely, we lose sight of its original magic. Pegasus, autopsy, by Julio, basos, barrera. Translated from the Spanish, by Brian, Mendoza. It's a spacious chamber. Well it. A light that refracts the distant Woodland. Over the table lies the body and the wings. Outspread, like sails of a shipwreck. They've stitched together the carnage, with no other motive than something comparable to mercy. Soon the volunteers will arrive, and they'll take the body, including the

Bruno Ganza Berlin Wall Vim Venders Seattle Germany Basos Barrera Pegasus Julio Mendoza Brian
A highlight from 41. Kelcy Griffin "I'm Still Hustling"

Before the Break

05:22 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from 41. Kelcy Griffin "I'm Still Hustling"

"Alrighty, everybody. Welcome back to another episode of before the break this week. We're very excited about our guests. She's been on Broadway TV and film. She's had recurring roles on such shows as Gotham power, the deuce and dietland. She's also appeared on blue Bloods and on fussy verdon. She played the one and only Debbie Allen. Please welcome the show. Kelsey Griffin. Hello. What's not forget? Welcome. And my son, he is he'll pop up a couple times 'cause if he sees me standing here, he'll want to be held. So I love this. Same with my dog. Yeah. Oh, yeah. You're breathing. Why are you not holding me? Pretty much, yes. Yes. Why am I not getting attention? All the time. Well, welcome welcome. Happy to have you. Thank you. Thanks for having me, guys. So, Adam, where do we begin? Or the pain? We're doing it again. Kelsey, where are you right now? I'm actually currently in Los Angeles. LA, okay. Lovely. Originally from Chicago, right? That is correct. I'm originally born and raised in Chicago, and then I lived in New York for I don't know, 15 years maybe. Something like that. Wow. Okay, nice. So let's start at the beginning. Born and raised. Born and raised in Chicago. You want my beginning in this crazy world. Well, what was it? Like were you in the city proper? I did. I grew up in the city of Chicago, Hyde Park area. Till about 5th sorry? Yeah, 5th grade. And then we moved to the suburbs. But I went to like fun cool. I love Chicago. I really weren't so cold there. I would live there. I think that's what everyone. Could never go back. Recurring theme on this show is so many people we've had on here in Chicago people. And whether they go to New York or wherever they're like, yeah, it's cold here, but it's not Chicago cold. 'cause that's New Yorkers now. Oh my God, it's freezing. Chicago cold is maybe in a straight month out of the year. It's cold and like December. It's cold and march. But we're talking about January, February, where it's a type of cold that as you're getting to your door after like a long walk from your car, your eyes are starting to freeze just a little bit. And you're just the expletives that are just pouring out of your face. And every time every winner it was for 5 winners, I was like, last year, this is the last year. This is the last year. But then bring it in the most beautiful place and how could you not love it, but you know, onto bigger and warmer things, I said. Yes. I completely. And that's honestly in Chicago. It's fine. When I was a kid I was fine, 'cause this is where we live. This is what I didn't know there was anywhere else. So, but once I left and then the thought of going back like this, I don't know. I don't know. I think that I will say the one thing about Chicago that is better than New York as far as weather wise. It is colder there. But you can at least hop in your car. It's not so much of a walking city, depending on where you live. So you can hop on your warm car. You don't have to like sludge the snow to the subway. You know, like that got brutal after a while. New York has its own challenges, but anyway. Chicago born and raised in high park. Right. And as someone who was probably interested in the arts and performing, were you getting a chance to do what you could with where you were yeah, I was very fortunate actually my parents were very much like you like this. Okay, we love it. Let's go. What did they do? My dad is an engineer and my mom at the time was she was a regional vice president for Starbucks. See, you've got corporate and you've got an engineer that's very rare where they're like, go, art, uncertainty, get it. And me and my brother is a painter and I'm an oh, wow. Yeah. Do you think maybe I had I'm sure they had fulfilling careers, but maybe when they saw that you had an interest that everybody wants to create something no matter who you are, maybe they thought we don't want to deprive someone of that and force them into something like a corporate life if that wasn't for them. Yeah. I think just they had a holistic mind of like I would never want to force them into. Yes, were they scared of course when I told my dad and I think I was 8th grade and I proclaimed that this is what I wanted to do. And he was like, okay, like there was always that like, okay, well maybe let's do a backup type of thing or like have this. So I think every parent naturally wants to kind of put that in there, but he saw how passionate I was, and he's like, I knew that, you know, this is just what you're going to do. So why would I, you know? Actually quite, they're

Chicago Kelsey Griffin Debbie Allen New York Kelsey Hyde Park New Yorkers Adam Los Angeles LA Starbucks
A highlight from Best Of: Benedict Cumberbatch / Brian Cox

Fresh Air

04:33 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from Best Of: Benedict Cumberbatch / Brian Cox

"Cumberbatch was named best actor for his performance in the film by the national society of film critics, and by film critics associations in New York, Boston, Chicago, Dallas Fort Worth, and the San Francisco Bay Area. You can also see cumberbatch now in Spider-Man: No Way Home as Doctor Strange, and he's just completing work on the new Doctor Strange movie. Cumberbatch was nominated for an Oscar for his starring role in the film the imitation game, based on the story of Alan Turing the mathematical genius who was instrumental in breaking the German enigma code in World War II. Cumberbatch has played other real people like Stephen Hawking and Julian Assange. He's famous for his role as a contemporary version of Sherlock Holmes in the British TV series Sherlock. The power of the dog was directed by Jane campion, adapted from the novel of the same name, and is set in 1925 in Montana. Cumberbatch plays Phil, who along with his brother, played by Jesse Plemons, owns a cattle ranch. Film is hyper masculine. He skilled at cutting the testicles off cattle, herding cattle and breeding leather ropes. He rarely bathes. He's also a bully. He even insults his brother and cause him fat cell. When they're taking the herd to market, they stop at an inn where they have dinner. They're served by a young man, the son of the woman who owns the inn. He has a clean white linen towel over one arm. The way you might see in a fancy restaurant, not a little inn in a tiny town. His manner and the linen make him seem effeminate to fill. While the young man is serving the table where fill his brother and the cow hands are seated, Phil picks up a paper flower from the handmade bouquet, serving as the table centerpiece, and starts examining it. Oh yeah. Well, I wonder what little lady made these. Actually, I did sir. My mother was a florist. So I made them to look like the ones in our garden. Oh, well, do pardon me. There. Justice. Real as possible. All right, now Jenna look see, that's what you do with the clock. It's really just for wine drips. Oh, I got that boys. Only for the drink. I get us some food. Phil's brother apologizes to the waiter's mother, and soon marries her. When she moves to the ranch, filter menser, and when her son visits, they'll continue to mock and bully him. As the film progresses, we begin to get clues about what lies beneath Phil's exterior. Benedict Cumberbatch congratulations on your performance and on the film. And I should mention as we record this on Wednesday January 12th, this morning, you were nominated for a sag award. The Screen Actors Guild Award, which is fantastic because that's like a jury of your peers. Those are actors voting, and they know their stuff, so congratulations. That must be real honor for you. Thanks so much, Terry. It really is, and thank you, thank you for having me. It is a fortuitous moment. And you're right. It's such a great validation of the work to have your peers who share this craft with you as they work to recognize it in this way. It's a really, really humbling, a great honor. So the power of the dog is a western of sorts. I mean, it's set on a cattle ranch. And your character is he's a cowboy. So did growing up in England as you did did American westerns mean much to you and did you study the history of the American West or anything? I mean, not really, no. It's about as far from my lived experiences you can imagine. Which I guess is part of the enticement of wanting to take this character on and this milieu on. But no, I certainly didn't have a history of it. I had a little understanding of it from university from studying cinema at that stage in my life.

Cumberbatch National Society Of Film Criti Dallas Fort Worth Phil Jesse Plemons Alan Turing Jane Campion Julian Assange Stephen Hawking San Francisco Bay Area Sherlock Holmes Oscar Boston Chicago Montana Screen Actors Guild Award New York Benedict Cumberbatch Jenna
A highlight from Remembering Andr Leon Talley / Ronnie Spector

Fresh Air

04:35 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from Remembering Andr Leon Talley / Ronnie Spector

"Designers, he was an unmistakable sight. Tally grew up in Durham North Carolina in the Jim Crow era. His grandmother who raised him was a maid who worked for duke university. The fashions he was exposed to came largely from what people wore to church on Sundays. Until at age 9, he discovered Vogue magazine. After getting a scholarship to Brown university and a master's degree in French literature, he moved to New York, worked at Andy Warhol's magazine interview and was mentored by former Vogue editor Diana vreeland. Terry grows spoke to Andre Leon tally in 2018 when he was the subject of the documentary, the gospel according to Andre Leon tally. Andre Leon talley welcome to fresh air. Let's start with how were you introduced to the world of fashion? Well, from an early age, I discovered fashion through the pages of Vogue. I went to the public library in derm, North Carolina, and I was about ten years old, maybe 9, and I discovered this magazine called Vogue. And in those days, it came out on the first and 15th of every month and the editor was Diana vreeland. And this was my escape world when I was a young boy. I grew up in my grandmother's home in Durham North Carolina, bought his home. She was a maid at duke university. And it was just my grandmother and myself. She was an extraordinary woman. She was a frugal woman, and she'd watched her budget she had a bank account and we had a wonderful life because I never knew anything but love, unconditional love. So you're a 9 year old boy and you're totally fascinated by these fashions that adult women are wearing. So what captivated you as a 9 year old boy about the world of Vogue? The world of Vogue meant more to me than what the women were wearing as models. The issues of Vogue captivated me not only before the images of the fashion spreads, but it was the magazine itself that turned me onto a world that I did not know, had not been exposed to. It was the world of literature. What was happening in the world of art? What was happening in the world of entertainment? It was a gateway to the world outside of German North Carolina. It wasn't just a fashion, of course, I love the fashions. I love the beautiful images and I related so much to the images, and then the written words, the captions, the articles. So I was living through Vogue as an escape patch, but reading every single page, loving every single detail. I mean, they had a men's column called men in Vogue, and that was very fascinating to me. And it was a world that I internalized and I kept to myself as a young man because no one was interested in Vogue of fashion other than I, when I was ripping pages out of Vogue, putting the pitches up on my wall in my room, with thumbtacks, and I just had a room, wallpapered from head to ceiling, floored to ceiling with images from Vogue. So just to set the scene while you're entering the world of Vogue and very much wanting to live in that world of fashion and literature and music art. Yeah, so describe the actual house you were living in. My grandmother's house was very modest. It was the house of four rooms. The kitchen living room. Two bedrooms, and one bath. And we did not have central heating. I remember we had cold heating when I was very young. And then we converted to gas heating. We had a gas, stove in the front bedroom, where I slept and then we had a gas stove in the kitchen which heated up my grandmother's bedroom. But this house was a house of immaculate cleanliness. My grandmother was a great, great housekeeper. She gave me the chores of scrubbing the front porch, scrubbing the floors, I had to scrub the floors once a week. I also learned to polish the woodwork in the living room with Johnson's pace wax, sera, face wax. That was hard. I get the floor to shine. And I did this as a young man, and all the time, my grandmother was going to work to be a maid. She'd come home at 3 o'clock every afternoon, make supper, we sit down and look at the one little TV we had, my father had bought the TV for me from a Washington D.C. we had a black and white television and we were in the house. The stove was a very great memory for me in the kitchen because it smells from the kitchen, we're wonderful.

Andre Leon Diana Vreeland Vogue Magazine North Carolina Andre Leon Talley Duke University Durham German North Carolina Brown University Andy Warhol Derm Vogue Terry New York Washington D.C. Johnson
A highlight from 594: What Bodies Move

The Slowdown

03:56 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from 594: What Bodies Move

"During vacations or family gatherings, I know how many of us are prone to overindulge to treat the body with all things delightful. I was just with my husband's family, my family now, at a Lake house in Virginia, and together we enjoyed so many edible things. Oh, the rich, enticing things. I ate chocolate chip cookies that were made by my mother in law, chicken, Parmesan, made by my sister in law, and all of the snacks and beverages in between. Most of the time we listen to our bodies, but that weekend it was more like we were all telling our bodies to be quiet. Body, not so loud. Let me just have this one more bite. It's a funny thing to believe that the body is sacred, and then also want to give it all the delectable offerings that the world has to offer. As I age, it's a bit harder to bounce back from a weekend of indulgences. But I still find it worth it sometimes to let loose a little. The body is sacred. Yes, but the body also houses my hunger, and my brain, and my heart. Lately, I've been learning to find the balance between loving myself in the strict and protective way, and loving myself in the more generous way. As Oscar Wilde once said moderation in all things, including moderation. In today's poem, we consider the body as part of something larger, connected to something beyond us. One of the reasons I love this poem is that it offers both a realistic and a wondrous view of the self. What bodies move by Christine, K Brown. Let the world come hungry at me. Let the hours learn the tender curve of this net. For so long I've wanted to believe that I made of star stuff, a glittering spigot funneled from the blue spiraling arms of our Milky Way. I hear the clap of hands inside my chest. I swallow. The body softening against it. Who hasn't wanted to climb a top a roof and jump, prove we, too, can come back like the tulips after a bitter winter, a small body pulled from dark, a city of animated dust. I believe, sleep is nights apology for day, dreams the only respite from dark. I dream of fog. Fog, slowing, morning, minutes. Another day drained. Still, there has only ever been one setting sun, one rotating light, chasing one unreachable horizon, for billions of years. A small good miracle where I swallowed into a black hole I could live without shadow. I could live inside that sunless system of tunnels. I would be fine, dying there, and still there is the question. More God, or less me, I could go either way. I have been told that nearly all the atoms in the oxygen we breathe, and the carbon in our skin, fell from the hydrogen furnace of a star, which makes us less star stuff, and more nuclear waste. Weeds, in a field of buttercups.

Lake House K Brown Oscar Wilde Virginia Christine
A highlight from Artists monuments, the 500m Caravaggio villa auction flop, Michael Armitage on Sane Wadu

The Art Newspaper Weekly

07:48 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from Artists monuments, the 500m Caravaggio villa auction flop, Michael Armitage on Sane Wadu

"It helps others to find us. Now, in just the last two weeks, the colston four who helped topple the 19th century statue of the slave trader Edward colston in Bristol in 2020 were acquitted of all charges, a man attacked a public sculpture attached to the BBC's London headquarters by the artist Eric gill, who was exposed in the 1990s as a pedophile and a towering equestrian statue of president Theodore Roosevelt outside New York City's American museum of natural history, was dismantled because of its colonialist and racist connotations. These were just the latest events. In the recent debate around statues, monuments and public art across the world. This week, goldsmith CCA, part of the complex featuring the goldsmith's art school in South London, opened testament a show in which 47 artists have been invited to make proposals that ponder the idea of tearing down and erecting monuments and what it means to rethink them. Louisa buck are contemporary art correspondent, went to goldsmith to talk to Adam faran, one of the artists in the show, and first to Sarah mccrory, the director of goldsmith CCA. The notion of a monument has become such a lightning rod for so many different issues, grievances, movements. I mean, never more so than in the last year when we're thinking of a book called the toppling and indeed the acquit of the Coulson four in Bristol, the recent chipping away at the Eric gill sculpture outside the BBC by an angry rights for father's protester, confederate statues toppling governments using wall forms of monuments for their agendas. It really is a lightning rod. So it's a very timely moment Sarah to be having this exhibition. I mean, I imagine all these things were reverberating in your head when you thought about putting together testament and inviting these 47 or so artists to take part. Yeah, I think that the monuments somehow became symbolic or central to lots of these conversations and became a way of thinking about how to digest people's feelings of belonging in this country or alienation and also a lot of the conversations we have in institutions, whether it's universities or our institutions or just generally in our world is how going forward how do we treat people and some of the conversations coming out of the treatment of these monuments were really, whilst there was anger and fury and violence against, well, people and objects in a lot of cases, these came from places of a lot of people feeling, of course, like they weren't being listened to that their them personally and their families and the communities were being ignored and not just presently, but historically. So when we're having conversations on one hand about decolonizing institutions, but then on the other hand, about Brexit and what that's doing to different kind of groups of people who are being made to go home constantly on radio and TV. The monument was propping up. Both ways symbolically as a monument for these conversations, but also as the treatment of those monuments and how artists could potentially work with those ideas just seemed to make some kind of sense in a moment when everything felt amplified. And you've got the most incredible range of work here. You've got 47 artists who are invited to make a proposal about what it meant to make a monument in 2022. They're all UK based, and we've got drawings, films, performances, and inflatable pub paintings. I mean, you name it. It's an extraordinary diverse spectrum of artists. What were your criteria for choosing artists to take part? That's a pretty good question. It was initially Natasha or the curator at the time now maternity leave and then Phoebe crips. And I kind of just floated lots of ideas of artists who we've worked with before. Who we thought were tackle the idea in different ways. Some of the artists, it's really their modus operandi anyway. You know, if you talk about people like Jeremy, who has Adelaide. Jeremy Miller, who has a history of working in the public realm and working with these ideas. So some artists made sense because of their work already and knowing that they'd come up with a great idea. And then there was the flip side of that is not just wanting to ask the kind of artists who are good at making public art projects or proposals or working in the public realm. So we also invited filmmakers we invited people whose practice is mainly painting looking here at an Alvaro Barrington. We are an enormous concrete painting with symbols around the edge bits of cardboard box, a beautiful poem by Tupac Shakur about the rose growing through the concrete. So you wouldn't think about him as a monument maker. I mean, I think a lot of his previous sculptures and paintings, they include materials that nod towards permanence and weight and heft and also a lot of his work is really about his place in the world, a lot of his works very personal and Tupac is a really important figure for him. So a lot of the works as well touch upon ideas not necessarily around monuments or statues, but around class and race and inequality and other ideas that are made real through these conversations. So throughout the show, I think there's no work particularly that poses any answers. It's just conversations and questions about how we think about history now. How do you rethink history? How do you consider and respect people who feel affronted and offended by the objects that exist in our society in a very direct level, but also those ideas, you know, the translate into our institutions into our conversations about police or other people who are supposed to look after us? There's lots of very kind of contemporary news or contemporary issues that are bounced around within the galleries. I mean, making objects, but also taking existing objects and reclaiming them as monuments. I'm loving Jeremy Della's a monument to money laundering. This is just a text, but he says, take any recently built skyscraper, high rise in the center of London and rechristened as a monument to money laundering. A good gauntlet being laid down, or Mark wallinger's film that we're looking at as well that charts the mound at marble arch, the great big grassy mound that he points out is the only civic work made during the pandemic in London. Exactly. And he's so brilliantly mapped that sculpture or that object or that monument by looking at what happens around it and in many ways. You know, that's part of the conversation we're having if we look at historical monuments in existence actually the activity that happens around those corners in this case. Speakers corner. And of course, if there's any place for a kind of diversity of literal voices, it speakers corner. So his film is a great kind of testament to hear that kind of diversity of conversation and voices and it's relationship to literal bad idea. She says, questioningly, anti monuments and monuments. The sense of Holly Hendry's vast snake like coils are sort of lumps of architecture that cut and thrust through

Edward Colston Goldsmith Cca Goldsmith's Art School Louisa Buck Adam Faran Sarah Mccrory Eric Gill Sculpture Bristol Eric Gill BBC London President Theodore Roosevelt Colston American Museum Of Natural His Phoebe Crips Coulson Goldsmith Alvaro Barrington New York City
A highlight from A Marine-Turned-Journalist Returns To Afghanistan

Fresh Air

08:14 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from A Marine-Turned-Journalist Returns To Afghanistan

"I'm Terry gross. After serving two tours as a marine in Afghanistan from 2008 to 2010, my guest Thomas gibbons Neff returned in 2015 as a reporter for The Washington Post. In 2017, he joined The New York Times and continued to make occasional reporting trips to Afghanistan in 2020, he joined the times Kabul bureau. That gave him the chance to do something quite unusual. After Afghanistan fell to the Taliban, gibbon sniff interviewed a Taliban commander who 11 years earlier attacked the company of marines in which gibbons Neff was a Corporal, as gibbons nephrite, he had tried to kill me as I had tried to kill him. That Taliban commander is now a high level Taliban commander. The interview took place in an office in the Taliban government headquarters, which is in a building that Americans refurbished years ago. That interview as an example of some of the more personal writing gibbons Neff has done as part of his reporting from Afghanistan. Another is his article about the effort he participated in to rescue more than a 120 times employees and their families. After Afghanistan fell to the Taliban, that rescue required the help and cooperation of the Taliban, another unusual relationship with his former enemy. Gibbons Neff is in the U.S. and will soon return to Afghanistan, this time as The New York Times Kabul bureau chief. Thomas gibbons Neff welcome to fresh air. Thanks for having me here. Why did you want to return to marja and write a piece about the Taliban commander who you fought against when you were a marine, and his name is Mullah Abdul Rahim gulab. I always wanted to go back to Maria. I mean, as I was there as a 22 year old Corporal and fought and one of the bigger operations of the U.S. born in Afghanistan, and my perspective then was of an infantryman, right? Sent there to find and kill the enemy and all these years later going back kind of let me understand margia from a much different perspective. I guess as a journalist, they're trying to absorb about trying to impose. And when we went back in November of last year, we weren't there originally to interview Taliban commanders or I wasn't there to interview someone I had fought against that kind of came secondary in that after we had gotten to the district center and talked to the governor there and asked if we could, he rounded up a few fighters a few Taliban fighters who had been in Martian in 2010 and fought the Americans. So it was a stroke of luck and then that kind of interview came to be. So did you recognize him as somebody who had fought against you? No, no, I didn't recognize him basically he had said that he had been in margin February of 2010 and where my unit had landed was a specific village. We called the creature a, it's a little different and passed to, but when we got to talking and he said, well, he was there too. And then we kind of narrowed down what day is mind you this entire time I didn't disclose that I had been a marine. I was more asking for the Taliban perspective on a very significant U.S. battle since it was the first big operation of the 2009 surge that then president Obama had announced. Why didn't you tell him that you were a marine and that you had fought against each other? I mean, there was a lot of reasons I think after that article came out, there was definitely a lot of comments that asked that same question. The African reporter that I was traveling with was an entirely comfortable for one. I think we had kind of gone into it knowing if he thought it was comfortable. He would give me the nudge. He didn't feel comfortable and also we were in a room with about ten other Taliban to help fighters who were all armed. And this isn't ten years after the end of the war. This is in 20 years after the war. I mean, the war had ended in August and kind of unclear how that would land. You know, maybe it'd be fine in the room, but outside of the room, it might not have gone over well. And the Taliban commander you were interviewing had an M4 carbine rifle. Right next to you. Leaning against a chair. An American weapon, by the way, right? Right, American weapon that took very much I mean, was that the rifle I carried at the exact rifle, but at the same time in 2010. So do you know if the Taliban commander mister gulab ever read your article about your interview with him? No, I don't know. My colleague, yacoub, has his number, and I was hoping that maybe when we go back, reaching out to see if he ever comes to Kabul and would want to maybe sit down and talk again. So you're not concerned about him reading it. No, no, I'm not concerned. So before we talk about interviewing him and getting the Taliban perspective on the battle that you fought in, tell us what this battle was about in marja. Sure, right. So I guess you could say the battle for marja or known as operation mosh track was about seizing the district of marja, which was considered by U.S. Military commanders as the last Taliban stronghold in central Helmand, and that it was important because it was near the provincial capital. And several thousand American troops, Afghan government forces, some international troops in the middle of February 2010 landed and attacked. This district from several directions. And it kind of became the set piece battle of the first step is battle of Obama's surge at the time. Before we get the Taliban perspective, what are your memories of the battle in marja? Was it a turning point for you as a marine? Great. I mean, I think what happened in marja for me, again, you asked earlier what was it like, why did I go back to this place? I mean, it was kind of a huge moment in my life I was in charge of 6 other marines and navy corpsman. I was very young, my first deployment in 2008 while there was certainly fighting. It was kind of nothing on a scale or pace of what it looked like in 2010. And we knew there was a lot riding on it right that this was this big deal. Before we deployed, we watched as president Obama made his announcement that he was sending more forces to Afghanistan when he spoke at West Point, and we knew that when we saw that speech that we would be somehow involved, which we were so to kind of go into this battle with all that in mind our commander saying this is going to be some historic event. And then, as it played out, the killing and dying, our Friends being shot, our Friends dying. I mean, it kind of just became this place cemented in my memory that I wanted to revisit because it kind of I think in a lot of ways shaped who I was as a person. So in those early hours, nothing had really happened. It was very cold. One of my teammates asked if the entire deployment was going to be this boring. And then there was this called the prayer that I remember very well because the Mueller speaking through the moss speaker was very angry. It wasn't so much a call to prayers. It was yelling of some sort. We didn't have an interpreter with us. And then shortly after that, the shooting started. And it kind of went on for a few days. Those initial that initial day we were surrounded on at least three different sides. And as we tried to fight up to our objective, which was this two story building on the edge of this village, the cardura village. So the Taliban leader who fought against you, gulab. What are some of the things he told you from his perspective about that battle? That

Taliban Afghanistan Gibbons Neff Thomas Gibbons Neff Times Kabul Bureau Gibbon Sniff Gibbons Nephrite Taliban Government The New York Times Kabul Mullah Abdul Rahim Gulab U.S. Terry Gross Marines Marja The Washington Post Mister Gulab Yacoub The New York Times
A highlight from 593: Fragments for Subduing the Silence

The Slowdown

04:10 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from 593: Fragments for Subduing the Silence

"I remember walking the streets in Buenos Aires several years ago, and noticing the neoclassical buildings in certain areas and the brutalist buildings in other areas. What is ades is a city of contrasts. The contrast between the stately 19th century buildings like the Casa rosada, and the small, brightly colored buildings of la Boca, which is one of the areas where tango was first invented, will make your brain spin with the possibilities. Like many famed places with layers of history, it is both a city of noise and a city of silence. A city of both music and protests and of brooding intellectual intensity. When I think of the literary history of Buenos Aires, it's easy to first think of the famed short story writer borges. But for me, I also think of the Argentinian writer Alejandra, Pisani. Like the city where she spent her life, she was a poet of contrasts. She was obsessed with not just language, but with silence. How silence was as much of a force in the poem as the words themselves. I remember going to the iconic cafe tortoni, on the avenida de Mayo, and sipping a cider, and watching people stroll in for a tangle lesson in the back room. Buenos Aires seemed to me like a city where the arts are alive, valued, and celebrated. For me, the best way to get to know the history of any place is to explore the poetry of that place. When I read Alejandra pizarnik now I think of her at cafe tortoni, or at home, writing her darkly layered lyrical poems, and I also think of the note she received from the famous Mexican poet, octavio Paz, who wrote, I am in love with your poems. I'd like you to make lots of them, and for them to spread love and terror everywhere. In today's poem, Alejandra, Pisani, shows us the speaker struggling with both language and silence, and how the poem can both become a way in, and, a way out. Fragments for subduing the silence. By Alejandra, Pisani. Translated from the Spanish by yvette, secret. One. The powers of language are the solitary ladies who sing, desolate, with this voice of mind that I hear from a distance. And far away, in the black sand, lies a girl heavy with ancestral music. Where is death itself? I have wanted clarity in light of my lack of light. Branches die in the memory. The girl lying in the sand, nestles into me, with her wolf mask, the one she couldn't stand any more, and that begged for flames, and that we set on fire. Two. When the roof tiles blow away from the house of language, and words no longer keep. That is when I speak. The ladies in red have lost themselves in their masks, though they will return to sob among the flowers. Death is no mute. I hear the song of the mourners, sealing the clefts of silence. I listen, and the sweetness of your crying brings life to my gray, silence. Three. Death has restored to silence its own bewitching charm. And I will not say my poem, and I will say it, even if, here, now.

Buenos Aires Pisani Alejandra La Boca Alejandra Pizarnik Octavio Paz Yvette House Of Language
A highlight from Benedict Cumberbatch

Fresh Air

05:56 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Benedict Cumberbatch

"This is fresh air. I'm Terry gross. My guest Benedict Cumberbatch stars on the new film, the power of the dog. The film was named one of the ten best films of 2021 by the American Film Institute, appeared on many critics ten best lists, and won this year's Golden Globe for best movie drama. Cumberbatch was named best actor for his performance in the film by the national society of film critics, and by film critics associations in New York, Boston, Chicago, Dallas Fort Worth, and the San Francisco Bay Area. You can also see cumberbatch now in Spider-Man: No Way Home as Doctor Strange, and he's just completing work on the new Doctor Strange movie. Cumberbatch was nominated for an Oscar for his starring role in the film the imitation game, based on the story of Alan Turing the mathematical genius who was instrumental in breaking the German enigma code in World War II. Cumberbatch has played other real people like Stephen Hawking and Julian Assange. He's famous for his role as a contemporary version of Sherlock Holmes in the British TV series Sherlock. The power of the dog was directed by Jane campion, adapted from the novel of the same name, and is set in 1925 in Montana. Cumberbatch plays Phil, who along with his brother, played by Jesse Plemons, owns a cattle ranch. Film is hyper masculine. He skilled at cutting the testicles off cattle, herding cattle and breeding leather ropes. He rarely bathes. He's also a bully. He even insults his brother and cause him fat cell. When they're taking the herd to market, they stop at an inn where they have dinner. They're served by a young man, the son of the woman who owns the inn. He has a clean white linen towel over one arm. The way you might see in a fancy restaurant, not a little inn in a tiny town. His manner and the linen make him seem effeminate to fill. While the young man is serving the table where fill his brother and the cow hands are Phil picks up a paper flower from the handmade bouquet, serving as the table centerpiece and starts examining it. Oh yeah. Well, I wonder what little lady made these. Actually, I did center. My mother was a florist. So I made them to look like the ones in our garden. Oh, well, do pardon me. There. Justice. Real as possible. All right, now gentlemen look see, that's what you do with the clock. It's really just for wine drips. Oh, you got that boys. Only for the drink. Now get us some food. Phil's brother apologizes to the waiter's mother, and soon marries her. When she moves to the ranch, filter menser, and when her son visits, they'll continue to mock and bully him. As the film progresses, we begin to get clues about what lies beneath Phil's exterior. Benedict Cumberbatch congratulations on your performance and on the film. And I should mention as we record this on Wednesday January 12th, this morning, you were nominated for a sag award. The Screen Actors Guild Award, which is fantastic because that's like a jury of your peers. Those are actors voting, and they know their stuff. So congratulations. That must be real honor for you. Thanks so much, Terry. It really is, and thank you, thank you for having me. It is a fortuitous moment. And you're right. It's such a great validation of the work to have your peers who share this craft with you as they work to recognize it in this way. It's really, really humbling, a great honor. So the power of the dog is a western of sorts. I mean, it's set on a cattle ranch. And your character is he's a cowboy. So did growing up in England as you did did American westerns mean much to you and did you study like the history of the American West or anything? I mean, not really. No, it's about as far from my lived experiences you can imagine. Which I guess is part of the enticement of wanting to take this character on and this milieu on. But no, I certainly didn't have a history of it. I had a little understanding of it from university from studying cinema at that stage in my life. I guess the first inkling I had of a traditional western, it was the most John Ford, tough man, the John Wayne, but also for me, I think what I really clicked into it is probably high noon. I thought, ah, his deliverance from an unassuming hero in a way, and then the revisionist era of Clint Eastwood's unforgiven began as well. Which for me was at a very formative time in my cinema, going experience. But I certainly wasn't a playground role play thing for me. And it wasn't something I grew up fantasizing about or knowing anything about. Yeah. You said that westerns, cowboys didn't mean anything to you growing up because it was so far from your experience growing up in England. And you joked that to do this film, you had to go to dude school to prepare for the character. To learn both the western things, but I think also to learn that style of cowboy.

Cumberbatch Benedict Cumberbatch National Society Of Film Criti Dallas Fort Worth Phil Jesse Plemons Terry Gross American Film Institute Alan Turing Jane Campion Golden Globe Julian Assange Stephen Hawking San Francisco Bay Area Screen Actors Guild Award Sherlock Holmes Oscar Boston Montana
A highlight from 592: Lavender

The Slowdown

05:33 min | Last week

A highlight from 592: Lavender

"I have often thought that moods have colors. The green of calm and creativity. The red of anger and passion. When I get sad, I say, I have the blues. I say, I am blue around my edges, and it makes sense to me. It makes more sense than, saying, depression, or sadness. Just a little blue. Just some blues today, that's all. Sometimes it's my way of saying that I know it's nothing to get worked up over. Nothing anyone should worry about. I have a friend who went on a date with a man who said he was suffering from general malaise. So we said it for years, general malaise. I'm sure I'm remembering this wrong, but I feel like they had gone sailing and had this beautiful day and still he was sad. Distant. General malaise is no good on a first date. What was it that Holly go lightly said in breakfast at Tiffany's? The mean reds. She says suddenly you're afraid and you don't know what you're afraid of. In my friend group, we call that the fear, capital T capital F when nothing feels right or easy, nothing fits. And you feel a guilt, even though you can't pinpoint it. There are so many different ways to describe our many moods and still we could come up with so many more. Because there are so many moods. Right now, for example, I'm feeling a little aquamarine. Glassy, brittle, not totally here, not totally there. We could go on like this forever. In today's moody poem, we see a description of what I might call the blues, and meander, with the speaker to explore, or the blues, might take us. Lavender, by Joanna, vermin. Being in a funk is what the cool people call it. It's the purple that surrounds the scene at the Lake. Not sad enough to actually drown. You say I'm in a funk, and I think you think you're too pretty too well groomed to stylishly disheveled to actually sulk. Have you ever tried drinking a milkshake with a girlfriend in a funk? She just stares at the straw as if sucking on it would allow the whole world into her mouth. When a teenager wears baggy sweatpants all February, her math teacher may ask her if she's in a funk. She's actually just pissed off. Frogs don't get into funks, but toads do. In the Bible, Abraham thought Sarah was in a funk, but she was actually shaking with grief. When her baby arrived, her 100 year old flesh, quivered, like a sliced papaya. There is nothing funky about being in a funk. The Polish biochemist, Casimir funk, invented vitamins. The golfer, Fred funk, wore a pink skirt to settle a bit with Anika sorenstam. Doing cartwheels or changing the bedsheets are suggested cures for getting out of a funk. To be in a funk, is to want to cry. But to be unable to access tears. To be in a funk, is to be unable to hear the music in the subways rattle. If Virginia Woolf had been in a funk, she would have filled her pockets with dead lilacs, instead of rocks. The slowdown is a production of American public media, in partnership with the poetry foundation. To get a poem, delivered to daily, go to slow down show dot org and sign up for our newsletter. Find us on Instagram and Twitter at slow down show. The slowdown is written by me, Ada limon. It is produced by Jennifer lye. Our music is by Hannah Brown. Engineering by Cameron Wiley and Alex Simpson. Production help by susannah sharpless, Ryan lore, and James Napoli. Our executive producer and editor is best pearlman. Our executives in charge of APM studios are lily Kim, Alex

Depression Holly Tiffany Casimir Funk Anika Sorenstam Joanna Fred Funk Abraham Poetry Foundation Sarah Virginia Woolf Ada Limon Jennifer Lye Hannah Brown Cameron Wiley Alex Simpson Instagram Susannah Sharpless Ryan Lore James Napoli
A highlight from 'Succession' Star Brian Cox

Fresh Air

04:59 min | Last week

A highlight from 'Succession' Star Brian Cox

"About power plays that will lead to more power and more money with little regard for ethics, morality, or the consequences of his actions on the lives of others. When Logan's son Kendall asked Logan if he ever thought that Kendall could take over, here's how Logan responded. You're not a killer. You have to be a killer. That wasn't a fair assessment because Kendall went on to prove he did have killer instincts as he tried to take down his father. Ruthlessness is a trait that Logan succeeded in passing on to his children. Cox won a Golden Globe for his performance in succession and is now nominated for a Screen Actors Guild Award. He's written a new memoir called putting the rabbit in the hat. It begins in Dundee, Scotland, where he grew up after nearly dying at birth. That's here another clip from Succession. In this scene, waste our rouco is being investigated by the Justice Department, and Logan's daughter shiv is worried because she knows about the whistleblowers and the intimidation of victims. Shiva is played by Sarah snook. Can we, I mean, can we talk? Yes. We can talk. Okay, well. We're a big company. But how bad is. What is the worst thing? Not bad. Health, safety, compliance. A few bad apples. What? Well, I know that isn't true. Come on, dad. Tom worked in cruises. Bill told him everything. And besides, I know that there were black ops, and I know that there was targeted intimidation of victims, and whistleblowers, NRPI. Maybe there were some salty moves. You can't just change her story. I want to keep you clean. I put Jerry in, but I can't trust her. She's optics. I need you. Listen. I didn't know about any of the. Well, you're on emails. Do you know how many emails I got a day? I don't read my emails. I get the action points. I know. Schiff, the world is rough. We're on a cruise line on some tin pot ports registered in bungo hovers and we poured millions in insurance. Did we play rough with the odd union boss or some moaning mini repeat litigant? I don't know. It was a quarter of a century ago. A lot of it. So yes, I fought for you and your brothers. But you will not find a piece of paper that makes you ashamed of me. Okay? Well, the government does have an unbelievable amount of leverage at his disposal, dad. The law. And the law. The law is people. And people is politics. And I can handle a people. Brian Cox, welcome to fresh air. It is such a pleasure to have you back on the show. I love Succession and I love you in it. So welcome. Thank you. It's good to be here. Good to be back. Good to be back. The last line in the scene that we just played is so good, the law is people and people as politics and I can handle the people. That's such a memorable line. That's going to be a quoted line. So when you saw that line, did you think like, wow, this is a good one. Yeah, I mean there's so many good lines in the show. And you know, it's very interesting. He's an extraordinary character, Logan. He's probably one of the most extraordinary characters I've ever played. Because he is not what he appears to be. This is the interesting thing about Logan. I mean, he seems to be like this demon. And of course he is a misanthrope. You know, he is very disappointed with the human experiment. He and I both share that, except he's a pessimist and I'm an optimist. So that's the big difference between both of us. So at the same time, he's got a history. But he's also, you know, he's not. He just tells it like it is. And he's a truth teller. And it's not, it's not pleasant. And people don't like it. And they always suspect his motives. But his motives are always to do with the business. It's always to do with the firm. It's always to do with the what he's created. That's his concern. But Roman then does he said, what are you doing for? And he says, well, maybe love. And of course, this is like a red rag to a bull, because there isn't a lot of love coming from his children, you know? They talk about love, but, you know, he loves them, but where's the reciprocal? I mean, they just see him as a cash cow, you know, so much of the time. And that's the dilemma of

Logan Kendall Screen Actors Guild Award Rouco Sarah Snook Golden Globe Shiv Dundee Justice Department COX Shiva Schiff Scotland Brian Cox Jerry TOM Bill Government
A highlight from 591: The Remaining Facts

The Slowdown

05:18 min | Last week

A highlight from 591: The Remaining Facts

"Of my life as if they were essential to who I am. Just two days ago, our entire basement flooded. Surprisingly, we didn't lose much. I said to my husband, the thing is, we don't have that much stuff. To which he replied, and now we have even less. The main thing I lost was every single hard copy of a magazine or newspaper. I had ever had a poem published in. Honestly, I had just gathered them up neatly and put them in two big plastic bins and thought they'd be fine, if the basement took on a little water. But then this pump broke while we were out of town, and the basement didn't take on a little water. It took on a lot of water. The strange thing is, even as I tossed each slimy sodden periodical or magazine into the enormous trash bag, I found myself releasing them. When it comes down to it, I'm okay losing things. I'm not okay, losing animals or people. That's where I suffer. That's where the memories become essential, elemental. The thing I never want to let go of. And yet we do. The memories of old friends or loved ones, or people we've lost in our lives, do eventually begin to fade. I've never been able to determine if that fading is a way of protecting ourselves or if it's just the brain becoming too overloaded with new information. Does the memory of the new tree replace the memory of the original tree? How can we be sure to hold on to the memories? We are so determined to keep. Today's devastating but beautiful poem by the poet Michael Robbins is a meditation on what it is to recall those very last moments you've shared with your partner. How, in that memory of those moments, the tenderness, the conversation, there is something of a microcosm that forms. Everything that's ever happened between you can exist in that small, final moment. The poem is a record, written down in the permanent ink of the heart. The remaining facts by Michael Robbins. On the hour, the full shuffled weak since you said goodbye. I said goodbye. A pillow in your lap, and 6 days later, the boarding pass in the pocket of your black sweatshirt. I remember touching your leg to wake you. And if we erase the walls, you face the ocean at the edge of the bed, waiting for your clothes. The torn nail, from days ago, now nearly healed. And my difficulty hooking your bra. Three, four steps outside, and I've been driving slower, lucky asked. And letting go. Senseless coincidence here in its rightful place and little more. Not figurative, nor overblown, yet we were waiting on one of many storms. Later, we left the highway for a wooded drive, and I learned the difference between widow, and widower. Then I kissed your head through a paper mask. The slowdown is a production of American public media in partnership with the poetry foundation. To get a poem, delivered to daily, go to slowdown show dot org and sign up for our newsletter. Find us on Instagram and Twitter at slow down show. The slowdown is written by me, Ada limon. It is produced by Jennifer lye. Our music is by Hannah Brown. Engineering by Cameron Wiley and Alex Simpson. Production help by susannah sharpless, Ryan lore, and James Napoli. Our executive producer and editor is best Perlman. Our executives in charge of APM studios are lily Kim, Alex schaffer,

Michael Robbins Poetry Foundation Ada Limon Jennifer Lye Hannah Brown Cameron Wiley Alex Simpson Instagram Susannah Sharpless Ryan Lore James Napoli Twitter Perlman Apm Studios Lily Kim Alex Schaffer
A highlight from (Episode 277) "Peacemaker" Actor: Alison Araya.

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

01:38 min | Last week

A highlight from (Episode 277) "Peacemaker" Actor: Alison Araya.

"I'm Alison aria from peacemaker and you're listening to Monday morning critic. Have you ever heard of a guy named peacemaker? No. He is a trained killer. We've got trouble with that maniac. What are you waiting for? That thing better not crap back there. Yeah, how straight an eagle dude? No one else dealing with soul. Hey, dad. Kind of rough go from it how he did. You don't say. So we shot me building fell on me. You let somebody shoot you? I invited him to come shoot me dead. I thought you were in prison for life. I worked for the government. Post office? Do you think they put me out of prison into little male? I don't know. It was the first government job I could think of. I killed people, okay? This task force doesn't officially exist, which leaves us on our own. We call our targets butterflies. They are a serious threat to the safety of American citizens. There's some weird going on, you think me and vigilante are too stupid to notice. Hey, everyone. Which one's me? Which one's eager? Okay, you're half right, but you score 50% of the tests at school. What do you get? School was my bank. It's for dorks. You guys clown. There's something about him that's. Sad. Is he a target in sight? Peacemaker take him out. Kids are grass, terminate. I'm immediately. Take the shot. He told me to kill kids. He didn't say, why? Because right now, the world needs son of a bitch. And you're the

Alison Aria Government
A highlight from 590: "Let my anger be the celebration we were never / supposed to have."

The Slowdown

03:53 min | Last week

A highlight from 590: "Let my anger be the celebration we were never / supposed to have."

"I was giving a virtual reading recently, and I told someone that it's very hard for me to write from a place of rage. And immediately, the chat blew up with comments about how I was denying my own anger and how important anger was. I never responded, but I do think anger is important. And that rage can be useful, but I think it's a hard place to create from. When I am truly angry, I don't want to write. I want to break things. I want to burn things down. Do you remember the very first time you were angry with America? Were you ever not angry with America? I asked this because when we see the news and wonder about gun control or a woman's right to choose her own life, it's hard for me to be eloquent about my feelings. It's hard to find the distance I need in order to write in a way that explores anger, but also explores distance and equanimity. But that's not to discount the value of anger, anger can be useful, protective, and it can lead to good effective action. What I don't want to become is too angry to make progress or too angry to make poems. In today's poem, we see both rage and truth. Here is a poem that looks America in the eye, and tells the country how she feels. It's also an ode to the power of anger. Let my anger be the celebration we were never supposed to have. By Natasha, Aladdin. After Jackie, Jermaine. America, you have left me on red, more times than I can count. And yet I keep writing these texts to you, though you ghost me on the regular. Buzzed, I go to bed, and buzzing with expectation each morning I wake up ready to do the same thing all over again. As though faith weren't something inherently crazy, given the state of things. Lately, I've been making in times jokes, except they're not really jokes anymore. Who knew? The book of revelation is a documentary, and the sky really is falling. And the ocean is filling faster with the blood of everyone except those who spill it freely without guilt. America, this is what my God has told me about you. You feel of dying sunflowers. You semi automatic gun slinging un sanctuary. You apparition that is the crowd gathered beneath yet another oak tree on the postcard. Justice is not a pendulum, justice is not a hammer, justice is not a bandage. It is water, and your better angels have long sung of its rolling tide, calling those things which are not, as though they were. Am I crazy America, letting you inside me again and again, though you do not even love me. No matter how much I pretzel myself into something soft and edible enough for

America Jermaine Natasha Jackie UN
A highlight from 40. Shane Hartline "There's No Shortcuts"

Before the Break

05:13 min | Last week

A highlight from 40. Shane Hartline "There's No Shortcuts"

"Okay. Oh my God, Tommy's mister giggles today. Tommy, how are ya? Yeah, I'm good. I'm good. I'm good. It's Monday. And that's all I have. Great. Thank you. Awesome. Shane, this was awesome. And I best interview ever. All right, we're very excited to meet our guests this week. He's an actor comedian and a filmmaker. You've seen him on such shows as Jimmy Kimmel Live, Disney's stuck in the graceland, the in betweeners and the film rock of ages and you can currently see him as the recurring character Maddox on ABC's station 19. Please walking the show, Shane hartline. Yay. We're doing it. What's up Shane? Hey. Guys, thanks for having me. Thanks for being here. Thank you for joining us. For those of you at home, Shane is donning a man's cap with Alaska on the top. He's got a dental shirt. He looks like a rugged man. He looks like he's been outside for a long time herding cattle. Something wonderful. Is Canada called this time of year? I assume. No, this is kind of my way to feel like that I do go outside and do stuff. But truthfully, I stay inside 99% of the time. I was wearing the same exact thing that you were, we picked up my brother's dog sister in law, future sister law never met before, but my wife says, well, just look out for Tommy. He's in a red Toyota and he looks like a lumberjack cop. And that's a good look. That's just my thing is if you have that look, you just gotta lean into it. I think if you have that look, you don't have a choice. You have to lean into it. It's illegally. It's illegally. Mug of coffee all the time. Just a slow sip. There's nothing in the cup. It's soldiers too. No, no, no, no, no, manly folgers. Throw a little barbed wire in there, rusty barbed wire. I don't even think I was such a late adopter to coffee. I don't think I even did the full easy to it. I just went straight to like just way harder stuff, but harder stuff at the macchiatos. Yeah, right? Shane, we're in the hell are you? I'm in Los Angeles, currently. I did a risky, but I did Florida for Christmas. You know, and everything. It's always no matter yeah, I mean, you know, I was born in Florida and I, you know, I try as much as possible to remain proud of that. No, I'm kidding. I love it. I'm from Indiana. I get the same stuff. People are like, so the KKK, huh? I'm like, it's like, yeah, that's not the whole state. You know, we're not all defined by the crazy people. But you know it was Christmas was a bit more stressful than usual just trying to avoid COVID and you know I can't canceling plans. It's like we got off the plane and everything started changing with the spikes and everything. Not the head in that direction on this podcast. But you know it's what's happening and it's stressful. And now I think there's a new variant. There was oma cron. It was Delta. And now there's a new one. Awesome. We should just call it Delta Omar Kron. I think it's called delta Kron. It sounds like a fucking transformer. Exactly. It's really a movie franchise. You know, at this point, you know? Oh my gosh. Anything. A side topic we should talk about at some point is the new matrix. I have very strong feelings about it. I just saw it the other day. Dude, what do you think? In a nutshell. I already know. I already know, I'm seeing Adam's face he hated it. Do you want to just do it with our facial expressions? Like just do a facial expression so we're not saying oh yeah. He went wonky went sideways. And I'm gonna just close. I love hated it. Did you love me? Yeah, because I love two and three also. I know one is a perfect film. It's spectacular. It ages perfectly. It's just, it's a kind of a one in a million film that is still being copied to this day. Two and three I understand why people fucking hated them. I still love them. I just love that world. And I thought this one, you know, Lana on her own directing it. I just kind of appreciated how like balls to the wall on the nose like very meta. It was. I was like, because the matrix is a world where you're like, you can do that. I don't know. It was, I don't know. I don't know. You, I hear you. Shane has different thoughts. There was nothing new in it, though, like, but I mean, they also talk about that in the movie. Like, how do you stop? Making up something that is still copied to the states. It's just wild. And the action was fine. I didn't love the action, but I thought it was fine. I don't know. I have so many so many thoughts in it.

Shane Tommy Shane Hartline Jimmy Kimmel Maddox Oma Cron Delta Omar Kron Delta Kron ABC Disney Florida Alaska Toyota Canada Los Angeles Indiana Adam Lana
A highlight from Attorney Laura Coates On The Fight For Voting Rights

Fresh Air

03:05 min | Last week

A highlight from Attorney Laura Coates On The Fight For Voting Rights

"I'm Terry gross. My guest Laura Coates worked in the civil rights division of the Justice Department, specializing in the enforcement of voting rights. But she left in frustration after finding that the bureaucracy was unbearable and lobbyists and elected officials at the state and federal levels would often interfere, rendering investigations feudal. She left that division to become a criminal prosecutor as an assistant U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia. Kotze's black, when she worked to enforce voting rights, she was seen as a hero, but as a prosecutor, she was often seen as a trader. How should grapple with that and the injustice issue witnessed and sometimes felt complicit with, are the subjects of her new book just pursued a black prosecutor's fight for fairness. A quote from her book about serving as a prosecutor seems especially germane on this Martin Luther King day. She wrote, quote, I had thought each case could represent a dot on the arc that doctor king hoped would bend toward justice. if I was bending the arc of justice or breaking it. And afraid the justice system might just break me. Coats left the DoJ and has been an adjunct professor at the George Washington University law school and is a CNN senior analyst and a serious exam host of the Laura coach show on the potus channel. Laura Coates welcome to fresh air. Voting rights is one of the most important issues in the country now. You were in the voting rights division during the early years of Obama's first term. So this was before the Voting Rights Act was gutted by the Supreme Court. What was your job and what did you hope to be able to achieve? As a voting rights section attorney, my job was to investigate acts of discrimination across the country and to observe elections and help to carry out the Voting Rights Act of 1965 in jurisdictions that have a history of discrimination. At the time, we still had section 5s formula for preclearance, which was a very big and strong aid in nipping discrimination in the bud. We also had section two, of course, as well if after the fact there were an issue. Now, of course, the Supreme Court has rendered the Voting Rights Act largely anemic, and we require legislation to fortify it. By the time our role was really to make sure that the gains of the Voting Rights Act could not be clawed back based on bigotry and prejudice and everyone had the opportunity to vote and vote freely and have the strength of their voting power realized. And I should mention since 2013 when the Voting Rights Act was gutted, at least 26 states have passed new voting restrictions. You write about your frustrations in your job trying to uphold voting rights and you are at that lobbyist elected officials at the state level and federal levels often interfered, rendering Justice Department investigations feudal.

Laura Coates Kotze Justice Department Terry Gross District Of Columbia George Washington University L Martin Luther King Supreme Court U.S. CNN Laura King Barack Obama
A highlight from (Episode 276) "The Book of Boba Fett" Actor: Skyler Bible.

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

07:30 min | Last week

A highlight from (Episode 276) "The Book of Boba Fett" Actor: Skyler Bible.

"Is a talented actor whom you can find in first man, the wolf that's so hollow and currently playing on Disney+. The book of boba Fett, welcome Skylar Bible Skyler. Thanks for being on the podcast today. Yeah, man. Happy to do it. Thanks for having me. Yeah, so where do I start here? So Skyler, just curious because I'm trying to put some pieces together, especially early on. I know kind of some of early on, but we're specifically are you from Skylar? I grew up in Santa Barbara. Gotcha. Yeah, gotcha. So you grew up in Santa Barbara. You're the kid that kind of is moved by being in a play eventually in high school. You're not so great. When you first start, but you kind of ease your way into it. You tell me from your point of view. That's kind of what I know. I could be off. But tell me how this journey starts for you. Where does this thing really create momentum for you? Yeah. So I kind of started in musical theater and quickly found out that singing and dancing and ability was the best. But I like the acting. I like being on stage and just finding different characters and all that. And I found plays in high school and fell into those and fell in love with the people and I'd always been like a big sports guy. And then it kind of just didn't work out. I kind of just liked being in the theater more. And then, and yeah, there was this, that's what I want to do and move to LA kind of right after high school. You know, I got to say Skyler to support that point. I have to say, but I'm not an actor, obviously, but there's times I'm watching the Patriots or whatever I'm from Massachusetts, but it's like, you know what? Whether it's sports or I love sports. I'm like, I would so rather be into this show that I'm streaming on whatever network. I don't know. Sometimes I feel that. You know what I'm saying? Yeah, it's not that I don't like sports, but it's like, what are wasted time? I watch this team play they suck and it's like, I don't know. So I kind of get where you're coming from in an odd way. Yeah, and I still you know, I still recreationally. I love soccer. So I play soccer all the time and just like with Bundy's and kind on the weekends and stuff, but yeah, there's just something about this industry that keeps kind of pulling me back in. So he was Ted Lasso guy? Oh, totally. Love that show. He wants it twice. So you have to be honored that you and Christopher Fernandez have been on the best podcast in the United States. Yeah, it is such a great show. Are you more of an MLS guy or international soccer or both? I just love watching it. I'm definitely more international, but it's always fun to find an MLS game somewhere. Yeah. Yeah, for sure. One thing that I did read about you was if we talk about a movie or a show where you mentioned, you're singing and dancing and so forth in high school. But Gladiator is a movie that really hit home for you, right? Yeah, so I saw that in high school and was like, I want to do that. But that's what I want to do. And it was kind of, that was the solidifying film. That Lord of the Rings. But two fantastic choices, by the way. It's something that can kind of pull me out of my own life and make me forget about where I'm at and be totally immersed. That's what something I want to be a part of. Gladiators almost like the perfect action drama slash historical movie. It's so well done. It's from the music to the way it's shot. There's so many scenes that I think about on a daily basis. The scene at the end where going through the dirt and he's like, there's such a deep movie, right? Yeah. It has everything. How's everything? Good call, but you moved to LA at 17. If I have this right, I hope I do. Alone. Kind of leaving the ones you lovely or people that you care about. Talk about that transition your latest code. That's not easy. That can't be easy for you. But it shows the fact that you're really passionate in you're going after your goals, right? Because people do that a lot. Not a lot. But they do that, not knowing what the result is going to be. From your perspective, talk about that and how that played out for you. Yeah. So I got into school in Washington at puget sound. And I was going to go to school there. And I got an opportunity in LA to just an audition. But it was an audition for victorious. And so I kind of had a choice and I was only 17. I wasn't even 18 yet. Sounds some roommates on Craigslist. And kind of just called the school and was like, hey, thanks, but no thanks. Pursuing my dreams and goals and yeah, just kind of left and it was just my mom and I so she kind of she wasn't very far away. So it was an easier transition than most I think it wasn't like moving across the country. Right. But you know it was three people I didn't know and kind of brand new in the new city and yeah, just kind of wait for it. Skyler is mom still around to see all the wonderful things you've accomplished? Yes, she is. To say she must be proud of you as I understand it. She's very proud of me. She's been a little skeptical here and there, but yeah, she just wants me to be happy and stable. She's kind of hard starting out in this industry. You know, it's kind of hit or miss. Yeah, you know, and the fact that you took that risk is huge. What's the toughest non acting job you've ever had Skyler? I was an EMT for a couple of years. Wow. Yeah. And that one was that one was difficult. Just kind of all encompassing. It was obviously a new job totally new career direction. And so I went to school for that for a few months and then got my certificate kind of started doing that and just kind of went all downhill. So many stories of just bad timing, being at the wrong place the wrong time, people jumping out of the ambulance. Crazy. That was probably the hardest job I've ever had. A crazy question will be not crazy question, but I guess maybe I'm thinking too deep here. Is there anything you can pull out of your experiences and EMT that you use for acting? All the time all the time. I mean, it was an insane experience, but I mean, I wouldn't have changed it. There's so many things to pull from that job. And just in like the most recent, I was in 9-1-1: Lone Star and I was a victim on that show and I, you know, there's so many that's what I did for two years. So there's so many things that I could pull from that job and kind of use

Skyler Skylar Bible Skyler Santa Barbara Soccer Ted Lasso Christopher Fernandez Skylar LA MLS Bundy Disney Patriots Massachusetts United States Puget Sound Craigslist Washington
A highlight from 589: addy

The Slowdown

04:02 min | Last week

A highlight from 589: addy

"When I was a kid, I felt guilty about having favorite stuffed animals or dolls. I'd line them up all on my bed and put some of them in the back and some of them in the front. Inevitably, the new ones would go in the front, and the older ones in the back, or the ones that weren't very soft, would go in the back, and the fluffiest pretty ones would go in the front. Even then I knew this was wrong. It felt just like the hierarchy of kindergarten and elementary school. The prettiest ones getting the most attention. The ones that were rougher around the edges being put in the back row. When I'd fall asleep, I was sure to say, good night, to all of them. And some days I'd switch them all around. So no one got their feelings hurt. That's the thing about dolls, and stuffed animals. They become alive to us. They are a proxy for a human being. A small mirror of ourselves. That's why we can find them scary or off putting. They are important symbols. When we find a doll that looks like us, it becomes even more important. Or, when we can't find it all, that looks like us. The absence can feel enormous. I remember so well sitting in bed in the dark of the night, trying to be fair with my love, and somehow knowing it was impossible. Even as a child, I was aware that what I was feeling was something I was going to have to feel for the rest of my life. One of the reasons I love today's poem is that it takes the familiar relationship of human and dull and flips it on its head. The poem asks what would it be like to be a doll, and to be made and controlled by the hands at the doll factory? Addie, by moon heart. Two cold hands picked me up. Packed ounces of cotton up the slit in my back, popped my plastic legs in place. And left me there a moment undone. Armless. My new legs split, open. One pointed north, one point itself. I was nimble as my maker's hands, thumbing each eye into its rightful socket. My gaze, blank, as the ground, above my twice great grandmother's grave. They could make us anything, I thought. As me and my sisters lay nose down on the factory table, searching for any shallow breath as our makers twisted our next straight, flushed upon our vinyl half smiles with paint. Grabbed our right arm from the line. Then our left, popped them in, through us back in the bin at their shifts end. We were all just black for a moment. The stuffed animals of our chests still naked, heaving against each other in the bite of the factory nights cold. Keeping each other warm as we could there before tomorrow. Where we'd be lined up shoulder to shoulder, snooped and pricked in search of defect, branded at the nape of our necks when they found none. Pleasant company, all unaware of the name, they'll give us in the next room.

Addie
A highlight from The art world in 2022: big shows and market predictions

The Art Newspaper Weekly

03:19 min | Last week

A highlight from The art world in 2022: big shows and market predictions

"Now, even though many museums are beginning the year with closed doors due to the Macron variant of the coronavirus, the 2022 should COVID-19 permitting be a great year for exhibitions and events. So to look ahead at the big shows over the next 12 months, I'm joined by the novelist and regular columnist for the art newspaper. And our contemporary art correspondent Louisa buck. Louisa and chibundu, I thought we'd begin by talking about the big art world events these biennial or any events that events which occur every now and again. And two happen this year that are of particular importance. Let's begin by talking about the Venice Biennale. Louise, is there anything that's really standing out to you about the Venice Biennale? Well, of course, the Venice biennial, which has been postponed I hasten to add, came into being in this time of incredible upheaval pandemic, Black Lives Matter. I mean, just across the globe seismic. And Celia alemanni the curator is saying that, yes, she's going to be addressing this. I love the fact that the title is the milk of dreams, which is actually a book by the surrealist leonora Carrington, and more about surrealism and norms as a realist coming up. So I think it's going to be very interesting to see how the Biennale addresses these unprecedented times. Having said that, there's some pavilions that I'm massively looking forward to. We don't know all of them yet. But I mean, we've got Sonia boys in the UK, pavilion. We've got Simone Lee in the American pavilion. We've got Alberto whittle, these three great black women in their national pavilions for the first time ever. So things are being shaken up immediately, I think. And I know their work well enough to know that they're going to be very much addressing nationalism, the past, history, colonialism. I know that Simone Lee is actually saying she's dedicating her her pavilion to the experiences and contributions of black women, not just in the art point of view, but she's had a whole lot of education projects in schools across the Veneto. So it's not just the art elite. It's actually going out into the educational infrastructure. So that's fab. Also the pavilions themselves seem to be messing with nationalism. I'm loving the fact that the Nordic pavilion, that beautiful modernist exquisite piece of architecture in the jardini is actually going to be given over to artists three artists in the sapmi region, which is the far north, which is former Norway, former Sweden, former Finland, a former Russia before these national boundaries were even drawn up, so immediately they're messing with that. The Netherlands are giving up their pavilion to Estonia and having an amazing sounding artist who's actually a sex therapist. Who's going to be dispensing dispensing services? I think the art world could possibly do with a bit of that. So this already a sense of things, you know, old orders, hopefully being toppled. Having said that, it is, you know, the big event of the international art world, which is a fantastically elitist affair, a fantastically white male dominated affair. And, you know, it's going to take more than some changing names to change that, but it does look very positive to me that these kind of orthodoxies are being questioned. And I love the fact it's a quote from a surrealist woman based in Mexico that's kind of giving it the overarching theme.

Simone Lee Louisa Buck Chibundu Celia Alemanni Leonora Carrington Sonia Boys American Pavilion Alberto Whittle Louisa Louise Nordic Pavilion Veneto UK Norway Finland Sweden Estonia The Netherlands Russia Mexico
A highlight from 588: Good Death

The Slowdown

03:32 min | Last week

A highlight from 588: Good Death

"In their best black clothes. Of that darkness full. Of the laugh, forged of dust that spilled its gold, light into the tomb. Of the wreath carved upon the copper vault. Of the ivory city, bones like trumpets, blowing you away from us in song. Of the city again, or you will be welcomed by vultures. Of the road between the dates a short slash and usher in a gold hat. Of the pronunciation of sorrow, always, in summer, of the snake who suffered the story. Of the afterlife, and its downpour of ordinary rights. Of rights, I enact in my broken thoughts of my fever waving its anguish until the match goes out in disbelief. Of the 9 stars bleeding mercy beneath the roof of God, of God, God, and God. Of the peace and suffering my people have been promised of the clean white clothes I gave the undertaker. Here are the stockings I said, not knowing whether they would match her skin. Of the poems I have been trying to write. Die, I say, go elsewhere for songs. Of the food, and the appetite, of my father's shoulders in a black suit of downpour again. Of the animals who charge me with horns when I offer my clay ribs of her visitations. Of the hot comb, I cradled on my knees in the bathroom. Of the brutal gospel of hair, untouched toothbrush, clothes, in closets, with sale tags, of dreams or my teeth scatter like Maple Leafs of what I will never remember. Of The Rain that makes my howls float like empty bottles of glass. Of the dreams where my white clothes grow flames, of what I will remember remembering. Of the neon colored nail polish on her hand. I held at her deathbed, of what I hated to ask the night and gods. Of the knees that remember the orange mud before the grass grew back, a view, reader, looking at my face here, and reading, because we all want to know how to bear it. Of the strange, carrying question. Their voices poured like grace over my side where I was trying to leave. Get out of skin. Of it being over. Again, and again. Of it beginning. They ask me, was it a good death? Was it a good death? Was there peace for all of us? Why should I want peace instead of my mother? Of the mothers who have always known while holding children in their rooms. Why wasn't I told? Now I walk into the sea, with my jewel of anguish, and shake those human flowers from my new bald skull.

Maple Leafs
Off the Wall: Van Gogh’s Art Comes to Life in Immersive Exhibit

The Christian Science Monitor Daily

01:47 min | 5 months ago

Off the Wall: Van Gogh’s Art Comes to Life in Immersive Exhibit

"Immersive art shows aren't displaying the real thing but our review of a new van gogh show suggests. That's not the point. These exhibits can still be authentically. Inspiring the immersive exhibit of vincent van. Gogh's paintings playing on sunset. Boulevard in los angeles is part of a hugely popular global trend in projected art produced by mostly non museum for profit companies in the los angeles production. The main event is a florida ceiling wall to wall surround showing van gogh images. These are produced from sixty. Four projectors that run on a continuous loop visitors themselves splashed with the images. Sit on socially distanced cubes from there. They watch a mash up of masterpieces. Morphing for one to the next in which crows fly win meals turn clouds shift and iris's grow the soundtrack ranging from edith piaf to mode dust. Muzar sqi is integral to the production. At the show's end. Visitors applauded with enthusiasm and even whooped one visitor browsing in the gift shop afterward said he loved the show. I felt put into the art. He added the monitor's francine keefer had wondered how giant video projections could possibly compare with a face to face encounter with authentic works of art but after she watched the show and talk with visitors. She realized she was asking the wrong question. This isn't about a comparison with the real thing she writes is a variation on a theme a building on what's come before

Vincent Van Van Gogh Los Angeles Gogh Edith Piaf Francine Keefer Florida