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Listen to the latest on healthy living tips, the importance of keeping fit and how to manage the lifestyle you want, from audio aired on leading podcasts.

Using Nature and Animals to Manage Anxiety

The Psych Central Show

7:03 listening | 5 d ago

Using Nature and Animals to Manage Anxiety

"Richard. It's great to have you. A lot has been talked about the connection between mental health and nature mental health and animals. And I kind of want to start off in this place. I'm a big fan of social media loved or hated. It's probably here to stay and one of the things that I often see on social. Media's this meam that says the best antidepressant is a walk in nature and I know that you don't feel that nature replaces medical science. But you do feel that a walk in nature has real real support and real help for people who are suffering from depression. Can you talk about that for a moment? And that's new. When I wrote last child in the Woods College in two thousand five. This was ignored the impact of the natural world on human wellbeing on on health on cognitive functioning all of that pitted been in basically ignored and I could find maybe sixty studies because many of them were about the growing disconnect between children and they're for adults to and nature and some of the some of those studies dealt with the benefits and some of those studies with mental health and physical health. That is a drop in the bucket. Compared to how much money is spent researching just about everything else and it struck me that something. So large as the impact of the natural world experience on human health and wellbeing have been ignored. How could that be and as I looked into it? I was working with some neuro scientists. Them they were studying brain architecture development and young children and they were looking at all kinds of things and how that affected brain architecture development everything from parent child attachment to add daycare too dangerous neighborhoods in all of that and those things they were. Aim literally shapes the brain. You Early Childhood and I asked them on. Have you ever thought about how the natural world helped shape the brain young children experiences actual contact with the natural world? And they look at you with a blank face and they said what's nature and I understand that that science has difficult time defining nature. But you know I said to the neuroscientist. This isn't rocket science or and it isn't brain surgery. Come up with a hypothesis and tested hundred. Twenty trees pray or whatever. They still had trouble so I decided that was one of the reasons why this was so under. Studied is the blind spot in science about nature the rest of nature which we are part the second reason. Where does the research money come from? What till can you manufacturer? What thing can you commercialize out of that? Now there are some things I mean parks and outdoor hiking organizations things like that. There are some but for the most part people don't think about cert- certainly funders. Don't think about this as something that they can get something out of by funding. That's changing today. If you go to the chill nature network which you mentioned your introduction. We have a research library here that we built and it is for anybody in the world is free. And there are now probably. It's just tipped over one thousand studies. We have abstracts for him links to the original studies when they're available so it's gone from about sixty two over a thousand in about fourteen years after not existing before. I think that it's interesting. That one of the things you said and this really plays to the pessimist in me is. We don't want to tell people to go for walks because there's no funding for it and you can't make money it you know. We can't prescribe one. Walk a day or hug your dog every day that that's not something that you can fill at the pharmacy and this is kind of cancer. Balanced against the medication is important. Look at the advances that we've made with cancer by coming up with better treatments etc but I would even argue that taking somebody who is suffering from cancer and completely isolating them taking away their friends their support systems their animals and even a window would put them in more of a bad way than they already are. And I think that's what you're saying and you've talked about in your work. How animal assisted therapy is becoming one of the biggest healthcare trends and I don't think that's a bad thing but you also talk about the controversy surrounding it and then you back it up with science. Can you talk about animal? Assisted therapy for a moment. Because I I just find it absolutely fascinating. That people wouldn't respond to this favorably but I also understand that this is our culture. Everything is good and everything is bad seemingly at the same time I think it's more nuance than that. I think that most people understand that their dog helps them. You know most people get get it at this level and in terms of organized animals therapy whether it's dogs or or wine therapy with horses or going outside and connecting with wild animals. No matter what that is people necessarily understand that it's the science is coming now and the science is really interesting though that some of it is controversial but nobody. His watched a kid with disabilities in an equine therapy. A Horse therapy course assisted therapy. Setting cannot be not moved. It's very moving to watch this. One person who works in this field told me that her mother was bringing her child who is autistic to animal assisted therapy sessions which involved horses and he would ride horses with a helmet and somebody would lead the horse and he was. I think about nine years old and he had not talked ever and one day when they didn't go when they were supposed to to the horse. Therapy Her son walked into the living room and said there were horse. First Time she had heard him say a word so there are moving stories like that I talk about a woman another woman who is on the autism spectrum and she tells quite a moving story about not only how her service whose name is Cobo has her but how she has learned to help Cobo using some of the same techniques to Kobo. Us to help her so often. What is occurring is a kind of mutual. Azam is not one way. I don't want it to be seen as just what we get out of our relationship with other animals my promote something in the book called the reciprocity principle which basically holds it for every bit a healing that they give us hamels whether they are domestic or wild animals. Give us we need to give back to them. The same we need to protect them as they protect us.

Richard. It Cobo Woods College Azam Hamels Kobo
Going All In on Sleep Hygiene

Forever35

9:05 listening | 5 d ago

Going All In on Sleep Hygiene

"I love what you wrote here you do in our in our little prep document. He said okay. Gone all in on my sleep hygiene. Those words are music to my ears. Well you know I wrote this document before I went to bed last night and then last night was just in party with Mehan insomnia just a sexy dance between the two of us but it was okay. I figured it out I worked through it. I would say insomnia is probably not the maybe it is the right term but just I had a really hard time falling asleep. I could not do it last night. I did all my little things that I try but then finally I've mentioned this on a recent episode of here for you but I got mentioned again. A listener recommended something called good day. Chocolate sleep supplement candy coated pieces with one milligram of Melatonin per piece. Now got some in a grocery order. I should tell you Dorie yes I ordered it. I had done like a whole foods pickup order. Okay and I put this on my list thinking it'd be like a big bottle of vitamins. It is eight pieces of. Oh my gosh. It's so tiny. It's literally like the size of an a little cardboard box the size of an eraser that you get an elementary school. It's a very small. Wow or eight pieces of chocolate and I've already had two of them last night. So like you now loops and I just dropped. What on my desk so just FYI. I I don't know I need to do a little more research on if I can acquire more but they are basically giant chocolate eminem like candies that have Melatonin in them and at one thirty last night I took to them and that did help me transition into sleeping. Okay do you know. Do you know why you weren't able to fall asleep last night. Okay as I confessed to. You already pre recording. I was doing the thing where a looked at my phone late. Yeah and I regret it. I deeply regret it. So let me let me. May I fill listeners? In on kind of just what? I'm Lee the steps. I am taking s please. I would like nothing. So our we've talked about sleep hygiene a lot on forever thirty five and I have always found it to be a struggle and I've had sleep issues in the past and they go hand in hand with my anxiety so i. It's pretty clear to me that this is pandemic related. Yes omnia and stress like I know what it is and I do feel very fortunate that like while I do have to wake up and work and take care of my family. It's not like I have to wake up and be at an office eight o'clock so because when I used to get this kind of sleep. Insomniac used to be at work at eight and it would be this kind of like all night panic about it So so that is. That is very lucky for me. I feel like right now. That is that does help. But I'm trying to figure out ways in which to not Trigger this kind of bedtime sleeping Zayed's so the one thing I need to do that I think really helps get off my phone about an hour before I plan on falling asleep. Okay and that is hard for me because like when I go to wash my face a bring my phone okay. Do you do this studio the no? I put my phone away before I start my whole bedtime routine brain. It's like I want be looking at facebook while I'm washing my face. That's what I do. Here's what I do and like you. Can you're welcome to do or not do this? I don't care if I'm if I'm doing something in the living room like say watching TV. I will finish watching TV. I'll take one last look at my phone. And then I'll plug my phone in the kitchen and then like I'm done with the phone for the night. Ooh And I go into my bedroom. I change into my pajamas or maybe. I'm already in my pajamas. I do my whole you know. Wash my face put on my serums my lotions. I brush my teeth floss etc. Do Yoga Toes. I write in my journal I'll usually read kindle for a little bit Last night I was on my ipad looking for something but I will talk about in a little bit but I try and I try to stay off my ipad because then I get then. It's tempting to look at news websites and I don't want to be doing that and then I usually get so tired. I often fall asleep while reading. Yeah that's amazing like lights on kindle in hand and then I like jerk. Oh Okay and then. I'll put the kindle away turn up late and like really go to sleep. I feel like that's how you know that you hit Middle Age because I do that too and I feel like I would watch my parents do that and be like they are so weird though kick in their bedroom and they both leap with the lights on with books on their totally but like now we're there and it feels good and like you get why you just Kinda like close your eyes mid book. Yes I I've had that experience in my better sleep days and I and I I really admire that. You are so consistent with that that and not the just that it works but that like you. So much of it is forming the habit. And you've done that and you've done that as long as this podcast has been in existence even before you know well. Yeah I mean as discussed on this podcast. I have had to be consistent because of my sleep disorder and even though I still get night terrors. Having a consistent sleep routine does help. So did you talk to anyone. Like did someone guide you through figuring out asleep routine in terms of dealing with your sleep disorder or is this something. There's a lot of articles about it that I consulted. It's also partly why and Matt Matt and I are at odds about this. I like to have my bedroom be cave like I like it pitch dark preferably like blackout curtains. No late getting in quiet as to WHO and he likes to like. He likes to wake up with Natural Light. Which means that there's late seepage. All the time and I so yeah so so that's been that's often been a source of conflict but lake ultimately. I think the person with a sleep disorder wins out a man But yeah like some of the like I've talked about this before but like going to sleep at a consistent time every night is also very important. Yeah Yeah having that wind down period is important earplugs. I mask like do earplugs at night. I do okay okay. Do you have a certain brand of that? You like or is it just kind of like a generic drug store earplug. It's a generic drugstore earplug. I believe the one I have right now are from walgreens great shoutout to Walgreens shout to Walgreens I so I don't know I like a very loud white noise eight. Yes yes and I love the variety of white noise. Machines have cranking up all over my house. I have been finding Melatonin to be very useful and as well as reading and journaling at night. That does really kind of helped me wind down. It's the transition from phone to non phone that has been really hard and maybe I need to move my phone out of the bedroom completely. I've been leaving it on my desk. Which is in my bedroom and as you mentioned you like when we were talking about this previously I think work needs to be kept out of the bedroom but right now. My workspace is literally twenty four inches from my bed. That's very hard right now. I'm sitting at my desk and I can reach behind me and touch my bed. So that is. That is a little tricky. Like I will look at my computer and I'll think of something I haven't done for the podcast and I'll be like oh just do this one flip it. Oh men and do it. So so. That's that's hard for me to. I need to kind of start figuring that out but I will say I have been wearing an eye mask a lot more in not only is it helpful and filtering the light. There's something about the pressure of it. That is comforting. You do you experience that like the jazz header. Caress of an eye pillow against my face. I'm finding very soothing. That's very

Melatonin Insomnia Walgreens Facebook Dorie Insomniac Matt Matt Zayed LEE
Coronavirus: What You Need To Know

COVID-19: What You Need to Know

4:42 listening | 6 d ago

Coronavirus: What You Need To Know

"As each state has now taken at least a step toward easing restrictions meant to contain the corona virus. We're getting a clearer. Picture of communities have been most affected. It's lower income communities and communities of color particularly in New York City where twenty seven percent of people in those neighborhoods tested positive for coronavirus. Antibodies compared to nineteen percent of the general citywide population. The spread is continuing in those communities. And that's where the new cases are coming. Andrew Cuomo said today. The gap is even wider in certain parts of the Bronx and Brooklyn where more than forty percent of. The people have the antibodies. That's where the cases coming from. That's where the new hospitalizations coming from. That's going into the hospital system. That's where you're going to see the highest number of deaths. He said the state would begin. A public health education campaign in housing projects and distribute masks and hand sanitizer getting the P. p. e. into the community getting the hand sanitizer into the community explaining social distancing. And why that's so important and explain how this virus spreads its public health education effort to those who live in public housing. This is overdue. The density makes social distancing difficult and leaves tenants vulnerable this week. Abc News is offering special coverage of the disproportionate impact of Corona virus on Black Hispanic and indigenous Americans in a series called a nation divided. Ju- Brown joins US FROM JOURNEY FOR JUSTICE ALLIANCE IN CHICAGO. Why is this virus hitting communities of color so hard you know Cova crisis just unveils? Horrible practice that we've experienced really for decades in this country which has been the sabotage of our basic quality of life institutions food production delivery systems health care education housing economic development So those things that many Americans take for granted. We often have to fight and scratch for so. This crisis really exposes our country's lack of willingness to address these issues. How does that play where you are in Chicago? Going to pandemic really a hit. We started seek death with around the country is Chicago today. Early thirty percent of the population we would seventy percent of the deaths and while this is happening Many of our hospitals were on the brink of closing such as Mercy Hospital. We've already lost. Michael Reese Hospital in virtually every other hospital in the black community has been starved to the point of really minimum capacity but at me when the pandemic hit many of our people who have pre existing conditions. We go to the hospital with sent back home right. I HAVE FAMILY FAMILY MEMBER. Who would sit back home from the Emergency Room? Three times and died. What's causing these gaps and disparities? Will you know This African proverb that says the truth. The simple complicated is a lot and I think at some point. We have to realize that America has never dealt with her ugly which is a baseless hatred for Black Brown indigenous families. It's to tional. Racism is the reason institutional. Racism is at play so people going to say that black people get Kobe because we are not listening right while ignoring a white families that are storming the state capital in Michigan or doing protest all over the country. And they're not social distancing we are getting covert because we don't have health we are getting covert because we're going to the high school in sending us home and so I think at the federal level and at the local level what we must have from people is the first thing humility understanding that you not better than at mother who's a high school graduate who works at Walmart that that mother is working just as hard as you to make the future for her baby. Do you think the clamor for reopening would be different if it weren't communities of color that are now the source of the most new cove infections. I definitely believe that's that's a major part of it at once. People realize that is Black Brown indigenous folks. That are getting sick. They're getting sick. The most sensitive importance has gone down a great deal. We had a very critical moment. Where we see America's response to life or death leads has not changed so institutionalized level loveless nece is alive and well and we but we have a moment an opportunity to change it t- to Brown of journey for Justice Alliance in

Michael Reese Hospital Chicago Ju- Brown Justice Alliance America New York City Andrew Cuomo Mercy Hospital Abc News Brooklyn Cova Walmart Kobe P. P. Michigan
Staying Connected While Apart & Other Good Tips

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

3:41 listening | Last week

Staying Connected While Apart & Other Good Tips

"GONNA talk today about how to stay connected when we can't be together physically. Which is a great topic right now but it's a good topic even past pandemic. Let's hope so. I know from people that have reached out to me. It seems like a lot of their loved. Ones are declining faster because of their routines being up ended and lack of stimulation from different people. Which I think has been a surprise so I don't know if you have any. Any suggestions are thoughts for them but we can talk and then maybe some little pop into your head okay. Alrighty so what kind of ideas do you have for helping people stay connected when we're physically distant? Well I mean first of all The amount of routine that either been kept in place or has gone by the wayside Depend a lot on the environment that they're in I know in home environments. You might think it's to keep people in their regular environment in their regular routine. But not so much. Because we're all Highness swimming in uncharted waters right now. I know Pretty much across the board most of the care communities or following state health department guidelines. And so they are close to visitors. Right now is difficult but what we need to keep in mind is of course. Everybody is their own on their own. Journey would dementia Because some people might both be in the first or second stage of dementia doesn't mean that they have the same functionality in the same capabilities it nobody has the same two fingerprints so nobody experiences Dementia in the same way. So stop and think your loved. One is on their journey If they're just beginning if it's a it is a very early stage and or even a later stage but there are parts of their cognition that They've managed to hang onto factor. You need to factor in where. They are on their personal journey. So having said that I know that A lot of people have been doing the the window visit going up to the window and and doing visits like that Another way that we can stay in touch us to remember. You know that there's five senses and physical touch tactile. Touch is one of the five. So that leaves us eighty percent of our senses to play with So one of the things that Is a a real good way to be in touch and also Provide Comfort I can suggest maybe having a photo pillow or a photo blanket made for them There's the there is the tactile element there if you get a nice soft fluffy fabric can be very comforting Something to have something you know just to wrap themselves up in the one thing that we need to keep in mind if we're doing any sort of a photo project whether it and how boom or A pillow a blanket is that

Dementia
COVID-19: What You Need To Know

COVID-19: What You Need to Know

6:04 listening | Last week

COVID-19: What You Need To Know

"This is an ABC news special. Kobe nineteen what you need to know here is. Abc News correspondent. Aaron Katersky as this school year nears an end. Parents wonder about the start of the next academic year. We'll schools welcome kids back. What will the classroom look like or will there still be online? Learning the answers dependent part. On what the virus does to kids and how kids transmit the virus. The World Health Organization said over the weekend that children appear to be less capable of spreading corona virus than adults. The comment came from the. Who's chief scientist? Sumio Swaminathan who appeared on the BBC? What we have seen in countries where schools remained open is that they have not been big outbreaks in schools and where there have been seen associated with we defense. A lot of people gather not in regular classrooms and it's often been associated with Donald who's had infection and who spread it so it does seem from what we know now that children are less capable of spreading it even if they get infection and certainly are very low risk of getting from the Z's for more on what all of this may mean. We're joined by Dr Edith Bradshaw Sanchez. A pediatrician and professor of pediatrics. At Columbia University. What do you make of her comments here? I think some of the reports that we're seen in the comments that were seeing from the. Who are definitely reassuring. I just want more data so a number of things have gone into into these comments from what I understand and there are countries that have opened schools Germany Denmark Some parts of Canada in those countries are not seeing big outbreaks of covert nineteen in children linked to schools which is reassuring but we just need more data. These countries have also done a variety of things to keep kids safe in school Germany. For example we've rent reports that they are having children self test every four days and given a green sticker to kids test negative and allowing them to walk around the school without a mask on some schools are taking temperature. Some schools have introduced a variety of social distancing in hygiene techniques. So so when we look at this at these reports and we we look at the lack of outbreaks linked to children after they were allowed to go back to school. It is reassuring but we have to remember that there are measures that these countries have taken and that we don't have all of the information yet. Really the bottom line is can. My kids hug their grandparents. Yeah I think that's such an interesting point for a long time and longtime in the cove world is a few months for a long time. We've been thinking about children in terms of the risk that they pose to adults. We've been saying okay. Well my kid goes back to school. Can they? Then come home and bring me the corner virus or bring the current virus to to grandma and GRANDPA if they visit in now. Not only. Is it that that is very much too little consideration? But now we're starting to learn for example that there is a new rare but serious complication of covert nineteen seems to affect children very differently than an affects adults. And now I think that the conversation starting to switch to what is the risk to children themselves from Bo Bo from going back to school. What's the answer? I wish I had it but I just don't know we just don't know there are reports for example right there. There is a report of a child. I believe from England who was in the French Alps and then went home. Was In contact with seventy two people that child himself tested positive for current a virus. None of the seventy two people. He came into contact with tested positive. So that was reassuring but then we had another report of a six month old whose parents had couvert nineteen and the child had to be cared for in the hospital and so they were constantly testing this little baby six months old and he shut the virus at very high levels for sixteen days. The data so far has been mixed in. I think that's why it's so important that we collect more data in children and the NIH as you probably have heard launched a study at the beginning of May to follow two thousand families to try to answer this question. What exactly is the rate of transmission? What exactly is the risk to children because we just haven't been collecting the data yet. Pediatric Multi Symptom Inflammatory Syndrome. What do we make of that? Does it matter whether it specifically connected to cove it as the CDC seems to suggest that it is? I do believe that it is linked to covert nineteen. And I'll tell you why. This new syndrome seems to have some characteristics of Kawasaki disease but it also has some characteristics. Overlap toxic shock syndrome. And I'll explain very very briefly Kentucky Diseases and inflammatory condition. It is cost by inflammation and then the the blood vessels in the body are affected. Ultimately different organs can be affected. The one that we worry about is the heart children present with fever with the red. Is the rash The swollen hands feed swollen. Lymph nodes some of the same symptoms that we are now seeing in this new condition but the difference one of the many differences that we're still learning is that these children were presenting with the new syndrome also seemed to have some of those symptoms from toxic shock. They are very sick when they present to care. They sometimes have low blood pressures and signs that there multiple there's multiple organ systems that are affected. And that doesn't go with Kawasaki. Disease it also here before cove it so we can of spectacularly Why are they testing? Summer testing negative for the antibodies and the virus itself. And that is absolutely puzzling. But I think at the end of the day you just sort of have to take a step back and think okay well. Even if it's not linked terrific can't prove it yet for some of these kids remember them majority are testing positive. And where was this before cove

Abc News Germany Aaron Katersky ABC Kobe Dr Edith Bradshaw Sanchez Bo Bo Kawasaki Disease World Health Organization Sumio Swaminathan Professor Of Pediatrics Kawasaki BBC French Alps NIH Scientist Donald Trump Fever Columbia University
How COVID-19 Shines A Light On Our Broken Food System with Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

7:50 listening | Last week

How COVID-19 Shines A Light On Our Broken Food System with Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian

"We want to talk today about what seems to be unrelated to Cova Nineteen which is an infectious disease but it's diet and chronic disease and you wrote an article with the former secretary of agriculture. Dan Glickman that was posted on. Cnn entitled Can Diet Flatten the curve for covert nineteen and it's sort of like How does that even make sense? So we've heard all about these ideas of fighting. The curb was social dissing handwashing washing and contact tracing an isolation testing but your article presented a very different view about how we can use food and nutrition and specific nutrients to actually help us address. This pandemic so. Can you tell us why you wrote this article and why this is more important than ever to address these issues? Yeah I think markets really clear that that to those of US following this crisis that cove nineteen has really laid bare these incredible challenges. These incredible disparities is incredible unreasonable aspects of our food system. Are there so many ways that that covered nineteen influenced student? Nutrition and nutrition Kobe. Nineteen back up at at all. Just go through quickly and we can go about each of them so you know. One is immunity the actual immune response to Cova and then you actually the blunting of the excessive inflammatory response to cove. We can talk about nutrition and actually the immune response to is is hunger and food insecurity which of course 'cause incredible human suffering with this economic shutdown lost wages at schools being closed but also we know from long clinical experience malnourishment further predispose people to infection. So that's the site and that doesn't mean and that doesn't mean skinny and wasted away could be that your nutrient deficient which is really common in America. Absolutely absolutely. There's one call hidden hunger. People look like they're getting food but there's hidden hunger because they're not getting the right the right nutrients and what's paradoxical is the most obese are often the most nutrient deficient when you look at their numbers. Right it's kind of interesting. Yeah and then. These other aspects of Kobe crucial to to you know of just quickly mention our third. The incredible intersections supply chains and food. Waste and getting food to people we. We don't really have a national food system even global food system. We have this fractured supply chain. That's now becomes you know very very dire And then I think one of the one of the most important things for really thinking about covert long term. Because this is going to be with us for for some time. Many ears is the incredible relationship between for Metabolic Health Diabetes Hypertension Heart Disease Obesity and poor outcomes with Cova. The the latest analysis from New York which has had the most cases in in the United States showed that with each of those conditions diabetes hypertension of city. There is about two or three full higher risk two to three times higher risk of hospitals. And if you put those three things together lots of people have diabetes hypertension and obesity. There be sixteen fold higher risk of hospitalization. And so it's very it's very plausible. And we're modeling this now. It's very plausible. That you know. If we had a metabolic healthy population job it would be much much less severe. And so you know thinking about nutrition and immune response malnourishment and hunger and food insecurity disparities very high rates and african-americans very likely related to nutrition in a major way the challenges to food systems and supply chains food waste and then metabolic health. You know these are all things that that you and I and others who study food at about that that food nutrition or a dire challenge and an incredible opportunity to improve the health of the population but Kobe. Nineteenth really liked taking a you know a knife and slice down dessert that was hiding immediate objects and so you know if five years from now we're back to where we were a couple years ago and there's no improvement in our food system quality of the food the way we get it to people in science that we have to address questions. I would be just devastated. I would be so disappointed that we haven't realized the opportunity here to fix the food system. So filming in the straight. What you're saying is that if you have chronic diseases and multiple chronic diseases that your risk of being hospitalized sixteen times higher that if you're metabolical unhealthy more likely to get sick because your immune system isn't working and then only twelve percent of us are actually healthy so that means if we actually had a healthy population that was eating a diet that created metabolic health instead of the opposite. Which we're doing now that this may just be a bad flu and we wouldn't have full hospitals in a society that shutdown and trillions of dollars in economic losses. All the evidence supports that you know. Of course we can't do a randomized trial and wave a wand and make everybody know about healthy to test that but all the evidence suggests that you know as you said. I'm based on national data. Only twelve percent of adults in this country are metabolic Healthy that's just taking things like waste. Your Conference Blood Glucose blood pressure cholesterol. It just measure those things. Only twelve percent of adults or metabolic be healthy and most of those people in their twenties right. You haven't yet really had a lifetime of for die in for lifestyle. And so the vast vast majority of American adults over forty are metabolic late unhealthy and given these associations you know as I mentioned even just one of these risk factors. You're doubling or tripling the risk of hospitals ation and you start piling up together In terms of risk of death is in so few debts especially under age. Seventy unless there's at least one of these other conditions. Yeah and so. It's very plausible. That if we had a very healthy population you know. Instead of a twelve percent medically healthy. We had twelve percent metabolic the unhealthy. What if nine of were metaphor healthy then in nineteen would be a far far less severe disease? Many many fewer hospitalizations fewer deaths. We wouldn't be shutting down the economy we wouldn't have. These hospitals overloaded our healthcare providers but insulted dangerous petit and working chefs on an and. What's really important here is that we can actually fix this now in real time. And so you know. It doesn't take years and years and years to reverse diabetes or to reverse hypertension or Reverse for metabolic health. Yeah does take years and years to change. Wait for many people but metabolic health. Whatever your weight. We can pretty rapidly improving. Edibala cal over months sometimes even shorter. But so yeah so the country. In addition to the things that we're doing social distancing and testing we should be launching a national campaign to improve the way we move and eat to improve our metabolic health

Cova Dan Glickman CNN Hypertension Kobe Secretary America United States New York FLU
Fighting Loneliness? Try Friending Yourself.

SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

6:56 listening | Last week

Fighting Loneliness? Try Friending Yourself.

"Hey all you sober people hand anyone else. Who is interested in listening to me talk about mental wellness? Some of you might remember that my word for the year is clarity and especially with. Cova did that word has not changed my journey. This year is very much about taking the noise out of my daily life and boy has that been difficult in this time of lockdown and isolation and loneliness which is why. I'm GonNa talk about loneliness today and what it means. Not only to me but to you all as well. The statistics are growing. Not only because of covet but prior to Cova. We are becoming more and more lonely. And why is that and more importantly what can we do about it? I live alone and if I am feeling the loneliness even though I have people built into my daily work. I can't imagine how other people are feeling who don't work any longer or don't necessarily engage with people daily in their line of work before Kovin. I liked living alone. I enjoy the peace and quiet and frankly I like my relationship with myself but now that I'm confined an had been confined by the way. I'm still very much. Laki myself down except for a walk that I take almost daily with some friends Monday through Friday but we social distance or physical distance during the walk. I carry a mask with me so although I'm getting Interaction I still spend most of my downtime. My non work time by myself and it's become more difficult. I only imagine how difficult it is for some of you who live in bigger cities and can't get out to walk every day on walking past like I do. It has to be really tough. Interestingly the rate in which we are living alone has been on the increase for the last fifty years Grand Julie Aching up to about twenty eight percent in two thousand nineteen of our total population here in the US which means at thirty five point seven million people here in the US live by themselves in a recent study by CIGNA which is a health insurance company here in the US of twenty thousand people. Us adults they found that half of Americans feel like they are alone. Only slightly more than fifty percent of the respondents said they had meaningful in person. Social interactions on a daily basis and fifty percent said that sometimes or always they feel that the relationships are not meaningful and that they're isolated from a smaller but still surprising number of people. Twenty percent of the twenty thousand said they never or rarely feel close to people and eighteen percent felt like they have no one to talk to and this same study by Cigna revealed that Young People Age Eighteen to twenty two are far more likely than senior citizens to report being lonely and Import Health. Making them the loneliest generation and well loneliness itself is not an diagnoses or a mental health disorder. It goes hand in hand with many of the diagnostic criteria in the DSM. Five diagnostic statistical manual. That most of us in the mental health professionals zone us. Furthermore there's no accepted definition of loneliness. Sometimes it gets jumbled together with social isolation but the two concepts are very different social isolationism indicator of how much contact. Somebody has with other people. Whereas loneliness is the subjective feelings of isolation and there is no agreed. Tipping Point at which acute loneliness transitions into a chronic problem with long term mental health and physical health ramifications. Alone doesn't necessarily mean that you're lonely nor does being around people mean that you're not loneliness is a very subjective. Feeling loneliness is a feeling that only you the person experiencing it can truly identify the fancy schmancy definition of loneliness is the distress that results from discrepancies between ideal and perceived social relationships. That's according to the Encyclopedia of human relationships. What that means is that loneliness is a feeling and a perception. It involves a wave seen ourselves and the world around us. We can feel lonely. In a wide variety of social settings and circumstances. It doesn't take being alone. Some studies have shown that people who struggle with loneliness may actually perceive the world differently. Does that sound familiar to some of us. I know it sounds very similar to the world that I grew up in the world that I created for myself through my perceptions and certainly when I was drinking boy did I create A world within a world one researcher even found structural and biochemical differences in what he labeled the lonely brain. Okay and I'm going to murder his name. I'm sure John Casio Gosh. His research revealed that a lonely person can experience more difficulty recognizing positive events and have more trouble picturing the thoughts of others known as mental ising.

Cova United States Social Isolation Cigna Kovin Encyclopedia Of Human Relation Import Health Researcher Murder DSM John Casio Grand Julie
Bronzers and Journals

Forever35

9:31 listening | Last week

Bronzers and Journals

"Moving on to a different topic that but one we have not discussed. I don't think no over on for over thirty five sunless tanner cousin. That was the tide. The subject of the email. This listener writes to us. I just came to the starting realization that there is a crucial part of skin care. We have not dove into yet. Sunless tanners exclamation point times three. I have more time than usual during the self isolation and since I won't be visiting a beach anytime soon. I'm wiping out the self tanners. For a little pep. I would love to hear some wrecks of easy to use an effective self tanners or an inhouse comparison tests. I've had good luck with tart tanner's but I am trying out I'll of paradise and will report back curious to hear what others are using out there. I'm curious to. I'm curious to because I don't use anything like this I don't either and actually I'm incorrect. I believe the title of this email. Referenced Bronze Irs and so it made me think about like what we may be putting on our sheikhs but that in our face but then I believe they're also talking about like all over Sunless Tanning. Yeah. I think they are now. Has Tanning ever been a thing for you later? Channing have you ever like bought the Juergens on okay back in the day. I mean. We're probably talking like DOTS. I feel like everyone was using that. Jergens sunless tanner. I would use it. I felt like it always looks sort of streaky on me So I I was never a huge sunless. Tanner person how about you. I also went through a phase of putting that jerk stuff all over my body but I have never gotten a spray Tan. I've always wanted to but I just have never gotten around to it. I don't even know where to begin to spray tans in my life one I got in the early to mid odds before a friend and I were going on a trip to Atlantic City when I lived in Philadelphia and I loved the Spray Tan like. I thought it was amazing and I was also like Oh. This is what it would be like to be. Tam like this. This is fun. Didn't get another one for probably ten years or so. And then when I was at buzzfeed someone else was doing in article about spray tans and they got like a spray tanner to the stars to come in and they asked if anyone wanted to get a spray tan and I volunteered and it looked so bad. It looks horrendous. Oh my it was way too dark. Okay I looked. I didn't look like myself like I felt like maybe over the years. I have now romanticize this original spray Tan but I felt like what was great about my original Spray Tan. Back in two thousand and four. Was that it. I still like looked like myself and this was just like what has happened. Look Tan mom remember Tan mom. Oh remember Tan mom. I'm like fully up on Tan. Mom what she doing now. I mean she's like releasing songs and occasionally appearing on the Howard Stern show it good for her? She's still so Tan. I believe she is. Okay but yes. I do remember Tan mom yet so that was my last experience and I was just like what no so. We didn't get a spray Tan. Like for your wedding. No I didn't okay. Okay I mean. I know a lot of people do that but I was just like nervous that it wasn't going to turn out well and then you're like stuck. This is my fear. This is why I have never done it and I. I also like for example. I used to wear the steel. Bronze are as like my blush. Even owned blush. That was just what I use it. I really liked it but now I get confused over the way. Bronze is USED TO CONTOUR Like I feel like I feel like the the way we use. Makeup is evolving. And I'm still in like two thousand and four and so I don't quite have a sense of what I would do with it. Like I did. Watch him Kardashians like basic makeup routine video and then I tried to emulate at home and it looked like I tried to make a three on my face with some bronze and looked very stupid. Like I don't St- I'm still not good at countering although maybe I should take Contra Zoom cloud. We didn't. We discussed that. We were going to learn how to contour during yes. I've watched this video and I was like this was like her own doing contour herself. So I thought I could at least figure it out as opposed to a makeup artist. I couldn't I had no idea what was happening. So there you go so anyway this is. This is a spot where we would love some listener feedback. Yeah we would love to tell us. What are you doing this? For Sunless Tanning are you doing? It is still a thing. What do you like? What don't you like tell us because I would. I am totally game to get a bunch of stuff and try it out for the sake of the pod I just. I'm not sure where to begin. So I'm ready okay. Great I'm ready to experiment okay. Story I think you've gotta read this this so I'm happy to I've been reflecting lately on the act of journaling and I think you two are the perfect people to reflect with me on this. When I was a child I used to try to keep a diary as documentation of my life growing up in the nineties with Nickelodeon. I was inspired by the movie. Harriet the spy and wanted to have the dedication that Michelle Trachtenberg character had with her writings however I was never very disciplined by. Diaries were sporadic. And I judge myself harshly for that in my mid twenties. I hit a rough patch in my life and my other wonderful sister. Hope Gifted me a journal to help me work through anxieties. Something clicked and I stopped writing for posterity or documentation. I started writing to get things out of my head. I stop worrying about continuity I would mention people places or events without preamble for my quote audience in fact I began my journals things that I would never even myself read again often because I assumed it would be too painful to revisit them. Journaling has been a great way for me to clear the junk out of my head now that we are in this unique time in history. And I'm expecting my first child that I should be. Writing for an audience has crept in again. I have the urge to think more of my writings as documentation that will be meaningful to someone else at some point. I'm definitely not a dance. Like no one is watching kind of person and this perspective is stifling. Dory I know you've been dabbling with generally more lately and since we're both writers. I'm so curious to hear what you think of on this question of audience for journaling. Do you write for no one like I prefer or for future you for your children or historians. I would love to hear from other listeners as well. Well well who do you? Who Do you write in your journal? Forgery? I think I write for future me I think I do too. I feel like writing for no one. I I kind of doing that. 'cause I'm not really thinking about the intended reader right but ultimately the intended reader is going to be future. Yeah hopeful and I say that as someone who still has kept journals pretty much through through college inconsistently but I have journals through college And I do enjoy a kate like not all the time but like occasionally I have gone back and looked through the journals and it like it is really wild to look through them and read them like re not just read about your your state of mind but like what you were doing and who you're hanging out with and I don't know I like I just find I find it really interesting but I also you know I like history and I like documents and so does obviously find interesting too. Yeah I you know when. My My parents gave me a journal the Christmas while I was living at home when my mom had pancreatic cancer and so I have a journal that kind of starts about three months before my mom died and it is really because that time in my life is so fraught and I don't remember anything from it. It is actually really moving to go back and read it and it's also very hard and miserable but it is really interesting to just see what my state of mind was during that time and I also have kept journals on and off my whole life. I mean I do think you do have to be prepared for if you are no longer around someone else reading it. You know like that is a reality that could happen.

TAN Tanner Sunless Tanning Spray Tan Howard Stern Forgery Channing TAM Atlantic City Philadelphia Michelle Trachtenberg Nickelodeon Harriet
Matcha Tea

20 Minute Fitness

5:39 listening | Last week

Matcha Tea

"So much powder so farmers grow matcher by covering that. T- Twenty thirty days before harvest to avoid direct sunlight. Visit increases chlorophyll production boost the amino acid content and gives the plant dog Green Hue the Policy Years Macho as you've probably seen everyone has grown in popularity you can get much law as and ice cream on pancakes and so on and literally means mattress. Pouted t the leaves are hand selected their steamed briefly to stop from tation that droid and then aged in cold storage. A MRS deepening. The flavor and the leaves are stone ground into a fine powder but wise the hype around Macha so matcher is commonly referred to as a mood and brain food with previous research demonstrating a three constituents present in match. Aotea dot big fan on each and caffeine affect mood and cognitive performance healthy nine has been shown to potentially increase the Alpha waves in your brain and these waves linked to mental realization and also helping to fight stress signals. It's also been shown to increase the number of feel good chemicals new brain which has been shown to prove your overall mood your memory and your concentration another difference between green tea and matcher. Is that the whole leaves. Aw ingested so it's a more potent source of nutrients than Steph's green tea and some sources cite that one serving match matchy is in nutritional equivalent of ten cups of regular Brews Green Tea with match T. containing two hundred thirty seven times more antioxidants. More information on until do remember back through all previous episodes as we've come at this in depth. Bought the on anti-oxidants in Macho a called polyphenyls and they've been linked to protection against heart disease and also helping to reduce your blood pressure again because of the the factual construing the Whole Leaves Matchup. You also gaps through three times. The amount of caffeine the compost tate about the amount you get in a brew coffee and Macho Warriors out there who proponent of the product with claim that you don't get a caffeine buzz life from coffee or something like that but an alert com due to the lvn on present which can induce feelings of relaxation without the drowziness again. Oversee Caffeine has same benefits. I'm pitfalls already touched on this too much but what I will say. Is that the impact of caffeine weight. Loss's regularly being examined. Several studies suggesting the caffeine can help the metabolic rate and increase fat burning. So let's potentially the the benefits thoughts in much tees. Well we've seen four seems forever. That marketers have been pushing green tea products as a weight loss tool whether that be just literally drinking green tea or as a supplement in pills for example. And it's been a number of studies that have lingering t to fat loss however there are of course opposing studies which is shown no such link but the studies. Supporting Green. Tea's thought thank state that the active ingredients can boost the effects of some fat burning hormone such as Norepinephrine noradrenaline and main antioxidant and T. E. G. C. G. Which has said much as well can help inhibit an enzyme that breaks down the hall man nor epinephrine. So that when this ends honest hypnotise. The amount of north of noradrenaline increases promoting fat breakdown. And as I said at the Star Macho Green tea has a similar nutritional profile yet it contains significantly higher levels of things like egg than regular green tea and this has been shown to have highest biological activity among green tea. Gaskins and again if you remember from previous episodes Catkins are type of disease. Fighting flavonoids anti oxidant so as mattress. So high in this egghead. It's interesting to look studies following its influence on fouls as well because I was a green tea's been looked at in big debt as well so this face needs to be further. Developed on some of the results are inconsistent but two thousand five study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition looked at individuals that drawing catechin rich tease. Macha on those who drunk rich green tea. That didn't have as much catechin is in on the people. Drinking teas just match dropped almost twice as much weight in twelve weeks. Participants who didn't additional human studies have collectively also found that taking hundreds of four hundred sixty milligrams of egg together with ace two three hundred milligrams of caffeine for at least twelve weeks linked to significant weight loss and reduction of body. Fats what is interesting to note from this? Many studies dot the fat burning effects of things. Like you'll match guarantee Harley justic on almost dependent on not consuming caffeine habitually so all the time EG CG has also been studied extensively and has been shown to help fight inflammation in your body. Help maintain healthy all trees. I'm promote cell replant so because macek contains grade levels of antioxidants such as G. It appears to be a superior. Taeb gets the all the benefits of green tea on more. But it's important to keep in mind that was laid out when it comes to weight loss. It's a very small piece of the puzzle doomed to stress that you should not be over consuming match Or even green. Tea's tries to make sure you don't how to more than two cups a day. Really so that concludes. Today's episode on match tee. Tonight you understand what is being all the next time you hear someone match. Lotta hipster cafe for example. But that's that's over. Now we're GONNA hit you. Enjoyed unnerving yearbook catch real

Caffeine TEA Macha American Journal Of Clinical N Steph Gaskins Harley Justic Taeb Epinephrine T. E. G. C. G.
Turning Social Isolation Into a Creative Outlet With Martha Alderson

Live Happy Now

5:53 listening | 2 weeks ago

Turning Social Isolation Into a Creative Outlet With Martha Alderson

"This is Paula Phelps. And this week we are going to tap into our creative side. Using our creativity is a proven way to increase our personal well-being. It can put you in a positive mood and that starts an UPWARD SPIRAL. That makes you feel more creative. And thereby further increases your happiness for somehow life creeps in and takes over the time. We'd love to spend exploring creatively before we know it. We feel like we've lost touch with our creative side entirely. This week's guest is an expert in tapping into creativity. Martha Alderson is an author who also works with bestselling authors Hollywood directors artists and performers all over the world to help them find their creativity. Now you can try this at home. Her New workbook boundless. Creativity is a one month exploration into your creative side. So let's hear what Martha has to say about it. Martha welcome to live happy. Now thank you for inviting me. I'm thrilled to be here. This is such a great work book that you've written for us. And what a great time for us to work on our creativity. It seems like it. I know that a lot of people are under enormous stress for all sorts of reasons because of the virus but if people do have free time and they're looking fill it creatively. I think by going through the program in the workbook. It's just a great way to let go of. That's happening around us. All the news all the problems of the world and just sink into your creativity and into really your spirit sh and who you are at your core beyond all the material things the problems and everything else so. I think it would be a great place for people to spend some time. We'll obviously when you wrote it. He didn't say hey. I think everyone's going to have a couple of months you know. So what was your decision behind writing it in the first place? Well I been a plot consultant for about thirty years for riders every story whether it's a memoir scream player. A novel has to have a plot and I'm passionate about empowering women's voices and women traditionally have had a lot of trouble with plot because it's a very linear logical progression and of Women. Writers are highly creative somewhat disorganized and are very interested in character development. But they don't really get plot in so. I just became passionate about teaching everybody but it seemed like it turned out to be the majority of women and then in doing that. It soon evolved into working with all kinds of creative people because what I found is we're all sort of on the same universal path. It's a universal story. That has certain markers in them that we pass through along the way. And what I found is that it's great when you're in the creative muse and everything's flowing in your feeling that euphoria of feeling like a conduit or a medium for the creative news to come through you. But at some point we stumble and all of a ten. We read over what we wrote. Are we look at the painting we painted and think? Oh my gosh you know. It's not what I thought it was going to be. And we started to doubt ourselves and self sabotage come up with sorts of reasons why we should put the project aside or give up or whatever and this is especially true for anyone who has perhaps suffered what. I call a backstory wound. Which is something that has traumatized them? In some way you know it can be a divorce or apparently being when you're a child or some kind of abuse or whatever and that really influences what we say to ourselves about our worthiness in our capabilities and our potential and that really interferes with the creative flow. All of a sudden that flow is stymied and our spirits. Can't really get through to be able to give us the support and the encouragement that we deserve. I wanted to write a workbook to be able to help people to become unblocked it to be able to get rid of all this self doubt and insecurities and unworthiness and to really live a life of passion and excitement and happiness joy and that really is something that I'm devoted to and with this workbook. You really prepare us for what we're going to do. It does such a wonderful job of asking these deep thoughtful questioned. Where did that come from over the course of time? Did you develop that? These are the questions that are going to help drive us into our creative selves. Well I think it's just sort of evolved over the last thirty years or so probably my whole life to tell you the truth but when I came up with the idea of the universal story I had a really hard time bringing it down to the concrete was very cereal and spiritual in all of that but once I started writing more about it and seeing these parts you know the beginning the middle and the end it really correlates with the Hero's journey that Joseph Campbell came up with but I take it a step further and called the universal story because I see it in not just what we move through as humans on our human path but nature you know the seasons of the year the moon cycles plants growth animal cycles. All these things have the same beginning middles and ends. And if you're aware of where you are on that journey and what's expected of you. It just makes the journey easier.

Martha Alderson Paula Phelps Joseph Campbell Consultant
Feel Good Habits with Marcia Kilgore

The Emma Guns Show

4:49 listening | 2 weeks ago

Feel Good Habits with Marcia Kilgore

"I'm so trade at trying to turn around how I feel and and how I'm thinking so if I have an important event and I have to do it I will use all the again all those chosen. If it's just a tiredness thing it's water benefits. I can't cope with this thing will question that thought it so this fantastic limiting Byron Katie. Have you ever heard? Yeah Yeah I mean just. You don't have to study everything that she does or or be an expert at her method but just questioning whether or not the thought that you having is correct and this. I think it goes into my second habit which is connecting. Sometimes tired you feel fearful of because you're not connected and I honestly believe that. Humans are kind of like batteries. Sometimes we need to go off and Y- recharge so Rechargeable batteries as sometimes. You need to just go sleep or rest or whatever it is. Sometimes the the solution is actually go plug into another battery. And so that's what gets your energy flowing and if rest hasn't done it for you or if you're having thought that maybe isn't helpful and I would say there two kinds of thoughts fight right helpful or not. Helpful never true. It's like well you can. You can think about the same thing two different ways in helpful away. And that's your choice but remembering that if you're feeling anxious about something is just a unhelpful. Fought and maybe you need to do something differently and very often. I find that if I just connect with other people and you know you go and you recharge you meet somebody. Suddenly it lifts your energy so much and it's because you've got somebody else's energy to lift you up to feel connected and really easy way reaching out zooming somebody calling someone or just going in and getting into a different mode where you don't necessarily theol- like that problem or the thing that was maybe reducing. Your energy is still there because it's not true anymore in story. I'm really interested in what you said about unhelpful and helpful foods and I think that's a really brilliant way of distinguishing them and also it makes it really easy when you feel like you're having a bad day or you're in a negative head space for you to be able to say actually maybe. I'm just being really unhelpful. Now I need to be helpful. Did where did you learn? That former was that was a business thing or is that just something you learn as a kid think somewhere. I re as much as I possibly can because I also find that reading gives you so many ideas idea whenever you stuck. I just hope right when you you are stop and you can find a little point of light. It's almost like the guy that's out of that stuck place when you're in that place where you don't have enough light really acknowledge that will take you out of there so. I tend to read anything I can. Whether or not Student 'cause you always find a little snippets of inspiration in there and someone just said very simply in its true. I guess there could be a neutral thought by means you're having a thought and it's not helpful you will. This spot isn't helpful. So let me have a different thought. I have a great example of this so we a Finance Director. At one point he was know mark the most positive person and sometimes instructors. They could be you. Want them to be constructed frugal. And that's what a good finance director and we were trying to. I think trying to sell a product to retailer and I said Hey. Could you make this call to this retailer? 'cause I'm really Swanton in Buffalo and he Had emailed me Taylor and not hurt back and I. I think I emailed him. I said so. I won't say his name. Just he's he's losing said did you the retailer. And he said yes but haven't heard back from and so they're not they're not interested. I actually laughed and I said that's running because if I emailed that person a tape myself to do this and they did email that I would say. Oh holiday it's different. He comes up when I did get back. So they're not interested at automatically. Assumes is unhelpful fe and I would think must be on holiday did time to get back to me and interestingly a couple of days later they emailed back so you can either stretch yourself out give up and say oh it's negative or you can think oh they must be reason for this and it is sprayed training to have like yourself immediately into the positive thoughts but you can do it everybody can do is just Joyce.

Byron Katie Finance Director Swanton Joyce Buffalo Taylor
Withholding Judgment

Be Great TODAY - Weekly Inspiration

2:19 listening | 2 weeks ago

Withholding Judgment

"Welcome to be great. Today we can start your week. I'm Jonathan Bloom or Bradley Sparks Band in the world of warcraft. Today the idea of withholding judgement I was playing watercraft as playing my Paladin the powder and has disability called judgment. It's an ability that sends out the shield and it's good for taking down range enemies to a faraway. I've made a phrase when I'm waiting to use the skill called withholding judgement and they've got the idea of withholding judgement in our own lives can like withholding judgement until more formation withholding judgement. We understand that person perspective. There have been times. I've been quick to judge somebody either. An an appearance of what the act was and I had this hot. Take as you will and then I realized that after I had the hot take. Oh there is more vision than I had needed. Sometimes people our love and grace and arguments. I find this to withhold judgment until I know what is the issue truly about might as a phrase the fights never really what the fights really about. I remember this one time I was at a coffee shop and I was having an issue with my phone and the rest of asking for more money and I was just starting to like tense up now. The BRISA and I wasn't angry at the money. There is things happening in my life. And my family's that that was getting to me. I find that situation can be more intricate. Take face value. We've all seen the story on social media. That at the beginning. Looks like her than you look into like. Oh there's a lot more to the story that I saw in that quick soundbite that quick video that was put out there. We take what someone does or says and make a snap judgment so this we encourage us to think through situations that we are in unless tried to avoid a hot take a snap judgment on what's happening maybe withhold judgment until we get a little bit more information on what's going on and then once we have the information then we can pass judgment on what's going on. It's definitely thinking that I've been working on in my life. I probably know all the information. It's like Paul Harvey used to say and now you know the rest of the story. Thank you for listening to this. Week's be great today. I always hope that this brings us a little bit more of an inspiration in some way and my goal is something that I'm working through. This week is something that can hopefully help you in your

Bradley Sparks Band Jonathan Bloom Paul Harvey
20 Minutes About Emotions, Anxiety & More With Lori Gottlieb

20 Minute Fitness

6:41 listening | 2 weeks ago

20 Minutes About Emotions, Anxiety & More With Lori Gottlieb

"Laurie run to introduce yourself. And Your Work Sarah so Lori Gottlieb. I'm a psychotherapist in Los Angeles. I'm the author of the book. Maybe you should talk to someone. And I write the weekly your therapist column for the Atlantic riots. You had an interesting career progression from first starting out in the TV and soon industry and then transitioning to Med School. And then eventually becoming a psychotherapist. How how did that come about? So I've always been interested in story and the human condition and so I started off after college working in film and Television and one of the shows that I was assigned to when I was over at NBC was Er and we had a consultant on the show who was an emergency room physician and I spent a lot of time in the emergency room with him to do research for the show and he kept saying to me. I think you like it better here. They maybe she go to medical school and say. I was a French major in college. I was very math and science. You but I was always insisted literature language but I did go to medical school and when I was up at medical school I was up at Stanford and it was This time when the healthcare system was changing it was a lot of talk about managed care and I had this idea of really guiding patients through their lives and it didn't seem like that was going to be the kind of clinical environment that would be easy to manage and so because I was still interested in story in the human condition. I left to become a journalist. Writing Roth and I. I still have a journalist but after I had a baby I've been a journalist for about ten years had a baby and I really needed to talk to adults during the day and so the ups guy would come in he'd like I would detain him with conversations if he would back away to his big brown truck and at a certain point he just tip toe to the door gently placed package out so I could not you know engage him in conversation so I called up the dean at Stanford and I said maybe I should come back and do psychiatry. And she said you're welcome to come back. But you might be doing a lot of medication management and. I know that you really want those those longer deeper relationships with your patients. Why don't you get a graduate degree in clinical psychology and becomes psychotherapist? And that was exactly what I did. I feel like I simply went from being a journalist where I help people to tell their stories to being therapist where I help people to change their stories and how you think your your initial background in the TV industry has been influencing your current work then is it really the storytelling telling or what is it. Exactly it is. I feel like when I sit in the therapist's chair that I am really editor and People come in with a faulty narrative generally because every single one of us is an unreliable narrator meaning that we're not trying to mislead but we tell our stories in a particular way and from a particular perspective and usually that version of the story is what's holding people back. A lot of people think that they're coming to therapy to know themselves by really. I feel like what we therapy is helping. People unknow themselves to let go of the limiting stories that they've been telling themselves so they can live their lives in some faulty narrative that they've been telling themselves about their lives. And how does it look in practice? What we now are like the radio said tell about themselves and how how is that changing after. Actually those with you. A lot of people come to therapy because they want something to change. Something's not working in their lives and usually what they want in the beginning. Is they want someone else or something else to take and what they come to realize is that they have so much agency to make changes themselves. That it's not about changing someone else or something else it's about. How do you respond to that? What kinds of changes can you make in your own life? And so we shift the story. So they become the protagonist in their lives and they're not just reactive to something that's going on around them right in you've seen riding that those individuals stories form to the call our own lives and you've been deeper meaning. Can you elaborate on that? Yeah I think that we're natural storytellers. Even starting with cave drags always wanted to communicate through story. And I think it's so much easier to see ourselves through somebody else's story so in. Maybe you should talk to someone. I followed the lives of four very seemingly different patients on the surface and then there's a fifth patients in the fifth patients is of course me as I go through my therapist. I go for something in my own life and I think that really the book is about the human condition. It's about the reader so so many people who read the buck say oh. I learned so much about myself. I saw so much myself in those stories. Because if you say to someone you know you do this or you're like this. Our instinct is to say no not notes but when you see somebody else do something. It's almost like having a mirror held up you where all of a sudden you see yourself much more clearly. And that gives you so much more agency and power in your life when you understand why something isn't working and what you can do about it and does require us to have you know these compensations to have basically that bureau held against us to really understand our own story better or something in play of how our own stories are forming in the first place like something that we can do actually to be more conscious about unknowing ourselves. I think it's hard to do by yourself because it's kind of like if you're zoomed into a picture you just see a little portion of it but if you zoom out you see this wider perspective and. I think that's what other people do for us. Were so close to ourselves that we lose perspective. We don't see the big picture and talking to somebody else can help me to see something that you haven't been either willing or able to see it's almost like. I think going to therapy is like getting a really good second opinion on your life and for those of us that don't have access to a therapist is like another way of actually realizing how the people in our own environment perceive US actually. Oh yeah absolutely. I mean the title of the Book May Be talked to someone. Doesn't just mean maybe you should talk to a therapist. Maybe we should all be talking more to one another and this was written before the pandemic so no this this applies all the time even more so now course but I think that a lot of times. We don't really take off the mask and talk to people about what's really going on with us because we have shame because we're afraid of how they might react because you know we're embarrassed whatever it might be and. I think what people come to realize when they do make contact with another person in that way is how much the same we all are that that underneath all we all want the same things we all want to love and be loved. We all have regret. We all have anxiety about certain things were also similar and so I think that we feel isolated so much time partly because everyone's going through something similar might look different but underneath the courts very similar and yet nobody wants to open up and share that so we feel like we're the only

Stanford Los Angeles Med School Laurie Lori Gottlieb Sarah NBC United States Roth Editor Consultant
How to Lead a Less Hurried Life

Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

10:05 listening | 2 weeks ago

How to Lead a Less Hurried Life

"So Dr. Like men. Dr. Alan Lightman. Nice to meet you hear remotely I've to meet you opera. Thanks for joining us for this call to unite and also on super so conversations. From the moment I read that article that you wrote in the Atlantic recently title the viruses. A reminder of something lost long ago perfect title. Might I say I was so moved by your words. I've been wanting to talk with you about it so I'm glad we had this opportunity so before we get started. I just want to introduce you all to tell you Who Dr Lightman is? He's a physicist also a humanities professor at Mit you're known as one of the few scientists who is also a bestselling writer of novels and one who embraces spirituality. That's what got my attention. A scientist who embraces spirituality. Sounds like to me. You're a renaissance man. For Time. Such as this well the world has gotten more and more interdisciplinary so we need people that can cross discipline and talk to each other so before we talk about that article in the Atlantic and I was just sharing with you before we that the Atlantic is doing a great job on covert you there so nonpartisan you. You spill the truth in them. I wanted to ask you about an experience that you wrote about in one of your books. Call for the stars on an island in Maine. So you're on a boat at night on the ocean when you had a transformative transcendent experience. Share that with our audience. Will you will. I was coming back to an island late at night after midnight and a clear night and there was no one out on the water and I turned off the engine of the boat and got even quieter than turn off the running lights of the boat in got even darker and I lay down in the boat and just looked up at the sky. And just you just you just me just me on about after midnight. I lay down on the boat and looked up at the at the sky and I felt like I was falling into infinity. I felt like I was merging with the stars and not only with the stars I felt like I was merging with the cosmos was an incredible feeling. I felt like I was part of something larger than myself. And I've been scientists all of my life and But I realized later the Dow was a an experienced it was really not reducible by the methods of science. The feeling that I had of being connected to something big because science does always out to prove a thing. And you're saying that just the experience itself for you and anyone else. Who has that experience? That is proof enough. That's the authority lies the experience itself. No-one can negate the experience that you have. That's pretty amazing coming from scientists. So we're living in a world now at a time where a scientific facts as we can tell from. Every news organization are more important than ever for albro from all the information that we're getting we're living in a time where scientific fact is so important but you say that there is actually room for us understand that there is an invisible and as we just said unprovable but real connection between all living things in the universe. Can you explain a little bit more about that? Well i'd like to distinguish between the physical universe. Which is the subject of science? And what what I might call the spiritual universe and by spiritual universe. I mean the collection of all of those experience that we have where were tied to something larger than ourselves. I'm not talking about organized religion on talking about this very vital personal experience like the one I had lying in the boat and Maine looking up at the stars where we feel connected to things bigger than ourselves and those are two domains the scientists in spiritual h had their own region of validity. Up questions like how old is the earth or what is the cause of climate? Change those light in the physical realm and they are the the realm of science but there are other human experiences that we have like the one we describe lying about looking at the stars that that are not reducible by science and the report of some other world some other existence. I think that's one of the things that connects us as people. Well you know. It's interesting what you describe in the boat. I had an experience like that in two thousand six. I was walking along a road in Maui in an area where the cloud had come down and it was like we were walking through the clouds. You could see only through the cloud. Just a sliver of a of moon and it looked like the moon and my friend said Oh that looks like the DreamWorks Moon. You could put boy up there with a fishing pole and you could just see the sliver of the moon and as we're walking it became so still that I tell you just thinking about. It makes my eyes water. It became so still that I felt that thing that you're talking about in the boat where I felt a connection between all time all life all sp it just felt. I felt expanded. I felt like I felt like I was a part of the clouds. So that's one thing you're talking about. Yes that's the same thing and I think many I think all of us have had experiences like this One of the aspects of the experience you're describing and I imagine you felt to is. Is You you lose your body. You lose track of your ego you lose track of yourself you lose track of time. It's a beautiful experience is Dr Lightman. Is that just a glimpse? That's just a glimpse of what at what is right. That's a glimpse at the full present moment that we speak. So much of this is a tiny little glimpse. Just please call me Alan. Yes that's Okay Allen Dr Allen. Now that we're talking about transcendent experiences we should be. Yeah Yeah it's a glimpse it's a glimpse of something and of course we don't know with that larger thing is. Einstein said someone asked him whether he was a spiritual person or believe or something and he said I feel like we are children going into a library and we see a lot of books in the library written in different languages and we don't. We can't read the books but we know that somehow they got there that something produced those books. Yeah you know. I'm thinking that this pandemic as a massive reset for the world and I know that you believe that we have a chance to choose a less hurried life. Now you wrote about that in the Atlantic article and you write that we've been living too fast. We have sold our inner cells to the devil of speed efficiency. Money hyper connectivity progress. I know you are a whole book on this topic. Call in praise of wasting time but this time that we have white now. Do you think that this is a perfect time to be reset and to do what we're talking about? Be more united. Yeah well I think there is a silver lining to the the virus and then of course when you say that you have to. I acknowledge the tremendous human suffering. This going on the billions of people don't even have clean water to wash their hands so millions of people who've lost their jobs people lost their jobs and we need to celebrate the the care workers and the people working in grocery stores. That are keeping everything going. You know what this time has done. It is allowed us to see that the people who you for for many people overlooked and were just a part of your daily life how necessary everyone is more your life to be lived comfortably and well yes yes it gives us a greater appreciation of the end of an invisible people that make our lives run But I think that there might be one or two silver linings to this devastation. And one of them is that it is forcing many of us to slow down Of course you have to have a certain amount of privilege to be able to slow down. But I hope that we can become conscious of of the frenzy of our normal lifestyle. Where most of the Runaround checking off items on our to do list Being connected to the grid. Twenty four seven. Everything is scheduled up and we haven't had the time to think about who we are to reflect on what's important to us To be quiet and still and I I believe that one of the possible benefits of this period. We're going through now. Is that it's forcing some of us to slow down

Scientist Atlantic Dr Lightman Dr. Alan Lightman Maine MIT Dr Allen Physicist Writer Maui Professor Einstein
Little Known Things That Are Affected By Your Sleep

The Model Health Show

3:54 listening | 2 weeks ago

Little Known Things That Are Affected By Your Sleep

"I want to talk about today is our sleep quality but not just the normal run of the mill stuff today. We're GonNa talk about seven specific ways that your sleep quality is impact in your life that you're probably not aware of and I know that some of these things are absolutely going to blow your mind now for many of us big reason why our sleep patterns or a little bit often routines the fact that we're not getting out and doing the things that we normally do our normal routines like getting up and going to work putting on clubs just a big shot to you if you put on anything other than leggings Jag. Ings and sweatpants in the past few weeks to a couple of months are just a big shot out not that we have to but sometimes you just WanNa Kinda get dressed up some other stuff on and you know what's so interesting about humans is that we actually have special close that we put on in order to go to bed right these closer we call this under this category. We WE CALL PAJAMAS IN PAJAMAS. The word itself just makes you feel good. I dare you to say pajamas. And not like some warm fuzzies. Come over you. You can say with me now pajamas. Now for many of us are pajamas. Are something that we put on again. It's a it's tied to a neurosurgeon for relaxation. For SETTLING DOWN AND FOR GETTING SLEEP. It's all connected and our brains association. Our brain is always looking for patterns. It's always looking for associations and a longer we do a behavior the more ingrained or the more mylan gets laid down making that habit or their behavior more permanent in our minds so now all of a sudden if we're just living in our pajamas we're just my son. Brayden was just walking around his pajamas. My wife to she went outside. She got like the Wednesay Pajama. She went outside but just like walking around. You know so. If we're habitually living in our pajamas right now this can be another little interesting factor throwing off our sleep rituals and our patterns and so with that said we're going to talk about number one. We want to create no matter what is going on right now. A semi consistent sleep routine. And today you're going to really understand why and have more legs under their belief on. Why your sleep quality is so important and so let's go ahead and jump right in to these seven little things that are affected by. Your sleep. I'M GONNA start right at number one. And this is the fact that great has been found to provide some of the very best care neuro-scientists in Sweden conducted a study to investigate. How sleep deprivation actually affects our attractiveness. Now humans naturally use social cues on people's appearance that are essential in helping to keep us protected and helping to keep us healthy because just based on people's appearance we can gather subconscious very important data kind of disseminating illiterates snow their level of health or sickness or even their intentions and this is again. This is largely done in our unconscious. Subconscious mind now. The researchers took a photograph of test subjects after normal sleep and another photographed after limiting their sleep for two nights in a row and now they had. Raiders look at a rate of randomized photographs. Summer including when people are sleep deprived and when they're well rested and consistently the raiders rated photos of people who are sleep deprived as less attractive less healthy and they were less inclined to want to socialize with them just based off of whether or not somebody was sleep deprived their appearance based on that and another study found that sleeping less than six hours a night for five nights in a row caused fine lines and wrinkles to increase by forty five percent also blemishes went up by fifteen percent and redness increased by nearly ten

Wednesay Pajama Raiders Ings Brayden Blemishes Sweden
Finding Positivity in a Pandemic With Deborah Heisz

Live Happy Now

7:12 listening | 3 weeks ago

Finding Positivity in a Pandemic With Deborah Heisz

"Welcome to episode two hundred and fifty nine of live. This is Paul thanking you for joining us for many of us right now. It seems a little bit harder than to find the good in the world and finding things to be optimistic about concealing even more of a chore. If you know what I'm talking about and I'm guessing you do. You don't want to Miss Today's episode. This week I sat down with live happy. Ceo Deborah Highs to talk about how we can look for. What's good in these? Trying times and find positivity and optimism and make the most of this most unusual time deb. Welcome as always to live. Happy now remotely are remote social distanced version of live happy now. I always glad to be her Paula. And yes it is a social distancing time so we are in our respective homes and having this conversation do unique experience. I don't WanNa these for my house yet. Yeah we'll see. It's all about new experiences right now. It really is well. I wanted to talk to you because you always have such great insight on kind of the lesson in the goodness of what's going on so when you look at what's going on. How do you start finding some of the positives in the pandemic? Well there are some real positives for many of us. I don't WanNa say all of us because not everybody is in. You know the new social environment where they have a family to be at home with but for those of us who do have a family to be at home with and people we live with you know. One of the great positives is truly eating dinner together. Every night truly spending time and and being in each other's involved in others lives meal for me. I've found a way that I haven't had the opportunity to do before I love to cook so we don't go out of the League at groceries really so I've been able to cook. We'll have family dinners at kind of the same time every night because I'm also not stuck in that car for forty five minutes on the way to and forty five minutes away from the office and I'm not getting home to load the kids into the car to go to whatever practices is on tonight. So it certainly. It's created kind of A. I'm going to say a change of pace. That is welcome. I think might be the first time in my adult life. I've getting the right amount of sleep per night. Yeah and I've heard that I've I've also heard the flip side of that is true but and we'll talk about that in a minute but you know we were talking in our house the other night saying I wonder how many people will when this ends in opens up. How many people will decide voluntarily like? I'm not going to go back to that job. Because I've found that this is like I was spending too much time doing Xyz and not enough time with my family or taking care of myself. I think it's a real eye-opening time for a lot of people who I think that's true. I also think it's an eye opening time for a lot of employers being manager being someone who who who leads organization you know you always have a little bit the fear that people aren't there in the office. That work isn't getting done but I think you know. My experience has been exactly the opposite. I think more work is getting done by people because are more positive environment more self directed environment and yes. We spend a lot more time on conference calls. Communication is definitely more deliberate than it was in. You know flying by the Hallway and somebody and being at this question you know you actually have to schedule a meeting time to do it or pick up the phone and call somebody to get to make sure we're communicating but there are advantages on both sides. I think there are a group of people were like. Hey you know what I really like this working from home. I'd like to continue doing it. And there's a group of people who are like you know what I was fearful of. No maybe my employees or my staff to Matt. I'm not as fearful anymore because I see that things are getting done so that's been interesting but I also agree with you. There's a whole swath of people that are like what have I been doing the last five ten years I've been I've been in the rat race and suddenly I'm not certain there's some real advantages adding time to meditate workout. Do the things that we know we should be doing and do with people we love. I think it's going to be hard for my children when I go back to work. And they go back to school so to speak not that I haven't been at work but it's going to be different. It's going to feel like there's a loss yellow St- I think we have not put enough I into that yet because people are saying thinking of like. Oh my gosh as soon as this has done. I'm going do this. And this and this. But we're kind of discounting the fact that we're gaining some real treasures here in in terms of time in our interaction with people and we. WanNa make sure we don't miss those. I agree I think what we lost in entertainment because you know for me personally. I think people listening to podcasts at all. No I'm a sports fanatic. I Miss My sports. I MISS WATCHING BASEBALL ON TELEVISION. And going to hockey game. You know but what we've lost in those areas. I do think we've made up in other areas. I have never done as many Legos as I have in the past four weeks. But it's been quality time and you know my dog probably doesn't WanNa go for walks. Yeah that's how the dogs when the people go back to work. They're going to be like way way way. We thought we had a new world and we were running it and well you know. There's been a lot of dogs adopted from shelters. It's GonNa you know for pet population. I think there's a lot of positive. I certainly hope people take as much care of an animal. That bonding with right. Now when they go back to work and I don't find it. Suddenly it is a little bit more difficult when you have to buy a dog walker home. You know there are some positives in the world. You know somebody another thing I wanted to wrap on. The positive side is now social. Distancing is is interesting in that most of us know that you know when we're in crowd were in or anything. We always have a bit of the risk of getting the flu or or you know a cold or something. You know you have this. But the social distancing claim for a lot of people. They need to remember that they aren't doing this for themselves. It's not about whether or not you get sick. It's about helping other people not get many occur strangers to you. This truly is an opportunity to give back to the world by doing something that most of us never would have thought that simply staying home and help the world by doing your part. It's really a collective effort to improve the lives and the health of the people in the world but in order for it to work it has to be a collective effort. It's a very interesting thing it's going on. It isn't good enough that you stay home. Your neighbors have to so just an interesting social dynamic going on and I find it fascinating that so. Many people are adopting social distancing. You know not just because they're told to but because they're doing it because it's the right thing to do and in some ways it gives me faith in humanity that people are out there. Doing the right thing.

CEO Deborah Highs Paula Paul FLU XYZ Matt Hockey Walker
Extroverts and Introvert Survival Guide

The Chalene Show

8:09 listening | 3 weeks ago

Extroverts and Introvert Survival Guide

"I'm sure you've been seeing all of the memes about how this is just the ideal time for introverts okay. I've collected a few of my favorites. Let me read these to you. Daniel Howell says social distancing. Please I've been training for this pandemic my entire life introverts rise up we are finally valid. Brit Burnett said the hardest. Invert thing right now is getting yourself off of a lengthy zoom when your friends. No you have nowhere else to go Randy Rainbow said with all the social distancing and take out food. My life is about to be dramatically. The Same Jen. Grandin said introverts colon flattening the curve since forever. Here's another one. Oh now everyone wants to know what introverts do for fun. Sarah Sarah Carp said I really need all of this time for social distancing to prepare myself for all the quote. Yeah we should get together once. This is all over plans that I have agreed to. That's hysterical here's another one. My favorite part of social isolation is that I no longer have to think of excuses. Why can't come to your party? Biggest wakeup call of the pandemic introverts realizing they've been in quarantine for fifteen years or more. Okay then I tried to find some funny memes for extroverts. But they're not funny. They're all just really sad. Like most of them are just pictures. Like a picture of a person sitting on a couch looking blankly off into the distance like they're about to cry and it just says extroverts during quarantine. I think it's really true. And you know there are a lot of memes about it. We've been joking around about it. And I know many of the introverts we assume all introverts are really happy about this but the truth is not necessarily so and it's not a joke for some people with certain psychological characteristics. I mean all of us have psychological characteristics that make us more vulnerable or more triggered or more uncomfortable in certain situations. And there's just no way around at the extroverts are probably the most uncomfortable and the most vulnerable right now during this whole lockdown how we adjust isolation to a life. That's been shrunk down to the confines of your home to uncertainty too dramatic change to the amount of people that were around is really important and frankly I think we've been doing a little too much generalizing. I think the assumption is that all introverts are thriving and that all extroverts are dying and that might be true for some but for most of us. It's more complicated than that. I should also mention that there is such thing as an ambivert right. Most of us are probably somewhere on the spectrum. You're not fully introverted or fully extroverted. Most of us are somewhere. In between in certain circumstances can make us feel more introverted or more extroverted. I have coined the term for myself outgoing introvert. That means I tend to get more energy. I need a lot of alone time. I need a lot of time to think and talk to myself and be alone. I need I need not just people not around me. I need silence however when I'm around people I really get into it and I'm outgoing and I like to be the person who's keeping people talking and asking the questions and I wanna get to know people and I'm not afraid of a big crowd. I like a party. I don't mind being the center of attention but those kinds of things I can only do in pretty small doses and there are certain groups are certain types of social settings that I cannot do. I literally feel like I'm dying. If I'm with a group of phony people you know the type y'all or like where it's maybe it's not phony people maybe just like a group of people no one is really like being real and everyone's like pretending or being pretentious or making everyone's making small talk or everyone's trying to impress each other. I would rather barf or where people are like fighting for attention. Like if you're in a group of a bunch of Alpha males or Alpha females and there's just like a group of them collected I can't like shoot me in the head. I cannot I just so but if you put me in a group of the right kind of people people who are authentic and real and are willing to go there or just don't need to impress you or prove themselves to you like that doesn't drain me so for many introverts you know we like to retreat to our home space. That's where we have control over our schedule. It's where we can have control over our routine. It's where we get to decide who we want to be with and how we want to be with them. We get to control the volume level in our homes and frankly introverts and extroverts have lost the ability to turn up or turn down whatever it is that they get energy from so for me in order for me to get energy after turned down my social interaction. But I don't have that choice right now as you you know. I've been talking about like what like home? Life is like here in the Johnson Home. And there's a lot of people even my own husband because I'm an introvert there every single day before the pandemic I could count on like three or four hours where I could do my interview thing. I could be quiet and I could think and I could process daydream and I could create. And I can't do that not only that I've had my daughter and my son and their significant others here too and I love them. Love them all but there's kind of always someone here so for me. I've really had to figure out how to find that time even when people are here and it's possible but I do think without question. This situation is probably much easier on introverts than it is extroverts. I have heard from so many of you who've said I I don't want this to end. I love it. I love it so much. I don't have to all the MEMES. I read in the beginning but true introverts are like this is kind of how my life always and so. I really am enjoying it and I don't have to make up all of the reasons why I don't have to go out and meet people Those who are often inviting me to go to coffee or to do social things like I don't have all that associated guilt that I normally do trying to figure out a reason why I like you. I like you a lot but I just. I don't want to get together really with anyone I mean. That's an extreme introvert but some of us are extreme introverts. I'm pretty far on that extreme side. I really am. I mean when I do get together with people. It's pretty rare. I'm a homebody so I wanted to talk about my extroverts because I do think y'all are struggling and that struggle is very real and it is really hard for you to you. Can't sneak away and socially I mean I guess you could but for an introvert you can. You can sneak away and find your alone time. You can go outside but for an extrovert. It's that social interaction. The physical touch that thing that you get that gives you energy unless you've got a lot of people in your home and I don't know even if that is the same for you because I think for most extroverts unique kind of new people around you a lot of the time to.

Social Isolation Randy Rainbow Sarah Sarah Carp Brit Burnett Daniel Howell Johnson Home Grandin
Lindsay Gibson- Womens Adventure Club

FitLabPGH

6:12 listening | 3 weeks ago

Lindsay Gibson- Womens Adventure Club

"Always curious with people that we interviewed for Fit Lab Pittsburgh and I know women's Adventure Club you clearly like to spend time outdoors and you clearly like to move but were you in active kid growing up and if you were an active kid was it. 'cause MOM and dad's get the heck out of the house or was it because you played organized sports or did you find movement and being active outdoors later in life. I always loved playing I was in. I was in a few organized. I never really excelled at any one of them. We played tennis with my dad Soccer I did track in high school. I love to swim. I think for me. It was less about the competition and more about the social part of it. You know who I was with especially things like being with my dad. I mean I didn't care really what I was doing as long as I can be with him and And somehow food was always involves like ride our bike and get ice cream or. Let's go play tennis because hotdogs that they sell at the stand are so sure how healthy that is. That was part of part of my go. I know I was. I was interviewing somebody for moving to live a doctor who's gentleman who is a physician is in Spain right now. He talks about his wife is from. Spain and people always say well. You have ice cream every day for dessert said but what they don't take into a cow is you. Walk Six thousand steps from Your House to the ice cream parlor. You have one small scoop and you walk six thousand steps back so the hot dogs or the ice cream that you got with your dad. It probably wasn't hop in the car. Hop in the mini van. It was more along the lines. We have to walk. We have to ride our bikes. And then you get that as a reward. That's right that's right. I think exercising in nature is something that came later Although looking back you know you you find your passions and adult as in the dull and you look back at your childhood and you can say all they were always there. He's I used to love playing in the woods with my sister. I was little and I. I just Those same feelings are still there when I go out into into the woods now for a long hike or cross country ski or about bike and I know from looking at the Women's Adventure Club web page and facebook page. You lead a variety of outdoor movement activities. How long have you been doing a variety of outdoor movement activities? Was this something that you started when you got to. Alaska you said all the others all these opportunities or was it when you were younger living in different parts of Pennsylvania. Hershey as a working adult. I think you know as As you evolve as I've evolved different activities have come into my life so kind of according to place so when we're in California we where my parents live we serve and we hiked by the ocean And we're in Alaska. The winter was long. We had five to six months of winter and I was not a downhill skier. I never had Nordic skied before moving to Alaska. I never snowshoeing before a though I I better I better learn how to do these things and they ended up being my favorite ways to be outside and most of these things. I learned in my late thirties. Which was a huge important part of learning for me is that you don't be afraid to try something just because you think of yourself as being old you know it's really never too late to go outside your comfort zone and try something new. I think that's well put. I know a good friend of mine. Did his first ironman triathlon when he was forty four forty five and he's sixty six now and he said he can't just imagine a day or a week where he doesn't go for a bike ride or go for a run and I think you hit on it a few minutes ago moving and being outside there's something to it I know there's forest bathing anders nature baths and things like that so. I'm always curious when I talk to people who were movers. Is there a favourite movement activity that you have like if you have a free day or free week and somebody says Lindsay? Hey you can do. Anything you want cost isn't an object. What's the favorite movement activities? That you have architects. I think I think hiking I love Nordic skiing but the you know our winters are not very conducive to that here in Alaska. It was definitely Nordic skiing here. I think it's hiking it's accessible to everybody. There are so many great trails parks around the Pittsburgh area You can get out there regardless of your age and to some extent what kind of physical figure and you know you can do hikes or you can do really long all day. Hikes where there's a lot of elevations gain At your in the trees and I did a hike on Tuesday. Were it was in bear? Run Nature preserve down near Falling Water and at one point I stopped and could not hear one man made sound. It was just complete silence so I think hiking really allows you to get away and kind of get out of your head and take all the joys of Nature. I can understand that we do movement tippin lifestyle hack and fill out Pittsburgh. Were there videos and I know when I go back and I watched the videos very often. I've surprised at all the data. Sounds I missed? So it's really reminds me when you're out there. You know that that babbling brook the The the sounds of the birds that if you don't pay attention you miss that. And that's part of the real thrill and I told the couple people this week. One of the things that if I was an indoor exerciser I never would have been able to see is about a year ago when I was in my local park with dogs. There've been a lot of rain. I got to see three deer. Swim across a stream. One of them being taken out or taken down with the current and Kinda ride the current. Kayaker does do they hit a Eddie and all three hop up in the bank and shake like a dog on what one of the cool things about that as actually had my phone with me so I have a video of it and to me having exercised literally all over the world. That is one of the coolest things I've ever seen which I never would have gotten if I didn't go outside right. Oh that's so cool

Alaska Tennis Pittsburgh Spain Fit Lab Pittsburgh Facebook Soccer Hershey Falling Water Lindsay California Pennsylvania
Dream Big

Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

4:01 listening | 3 weeks ago

Dream Big

"Now me dreaming big has never been about money or fame. I just happened to get it along the way. It's about the process of continually seeking to be better and my prayer. From the time I was a little girl was God. Use Me use me. Guide us me and it just so happens that God chose to use me in the world on a platform that caused me to have money and fame. I see that very clearly in my life. Yeah it's so important and what a great job you've done but that's that's the way. God is his dream our life big many times. We limit him. Because we think we'LL OPRAH I don't have the Education Ronald have the money I don't know the right people but what God never tells you to figure everything out. He says if you believe all things are possible and so I think that's a big part of it is just yes. Yeah taking the limits off him so I would have to say. We talked about this when I came to your house and interviewed you and Victoria that from a little girl I was looking at. What did I really believed? I believe I would sit on the on the second pew from the Front on the right every Sunday. That was my spot. I was baptized when I was eight years old and I really did believe when I look back at my life. I believed I was God's child and I believe that because I was God's child being born in Mississippi being born in the segregated South They Wanna. I really did believe that anything was possible for me. And that's what is carried me to the space and that's what we want to offer you all. You become what you believe and to believe that you are created by the power that's greater than yourself and that to live in that space means anything's possible and what you want in your life. What you really want is not your little piddly dreams for yourself. Because I had some piddly dreams. What you want to do is to be able to live in the space. That Beautiful Bible Burson Accident Says in God I move and breathe and have my being. You want to be able to live in that space of God's dream for you so the question I think is what is God's dream for you. We want to talk about. What is the difference between dreaming and wishing for something? I think most people spend their life. They wish for things they want things. I want a new car. I WANNA different than talking about. What is the big dream for yourself? I think the big dream for yourself is tied onto your purpose. It's bigger than just you. Meaning that your dream should be connected to helping other people as well. When it's when it's just like you said it just got a lot of money. I want to do this. But it's very different when you say I want to fulfill my purpose so I can be a blessing to others as well. Of course you're going to take care of your family. But it's it's about fulfilling your purpose which is believed. God's dream is always tops in some way to helping other people. Yes some way to making the world of whatever we have. We're here as a part of the human family to offer to ourselves and to the rest of the human family all right. So how would you save? I Love Kristen Miller said on facebook. I've never really known how to have a dream. I just existed hoping for the best but now I know dreams are important and I'm working toward realizing my dreams and obtaining them as dozen God meet you where where wherever you are with the dream he meets you in expands it. Yeah I think he does. I. I'd like to say godel super size going into the fast food restaurant. Your dream God's going to super size anything dream to tweet tweet. God will superstar the super size me. Jesus okay that's good. That's just I feel super size me. Jesus

Kristen Miller Mississippi Victoria Facebook
How Add strength to your yoga Practice

Get Healthy Lose Weight Podcast

1:58 listening | Last month

How Add strength to your yoga Practice

"As you're planning your workout. Think about how you can use yoga on. Its own or in combination with other activities. Use these tips that I'll be sharing it with you today. To design a routine that will enhance your strength and overall fitness. A when you're using yoga for training you'll wanna I read class description. Different forms of Yoga have their own unique benefits. So choose the style. That's focusing on your strength like Vanessa or US Tanga as well as power. Yoga classes increase repetitions. You build strength by gradually intensify your workouts. That may mean doing a longer series of Sun. Salutations as well as standing poses and inversions hold poses longer. You can also increase resist inspiring manning and oppose for additional seconds or minutes. This type of isometric training is especially useful for maintaining strength and stabilizing joints. Check your form to stay safe. Start WITH BASIC POSES. Where you can learn correct alignment use props like straps and blocks if you need them rest up. Excessive workouts actually weaken your muscles. Take at least one day off from vigorous activities each week and make sleep a priority eat. Well Nourish your body with whole foods. In particular consuming protein within two hours of working out may help build muscles now supplementing Yoga for strength

Vanessa Manning
How Much Sex is Psychologically Healthy?

The Psych Central Show

7:23 listening | Last month

How Much Sex is Psychologically Healthy?

"Steve. Welcome to the show. Hi Dave it's to be with you today Steve. I want to say that I absolutely love your bio. I think it's important to just own things and I like that. You had a seriously messed up childhood because in many ways I feel like I had a seriously messed up childhood and I believe a lot of our listeners are looking back on their childhood and their feeling the same way and you know sometimes our guests. They really want to tout their professional accolades. But they don't want to tout their human experiences so first off Kudos to you for your honesty. Oh thanks I just think that for me. Such a huge part of my motivation to help people. Because I know what it feels like to be those uncomfortable family situations it makes perfect sense to me and that vulnerability. I think is really important giving that you're subject matter it sexuality because people are often embarrassed to discuss sex and sexuality anyway. Now let's talk about your Ted ex. Talk the magic sex number. What is that all about? Basically the idea is that we all have specific needs that we're pretty much hard wired to have and that they aren't subject to Moral Suasion or to personal appeal. Like for example. The number of hours sleep. You need to feel refreshed and also the number of calories. Unique per day to feel satiated. We don't really talk about sex that way but everyone I've ever interviewed and I mean thousands of people had enhancer to that question. Ideally if you could be in your perfect relationship there was perfect in every way. How often in dealey would you like to have sex? And some people respond with the number one end of the continuum and other people respond with a very different number and then represents the range of humanity. We're all normal and we're all different so we just don't talk about very much. We sort of presume I think in an EGO centric way that when we fall in love with somebody they will want US pretty much exactly the way we want the frequency. We want them and that just isn't true because of the range from one person turnover can be quite serious when I think about a magic sex number. The first thing that I think is how am I supposed to figure mine out? Yeah that's that is really tricky and it's actually trickier than I even thought it might be. Because there's a lot of cultural and moral interference with getting an accurate assessment. If people have an idea that there's a right number and that number is way too low way too high. They tend to Skew their number two. What they think is more acceptable more normal and in the same way. A lot of people are preset to self deception because they end up coming up with a number that mentally is actually the number of they'd be willing to settle for and that's a very different numbers on the number that they ideally would like to have so for me. The question is one of sustainability. If we're serious about getting all of our sexual needs met in one monogamous relationship then we need to make sure that that sexual relationship is at least a fighting. Chance of being sustainable. And if we don't do that we really haven't done our due diligence. One of the things that I'm thinking about is when it comes right down to it. How important is our magic sex number because it sort of sounds like you're making sex the end all be all of a successful relationship? Aren't there other things more important like compatibility and values so how important is a magic sex number? It's a little bit like arguing though. Which organ is more important the heart or the kidneys because the truth is we need all work together for us to survive and have a happy life and then same way if I have the perfect relationship? Perfect in every way but there is a significant problem there could be something like in my mate decides to engage in compulsive gambling. That alone could destroy in otherwise good relationship so I'm talking about sex most about us. We don't talk about it too much but we have an idea in the back of our mind of what our future sex life would be like. But we don't imagine something like what happened to one of my clients and his wife came up to him after seven years of marriage and they had two children by that time. There were a couple in their thirties and she announced that she would not be having sex with him anymore and he was shocked. And I didn't know what to do about this. And for the next forty years they did not have sex and ended up disastrously for both of them but he never ever thought that he would be in that sort of situation and most of us don't but we don't think true like well what would I do. And what are my sexual needs because if we think about managing our sexuality intelligently and we have an idea of our magic sex number you know for some people. It'd be three times a week for some people. It will be once a week or whatever that number is. It's what you need to feel comfortable otherwise you're facing catastrophic marital failure where you end up getting so frustrated that you either have an affair or get a divorce or whatever that is. We'd all like to avoid that. The first thing that I thought of as you were telling that story is forty years of no sex. That doesn't seem like a marriage to me. That seems like a friendship. How did they survive? Forty years in a sexless marriage For her her discomfort with the idea of having sex with him was not replaced with anything other than deep dive into alcoholism so she relied on booze to get through the rest of her life for him because of his religious upbringing. Divorce was an unacceptable option and I live in Nevada where prostitution is legal and he never availed himself of the services of a legal prostitute. Nor did he ever had an affair instead? What he did is he spent the next forty years trying desperately to take care of me sexual needs simply masturbation and of course that was not a successful effort because sexual needs are far more complex and diverse and just orgasm alone so even if I were let's say masturbating as frequently as I wanted an orgasm. That's not gonNA take care of my needs for companionship. Conversation Humor and play so it just doesn't work.

Steve Dave Dealey Prostitution Nevada
Jeff Moyer on ACL Injury Prevention

Just Fly Performance Podcast

5:20 listening | Last month

Jeff Moyer on ACL Injury Prevention

"Acl Injury Prevention. What do you think about it? What's What's your take on this vast area that a lot of athletes are being ushered into in ACL prevention programs? I have an interesting. I think a little different background maybe most coaches I used to work at a sports. Medicine Orthopaedic Practice And one of my jobs was the return to play. I was the return to play guy after some got hurt went to saw the Ortho so the PT. So the act than me. And then in the meantime I also ran their ACL prevention program. Which I believe if I remember correctly was a six week program where we saw the athletes. I think twice a week and we start with this baseline jump test and how they land and US take video and then you put it in this program that they set up and it gives you these numbers in these drawings of their values knee collapse and shows you how should he they are and then after six weeks you redo the exact same test and punch it into the program and it shows you. How Great Their Vegas is. And congratulations to certification you prevent an ACL injuries. Lottie da and that was the whole program and every workout was just hodgepodge just weird stuff doing various jumps in the middle of the field on allowed unstable surfaces a lot of closed Agility drills to cones and all this stuff and it was I don't know I was turned off to it then and the doctor. I think could see that because I wasn't doing a very good job of promoting trying to sell it to coaches and stuff and I'm just the type of person if it's not in me I just can't fake it So I yeah. That didn't work out Me Working there very long and hence me down here. Pennsylvania so It's an interesting It's been interesting journey. Starting there And then my work with Dr Yeses and seeing things from a- bio mechanical standpoints With stuff and then getting more into the vision and perceptual side of things with Dr Harrison is really Kinda again changed my view so to speak in and I guess There's three I kinda categorizes three camps that I see that view injuries and Sel's earlier movements People your perception action. There's no true bio mechanic structure Everything's based off perception to the environment to the Oregon from the organism and In task what's going on there are the other type of people that look at Range of motion and used movement screens. And this and that and do everything in closed environments and then Uganda got your strength camp. That is a let's work on the The the E. centric in the isometrics and that will take care of their ability to decelerate and land And for me. It's Kinda I try to use. All the answer's always in the middle so I always try to look at it all When it comes to preventing injuries I don't really start any which way or just Kinda just kinda use all of it You know but what's what's interesting to me that not a lot of people talk about so depending on where you get your statistics from FRAC- Al Injuries. What eighty percent of them are non contact or seventy percent depends on where you get your information but in an interesting study Think in two thousand fourteen on on soccer players. Although those non contact injuries A- player was one to two meters Around that person so it wasn't like this athlete which is running with a soccer ball stepped in a hole and fell toward the knee. Or something. there was a perceptual aspect to the injury. Which I find very interesting and Going further into that study found that defensive players were more likely tear their injury or tore their heels and then often to players so something about defending and the chaotic nature of that so building perception Into OUR REHAB programs are prevention program is huge. Now I also think it's it's crap to say that we have a prevention program in a Rehab Program would ever think it's just all one of the same I look at athletes whether they heard or not kinda put him in the same boat I think a prevention program is just some kind of sales pitch that doctors use to create these programs to make money or that's some organizations use to say hey. We have doctor's approval from this so that gives them some kind of credibility. Sell this bullshit It's just one in the same So might be with working whether it's prevention or to someone who's torn ACL or tender Rehab. Back I really don't. It's it's really not much difference It should be one one thing. One thing only is which is performance and getting better and you know if they're hurt then we got to get them to be able to perform and if they are performing that we gotta make sure that they stay able to perform that's that's really

SEL Soccer Lottie Da United States Frac- Al Injuries Uganda Dr Yeses Pennsylvania Dr Harrison Oregon
Morey J. Kolber PT PhD CSCS- Covid-19 as a Physical Therapist

Moving2Live

7:59 listening | Last month

Morey J. Kolber PT PhD CSCS- Covid-19 as a Physical Therapist

"So maury. I know that you've had a big change in your main job right now. Which is teaching physical therapy students at Nova southeastern and I'm curious before all this came down. How much teaching of physical therapy students Nova southeastern was done in the online environment versus what we think of as the typical face to face environment of education all our program at Nova Southeastern University in Fort. Lauderdale campus is traditional teaching. So it is a face to face program. An each faculty sort of had a different way of approaching their courses. Some faculty had a mix of online prerecorded lectures in class laboratory. Others were one hundred percent in class. I I think it was somewhat variable but prior to all of this era traditional program. We have lecture class as we have lab classes. We have testing so the landscape of what we do. Moving forward is already changed. And it's GonNa continue to change and I know we were talking a little bit before I started recording. And you said that you had some impetus essentially a month ago that there may be some changes or to be prepared for some changes. And what was your initial thoughts when you heard that? Potentially you might be teaching courses in physical therapy program entirely online. I mean my initial reaction was panic because everything I do everything I've had setup is face to face that's the part of my job that I enjoy the most I think for some people. They probably saw a great thing for me. It certainly wasn't but there were some initial panic. Probably the first thing I did is stopped. All clinical visits adapt might have for various reasons one being the the threat obviously of Kobe. But the other was knowing that I needed to begin dedicating some hard time into creating modules and a change in my course which is currently ongoing. And I know you've been teaching for a number of years although courses changes knowledge changes and you try new things. How much of an increase in workload did you see or how difficult was to take some of these classes that until a month ago you were seeing students two or three times a week and now suddenly you're like okay? This all has to be delivered online in a synchronous or a synchronous manner right. It seems that something that would take five minutes in the classroom setting. We'll take fifteen minutes on his accession. Astrom said I'm sorry and I'm curious with the students that you've communicated with so far health familiar with most Zoom in online education versus panicked similar. To what you had a couple of weeks ago I mean fortunately for us in what it seems. Our students are probably a little bit more savvy than than some of us in terms of online learning. When I went to Undergrad we didn't have online learning. I imagine most of them did to some degree. Fortunately for us our program director had began pushing us into into exam. Soft which is a means of testing getting rid of paper and it wasn't because of this. This was last semester. So fortunately we transitioned into that software program to deliver our tests so we ready to go with that. Had We had to learn that at the same time it would have been a challenge in with that and the switch to online education with the students. What is the reaction of the students that you've talked with been so far? They've been excited about it. Just happy that they continue it or kind of a little bit of panic. Because it's something new. I think there's a little bit of panic with regard to testing because now they're they're being tested in an environment that they have to create that his private secure. There's a camera watching them. So that's changed. The ability to review exams is obviously changed due to security. You don't want exposure questions whereas when you have a setting where student comes your office you hand them a written exam they take a look at it. There's no exposure of that exam so now there's different considerations that didn't exist before you know. I'm always reluctant to to approach students. Say Hey how did you like the lecture? I just did on zoom because I think when you do that you know your you know your responses are going to say why I really liked it. I don't know that it's appropriate. I'm not big on just walking up approaching the students say hey. How did you like what I just did? Because students are generally kind been. We'll we'll say they liked it but that doesn't necessarily mean they did. I feel like our students have an expectation to in classroom teaching and laboratory sessions Expectations GonNA possibly need to change. Perhaps through the whole summer and I know I've been teaching for a number years at California University of Pennsylvania. Not In a physical therapy program but in exercise science program in our classes are a synchronous in other words we do narrated lectures and things like that where the students have a time period where they have to complete it with Sudan. Switch that you've had with your teaching. Are you doing this in a synchronous manner or their specific classroom times where students that you saw month ago in the classroom you our meeting with them on Zoom? So plan is moving forward to have both a synchronous synchronous so the plan will be for the summer. We were just wrapping up our semester. So there wasn't a lot of content but it was mix tasing fairness and synchronous moving forward into the summer. The students will be given a certain amount of time to do a review of a lecture. That's a synchronous. And then when they complete that then there will be a zoom session. Which will be synchronous where it'll be more focusing on cases questions and reviewing the content that they did earlier we have a media platform called counter. And that's what we use for our courses to prerecord certain lectures and I think from an efficiency perspective for them and us that's going to be strategy provide these cal- Torah lectures for the heart lecturing. Because if you think about it these students are going to be sitting in a zoom session. Three hours in the morning three hours at the end of the day it is going to wear on providing a synchronous cultural lecture. That's prerecorded and following up with a review. Overview zoom is going to be the way to go and I'm also interested in learning As physical therapy program. I know the American Physical Therapy Association has certain requirements. That students must meet. How communicated have been with you and with your program as far as recognizing that okay. This is something that really hasn't been done before we haven't had a pandemic and almost one hundred years so this is a significant change. What is their communication been with? You will our director and share. Have sort of been on the front line in terms of communicating with captain which is our accreditation body and at first there was this fear in debt. Changing our curriculum is a substantial change. It's GONNA require an application forms paperwork but Kathy did come down with some some documents stating that. There would be some flexibility based on this situation and with both changing models of classroom teaching as well as clinical hours and I suspect the most important thing about that is that when students finish their work at Nova southeastern. They'll have the ability to sit for the certification

Nova Southeastern Nova Southeastern University American Physical Therapy Asso Maury Program Director Lauderdale Campus Fort California University Of Penns Astrom Director Kathy Sudan
Feel Good Habits with Jordan Samuel

The Emma Guns Show

3:03 listening | Last month

Feel Good Habits with Jordan Samuel

"If they're another habit before I to he question super easy but honestly for me and I don't know about you or anybody else but Vena former dancer loving music and for me. My like outlet used to be even jogging on the treadmill doing the elliptical with headphones and listening to good music or even taking Zuma class but is it does not have to be a structured workout. It doesn't have to be anything on the computer but putting on music on a speaker in your headphones like I'm watching my husband right now. He has his headphones listening to good music. But listen to good music and just dance around. Move your body. Just I mean movement. In general we know is a great habit. A great thing for buying absolve skin everything but Put that music on while you're cooking dinner dance around have fun. Just have your own dance party. Honestly have your own damn dance party because it's so good. It's so good for your body. It's so good for your mind and I just think that I can't imagine people and I'm sure some people are in there blasting their music in their indoors but it seems like things are quieter at least around here in Seattle quiet. I don't hear music in the building. I don't hear music outside. All here is the news which is not great so good uplifting music dancing around and just like work at help. I've got a business idea. Iffy house policy the APP. Yes went don't party with Jordan. Samuel would be in that party and also I've done view these interviews now and what's really struck. Me Is how people are saying that the skin care routine is always a good habit but is something that they then looking at it in the same way as they were so what used to be. Maybe perhaps quite functional all I want to do that. I want to use this to get this result. It's now definitely becoming more of a pampering experience and I wondered whether you've changed that as well well for me being in the skin-care World I've always made it a superpower inexperience. Also because it's whether I'm trying a new product out from our lab or my lying or from another line or from friends line or something like that. I've always really used it as I'm also a big believer in facial massage so I do take time in my routine anyway But yeah that routine is happening like clockwork morning tonight. Because that's reminding like Goto but I'm happy. I'm happy to see the people. Yeah are are sort of also seeing the point in everything they're Using I think by having to be more pampering having it slowdown a bit having More self care they can look at each product and see its function instead of sort of like. You said I mean yes functional. But sometimes it's just use X Y and Z. Because you've been told to use X Y and or because you but now to really look at what each thing is doing what it's bringing and And if it's serving a purpose for you do

Zuma Vena Seattle Samuel Jordan
20 Minutes With The CMO Of Crossrope

20 Minute Fitness

8:33 listening | Last month

20 Minutes With The CMO Of Crossrope

"Well surge. Welcome to the show firstly. Thank you very much for taking your time. Talk today now. Thanks for having been really interested in this topic. It's something that I've always tried to do. The pulse like I'm sure many people that have customers of the past said they struggle with it and they give up so we're talking today about jump. Raven crossroads in particular. Can you give us a bit? More context about crossroad. An-and really how you came to be involved with with with business. Yeah absolutely so cross up. It's a it's a unique jump rope. Workout experience We created some time ago. Really with with this idea of giving people a funny way to get fit you know wherever they go And we'll get into the benefits of jumping rope. I'm sure but I joined the business back in two thousand and fifteen but really been jumping rope probably for the past ten twenty years. I'd say I think I I. I picked it up when I started boxing back university on known to go to tool for endurance and whatnot and I found that it helped a lot with my work that I played a lot of basketball growing up and still do and then you know even when I put the boxing gloves down. It's just one of those tools that have always kept around in my gym bag and enjoyed using it as a one tool. Eventually a came across the crossroad system. Back in two thousand twelve two thousand thirteen when it? Kinda I got introduced to the market became close friends with our CEO. Right right now and in the system similarly changed the game for me. Kind of became one of my go-to tools. It's really because of its unique design about our systems. We've created interchangeable set of jump. Ropes where you can easily clip in different weights and ropes in and out of your handles and that gives you more engaging in Bristol workout. Then you know what you get with a single. Abc Rope so similar to how you'd maybe have a wide range of dumbbells in gym and we like to offer different weights. Ropes that help with different fitness fitness goals. And so another thing that we really focus on on like jump. Ropes are ropes are S- are primarily designed for jump rope fitness so we've built on specifically along with their APP workouts. Help you get lean build endurance and build strength so they're primarily. Ah Fitness tool and with that. We've we've Created a companion fitness APP. That gives you access to you. Know hundreds of really workouts You can follow along to and do do anywhere really in thirty minutes or less which considering these schedules these days. Everyone's on the go. All the time is exactly what we need to even now the situation of like staying indoors. It's perfect time to pick up a rope and just do that anywhere wherever you in a house for example yeah exactly Amina Sometimes You know we'll get a lot of questions about the benefits of jumping rope. And some of them are obvious and some of them are not obviously great for building endurance and Cardio floodway but the portability of the tool especially in today's day and age on the ability to take your workouts anywhere and like you mentioned them at home is really important for a lot of people you know even before the craziness of today. We talked to a lot of people people who love the ability to be able to squeeze in a workout at lunchtime. You know we've pulled our community recently just to kind of get a sense of the versatility and different ways. People are adding jumper workouts into their routine and at the list really goes on. I mean some like I mentioned earlier. They use it does warm up others use it. As a workout finisher others added to their strengthen hit circuits some use it in place of Iran or combine it with Yoga practice. And so it's really. It's a really interesting tool for anyone who's looking to add it to whatever it is that they're all redoing. I hadn't even thought about the benefits to things like footwork. When we're talking about boxing honestly stereotypically in films and such you see people always jumping rope and you think that's obviously that warm up endurance. But you don't even consider the additional supplementary benefits like footwork which is obviously such an important parts of sports like basketball boxing even things like NFL. Everything thoughts you still need to have quite good agility. And that's the such supplementary benefit the thing necessarily comes to mind. Yeah no absolutely and that's something. I saw firsthand when I first started using it back in the day in day in. And it's something that I feel like. Sometimes there's a bit of a stigma with jumping road that you need to be well coordinated or athlete to be successful with it. And that's something we've really tried to think about when we built the cross rope system and what we've learned by running workshop shops especially early on is that we've really found a way to drastically accelerate the learning learning curve and That religious goes into something. I'm sure we'll hit on. But it's the the weighted rope aspect and so when a lot of people. I started jumping rope or they try to learn how to jump rope. It's typically with the CDC ROPE. Something you'd you'd find out that. Nisar Department Store what most gyms Carey in trouble with that. Is that throat this to light? And so if you're struggling with coordination or tiny becomes really difficult to tiny jumps and that's where a lateral a lot of mistakes in triplets. Happened in where the frustration comes from. And so what we've done is we've introduced a range of weighted ropes in for example when we speak with our customers were just getting started. We often recommend a half pound. Roper Market Lean set and it's ideal getting started or because what it does is it slows down your rotation and that extra little bit of resistance makes it easy to feel the rope turning around your body and that helps with the timing the coordination so you know we have seen people who try jumping rope with plastic. Pbc ropes. I should say in the past go from struggling to string along fifty to one hundred jumps within five minutes so I think the that piece of it. The coordination is super important from both sides of it. You're already in athlete. Experienced Stephanie. Going TO HELP IMPROVE. foot speed. And if you've never jump rope before you feel like you're not at that level yet. In terms of coordination there are ways where the system kind helps you learn this particular skill and exercise very quickly. I think what's touchback on? Then is that you mentioned. There is some stigma. Wave jumping rope. We think because of it being portrayed in films and other forms of media crossovers and all sorts. It makes us being the we. The average person have tried it before. Call just dive in and do it. And I've always said to myself the arm too heavy footed or to not like my feet. I'm really bad at jumping rope so I just stopped myself from other trying even though I know. Be a helpful tool. So how are you trying to help? People get over the stigma to understand that it can be for everyone. And if they gave the Patrol I really understand what you mean by. Having a slight resistance failed to get more controlled. How you hoping people vs into that transition of like item do this. We try to tackle it a few different ways. And I'll tell you a quick story. I mean when we were at the Arnold Classic in Ohio a couple of years ago you know they have like two hundred thousand people walking by and we held a little sixty second challenge at our booth where it was basically a you know trying to do as many jumps as you can with a one pound and winner at the end you know. We gave away a couple of a couple of sets and it was really opening to us to see just how little people know about way. Ropes feel that you get and it's and it's you know when we see you know big guys come by and trying to do this challenge and the just getting absolutely winded within sixty seconds looks on their faces really kind of told everything and so for us. It's been a challenge to kind of share that experience through our marketing and through our storytelling and saint goes with you. Know getting started because of the stigma because of the challenges people may have faced in the past and what you may be seeing in the media the ways we try to approach it is really through education and so we try to share the experiences of other jumpers in our community who have kind of gone through that experience themselves we have a lot of tutorials and beginner oriented. Workouts are fitness at and so we help guide people through those where it really helps. You know how to get started. I feel with other jump ropes. You don't really get the content piece in that sometimes make makes it really difficult because you you get the rope in. You're not sure what to do with it. And then you know we I think the most interesting pieces just People don't know what to compare it to the weighted rope aspects. Because they've never tried anything like that and so we really try to make it as easy as possible to give cross rope a try so you know we we have a sixty day. Return policy rarely used. You know we we tell people hate. Get the ropes experience for yourself. See The difference. If you don't like it we'll take the we'll take it back and give a full refund in through those efforts. We've got a lot of people to give the system a try and once you try it. You instantly know the difference. He has certainly see it for yourself. Because when you feel that resistance heavy rope turning around your body at it's a game changer. As it was for me when I first tried

Basketball Raven Crossroads Boxing CEO Bristol NFL Iran Amina ABC Nisar Department Store Stephanie Ohio Carey