Wellness

Listen to the latest on healthy living tips, the importance of keeping fit and how to manage the lifestyle you want, from audio aired on leading podcasts.

A highlight from Session 259: Black Women & Digital Communities

Therapy for Black Girls

01:25 min | 7 hrs ago

A highlight from Session 259: Black Women & Digital Communities

"Is not meant to be a substitute for a relationship with a licensed mental health professional. Hey y'all, thanks so much for joining me for session two 59 of the therapy for black girls podcast. We'll get right into the conversation after a word from our sponsors. AT&T dream in black wants to celebrate you. The changemakers innovators and visionaries uplifting their communities. If that's you, you do not want to miss the chance to power even greater possibilities. Enter the AT&T black future makers contest for a chance to win $10,000 and an AT&T 5G enabled device. You got this. Learn more at ATT dream and black dot com slash contests. Must be AC and older other restrictions apply. Shingles oh boy. My wife did not have a good time. You mean that rash she had? Yeah. She said she'll never forget the pain. The burning, the rash lasted for weeks, and there's nothing you can do to prevent it. Well, actually, there's a vaccine that can prevent shingles. What? Yeah, shingles can be prevented. Shingles can be worse. Prevent it 50 years or older, talk to your pharmacist today about shingles vaccination. This advertisement is brought to you by GSK.

AT GSK
A highlight from The Link Between Menopause and Alzheimers with Dr. Lisa Mosconi

Ask The Health Expert

01:56 min | 9 hrs ago

A highlight from The Link Between Menopause and Alzheimers with Dr. Lisa Mosconi

"All right, I just wrapped this interview and I think I might have fallen in love with my guest, have a good big girl crush on her because she is just so fabulous, so brilliant, and it's such great information. So I'm super excited to share this interview with you today and it is about the women's brain. And what we're going to dive into today is really talking about women's brain, how it's different than a man's brain. Duh. But why this is so important, how menopause can impact it, what you can be doing right now to make some differences no matter what age you are and what's going on. What the risks are with Alzheimer's, et cetera. I mean, just amazing, amazing information. And I am interviewing doctor Liza mosconi and she is phenomenal. She is the director of the women's brain initiative at weill Cornell medical center. And let me tell you a little bit more about our associate Professor of neuroscience, neurology and radiology as well. And she is also the associate director of the Alzheimer's prevention clinic. She's the author of brain food and she has her new book coming out depending on when you're listening to this called the XX brain. And honestly, as soon as we were done with this recording, I was like, all right, and you're coming back. So she's so good. I'm really excited to share her with you. She came through my buddy doctor Anna cabeca. And who is just phenomenal too. She wrote the hormone fix the keto greenway. So, you know, great people hang together. Alrighty, I am excited to share this interview with

Alzheimer's Liza Mosconi Weill Cornell Medical Center Alzheimer's Prevention Clinic Anna Cabeca
A highlight from Bullet Points | A Conversation on Hair

The Emma Guns Show

02:52 min | 15 hrs ago

A highlight from Bullet Points | A Conversation on Hair

"Hi and welcome to another episode of the Emma gun show and another installment of bullet points. This is our mid week catch up and a chance to share a little bit with you about what's going on behind the scenes of the podcast. Now behind the scenes this week has been quite interesting, and I wasn't sure about whether to share this, but we're going to share it. We're going to see what you think. So you may or may not know this, but when I'm not creating the podcast, I often host events for brands and various other bits and bobs, but it's lovely hosting. I enjoy it very much. And that's exactly what I did in London last week. Now, full disclosure, I was paid to host this event. It was an event for the ordinary at their store in East London. But this episode isn't sponsored just to be clear off the bat. I had a conversation with Rita Silva from their lab team about the new hair care products because the ordinary have added three new hair products to their hair care category and moving into hair care is a big step for them. And it's something that they're incredibly excited about because if you know anything about the ordinary, you will know that they are very much known for skin care and really shaking up the industry in terms of how we understand how topical products work and percentages and ingredients and what have you. And so they are applying exactly the same lens to their approach to hair care, which is very interesting. So we have this conversation at the event and we also had a conversation over Zoom about the innovations too. And the Zoom video was always going to appear on IG on Instagram as part of that paid collaboration that I mentioned a couple of seconds ago. But I thought that seeing is not everyone who listens to the podcast follows me on Instagram and because not everyone on Instagram listens to the podcast that you may like to hear this conversation here too. It is really interesting. I have to be honest and hosting these events is great. I love it. And getting to chat about products with a cosmetic scientist is always a joy, especially one like Rita, because she shares her knowledge of quite complex ingredients and formulations, but in a way that, well, I personally found it very easy to understand. I didn't feel like I had to keep saying could you just clarify what that means? Could you just explain what that means to the people listening? So it means that it's incredibly accessible. Which is another reason why I thought I'd share our conversation here too because it's just so easy to digest. So in this episode, you're going to hear our conversation which covered all of the points that we discussed at the event at the store in London. And we talked about these products and you'll learn in this conversation about the new hair care range. These new additions and why they deserve your consideration. And I hope you find this interesting. Obviously, I'd love to know if you do. So email me at the beauty podcast at Gmail dot com put bullet points in the title and that will with you up to the top of my inbox. So here she is, Rita Silva on the Emma gun show. It's my great

Rita Silva East London London Instagram Rita
A highlight from Harvard Professor REVEALS Why You Feel LOST & UNHAPPY In Life | Arthur Brooks on Impact Theory

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

06:13 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Harvard Professor REVEALS Why You Feel LOST & UNHAPPY In Life | Arthur Brooks on Impact Theory

"From regress. Arthur Brooks, welcome to the show. Thank you, Tom. What a joy to be with you. Long time viewer, first time guest. I seriously doubt this will be the last time your book strength to strength blue, me away. It was one of those where I actually got emotional reading the book because as I was telling you before we started rolling, I have spent a long time haunted by the idea that genius is a young man's game. And that ties into my first question, which is why do so many people feel lost and unhappy, and what can they do about it? People feel lost and unhappy is basically part of what it means to be human. And there's an irony in the having the big brains that we do. We developed a very large human brain over the past 40 million years for all kinds of reasons. It gives us a genetic advantage that we could say. It gives us, it's our survival. We're not fast. We're not very good climbers. We don't have a lot of hair on our bodies, but we got these big prefrontal cortex of the brain. The problem with that is that we can understand ourselves. We're the only species, as far as we know, that knows that Tom knows he's going to die. For example, you can understand the nature of your own existence, but you can't actually make your own existence work in a fundamentally different way. And so knowing yourself that the essence of consciousness is one that gives you incredible transcendental information, but at the same time it programs in a whole lot of misery. So for example, we have a tendency to our genetic proclivities force us to chase money and power and admiration and pleasure because those are the things that help you pass on your genes. You get more animal skins and flints and buffalo jerky in your cave and you're going to have more mates, basically. And so mother nature wants you to do that. But it's not going to make you happy. And you think that you want to be happy, the big prefrontal cortex says, I want to be happy because you're so conscious, but the things that will help you pass on your genes are not the things that are going to make you happy. Mother nature doesn't care if you're happy. And that's why it's so much more work. If you live by if it feels good, do it, you're going to be you're going to be a mess. That's what it comes down to. But so true. So I had a realization a long time ago. I'm very grateful that this happened early. It was, of course, born of misery, but I became so profoundly unhappy chasing money. I used to show up every day saying, I am here to get rich. And that provided me a lot of energy. So as a child of the 80s, growing up into coma. And I really grew up on the edge of Tacoma. It's probably more accurate, even though my dress really was Tacoma. It's more accurate to say I grew up in chihuahua. Oh, yes. For the western Washington state fair not a Washington stage. That is all accurate. And I it felt almost rural. And so I felt like I was living in the middle of nowhere, and John Hughes films showed me sort of this upper, middle class Chicago suburb and I was obsessed with getting a big house. And so I used to tell everybody, I'm going to get rich, I'm going to get rich. And my family was like, and I had friends that and I could literally walk to a trailer park. It was like that kind of part of Tacoma. And so my family who are all sort of blue collar, just thought that was hilarious. And they're like, yeah, right. And but I was really obsessed. I was, but I was cheating. So I was really, I did very well in high school from cheating and then in college literally from cheating. Yeah, yeah. I was charming. So I could get away with murder. Whether they're incredibly clever. Oh, that's interesting. My identity is not that of someone who is clever. So it was very much somebody who was charming. So I could make people laugh, and so I could get away with things, so whether I was asking my Friends to let me literally take the test off of their desk and put it on mine so I could show my work. Right. But of course I was showing their work. But when I got to college, and I'm not even sure what gave me this insight, but I was like, I'm going to be spending a lot of money taking on a lot of debt. I should actually learn what I'm here to learn. So I set a mantra to myself. Sink or swim, a or F, I won't cheat, not even once. And so, and I ended up doing very well. In fact, I did better in college than I did in high school. We were happy in college. I was, I was. When I graduated though, I was like, I'll never go back, not one of those people was like, oh, I'm going to get a masters and then a PhD. I was like, give me the fuck out of here. But it was filmed, so it was amazing. Yeah, and you were living by the dictates of your own integrity. You're a man fully alive. Yes. You were not shading the truth. Very true. He's very important. And this is a famous speech by I can't remember who it was. The guy who went on to become the president of the University of Texas, who became famous because he gave a commencement speech that was about make your bed. If you want to actually get your life on track, start by making your bed. What that was was to ask people to become men and women of integrity. And that means even when nobody's looking at your bed, make your bed because you're the person of integrity. You went to college and you said yourself, I'm going to be a person of integrity. I am not going to do that thing because that thing is not the right thing. And so doing, you ordered your mind in a different way. It's really interesting. So I wish that my life was like a straight trajectory after that, but it becomes the darkest period of my life becomes right after college. When I feel lost, I feel hopeless. I have no sense if I'm going to put things together. That was a really scary time because when you don't feel that you can affect the change that you want, it really, for me, let's go back to what you said at the beginning. So I call that the directives of evolution. So if you think of AI, AI has to be given instructions. You have to want a high score or you have to want to stay within the lanes if you're a car, whatever. And humans as nature's AI need directives.

Arthur Brooks Tacoma TOM Washington John Hughes Coma Chihuahua Chicago University Of Texas
A highlight from Dr. Will Bulsiewicz On All Things Microbiome: Heal Your Gut, Sidestep Disease & Thrive

The Rich Roll Podcast

05:48 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Dr. Will Bulsiewicz On All Things Microbiome: Heal Your Gut, Sidestep Disease & Thrive

"B is in the house. How are you doing, man? I'm great. Happy to be here. I'm happy to be live in front of you right now. I know we did this and I was not only on a Zoom call with you. I couldn't get my microphone to work properly. And I was on call, and I had a patient in the hospital who was sick, and it was just crazy. Well, the audience didn't seem to care. You didn't feel distracted to me in any way. That was a very popular episode. People loved it. And I made you promise that if you found yourself in LA that you had to come by and here we are. Here we are. It's the first time I've been in LA in about 15 years. Really? So yes, seriously, it's crazy. The last time that I was here, I was actually interviewing for GI fo ship at UCLA. And this was, you know, I was like in my way 20s and clearly not married and no kids, and now it's like, you know, my life is completely changed. Yeah. There's a lot of changes. There's a lot of stuff to catch up on. You've been on quite the trajectory in lockstep with everybody's growing fascination around all things microbiome. And gut health and your particular skill set and level of interest intersex perfectly with all this emerging science. That's occurring right now that we're going to get into. So I'm really excited to sit down with you. And my desire and intention for this particular episode is to have it be a little bit distinct from the first one where we kind of went into your backstory and covered a lot of ground, of course. But for people who haven't listened to that or haven't stumbled across that episode, definitely go check it out. I think it's episode 5 38 from like a half a or something like that. I would very much like this to be a stand-alone comprehensive review of all things microbiome, gut health, why it's important. And the many ways that we can take action in our own lives to not only sidestep disease, but to live to our healthiest potential. Yeah, I mean, I think we can do an incredible episode where we take it all the way from the top. That way you have the introductory material that you need. But we're going to bring you all the way to the cutting edge. There's studies that I'm ready to talk about today that have been published in the last few weeks. Well, let's come out of the gate hot with the cutting edge. What has got you excited in terms of the latest literature and what we're discovering about the microbiome? I was at a microbiome meeting recently and blown away. And this is coming from the guy who's nerding out on microbiome studies all day. Blown away by what's happening in cancer research with the microbiome. Complete game changer. So what we're seeing here is that first of all, going back a few years, we discovered that cancer has a microbiome. Like, how does that work? Like a distinct microbiome that it is differentiated from how we commonly think about it, explain that. I'm not even talking about the gut microbiome. So let me start with this. Microbes are everywhere. They cover us from the top of our head to the tip of our toes. They're most concentrated inside of our gut, but they're on plants, they're part of the plant microbiome. They're the soil, obviously. Everything that's alive in this planet either is a microbiome or has a microbiome. Those are the two choices. So everything has a microbiome, and I thought a tumor would be a sterile mass of cells. And a few years ago, they discovered that tumors, cancer, cancer, tumors, actually have their own microbiome. Separate from the gut microbiome, they have their own microbiome. And they took this further. They were taking a look at pancreatic cancer, which is one of our most deadly cancers. And they analyzed the microbiome of the tumor, not the person's gut microbiome of the tumor. And discovered that a person who has a low diversity within the tumor microbiome has a worse prognosis or a lower likelihood of survival, relative to the person whose tumor has a high diversity. So explain what that means, load diversity. So diversity is looking at sort of the spectrum of different types of microbes. So like different varieties of microbes and how strongly they're represented. So inside of us, as humans, inside of our gut microbiome, we could have anywhere from hundreds up to potentially a thousand different varieties of microbes living inside of our gut. And one of the things that we would look at in terms of the health of the gut microbiome in a human being is the diversity within that system. Sure. So what we find rich is that if you look at ecosystems, whatever that ecosystem may be, it could be the Amazon rainforest, it could be the Great Barrier Reef, and it can be actually our personal gut microbiome, which is an ecosystem. And what we discover biologists will tell you this is that diversity within the ecosystem is a measure of health. Right, it makes it more robust and resilient. Right, because there are different players that are there, and they all have different unique skills that they can basically contribute to the greater good. And if you, for example, if you take the rainforest diversity and remove the snakes from the forest, I'm not a huge fan of snakes. You remove the snakes, the problem is that the other animals, they're not snakes. They're not really designed to fill that role within the ecosystem. And so when you remove the snakes, it actually has a ripple effect because all these other animals are being affected by the fact that you have disrupted the balance that exists within that ecosystem. So anyway, getting back to the cancer, they discovered that these cancer cells have

Cancer LA Ucla Tumors Pancreatic Cancer Amazon
A highlight from Habit #5 | Daily Non-Negotiables Pt3

The Emma Guns Show

07:10 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Habit #5 | Daily Non-Negotiables Pt3

"Welcome to another episode of the Emma gun show and an installment of 12 habits. 12 habits is a yearlong project where together will strive to make or break habits each month. We all know there are habits and lifestyle choices that are good for us, yet trying to incorporate them into daily life can be so much of a challenge that they quickly fall by the wayside, and that can make us feel as though we, the individual, has failed when an actual fact it's the method that's not quite right. It's not you at all. So in 12 habits, we will spend a month on picking the challenges, figuring out our way over under and through the barriers to making these habits stick. So that they can become parts of our lives in a way that sustainable. And because there's no point trying to stick to a habit, if you've chosen to do it in a way that you can't adhere to and maintain. So our 5th habit, the habit for May 2022, it's all about establishing non negotiables. So you get that endorphin high of achieving something you've set your mind to every single day. And one thing that's been really central to this habit has been not aiming for perfection. Okay, so at the beginning of this, we said that we would set 5 non negotiables every day, but the goal is to aim for them knowing that by the end of the day we've done our best. I am certainly not trying to set anyone up for failure. And I'm certainly not saying that perfect is the best outcome. We are just talking about taking that action every single day towards those things knowing they are good for us. So let me talk about how I've been getting on my struggle with my 5 non negotiables, which I've shared with everyone in the Facebook group. Has been the water non negotiable. Oh my goodness. Drinking two liters of water a day doesn't seem like a huge struggle doesn't seem like it should be, but boy oh boy it is and I know that some of you in the Facebook group have been experiencing the same issue. I really struggle to drink water, even though even though I have plenty of experience and so much knowledge from my life from my actual life that my brain tells me that when I do drink a decent amount of water every day, I feel so much better and the reason why I say decent amount of water. And why even thought about putting two liters in or having a sort of putting a specific amount is because there's a lot of data to say that it's not really about the amount. It's about how hydrated you are and you can tell that by simply looking at your urine. Gillian Michaels is always saying aim for lemonade, not apple juice or something like that. So hydration isn't going to be if you've had two liters of water today, bang, you're going to be hydrated. It all depends on what's going on. So that's me going off on a slight tangent about the amount. But I put it in there as something to aim towards. And so of all of my non negotiables, this is the one that I've struggled with the most, but which I know probably probably has the highest success rate or the hit rate when it comes to how it makes me feel. It makes me feel good. And when I get irritated, the fact that I'm always going to the bathroom, but considering I work from home a good few days a week. I mean, actually, that shouldn't be something that bothers me, but anyway, as we travel together on this journey of building in these good habits, I wanted to reframe what might be considered obstacles. And so I just came across three points that I thought about this week based on the messages that you've been sending me. Thank you to everyone who's taken a time to be the DM me on Instagram at Emma garnes, has either posted in the Facebook group, the link to join us in the show notes or has sent me an email to the beauty podcast at Gmail dot com about how they're getting on with their non negotiables because that's been really interesting because I've been trying to draw my own experience, but you very generously sharing with me how you're getting on means that I'm able to draw on yours to create these episodes which I hope is really helpful for everyone. So as we travel on this journey of building these good habits, I wanted to reframe these obstacles and hopefully really get you to a point where you keep going, basically. So the first thing is, we're halfway through this habit. And if you're thinking, oh well, I haven't done so well with this, whatever the habit might be, whether it's one, two, or more. And you're thinking, I'll just sit this one out and wait until Emma announces habit number 6. Then I would really encourage you to reconsider. I'm sure you've heard the saying the best time to start with yesterday and the next best time to start is now. And that does apply here. Yes, we're already deep into this habit, but that doesn't mean you can't make significant progress between now and the end of the month. I'm just trying to thank, and I often think about future me, because why wouldn't I? But I'm trying to think of future me from June the first would come back in time and tell current me present me anything about these habits. And I suspect she would say, look, I know you got off to a rocky start with water. But if you just try your best for the rest of the month, then you'll actually have done pretty well. Don't give up now. And also me today needs to make a note of how it makes me feel. So I've been fighting the beginnings of a migraine for the last 6 days. This is very unusual. If you're a longtime listener or you follow me on Instagram, you'll know that I mean in the past I have been felled by a micro migraines for two days of just like completely out of action and then either two days either side of that where I'm just not quite a 100% right. And this is a new experience because this has been like a migraine trying to take root for the last 6 days. And I haven't had a bad migraine for ages. I really haven't. But this niggling sensation that's a combination of jaw tightness, pain in my eye. First it was my left eye now, it's my right eye. Light sensitivity. I love to go walking every day. I factor in my lunch break is an hour an hour long walk, and then I tend to sort of eat standing up or at my desk. But I prioritize going out for a walk, and it's really lovely here in London at the moment. And I have been having to wear my darkest sunglasses because I'm so sensitive to light at the moment, but I've got I really love to keep moving. So that's just another sign something's not a 100% white. I'm sensitive to light. My cravings have been ridiculous. Ridiculous. I woke up at about 11 o'clock last night. As I went to bed nodding off woke up and I suddenly thought, you've got some brioche buns in the freezer. If you put those in the oven, I mean, it was just ridiculous. I didn't, but it was ridiculous. That's not my brain was telling me. And plus, I have an inability to really get a good quality of sleep at the moment. So that's what's been going on. That's just been really this low level irritation that's been happening for the last 6 days. And it's been bothering me for so long now that it almost feels worse than an actual migraine, although I don't know if that is especially true, but it says irritating is one let me tell you that. And one thing I've not been able to do for the last week is stomach water. And that always tends to come with a jaw tightness. If my jaw feels particularly tight, the idea of drinking water just feels ridiculous, just feels awful. Anyway, so I haven't really been drinking any water either, so that's not great. And this morning, I woke up and I was so fed up of having felt like this for days now of having to say to people, I'm not really

Gillian Michaels Facebook Emma Garnes Migraine Apple Emma London
A highlight from Learning from the past with Julia Samuel

The Emma Guns Show

03:26 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Learning from the past with Julia Samuel

"It's all here, welcome to the show. My guest in this episode of the podcast is psychotherapist and author Julia Samuel. Julia is a returning guest, and in this episode we delve into one of the most valuable resources available to us. If we want a journey of personal development or just trying to understand ourselves better. And if you think about bettering yourself, you might think of today as day one and the better version of yourself that you envisage waiting for you at some point in the future. You ever been tempted to do that, start a new thing, a regime, or whatever, on a Monday, and you're sort of hoping that at the end of all of that effort, whether it's a month, three months, 6 months a year, that this great version of yourself that you really pinned all your hopes on is going to be waiting for you at the other end. Well, what will get you to that version of yourself that you're aiming for is consistent effort, learning, behavioral change, any number of things, but it's quite a few shifts. It takes a lot of effort. It might take a lot of learning and newness. And the perspective I've never really heard championed and one that Julia is expert in is an understanding who you are based on the information that exists before. And by before, I mean learning the story of your family. Who we are today, this version of ourselves is a combination of the people and experiences who came before us, and the effects may be showing up on our present, and they may be confusing. So rather than focus ahead on how to change, Julie and I discuss the value in looking back to understand how we got here. And Julie has actually written a fantastic book that explores this in detail with 8 families called every family has a story, how we inherit love and loss, and it really is a fascinating exploration into family relationships and how they fundamentally influence our health and happiness. And it's via these family therapy sessions with 8 families that she conducted during lockdown. And this book, perhaps wouldn't exist if it wasn't for lockdown because she explains getting, I think it was four generations of one of the families in one place was easy to do virtually then physically. Imagine trying to get four generations in one room to do this. So this book examines a range of common issues from separation, leaving home, loss, sense of identity, and shows through these multi generational conversations. How much has passed from one generation to the next? And how it shows up and how trying to work on it doesn't involve looking forward, although that might be part of it. It involves a lot of looking back. And I hope if you're a longtime listener of this podcast, that you'll know that when addressing mental health or talking about anything that sits in this quote on quote personal development space, it's my intention to arm you with tools, not just conversations you can not along with. And I'm not going to create a podcast where we're just naval gazing. I really hope that there are things that you can take from every episode that will be helpful. And Julia has, in all her visits to the podcast, but perhaps especially with this conversation, said shared so many practical tools tips and things you can do today that are absolutely actionable and achievable. And for that reason, I'm really glad to be sharing this conversation. I really do feel it's the show you could listen to today and learn something from take something from that could help you make a really profound change. You've been looking for. So I'll put the link to the book in the show notes and it's a strong recommend for me. It's very beautifully written as well, Julie is a very skilled writer. It's really a pleasure to read. So I'll put the links to the book and all of Julia's social media in the show notes, but it's a warm welcome back to Julia Samuel on

Julia Samuel Julia Julie
A highlight from How To BUILD MUSCLE & Lose Belly Fat For LONGEVITY! | Gabrielle Lyon

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

09:08 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from How To BUILD MUSCLE & Lose Belly Fat For LONGEVITY! | Gabrielle Lyon

"The body thrives under activity. And whether you take a human, whether you take an animal, if you essentially domesticate them, and they are not training, they will lose muscle. You can only pull one lever. So if you have two levers, you have diet, and you have muscle mass. Which would you have somebody pull for a longevity? You can have an amazing diet, but you have very little muscle mass, you don't do a lot of exercising, or you're like my swimmer friend, and you have just incredible output. You're exerting yourself tremendously. You have a great amount of lean body mass. We all know what swimmers look like. They look fantastic. But your diet is a Twinkie diet, like you called it. Which of those two levers is going to be more impactful? Okay, so I'm going to tell you what the research shows. And then I'm going to tell you my personal experience. Word. So the research would say, hey, if you had to prioritize one over the other, prioritize resistance training. Okay. That being said in clinical practice, I have absolutely never seen that work. If they prioritize dietary protein and they get that first meal right by lunch they feel better. I'm not asking them to wait four weeks. You nail that first meal by the second meal you feel better. You want to deal with body composition. You want to deal with optimal aging. You want to overcome this concept of anabolic resistance, which we can talk about. The only and most effective. Now again, this is my personal opinion based on seeing hundreds and I've been at the bedside of hundreds of dying people. Geriatrics is no joke. And if I could pull the lever and go back in time, what would I tell them? You know, I would say you've got to do both, but when you're young, you have more flexibility and you can out train a bad diet. But as soon as those hormones begin to change, if you have low quality protein and by the way, protein is utilized in a dose response. So it's a meal dosage. It's really a 30 to 50 gram, meal dosing. So that's between four and 5 to 6 ounces of protein per meal. And if you go under that, you are below what's called this leucine threshold. And I want to make this very palatable for people. So basically, there's essential amino acids. And out of these essential amino acids, that's really what determines the quality of a person's diet. And the quality of protein. So when they are subthreshold, one particular amino acid, which is leucine. If you eat food that is sub threshold to that two and a half grams of leucine, you will be skinny fat. You will never activate the proper mechanisms to turn over muscle protein synthesis. And this is a huge problem in our society. You know, there's nutrient sensors in the body. So hitting that particular amino acid load, which is really four to 6 ounces easy. And it's easy for people to anchor their meals in four to 6 ounces of protein, and then you stimulate your muscle tissue. Which we know is an endocrine organ. Let's talk about that. If you're not trying to body build, if you're not trying to get bigger, so I'm thinking, I know somebody love her to death. She's amazing, but her diet is ridiculous. But she's skinny. Her whole family's skinny. It's crazy. And so I've always said, I guarantee if you look at her biomarker, she's going to be skinny fat. She's going to be probably pre diabetic, judging by how she eats. It's pure insanity. Because I want to differentiate between busting your ass in the gym and what you're going to get from that and then just like, hey, even if you don't care about the gym, even if you don't buy into that, there's just a quality of tissue issue. And if you think of it as an organ, it's like saying the quality of the tissue of your liver or your kidneys, it's like this should matter. So if people could do one thing and leave this conversation with nothing else other than muscle is the organ of longevity and eat high quality protein, animal protein and plant protein are totally different. And if you have a diet of plant protein and is very hard to sustain and calorically devastating because you need between 25 and 40% more. So it's like 6 cups of quinoa for one small chicken breast. If you really wanted to think about the amino acids necessary to stimulate that tissue. And listen, that's not the only way to do it. Could we add in branched chain amino acids to lower quality protein? Absolutely. But why would you do that when we have, you know, cattle or a ruminant that we've been consuming for two and a half million years and have the capacity to take low quality plant nutrition and produce high quality nutrition that is nutrient dense and highly bioavailable for humans. So I understand I've heard you say the same thing. Like I understand people have, they may have a moral desire to eat plant based food. And I get that dude, is somebody who's absolutely I just love animals. And I long for the day where we can lab grow meat and that there was never an animal involved in that process, but I'm also just selfish enough to say, I'm going to protect my health, you know, when you look at obviously sustainable farming and things like that, I'm all for it. I couldn't be more behind that. But wanting to understand sort of at a mechanistic cellular level, what's happening, and I don't care what the answer is, vegan, vegetarian, animal, a mix, thereof. I just want to understand at a cellular level what's happening and to get that, I think, understanding what branched chain amino acids are, why they matter and how the profiles differ from plants to meet, I think it would be really helpful. Yeah, I couldn't agree with you more. So really the quality of our diet and this is globally the quality of our diet is largely dependent on protein. So there's 20 amino acids and 9 of those are essential. Of those essential amino acids. And essential meaning I can not produce it in my body. Exactly. So the key branch chain amino acids. And when you think about branch chain, it's just the structure, right? It's just a nomenclature. You've got leucine, isoleucine, and valine. And out of those three, which, by the way, should all be consumed together. Because everything in life has its own balance. Of those three amino acids, leucine is the most relevant for protecting the organ of longevity. And on a cellular level, having the right amount at one time dose appropriately, which is where that two and a half grams, that's from that's just from research. You know, it's really truthfully it's between 1.8 to 2.5 grams of leucine, which the majority of people are not going to go. How much leucine is in my food, right? It's not on the back of a label, which just goes to show you how protein has been the black sheep of the macronutrient family for decades. When you look at a label, all it simply says is protein. But understanding on a cellular level that really eating protein at a meal centric dosing, meaning you at one time, you're not drinking protein shakes over a course of two hours, but at one meal at a bolus amount, you are getting between 30 and 50 grams of protein, which would translate to between four and 6 ounces of high quality protein would reach that leucine threshold. So once you reach that leucine threshold, you trigger this complex called mTOR. mTOR is a mechanistic target of rapamycin, which then is actually a nutrient sensor. Anything below that, the body's like, I don't care. I'm not going to put on muscle. Or I don't care. I'm not going to really stimulate this very expensive elaborate process for the body. This doesn't care. So that's where you get skinny fat because you're grazing all day at this low threshold meal, especially important in aging because you don't have that flexibility. And when I say aging, I'm talking about 40s. You know, you've got to stay on top of it, but once you reach that threshold of arguably two and a half grams of leucine, which you could have a two ounces of fish and then a scoop of branched chain and get up that we've seen level. But mechanistically, you need that branch chain that essential amino acid. To then trigger the rest of what needs to happen for muscle protein synthesis. And listen, the way that they measure muscle protein synthesis, it's not like you eat it and then you're laying down protein. It is not an accurate assessment, right? I would be not being truthful if I said that, but it really is a period of time. Over a period of time, as you continue to do with anything correct, optimized habits, you then can protect your tissue.

Valine
A highlight from The Surprising Habit Helping People Live Long Healthy Lives

Ask The Health Expert

01:42 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from The Surprising Habit Helping People Live Long Healthy Lives

"Hey, this is JJ virgin. Thanks so much for joining me. This is ask the health expert. In each episode, I put the power of health in your hands and share ways to get healthy, lose weight, heal your gut detox and lots more so you can look and feel better fast. If you'd rather watch the video, hey, I did put on my makeup and do my hair, so check it out on my YouTube channel. What if it turns out that there was a really simple way to hack your metabolism and burn fat almost effortlessly and maybe even live longer? Well, it turns out there might be, and it's based on some pretty cool new science. Hey, it's JJ. Now, if you want to keep up with the latest research on things that will help you get healthy and then bonus, lose weight too, make sure you don't miss out. Hit like and subscribe to this channel and you'll be good to go. If you've heard of the blue zones, you know that people living in those 5 places are living a lot longer than just about everybody else. Sometimes passed a hundred. And more importantly, they're healthy too, because who wants to live to a hundred unhealthy, right? Now, even though they're spread out around the world, they have pretty much the same lifestyle habits. And there's some surprising things. In fact, one surprising thing that they do that you can easily do too, no matter where you live. If you want to get healthy, feel better and lose weight too, you probably already know that being overweight can put you at risk for disease, and it can also decrease your life expectancy and the quality of your life.

Jj Virgin Youtube
A highlight from Jason Gray Stanford

Dr. Drew Podcast

06:43 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from Jason Gray Stanford

"But as you know, I've been very obsessed with languages lately. And so it's on my mind constantly, so I hope that you're doing well. And do help us by supporting the people that support the podcast here and check out the Dr. Drew TV site as well where we're doing regular streaming shows. And I might love to have the corolla faithful over at Instagram DR drew pinsky and of course TikTok at Dr. Drew. Today the guest is Jason gray Stanford, the podcast is the Randy disher podcast, of course, the best known for playing lieutenant Randy disher in the Golden Globe winning TV program monk. And of course he voiced the role of raditz raditz. You're going all the way back. So there you go. We'll get into what Jason's all about, but you know him, of course, from monk. And you can follow him on Twitter at jazz GAS or jazz jazz. Gray Stanford. And Instagram at Jason gray. Stanford. Welcome. Thank you very much for having me. Dr. Drew. So talk about the podcast for a minute. Why should people go listen? Oh, well, I tell you what, if you're a monk fan, which there are many of them out there, the monk faithful, the monca holics, as we call them. Mongol files, whatever you want. Whatever you might want to say. What it's really kind of, I started it. When we'll get into it later, but I had some health issues. And I started it during that time. And it was really therapeutic for me. And I realized that, you know, during the pandemic, you know, a show like monk really kind of caught on again, having been off the air for a little bit of interesting. And it was really kind of my love letter, my thank you. Well, I think him over at maisel reinvigorated interest in Tony Shalhoub. You know what I mean? And I met him, could not be a nicer guy, right? Absolutely. He's kind of one of those like when you talk about Hollywood and people, you're like, he's one of the good guys. He could not be more just easy to talk to and welcoming and stuff. And I was always a monk fan, but I think I got more, I don't know, something about misses maisel connected me to him. And I think that's what sending people back to me. And a lot of people did exactly that. You know, obviously I think Tony has numerous Emmys now. He's got a handful for monk a couple for maisel. And it's one of those things, it's like timing is everything, right? And monk had this kind of real resurgence during the pandemic. And obviously with streaming and everything, you know, it kind of is so much easier to reach. Well, and you add to that, the pandemic of anxiety that we're having. And a lot of people's anxiety has an OCD flavor to it. 100%. And so it's perfect character. Yeah, it's absolutely, it's easy to revisit that, that's for sure. And it's actually funny that we're talking about this right now 'cause I can't give away too many details, but the monk fans might be very excited with some news coming up soon. Oh, good for you. So we shall see. That's very exciting. You'll have to stay tuned. He has not told me anything, but I know, I know what that well, I won't say anymore. But given where it is in the evolution of that series, I think I know what he means. So good luck, that'll be great. And I think we can back into your condition through all that because thank God you're here and well. Thank you very much to participate in this thing. What a pleasure to be fantastic, right? Let's stay with Tony Shalhoub and say, how did he respond when you got sick? And we'll talk about what that sounds like. What's very, very funny is this kind of all originally started for me kind of at the end of 2017 that beginning of 2018. That's when you realize that's what I started kind of feeling getting short of. When you went up the stairs. In fact, not so much. It kind of like, for me, it literally felt like fatigue. I just wasn't performing well at the gym. And I was like, and I was working. And you kind of put those two together and you're like, oh, it's a long hours. I'm tired. Whenever somebody complains about fatigue, I worry about this. Yeah. It's in the back of my mind all the time. That's the two dreaded things when people complain about fatigue is cancer and those are the big boys. And it can be coronary disease sometimes, too, to be fair. And I'm assuming yours was more viral or something. Mine was at the end of the, obviously it was idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, but at the end of the day basically what that means is we're not sure. We don't know. And they virus was kind of the final. As we say, idiopathic is the doctors and idiot and the patient's pathetic. You know what? All my time going through this, that's the first time I've heard that and I love it. I'm stealing stealing it now. But yeah, I mean, basically that's it. And I kind of brushed it off. When you were first diagnosed. When you started getting these symptoms, I mean, I'm very in tune with my body with my health with my diet and in retrospect. I'm like, wow, buddy. You miss this? Oh, it's easy. It's easy. Listen, you're not, I don't know if you had any medical training, but you're not thinking that way when you get fatigued. Yeah, no, it's one thing when you come into a doctor, we have to think about all that stuff. It's the last thing you want to think about when you're the patient. And you know what else also is funny to any kind of inkling of those things, you kind of, you're like, oh no, I don't want to be sick. I don't want to be suspicious of male. You want to push these men do that notoriously. 100% and I am guilty of it. Yeah, me too. And it's crazy because in retrospect, as I say, when I look back on all of it now and I kind of replay those moments, I'm like, holy smokes. The holy smokes is you now know the condition. And you know you can drop dead suddenly from. That's the holy smokes part. Yeah. So it's pretty shocking, but you know, so anyway, so I get so Tony. So basically, I kept it from everybody. I didn't say anything. Did he pick up that you were not well? No, not at all. That's an interesting topic by itself. Being a performer and having a serious illness. I deal with this all the time. The fear is I won't be insurable. There won't hire me. Fire me. Yeah, why would they take a risk on me? It's already so high risk to do a production that's so expensive. Yeah. That all that stuff goes through your head. And it's realistic. That's the horrible part. Absolutely. There were times where I was like, I'm never working again. This is not, I don't know what's happening. And not only was I getting sick and sicker and sicker as trying to time was going on. And obviously, you know, with heart failure, it's a very kind of slippery slope. It's a fickle beast, really.

Randy Disher Dr. Drew Maisel Dr Drew Pinsky Jason Gray Stanford Raditz Raditz Gray Stanford Jason Gray Tony Shalhoub Golden Globe Emmys Stanford Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopa Jason Tony Twitter Hollywood Coronary Disease Cancer
A highlight from COVID-19: Two Years, One Million Lives

COVID-19: What You Need to Know

01:38 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from COVID-19: Two Years, One Million Lives

"The loved ones we've lost. It was hard because I couldn't touch him. I couldn't tell him how much I loved him. We can't on see what we've seen. Which is just pure devastation. The toll it's taken. The last two years has been very overwhelming. I definitely got depressed. It's a struggle under mental health. It struggle on our relationships. It's a struggle on our finances. There are so many things. How we've rethought our lives, the great resignation, did not tell the full story. It really should be referred to as the great reevaluation. Join us as we examine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. From ABC News, this is COVID-19 two years, 1 million lives. Here is correspondent Alex stone. These are the grim sounds of COVID-19, the machines that fought so hard to keep mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters, sons and daughters alive, over 1 million Americans have now died from the virus. Two years ago, that number seemed unimaginable. 1 million families impacted forever. When the tent went up. Was that unbelievable in your medical career? Only a few months ago, the area I'm standing in was essentially a battlefield hospital. I'm in the parking lot here at cedars Sinai hospital in Marina del Rey, California. It was a giant tent with patients being triaged inside and doctor Oren Friedman was on the front lines his medical director of the ICU. So

Alex Stone Abc News Cedars Sinai Hospital Marina Del Rey Oren Friedman California ICU
A highlight from DO THIS Every Day To Melt The FAT AWAY & BUILD MUSCLE | Sal Di Stefano

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

06:48 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from DO THIS Every Day To Melt The FAT AWAY & BUILD MUSCLE | Sal Di Stefano

"We've now identified one metric that can predict all cause mortality, almost better than almost any other single metric. So I tell people avoid those foods because it makes it really hard for you to connect to the signals that your body is telling you because these foods are so good at overwriting all those signals. Sell the Stefano, welcome to the show, man. Thanks. I appreciate it. Thanks for having me, man. So the book is incredible, super excited. What can people do from working out nutrition and whatever the case may be to burn that belly fat to live longer to be in better shape, add muscle? Yes. What's the key? So as you know, my experience, I don't have tons of experience in media. I mean, now maybe a little at this point at this point I do, but number one podcast and health and fitness space. The book resistance training revolution. Yes. But people know. Yeah, so before that was about two decades of training and working with people, and when you do that long enough, and I really care about helping people, you start to figure out what works and what doesn't work. And what we tend to focus on, maybe too much in the fitness and health space or the mechanistic actions. And that's important. Proteins, fats, carbs, calories, what exercise and kind of work out and that kind of stuff. And that is important. But what I try to do is I look at all that in the context of the average person. Not in the context of I'm talking to a fitness fanatic or someone who's hyper motivated because that motivated state of mind tends to fade like all feelings do. Also, people are very busy nowadays, very sedentary, but also very busy. I mean, if you look at people's schedules, you and I remember when we were kids, there were no play dates. You just went out and played with your Friends. Everything's scheduled now. So it's like everything's scheduled, super busy, super sanitary. We're also surrounded by hyper palatable, easily accessible food. And we grew up in an environment where we learned how to value food for its palatability and enjoyment and its accessibility or convenience. So that's kind of what we're battling with. And we got to understand that context before we really recommend what people should do because if we make the wrong recommendations, it's not going to work. And we know this. People fail at like 85% of the time when it comes to long-term success. What's the main thing? What do people either, what's the myth that they got involved for? And then they find out it just isn't true, or is there something else, like why such a high failure rate? Yeah, well, the big reason is how they go into it. And I started the same way. This is how most people start on a fitness routine. It starts from a place of, for lack of a better term self hate, I'm fat or in my case I'm skinny. I don't like the way I look. I want to change who I am, but it's kind of this negative motivating factor, which you have to move out of into a self love state of mind. Like I'm taking care of myself, otherwise at some point you'll stop. You can't hate yourself forever. I mean, how many times have you heard someone say, you know, you have a friend who's who was on a workout routine or following a diet and then you see them a year later and go, hey, how was that? Program going and they said, oh, I had to stop because I just wanted to enjoy life. I mean, logically, it's insane to say that, right? Taking care of yourself improves all aspects of your life. And yet this person says, I want to enjoy life, so I stopped. Well, what do they mean? Well, it was coming from a place of self hate, exercise was a punishment, a nutrition was restrictive, also discussed. Go to the gym, beat myself up, that kind of stuff. So that's one of the factors. The other factor is the approach. What we learned how to just the average person has been told to value exercise, mainly by its calorie burn. And that's so wrong because the amount of calories you burn while you exercise is actually the least important thing. All the things that exercise. So we'll probably get to the calories in calories out debate and at some point it's probably not the place to start, but how is it possible that I'm not just in the gym to burn calories? Okay, so if I want to lose my belly fat for instance. Yeah, so calorie burn is important, right? In order to lose weight, you have to burn more calories than you take in. Now, that's a very simplistic way of saying it. It's true, but it's more complex than that, but let's just start with the simplistic formula. You got to burn more than you take in. The first off, the calories you burn while you exercise, really isn't that much. You work out for an hour really hard. You'll burn like 400 calories. So it's not a ton. And if you work out two or three days a week, consistently like most people will, it's 800, 1200 calories a week. It's not making a huge impact. So that's number one. But the main factor is the reason why that's not that important is we're ignoring the most important aspect of exercise, which is, how does this get my body to adapt? And then what does the adaptation mean? That's very important. If we look at exercise from an adaptation perspective, then we can start to judge exercise and say, which one in the context of fat loss, which one is going to speed up my metabolism. Which one is going to teach my body to burn more calories on its own? Because that is a much more sustainable approach. I mean, if you burning more cat like right now, I'm sitting here talking to you. If my body's going to burn more calories because I've trained it to do so, that's far more effective than me going out and manually trying to burn calories with my workouts. Also, if you do the wrong kind of workout and pair it with calorie restriction, you can actually teach your body to the opposite. You can actually teach your body to become more efficient with calories. AKA you can slow your metabolism down, which in the long run makes things much more challenging. And we see this. There's people do this all the time. When you look at the average person's approach to weight loss, calorie restriction, lots of calorie burning cardiovascular activity, for example. Cardio and starvation, baby. Yes. Let's fucking go, man. Yeah. And what you see is this initial weight loss, which is usually comprised of some muscle in some body fat and the muscle loss isn't because you burn the muscle, but rather your body was actually learning how to be a more efficient cardio machine, it actually pairs muscle down, which if you're trying to get lean, that's bad. It sounds good. Efficiency. 11 efficiency. Yes. But in this case, it's terrible. It is. I mean, if we were hunter gatherers and food was difficult to come by, you want an efficient metabolism. You want a metabolism that doesn't require lots of energy. But if you live in a modern society

Stefano
A highlight from Roll On: Kristian Blummenfelt, The Ministry of Truth, & Sustainable Self-Growth

The Rich Roll Podcast

01:05 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Roll On: Kristian Blummenfelt, The Ministry of Truth, & Sustainable Self-Growth

"Does this thing do exactly? Well, it helps you train smarter. It helps you sleep better. It helps you recover faster, and now it actually helps you live healthier by tracking and making sense out of a ton of biometrics like skin temperature, blood oxygen levels, heart rate, heart rate variability, and so much more. Here's a helpful example. As some of you may know, I recently had COVID. A day before I even experienced any symptoms, whoop dutifully informed me that my respiratory rate, which in normal circumstances stays within a very tight range, was through the roof. I thus knew something was up, and I was able to quickly get on top of my self care, a full 24 hours earlier than I would have otherwise, which I know was very beneficial in helping me expeditiously get over the virus. So sleep better recover faster, train smarter, and now feel healthier with whoop. The all new waterproof device is free when you sign up for a whoop four membership. And right now, whoop is offering 15% off when you use the code rich role at checkout. So go

A highlight from TBG Library: Patriarchy Blues

Therapy for Black Girls

03:47 min | Last week

A highlight from TBG Library: Patriarchy Blues

"Thank you so much for joining us today, Frederick. It's a pleasure to be here. I've been excited for this for a long time. I just love the work that's being done and I'm really excited for this conversation. Me too. Me too. We have been kind of trying to plan a conversation around this topic for a long time. And then when we heard about your new book, we were like, oh, we think Frederick is going to be the perfect person for this conversation. So in the work that you do, you describe yourself as a black man who wants to be a resource for other black men to get it right. When it comes to homophobia and misogyny, what do you mean when you say getting it right? What does that mean to you? I think getting it right is nuanced, right? Because there's a surface level of don't do these things, right? No, don't be misogynistic, don't be homophobic. Don't be transphobic. But then the more in depth version of that is, what does it mean? What are the implications on not just the world around you, but on yourself, right? Because homophobia actually, for example, is the root of a lot of people's inability to be emotional oftentimes, right? Misogyny is the root of people's inability to have a positive relationship with their partners, right? So what does it look like to get past that top layer and really get into how it's actually corrosive for you as a person? Yeah. And I would love to know how did you get to this place? I don't know much about your history, but I'm guessing you grew up in America. And so we know that they're just things that we grow up societally, kind of believing. I'm curious to hear about how you got to this place where you feel like you are not perfect because none of us are, but getting it right more often than not and what that has looked like for you. Yeah, I think that, you know, that's a journey that has a lot of stops, right? I always tell people when it comes to a lot of things, identify myself as an intersectional feminist. I'm an intersectional feminist in progress. When it comes to being a good partner to my fiance, I'm in progress, right? So on and so forth. So I think that progress started. Sometime in maybe college, I found out that I have multiple sclerosis. And when I found that out, actually, I was in grad school, excuse me. When I found that out, I started thinking about what the world around me, not only looks like what my place in it is. My grandmother used to always tell me when I was growing up. She's like, wow, you can still use your hands, use them for good work. So I had to identify myself. What does good work look like, right? So my education and my background is in understanding a lot of the nuances that I spoke about before, but not just in terms of gender, in terms of patriarchy, but also in terms of white supremacy and systemic oppression and various ways. So I just started identifying different pockets where I can make a change. And I do think that fight against MS was probably the first step on the journey. Yeah. So what do you think is one of the most common or maybe a couple of the most common things that you think black men misunderstand about being a man in today's society? Okay. I think that one of the most common misconceptions is probably rooted in this false sense of toughness and what that actually means, right? Because I think that I've seen plenty of times, especially in the digital age, this idea that violence makes you tough. This idea that not showing emotion makes you tough. This idea that war in the ways in which that manifests makes you tough. And that is not only a misconception, but it's also for a lot of people, you know, the quote unquote hoteps and whatnot. People don't realize a lot of that is actually rooted in colonialism and white supremacy, right? Because if you get to the root of who we are as a people, you know, before being brought over to these shores and to the shores of other countries, that's not who we were in our own world, right?

Frederick Sclerosis America
A highlight from Reset Your Stress with Dr. Doni WIlson

Ask The Health Expert

06:59 min | Last week

A highlight from Reset Your Stress with Dr. Doni WIlson

"And I love how you were talking about fight or flight, which is in my new book I talk about that as stress mode, right? So when we go into stress mode, we land in our unique stress pattern, which is going to be higher low cortisol and higher low adrenaline at various times a day. And to know your stress, your stress pattern is going to make all the difference in your recovery because the treatment, even the way you meditate and the time you meditate is going to be different, depending on how stress shows up for you. So how would someone even know where to start what they're looking at? Like right off the bat, you talked about cortisol and people saying my cortisol isn't high. First of all, what is cortisol? And how would you know if you were having an issue? So cortisol is our main stress hormone, but it's also, I think, in the cortisol as our supervisor hormone of our whole bodies, because cortisol is not that it's either there or not. We actually need cortisol all day every day. It's what wakes up us up in the morning. It increases in the morning, gives us energy, and it gradually decreases through the day, and so it's lowest when we go to sleep. When a stress happens, it responds and sends signals throughout our body to help us respond to the stress, and then when this dress finishes, which is, you know, this is the thing is a lot of times our stress doesn't finish. We keep having stress. So cortisol also communicates with our digestion and communicates with all the other hormones in the body, like the thyroid and insulin, and so on. Cortisol also communicates with our immune system and our nervous system. So that's why I call it like a main supervisor. It affects everything. And so you really want your cortisol to be in this nice, healthy curve of high in the morning gradually decreasing through the day. But when we're exposed to a lot of stress and not enough stress recovery, that's when this cortisol loses loses that pattern, it's going too high or too low at different times a day. And then when it does that, it's going to affect everything else is going to affect your digestion, your insulin, your immune system, your nervous system, and when that happens, that's JJ how it leads to this tendency toward weight gain, right? Because if it's disrupting insulin, for example, now our blood sugar levels are thrown off and we're more likely to have weight gain or if it throws off thyroid, that's another potential cause of weight gain. So it's when the thyroid is not where it should be, then it throws everything else off and leads to the symptoms. So the symptoms could be, for some people, it's fatigue, sometimes it's depression or anxiety, sometimes it's sleep issues, sometimes it's weight gain, or joint pain, it can really show up in a lot of different areas of the body, depending on the levels and whether they're high or low. But then you go to a if you go to a traditional doctor and you send out for lab tests, first of all, it's not even included. And if it is included, it's a single blood spot. Exactly. I'm looking at what you just said where you looked at and it was interesting. One of the biggest things that I've seen with cortisol with stress is that people who are eating healthy and, you know, all of a sudden their blood sugar is higher than it should be, even though, you know, insulin's good, triglycerides are good. So you know it's not a dietary thing. You know, it's a stress thing. But if someone weren't knowing how to look at these things, you might see a blood sugar of 90, you know, they don't check a cortisol. They look at a TSH, and maybe it's 2.5 and they think everything is cool. How does someone know that this is an issue for them beyond their symptoms and those symptoms could be, you know, the challenge with those symptoms is those symptoms could be other things too. How would someone get a clear diagnosis that this is an issue? And it's true, it's not going to be checked at the standard doctor's office. Even if you go to an endocrinologist, they may not even look at this because what we're really talking about is a what we may call a functional imbalance of cortisol. So it's not an extreme. We're not talking like Cushing's disease or Addison's disease where the adrenal glands completely stop working. We're talking about an non optimal level. That's still leads to health issues and symptoms. And so the way to test it is usually with I test it with urine or saliva because I want to know what your cortisol is when you wake up in the morning and then a couple hours later and then later in the day like usually before dinner and then before bed so that we can see the pattern and we can see it at different times a day. Cortisol is not supposed to be the same all the time. It needs to follow this pattern. So we need to measure it at different times of day, which you could do with a blood test, but now you're having to have your blood drawn multiple times a day, so it's better to do, we can measure it in saliva. So you're spitting in a tube or you can do a urine like a dry urine sample. And now we could get so much more information, but these are generally considered specialty tests that are out of pocket, but to me, they're, to me, they're essential for everyone. Like this is essential information, this is a stress test that we should all have to know this information about ourselves and what then with that information you can know best how to help get your cortisol back in sync again. If it otherwise, people will guess, right, JJ, they might guess, oh, I'm gonna take this adrenal product, but some of the herbs in those adrenal products could either raise the cortisol more or lower the cortisol or both in the same product. It's not going to be efficient. Right. So you would handle this, there's a couple different situations you'd be looking at. You could have someone who's all high on their curve. And what I found when I used to see a lot of people one on one is the people who are all high, they didn't come in. 'cause they were like running and they were like, you know, until they started to notice that they were getting some belly fat and it wouldn't come off. And then all of a sudden they started to get tired. Yes. And tired wired. And I'd love you to talk about that. And then they really got tired and of course all started to get really low. And then you'd start to see them. But the initial part where it started to lift up, they were like, yeehaw, let's go. Let's roll with it. So if you could talk about because I know, you know, there's a very different treatment when someone's high versus when someone's low and so the first step is to get tested, but the other piece of that too is what's going on with adrenaline, how do you know what's going on there, like how do you know if you're getting into the tired and wired stage? And what's going on with DHEA? How do you, how do you look at those two things? And then what

Addison's Disease Anxiety Depression Cushing
A highlight from Bullet Points | Dr Nicole Le Pera on finding your true self.

The Emma Guns Show

04:19 min | Last week

A highlight from Bullet Points | Dr Nicole Le Pera on finding your true self.

"Hello, hi and welcome to another episode of the Emma gun show and another installment of bullet points. This is our midweek catch up and a chance to share a little bit with you about what's going on behind the scenes of the podcast, and behind the scenes of the show right now there are lots of cogs in motion and a few projects now nicely underway that I can't wait to tell you about in due course, sorry. I know that's such a tease, but that's really what I can say up to this point. I'm also finding this month's habit of having daily non negotiables incredibly helpful. Not only do I get that high of achievement at the end of every day when I've ticked everything off. I also feel pretty good when I haven't quite hit my target on something, but I've come pretty close. Progress is progress is progress, right? And what I love about these non negotiables is that not hitting them doesn't mean failure. It just serves as a signal to what might need a bit more of your attention. How are you getting on? Let me know. Now, a few weeks ago, I started doing teasers or snippets from conversations with guests. And this was a suggestion from some of you my most excellent listeners. And we're back to doing that again this week, although we did have a little bit of a break because the actress Kristen Bell was over in London, talking about her children and baby range at hello Bello. And I was offered interview time with her. And so I popped it in the mid week episode. So not only did we talk about building a brand, which I thought was really quite fascinating actually. But she was also very gracious and generous when I took us on a tangent to talk about mental health. I thought her insects were really, really wonderful. So we're back to teasers. And one of the books I read in 2021 that had the biggest impact on me was doctor Nicole the Perez how to do the work. I knew, as soon as I read it, that I had to have her in the show, but she's in huge demand. She has over 5 million followers on Instagram. It has an incredibly huge waiting list for herself, HeLa circle. And his featured on pretty much all the major channels, especially in the U.S., where she's America's psychologist, if you like. She's hugely hugely in demand. I'm not going to suggest either that reading Nicole's book is easy or was easy. In fact, it was pretty confronting and it chronicles how to recognize your patterns. Heal from your past and become your true self. And if you're a longtime listener, then you'll know I've done a decent amount of work on myself after experiencing a breakdown back in 2016. And I honestly don't know if that's the right description, but maybe it's a bit crude, but for a long time, I've been trying to power through and then one day I just stopped. I just couldn't put the effort in anymore. And every day after that involved piecing myself back together, it really did. It really was a moment where I had nothing left to give. I to give I was completely done completely spent. And every day after that was a real battle for a while, it was an extremely difficult time. And the journey isn't easing. I'm using the present tense because anything like that is ongoing, but the rewards are worth it. So reading Nicole's book put a lot of my own journey into a new and more helpful perspective. And also forced me to confront a lot of the things that I still had to work on. There were some things that I was aware of perhaps was too nervous to pull it that thread. And I think reading the book and also the resources that she puts in that book for further reading. It helped me massively. So you can imagine the glee on my face when I received the email saying that she was happy to be on the show to talk about the book. But also deep dive into the practical things we can do that not only support our mental health, but allow us to be our authentic selves. And there was a lot of play for me. When I was going through my issues, but I was definitely, I definitely became very disconnected from me, from who I was as a person. And this is where we'll join the conversation with Nicole in this little snippet. I was really curious how someone can get so far away from themselves. And this comes back to this premise of the book, these idea that these patterns we create for ourselves can serve us for a while. But if we no longer no longer need them, but keep using them to protect ourselves, they can actually work against us and be quite life limiting. So this snippet shares Nicole's insight on this and also on being present and knowing oneself and one's own mind. We join the conversation when I ask Nicole about when safe and familiar becomes unhelpful and limiting. And if you want to listen to the full conversation with the cold, then link to that episode is, of course, in the show notes. So we're joining that conversation now and I hope that you

Nicole Hello Bello Kristen Bell America Instagram Perez London
A highlight from Lisa Bilyeu on Getting Radical Confidence & Finding Strength Through Adversity (BOOK LAUNCH SPECIAL)

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

00:46 sec | Last week

A highlight from Lisa Bilyeu on Getting Radical Confidence & Finding Strength Through Adversity (BOOK LAUNCH SPECIAL)

"I wear this Wonder Woman necklace. And I wear this Wonder Woman necklace and purpose. Now we talk very much about leaning into the thing that we want. Nothing happens by accident, right? We cultivate meaning to certain things and that can be either extremely beautiful or it can actually be detrimental to us. So how do we actually do on purpose? So I took my Wonder Woman necklace and over time I would see in the mirror and I was like, yes, I Wonder Woman. You're the superhero of your own life, Lisa. And I repeat that. And repetition becomes habit. So I see my necklace, I repeat what it means to me. I do that enough, it now actually starts to mean something to me. And so what I did before I got on stage is a suit up. Like Wonder Woman does with her cape, like she does with her cuffs, I put my on my big watch, I

Lisa
A highlight from The MOST IMPORTANT SKILL To Learn For The FUTURE! | Mark Zuckerberg on Impact Theory

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

08:17 min | Last week

A highlight from The MOST IMPORTANT SKILL To Learn For The FUTURE! | Mark Zuckerberg on Impact Theory

"I always believe that if you think that something is gonna be important, find a way to start working on it. There's only so much that you can really learn by thinking about something in the abstract. You really learn by putting an idea out there and seeing how people use it. Mark Zuckerberg, welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. I'm excited to be here. Dude, I'm very excited to have you. So as I was saying before we started rolling, I am obsessed with the metaverse and about a little over a year ago, we pivoted our company to be entirely focused on web three. I don't use the word metaverse a lot just because I worry that it's quite a ways off. But the core principles of what you're doing, I think, really align with my vision of where this goes anyway. And so looking at the massive investments that you guys are making into the space, it seems like a no brainer that you guys, even though the metaverse obviously will be built by a lot of people that you guys will be arguably the largest individual contributor. There's a lot of parts and pieces though. So how do you think about the metaverse? What is it? And what are the steps to make it real? Yeah, so the way I think about this, I mean, I think you're right. I think the metaverse and web three are related concepts, but are also distinct. The metaverse, I think of as an immersive Internet, sort of the next chapter of the Internet after the mobile Internet. The successor, if you will. There's always a platform that comes next and I think that the metaverse is going to be that. And I think that the defining characteristic of it is that you'll be able to feel like you're present with other people in it. And if you're designing social interactions and kind of platforms for people to interact with each other, which is basically what I spend my life doing. The ability to help people feel present with another person, and all that goes into that. Feeling like you're there, feeling like you can see people's expressions clearly. You can make eye contact, like you can kind of physically interact. Here where they're coming from, spatial audio, be able to express yourself in three dimensions. All of these things that go into a feeling of presence, I just think it's going to deliver way better social experiences and a feeling of togetherness than any other technology that we've had before. And we try to kind of simulate that on phones and other screens that we have. We're doing this. And right now, and I can see on a screen, it's not functionally, I can see your face, so that's nice, but I don't think neither of us is under any illusion that we don't feel like we're together. So I just think in the future whether you're in virtual reality or augmented reality and maybe we do a version of this conversation in the future where I'm a hologram on the couch next to you. And you can see that through your glasses. Or any of the other platforms that are getting built. I think that that's just, that's going to be just unlock a lot of new social experiences. And then on top of that, you're going to be able to do all kinds of new forms of entertainment, new types of hanging out, more physical types of computing, like things are on fitness that don't really make sense on mobile phones. Or computers today. And I think it's going to transform work too. Because you'll just be able to walk anywhere you want and snap your fingers and have your perfect workstation up, and then if you want to collaborate with someone, they'll show up as an avatar or a hologram next to you and you have that too. So that set of things is how I think about the metaverse. And I think you're right that we're certainly investing more than anyone else's in this. There's a lot of science that needs to still get solved. A lot of this isn't just engineering questions around. All right, let's go build stuff over the next few years. There are actually unsolved questions that need to get worked through and we have kind of hypotheses on how that might work, but for a lot of the hard questions we have. 5, 6, 7 teams trying to take different bets on it and we'll see what works. So that's an important part of it. And I do think that that will end up being an important contribution to the whole field, and I'm excited that we're doing that. There's a builder in the space, and the space is moving so rapidly. I'm constantly asking myself, am I focused on the right piece? So as you develop these 6 or 17s, how do you decide which problem you're going to tackle? So obviously you're starting with your thesis, you're about bringing people together. So presence plays a huge role for you. But how did you decide how to balance VR versus AR or AI like how do you know in what order to attack this multitude of problems? Yeah, I think that that's a really great question. And we're taking a fairly first principles and maximalist approach to this of basically saying, what are all the things that we think need to exist? In order to build this software experience, and at the end of the day, we are a software company. We build technology that helps people interact with each other that way. But we feel like we've run into all these limits in terms of what you can do on a phone or on a computer or just a flat screen. So from that perspective, I think that these immersive platforms for hardware around virtual or augmented reality are going to be really fundamental. And then there's all these different technologies that need to be advanced there. So in order to get holographic displays, I mean, no one's built anything like that before. With the level of quality and kind of field of view that you need and resolution, much less in the form factor, which is like a normal pair of glasses. So there were just all these different parts of that that you need to work on. So it's not just one problem at a time. I think, you know, I was getting started in building Facebook, you know, 18 years ago, when you were a small team, I think you do things one thing at a time. Now, if I had to say, what is the part of what we're doing that's the most important it would probably be the social platform work, the horizon work that we're doing in the avatars work to help people express themselves. But fundamentally, I don't think that that stuff will reach its full potential without also a lot of invention that needs to happen in virtual and augmented reality to be able to experience this. So we're also working on display technology and things like eye tracking and face tracking so when you're in VR, you can actually make eye contact with someone or when you smile or move your face around, that gets translated to your avatar automatically. And those are things that are going to be in the next VR headset that we're releasing. Or hand tracking so that we don't have to carry controllers around with you everywhere that you go, which I think is no controls are good for some things, you know, just like how on your iPad, you have a stylus. It's good for precise input. But I don't think we're going to, you know, in the future version of your glasses that you're wearing, where those can produce holograms and augmented reality, I assume you're not going to be carrying around controllers with you all the time. So you need some combination of a kind of hand tracking, which is advanced. Some combination of AI and computer vision to basically be able to in real time track where each of your fingers are and be able to interact that way. But there are other types of inputs too because you don't also want to walk around through the world and kind of have your hands in front of you all the time. So we're working on stuff like these neural interfaces where you just have this wristband. I mean, I think it's actually one of the wilder things that we're working on. And there are a lot of we could go pretty deep on neural interfaces if you wanted to. I mean, there's a whole different ways that you can kind of get at how can you make it so that your mind can kind of speak to a computer. The solution that we've sort of come to is it's called EMG and you do it on the wrist, which is the basic idea is that we all have extra motor neuron pathways to communicate from our brain down to our muscles, right so there are actually all these different pathways that you could be using to communicate to control your hand, but there are redundant or unused for different reasons, and you can train yourself to basically use them to communicate to a wristband or a computer typing different letters or different things like that.

Mark Zuckerberg Facebook
A highlight from Habit #5 | Daily Non-Negotiables Pt 2

The Emma Guns Show

05:06 min | Last week

A highlight from Habit #5 | Daily Non-Negotiables Pt 2

"Hello, hi and welcome to another episode of the Emma gun show in an installment of 12 habits. 12 habits is a yearlong project where together we will strive to make or break habits each month. We all know there are habits and lifestyle choices that are good for us, yet trying to incorporate them into our daily lives can be so much of a challenge that they quickly fall by the wayside and they can make us feel as though we, the individual has failed when an actual fact is the method that's not quite right. Not you at all. So in 12 habits we'll spend a month unpicking the challenges, figuring out our way over under and through the barriers to making these habits stick. So that they can become parts of our lives in a way that sustainable because there's no point trying to stick to a habit if you've chosen to do it in a way that you can't adhere to or maintain. So our 5th habit is all about establishing non negotiables, so you get that endorphin high of achieving something you've set your mind to every single day. From the messages I've received so far on this habit, many of us are aware of our hydration, so many people are saying, oh, yes, yes, yes, absolutely need to put that two liters of water down a day. So many people are aware of being active, being mindful of how they're using their electronics, clocking up a certain number of steps, wearing an item of clothing that they haven't worn before. I actually really, really love that one because I'm very guilty of buying a lot of clothes that I think or a way that's something fancy, and then when it comes around, I always wear the same thing. And so I thought, um, I have to steal that one. Other people have mentioned prioritizing spending time in nature, having a certain number of days off a week of alcohol, messaging Friends, or a friend every day, just to make sure that you're keeping in touch with your social circle. Journaling, doing at least one push up a day, that's one of my additional ones, and so many more. And I think I say one push up a day, but a few people have said, I wanted to do a pull up, so I'm just going to try and do one a day. Rather than trying to set the goal of by the end of the week, I want to do ten. Just one a day. So I think that's what's been really valuable with these non negotiables so far is really just taking that time to assess, what is that we want to be doing consistently because of how that might make us feel in the long term, as well as getting that real hit of, oh yeah, I'm actually achieving something every single day, so you get that high in the short term. So I know we've all decided our own non negotiables. And the great thing is there's no right or wrong here. It's what works for you. You know yourself better than I do. You know where you could probably pick yourself a bit on productivity or quality of sleep or your diet or your exercise or whatever it is. So you get to pick, you get to choose, but I wanted to sort of take a little bit of a step back and talk about the bigger picture of why having non negotiables. Why this particular habit is beneficial. And I wanted to share with you a little bit of the psychology. An actual fact before I do that, I'm going to say something else. You might have noticed if you are in the Facebook group that actually the 12 habits project that we are doing together, I hasten to add, got picked up by the doctors by doctors TV in the U.S.. So this is a television show produced by Dr. Phil. And they heard about the project and asked me to go on and talk about it. So I did put a link on my Instagram. I'll put one in the Facebook group. But that was just so thrilling. They said, we really like this idea. We really like the idea of taking failure out of habits. And I went on and I suppose for, I don't know, 6 minutes, I guess. Had a lovely chat about what we're doing. Why I started with meditation. So that's curious. If you're curious about that, then please do go to the show notes. I'll put the link in the show notes as well. Because it was so flattering to have them ask to chat to me about it, because I'm really enjoying the habits and from the feedback I'm getting from you, my most excellent listeners. It would seem that you are too, which is incredibly pleasing. So like I said, in this episode, I wanted to take a step back and talk a little bit about the psychology really, of why having non negotiables is such a good practice. So firstly, there's the fact that we've just discussed that we're choosing them for ourselves. It's not me prescribing the things you should do. And I hope that doesn't come across as me being hands off. But I do see things on social media with influencers and gurus and what have you sort of saying, do this thing with me. And I kind of give you the credit to be able to not need me to hold your hand. We're doing this together, but I feel like you can make those decisions for yourself, like we're all grown ups here. And so that's one of the things. So it's taking this time to really reflect and consider the things we'd like to make time for, like to include in our lives. But for some reason, they get pushed to tomorrow's to do list or they just get put to the back of the shelf or however you want to describe it. They just don't really come to the front, even though we know that if they were part of our lives every day, they would make us feel good. So that's the first thing is this taking the time to reflect and consider and really think about what this will mean today, but what this will also mean in the long term if we practice this regularly. So these non negotiables also constitute having a routine. Doing things every single day. And routines are proven to be beneficial for health and wellness. So having these sorts of non negotiables in place can help with all sorts of lifestyle habits and considerations.

Facebook Dr. Phil U.S.
A highlight from Gemma Newman, MD On Optimizing Hormone Health

The Rich Roll Podcast

00:47 sec | Last week

A highlight from Gemma Newman, MD On Optimizing Hormone Health

"The science that explains why it works. More on Gemma and the conversation to come in a bit, but first. We are brought to you today by native. As they say, the road gets narrower. In my case, I've had to ditch the drugs and the booze. Then I ditched the animal products, and the more I grow, the less tolerant, I become of some of my old behavior patterns. Then they're single use plastic. That's got to go too. You know what else has no place in your life? Major brand over the counter deodorant, you've been lathering on for decades without a second thought. Why does it have to go? Because these deodorant brands are chockablock with toxic chemicals like aluminum and parabens. Instead, it's time for native.

Gemma
A highlight from Is anxiety good for you? Dr Tracy Dennis-Tiwary explains...

The Emma Guns Show

04:21 min | Last week

A highlight from Is anxiety good for you? Dr Tracy Dennis-Tiwary explains...

"It's all here, welcome to the show. Joining me on the podcast is doctor Tracy Dennis tiwari a clinical psychologist and neuroscientist who is reframing the way we think about anxiety. Anxiety is no joke. Let's face it, it's sucks. And if you've ever had a panic attack, you will know how debilitating this heightened state can feel. We have so much vocabulary to describe these feelings of unease. When you really think about it, there are so many words out there. So everything from feeling unsettled to being overwhelmed or one might describe themselves as feeling a bit out of sorts, to get them much darker sense of dread. Then we might say that we're feeling worried about something and that worry might be ongoing. And we also might be able to say, I feel agitated about this situation. So we have so many different words, but for a long time, it was very much a blanket term that we used to describe all of these things. And that's probably stress. So I, for example, was definitely an anxious child, but growing up in the 80s and 90s before it was understood as well as it is now. I was labeled as sensitive or delicate, because labeling an 8 year old is stressed would have seemed pretty ludicrous considering stress is something that only really affected adults. It was something that went hand in hand with modern life. And there wasn't really much advice other than get over it, get used to it, or let it go. And so it struck me that we've see sword from a world that was relatively unsympathetic to all ages, in fact, not just children, but to all ages, adults and children, to one that is so concerned with people having these feelings across a wide spectrum that the treatment in inverted commerce is to eradicate it, to make it go away. And what Tracy has observed in the work that she's done in the emotional regulation lab, which is her lab, is that despite wonderful cognitive behavioral therapy treatments, medications for people who need them. Science back wellness practices, great self help books, growing awareness and, as mentioned, a huge destigmatization. Levels of anxiety disorders are actually on the rise. So despite there being more help available, more ways of describing it, more ways of identifying it, our anxiety was worse, which for a clinical psychologist neuroscientist seemed somewhat bonkers. So during our conversation, Tracy explains why tweeting anxiety really treating it might mean reframing it to stop seeing it as something we dull, numb and remove and lean into it and all the good things it can actually lead to. And yes, you might be listening to this and if you're struggling with anxiety, you might be thinking there is nothing good that comes from anxiety, but I encourage you to hear Tracy out. Because anxiety isn't a malfunction, it's a biological response, and it's a biological response for a reason. And it's actually a very intelligent system. It's your body preparing itself to perform at peak. So the best treatment, the best practice, is to make anxiety your ally instead of your enemy. And that's also consider this. If you remove anxiety, if you eradicate all those feelings that aren't so great, what are you left with? Because to feel good, you need to know how to feel badly. So this conversation is packed full of traces insights from years of research, as well as an extremely relevant Star Wars reference and the tools she recommends to begin harnessing anxiety for good. And I also talk to her about my previous techniques for doing live TV, which involved making myself a stressed as possible with not eating, having a lot of caffeine and really getting excited before I went on air. We discussed whether that was really a great tactic. Tracy and I recorded this call via Zoom. Tracy was at her home in New York and you will hear her dog bark a couple of times. So please don't be shocked or distracted when you hear a random wolf during the call. I am so glad I was able to speak to Tracy. And I learned so much more conversation and also her book future tense, which packs everything we discuss and more into an incredibly easy and engaging read. I taught through my copy. I couldn't get enough of it so well done. So if you like this show, if you like this conversation or you're inclined to learn more and hear more about the work that she's done, then I highly recommend you pick up the book at your first opportunity and it goes without saying, I hope that the link to find that book and buy that book is in the show notes. So here it is. I'm delighted, Tracy is joining me in this episode. And I hope you find this conversation extremely helpful. Here she is, the brilliant doctor Tracy Dennis tawari on the Emma gun show. A very warm welcome

Tracy Dennis Tiwari Tracy Anxiety Disorders New York Tracy Dennis Tawari
A highlight from MASTER These Laws To Achieve POWER & SUCCESS In Life (Change Everything In 2022) | Robert Greene

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

05:34 min | Last week

A highlight from MASTER These Laws To Achieve POWER & SUCCESS In Life (Change Everything In 2022) | Robert Greene

"If we saw completely into ourselves, we would hate ourselves so thoroughly, we wouldn't get out of bed we'd all be killing ourselves. You do need a degree of illusion. You do need to agree of self esteem and confidence, right? As people navigate the modern world as they try to make their way through something like that, what are the tools and approaches that you recommend to people? Well, it's kind of what the subject sort of what the daily laws is about. There's two things. So the source of your power in life is your attitude towards the world. And in human nature, kind of describe what I believe in attitude is. It's your land it's your way of looking at the world. Everybody's lens is different. You're not seeing things exactly as they are. You've seen them filtered through how you look at them. Some people are so important. Some people are optimistic and adventurous. Some people are anxious and closed. And you could put two people in the same circumstances visiting the same place, the pessimistic anxious person will find it unpleasant people are rude. I don't like it. The adventurous exploring type will find this circumstance is very exciting, but it's the same thing. It's just your judging in a different way. So the lens that you want, you want a lens that clarifies things. You want to lend that's realistic. Does you're trying to see things as they are, right? It's good to be excited, but sometimes if you're too excited and too adventurous, you're going to walk right up to that Tiger and they're going to eat you alive. Sometimes you have to be a little bit wary of things. You have to see your circumstances for what they are. In military terms they call it situational awareness. Your very aware, crystal clear about who you are about who other people are, but what the world is like. So that's the attitude that you want to craft for yourself in this world. And it's very difficult, as you've been saying very eloquently, the cards are stacked against you. A because of how we're wired, you know, our brains develop 200,000 years ago. And circumstances that certainly aren't the way things are now. So there's kind of a gap there between how we're wired to think. And what's going on in the 21st century and B, we're dealing with technology that's making things harder. So your goal in life is to become more realistic, to be able to step back and look at things as they are, and how do you get there? Is the question. So first you have to see that as your goal and it has to be important to you, it has to be something that you want. And it's not just something that's cold and dry and scientific. It really fast, why is that the right goal? Why is that the right goal? Yeah, to see, I agree with you. I just want to see how you explain it to people. Why it matters to see the world the way that it actually is. Well, okay, imagine it this way, so there's yourself everything begins with you, right? You're filled with all kinds of illusions about who you are about what you're good at, what you're bad at, what your weaknesses are, what your strengths are. If you're able to see inside of yourself with a degree of realism, you'll be able to understand, this is what I was destined to be in life. This is what I call my life's task. This is the career that fits me that suits me. So if you're able to have that realism, when you're 22 years old, you're not going to suddenly go off on this wrong career path that's going to make you miserable make you an alcoholic by the time you're 30, you're going to have a degree of direction in life. It's incredibly liberating. It's incredibly powerful to be able to see inside of yourself and know what you were destined for and what makes you you. Other people, other people wear masks, they smile, but their smile doesn't mean anything. There are toxic people out there. It's not everyone I don't mean to make you paranoid. Maybe there's like 5% of the world is truly toxic. Every single human being I can guarantee you has had to deal with these toxic people in a way that's painful. And you don't see them, you know, they're very tricky. These are people who've learned to disguise themselves. You're going to get sucked into all these dramas and traumas with these people. It can make your life miserable. Imagine that you had a realistic attitude and you could see through these people, you could catch before you get involved with them, signs of that they might be one of these types. Another thing that's incredibly liberating. The world that you live in, there's a zeitgeist, there's a spirit of the times they're trends. There's things that are going on right now in your career in the world at large. And we're fed with so much bullshit in the media. We have no idea what's really going on. The ability to see, this is where the world headed is headed. This is where business will be in two years. This is where things are going to be. This is the trends. The power. So the power to see inside your cell, the power inside you see other people to see the world, you know, your supermen if you can do that. If you can have a degree of that, the world is at your feet basically. So, you know, I don't think there's any counter argument to that. You don't want that kind of realism. And it's not this ugly thing. It's incredibly sexy because it's incredibly powerful, right? So we've now come to the point you and I agree that that's what you want. The person out there is going, yeah, I want that as well. Okay, Robert, that's fine. How do I get there? Aha. Well,

Robert
A highlight from Dr. Art Kleinschmidt

Dr. Drew Podcast

07:39 min | Last week

A highlight from Dr. Art Kleinschmidt

"You can call into that show via Clubhouse, and you can be on the restream there in the chat, and I'll see you. We tend to do a lot of interactive stuff there. All right, today it's my friend art Klein Schmidt, the organization is recovery for America, recovery for America. Are you doctor Yang? Well, I am. Doctor Klein. Was a senior adviser at domestic policy council, also senior adviser White House office of national drug control policy with that translate into is that he was the assistant drug czar. It was right under the drug czar and I thought he was going to move into that position and unfortunately that didn't happen. And it would have been an amazing thing. Had you done so art himself is sober for on the order of 20 years. And we'll talk about that. Welcome. Hey, Dr. Drew, happy to be here. First thing to talk about is recovery for America. Which I'm on the board of, I'm full fully involved with you and your wonderful wife, who is one of the most successful drug court judges that I've ever come across. This is something you guys set up. Tell us about it. Well, it is. My wife and I are both in recovery, but so this is a passion project that we made together. We have an excellent board. We have yourself. We have Randy Grimes. We have other people that served in high levels of the presidential administration as well. We have corporate people. And Randy Grimes, you just interviewed the other week. I did. He's a really interesting dude. He had a hell of a story. Yeah, he does. Yeah, he does. So we're very happy to have them on board. We have a Camille Shire, a former Miss America as well. I'm very excited about her work. She's a great addiction advocate out there. So yeah, really well. So it's a passion project that we tried to bypass a lot of the hurdles and obstacles from one person in need to actually get themselves to treatment. So we're trying to work and build treatment scholarships for those in need. And so would it be something where a family is searching for treatment for a loved one and you'd come to recovery for America and apply? How would that work? Well, we're going to actually, we're going to, well, exactly. I got a case that already sort of happened. A lady contacted me, a good friend of my sister. And their nephew needed help. And right now he's on Medicaid. So we're working to get him into treatment. Do we have certain centers we're working with? Yeah, right now we do have certain centers. So we're not going to give the money to the client or that. We're going to work with the center to get the guy on board into treatment. And as the plan to have regional centers all over the place and it is, we're trying to go to go nationwide with this. Do we have specific centers right now? We do. We have a couple that we're working with. That's why we have Randy on our board as well. And then I got contacts in the treatment world. I know quite a few interventionists are actually sober people that went through the treatment center that I worked that are out there getting people into treatment as well. So if you need an interventionist, we're going to provide that too. Well, I don't know if we can provide that, but they could actually we're going to refer that. Yeah, yeah. Like assists forget somebody from point a to point B is actually sort of the thing. And what we're trying to do is bike pass a lot of the obstacles that are actually in place right now and try to get right to the people and get them the treatment that they need. Yes, so many of the obstacles in this state and I suspect not so much in New York but there too. The laws prevent you from doing anything. You can't go from point a to point B you're breaking the law. If you try to help somebody. It's crazy. Well, that's kind of where the stuff that I'm trying to overcome right now. It's trying to get people from that and try to bypass a lot of the unnecessary barriers that are in place. Oh my God. Yeah, they really are. Yeah, it's almost sort of profound. They talk about the people need treatment. They need help, but then all of a sudden then they're actually making it so complicated to get somebody there. Like when I was in the federal government, you know, I was trying to pitch the IMD exclusion to talk about that. Well, when you look at you look at Medicaid and Medicare, it's within a they call it CMS. The center for Medicaid and Medicare. But when you look like at a Medicaid for to get somebody into substance abuse treatment, every state has a different system and then they have certain waivers that they do. And then if you're looking within the CMS system, it's almost like a foreign language unto itself. Yes. And so I was telling people, it's almost ludicrous to think somebody with a mental health disorder. Handle this. Yeah, yeah. It's not going to happen. So I have the exclusion came from the early days of the Medicare policy. I think it was under president Johnson that he exclusion in place. I thought Nixon, maybe it was Johnson, I don't know. It could have been Johnson. But way back in the 60s. So it couldn't have been Nixon yet. Though Nixon, I'm sure had he supported it, I guess. Yeah, I'm sure. But the bottom line is that Medicare for whatever weird reason would not support institutions for mental disorders. IMD. IMD was excluded from Medicare coverage, which is insane. And the reason that I understand that they did that is that this constitution specifically, and this has been discussed since president pierce. The constitution specifically doesn't allow for treatment of mental illness and therefore the states have to pick that up. And unfortunately, that was the state hospital system that was so vilified by the post structuralist who are now in charge of everything. Guys like Foucault felt that there was no such thing as mental illness that it was caused by institutions, which could not be more fucking wrong. Then we had the national student mental health with the three first directors the national mental health had a similar outlook and none of them had ever treated mental illness. And so it's just, of course, things got completely dismantled and screwed up. And now we're still living in a time when people with serious mental illness can't get care. No. And if you look at him, I think there's statistics for a little bit fudge. I believe most of them have. You look at the homeless here. That's going to be very complicated patient to treat, right? You know what I mean? And the longer they stay out there, the longer they use, the worse they get. Yeah, but you first have to understand that they're using to say that they're opiates in math are just rampant on the streets. Right. And then the people want to sit around and talk about what you'd use too if you're on the streets. I don't give a shit. We have to weed out have a drug problem. We have to treat that. I don't care how it happened. We have to treat it. You know what I mean? Right. Because they're doing it because they're on the streets, therefore, if you put them in a house, the drug addiction will go away. No. It doesn't matter why you're doing drugs. Now you have drug addiction. Now that needs to be treated. Period. Definitely. I mean, I equate this with some people to try to understand a little bit, even if they're not homeless, but like when I worked at I worked at a long term treatment center for very seriously multiple overdose sort of clients and stuff. So we had like a continuum of care there. But if they could one of them was like graduating, say, from treatment, they could get a parent to give them or especially with divorce parents, one or more to be the nice guy and get them an apartment and not make them go to the sober house to recovery house. We almost always always had like a new crack house in the neighborhood. A new shooting gallery in the neighborhood that you actually have to go and intervene on.

Randy Grimes America Klein Schmidt Doctor Klein Domestic Policy Council White House Office Of National Camille Shire IMD Dr. Drew Nixon Medicaid And Medicare Center For Medicaid And Medica Miss America Yang President Pierce Medicare Randy Johnson President Johnson Federal Government
A highlight from Bonus: Producers' Chat On Season 1 of Bel-Air

Therapy for Black Girls

04:27 min | Last week

A highlight from Bonus: Producers' Chat On Season 1 of Bel-Air

"All right, so the prediction team is back in full effect for our second part of what we're watching Bel Air. So the season one finale wrapped up a couple of weeks ago. So we thought it was fitting to come back and talk about what we watched, how the season progressed after we recap those first couple of episodes and to talk a little bit about what we're hoping to see in season two. So Frida, if you would start by telling us what were your thoughts about the remainder of the season. When I tell y'all, I hooped and hollered when I saw Marlon Wayans as the daddy. I love Marla Wayans. I love the way his family. And so anytime I get to watch them do their thing, it makes me so happy. And then to see Marlon in such a dramatic role, it was great. That was probably one of my favorite things from the final episode. Yeah, that's really interesting because the season finale came. There was some talk about like, oh, y'all are gonna be really surprised about who the dad is. And I thought that they were gonna bring Will Smith bag. I thought like, oh, I wonder if will is gonna be like the dead? So I was also very pleasantly surprised to see Marlon and after watching it read something about the fact that a lot of that scene between him and jabari was not scripted. So they were just like playing off of one another and ad libbing, which made it an even more impactful scene, I think. That was a great surprise. I went back and forth between whether or not I liked the situation where Jeffrey kind of got fired because he gave will the information. Jeffrey overstepped definitely, but at the same time, I think he had care and investment in will and also we learned that Jeffrey is separated from his son. And so he will have that connection, but I was really shocked that it came to a head like that and Jeffrey just poof he was gone. I hope to see him back in the second season because I really enjoyed his character and I still think there's not some underlying tension but a backstory between him and uncle Phil that has yet to be uncovered so hopefully we get that in season two as well. I completely agree. So that was one of the biggest disappointments for me is that Jeffrey was all of a sudden gone because he was definitely a highlight of the show for me and I agree with you at least I do think that there's still more to the dynamic between him and uncle field that they didn't really get into. And I think now that we have seen that the kids know that he was basically fired, I think what we're going to see hopefully fingers crossed is the kids putting pressure on uncle field to bring Jeffrey Beck, right? Because in a lot of ways, Jeffrey was very involved in their lives. And so I'm thinking what we're going to see is the kids putting a lot of pressure on him to bring Jeffrey bag. I thought what Jeffree said to uncle Phil about his aspirations being so big that they could shatter the family. I just feel like now that uncle Phil has quit the race, he should go ahead, call Jeffrey up and say, listen, my guy, I was tripping, you was tripping. We were stripping together. And I feel like he took his advice. I feel like Jeffree was a very sobering reality like, dude, I'm partially taking care of your family. That's an interesting thing for another man to say to another man because you have these huge aspirations. Are you going to let these aspirations that never end continue to be your main focus? I was so surprised when he dropped out of the race. I was so surprised. Yeah, I know in our first conversation together when we watched the first couple of episodes, that's a part of what we were talking about being interested in seeing how it would progress. The relationship between bib and uncle feel and how their career aspirations, what either, you know, maybe bringing them closer together or drive them further apart. When I was also very shocked. So what do you all make of the fact that he did drop out of the race? It's TV. So of course we got the last minute drama. I could see from uncle Phil's perspective, my wife wants to do this fellowship. That's really demanding. I now know if I go further into this race, it could affect will, which, you know, is going to affect his entire family. I thought it was a really noble thing to do. It was kind of strange that he endorsed his opponent just because I know they had beef, so I'm interested to see how that plays out, but I definitely thought it was a really noble thing to do.

Jeffrey Marla Wayans Marlon Jeffree Marlon Wayans Phil Frida Jabari Jeffrey Beck Jeffrey Bag Smith
A highlight from 3 Common Keto Mistakes & How to Avoid Them

Ask The Health Expert

01:30 min | Last week

A highlight from 3 Common Keto Mistakes & How to Avoid Them

"Hey, this is JJ virgin. Thanks so much for joining me. This is ask the health expert. In each episode, I put the power of health in your hands and share ways to get healthy, lose weight, heal your gut detox and lots more so you can look and feel better fast. If you'd rather watch the video, hey, I did put on my makeup and do my hair, so check it out on my YouTube channel. All the rage these days, and you want to know why, because when it's done right, it can really work well. It can help you get healthier, feel better, and lose weight. But to get the most out of it, you have to make sure you're doing it right. And that means you have to avoid the three most common mistakes I see people make. My videos are all about the things you can do to get and stay healthy and heal your metabolism, which is the first step in losing weight. So if you want more like this, click like and subscribe. So keto is a popular diet approach, and it can do so much for your health and weight. But it's really easy to fall in the trap of the three common mistakes that will work against you. Be bad for your health and could even make you gain weight. Avoiding these landmines is easy if you know what to look out for. First, a quick history lesson. Everyone keeps talking about keto as if it just happened, but keto isn't exactly new.

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