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A highlight from Centers for Disease Control Museum

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

06:56 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Centers for Disease Control Museum

"Of 2020, Luis Shah was thinking a lot about the pandemic. But not our pandemic. The influenza pandemic of 1918. Because Luis a curator of the CDC museum, and an early 2020, she was getting ready for an exhibit on how the 1918 pandemic shaped science and society. But then news started circulating at the CDC. News about a brand new virus. One called COVID-19. And that was when they had to change their plans. By early March 2020, it was really clear that we had to get on top of it. And it has been so different from anything that we have collected and documented in the past. The collection at the CDC museum, it's like a time capsule of every public health crisis that's happened in the last century. Take, for example, the polio exhibit. Wander over there, and you'll see a big hulking iron lung. Which is wonderful mayonnaise Barton Apia lived in for over 40 years. That, I think, is a crowd favorite. Then there's a glass jug filled with this noxious looking yellow water. And that water comes from the Bellevue Stratford hotel in Philadelphia. In 1976, bacteria in that hotel's HVAC system caused an outbreak of a mysterious respiratory illness at a convention of the American legion. The disease was dubbed legionnaires disease. The legionella branch had a big gallon jug of this killer water and we finally talked them out of it and we have it on display at the museum. And I say it's priceless, but it has no value at all. There's also exhibits on the obesity epidemic in the United States. And on the health impacts of secondhand smoking. And I do want to do a shout out for a smallpox eradication collection. We have probably the most stellar smallpox eradication collection anywhere. You can even try on a hazmat suit if that's the kind of thing that strikes your fancy. I mean, come on. But it's one thing to track down an old iron lung or charm your colleagues out of a murky jug of water years after the crisis has abated. It's something else entirely to collect artifacts from a pandemic, you're currently living through. We were doing a rapid response collecting kind of approach that we were trying to collect materials in real time. But rapid response collecting is a little bit like asking curators to peer into a crystal ball. You have to predict what objects people in the future will really connect with. Which ones will help them really understand what it was like to live through this crisis? So when reports about COVID-19 first started coming in, Luis sprang into action and cast a wide net. In early 2020, when a cruise ship called the diamond princess, had an outbreak on board, the museum approached first responders and quarantine passengers, and asked them, hey, do you have anything for us? In response, they got passenger correspondence, even a copy of a diary. And when CDC artists created the first medical illustration of the SARS CoV-2 virus, the museum nabbed one of the 3D models that they worked from. And of course, there was one object in particular that soon became a really big deal. One that reminded Luis a lot of 1918. There was the whole issue in 1918 about masking and there were mass shortages. So the Red Cross were doing like these events where it was women that joined together to make masks. Sounds familiar. Flash forward to the PPE shortages in the spring of 2020, and Americans are once again breaking out their sewing machines. And the museum made sure to collect some of those homemade masks. And as the CDC also rushed to certify the safety of new companies that wanted to manufacture N95 masks, the museum stashed away some of those that passed the CDC's muster. Luis says museum's first realized that they needed a rapid response collecting strategy after September 11th. Like people would put up a fly or have you seen my son or you have seen my mother, those kinds of things. And they were collecting the teddy bears at the sites. And it's a kind of collecting ephemera that if you don't collect it right at the moment, it might disappear. In 2014, the CDC museum put this new rapid response collecting into action with the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. And they knew they wanted to tell a story that was bigger than just the CDC's role. They wanted to represent all of the different perspectives in this collection that they were building, including artifacts from the community and religious leaders who stepped up to help fight the Ebola virus. We had aman and administer that actually shared copies of their Quran in the Bible that was mocked up with passages that documented why it was okay to have safe burial practices that were being recommended quarantine procedures. I will say in Ebola exhibit that was probably the most popular section of the entire exhibit. Included was a healer's bottle donated by the Sierra Leone indigenous traditional healers union. And it's wrapped with threads and cowry shells and was used to wash hands. The items showed that it wasn't enough for health officials just to promote safe practices. The messages also had to come from people who were trusted in their own communities. Rumors were an incredible issue in West Africa at the time, particularly early in the epidemic. Some people thought Ebola wasn't real. There was all sorts of things like, you know, this was purposeful, you know, people drinking bleach. That sounds sort of familiar, doesn't it? With the torrents of misinformation around COVID-19. The museum has had no trouble finding these kinds of artifacts to add to its collection. Things like anti vaccine posters. You might even say some of these artifacts come to them. Occasionally we'll have protesters in front of CDC and we have collected their materials. And they're sort of

CDC Luis Luis Shah Barton Apia Bellevue Stratford Hotel Legionnaires Disease Ebola Influenza Polio Smallpox Philadelphia Obesity Sars United States Red Cross West Africa Sierra Leone Indigenous Tradit Aman
A highlight from Abandoned Chacaltaya Ski Resort

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

00:59 sec | Last week

A highlight from Abandoned Chacaltaya Ski Resort

"This is Mendoza. He's 61 now, and he's telling me about one of his childhood memories. Yeah, we need you. We're at the neo Nazi and William of service as a business. I was 9 years old when my grandmother showed me a picture in a magazine. It was a picture of a man skiing down a beautiful snowy mountain. Don Samuel grew up in el alto. One of the biggest cities in Bolivia, Ned age 9, he never been to a mountain. So he was mesmerized by this image. I mean, well, I don't know. So I asked my grandmother, where was this? And she said up north and chakal taya. And I said I want to be a skier, like this.

Mendoza Don Samuel El Alto Skiing Bolivia Chakal Taya
A highlight from S1E8:  Our 14 Biggest STR Lessons Learned

Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

00:55 sec | Last week

A highlight from S1E8: Our 14 Biggest STR Lessons Learned

"Called our 14 biggest lessons learned. Why don't you have a sound for that? I don't know. The average occupancy rate in the U.S. is 48% for all air-b-n-b's. But the U.S. city with a highest average occupancy rate is all the way up at 68%. So take a guess what city that is? And everyone else? See your breath on Windows. Let's start to try again. On my way through. I started on my way through. All

U.S. 48% 68% 14 Biggest Lessons Windows
A highlight from Micropia

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

08:23 min | Last week

A highlight from Micropia

"In almost any love story. There's this part where one person sets eyes on the other. And suddenly, their whole world opens up. And from that moment on, everything changes. That is exactly what happened to Antony von leeuwenhoek. Chapter one love at first sight. Once upon a time, 1674, to be exact. Antony von leeuwenhoek was living in the Netherlands. And he was a Draper. He spent a lot of his life looking really closely at different types of fabric. He actually ground his own teeny, tiny single lens microscopes. In Antony was also a curious guy. So one day, he collected some water from a nearby Lake and put it under one of his microscopes. And suddenly, something very strange came into focus. Bizarre looking creatures world and zipped around in that drop of water. It was an entire, tiny universe. Some people call this story, the start of microbiology. But to me, it's the meat cube. It's the moment when humans first set eyes. On microbes. And today, we're visiting a museum that traces the history of this small but big love story. Through good times and bad through sickness and health. I'm Dylan theras, and this is Atlas obscura. A daily celebration of the world's strange, incredible and wondrous places. Today, we're going to micropia. The world's only museum dedicated to microscopic organisms. And we're going to learn about our invisible life companions who we truly truly can't live without. That's after this. Chapter two you've been here all along. This love story is kind of like one of those hallmark holiday movies. Where the main character is on the brink of marrying some very attractive, very successful person that they met in the big city. But then they come home and realize that their true love has always been there. That they grew up together. They were always in each other's lives, and they just didn't realize that they're Bond. Was so intimate. Do I think about Microsoft? Well, pretty much yeah. But that's simply because microbes have a hand in, well, everything really. There's not a thing you can think of that microbes aren't linked to. Jasper bax is a microbiologist who heads up micropia in Amsterdam. It's part museum, part tiny zoo, and part laboratory. For hundreds of different kinds of microorganisms. He says microbes and humans, they go way back. Take, for example, cyanobacteria. They produce up to 70% of our oxygen and have been doing so for 3 billion years. So without those microbes, we wouldn't be here or at least not in the shape and form that we are now using oxygen to live. Microbes have also helped us eat for. Well, at least the past 13,000 years. We've been making beer and bread for that amount of time. And of course, back then people didn't know that there were very small organisms that were actually helping them make that beer or bread or whatever food they were fermenting. So across the globe for tens of thousands of years, we've basically been getting drinks and having dinner dates with our microbe France. Whether through beer, kefir in jira or say cheese. So they went roaming around. Carrying the milk with their cattle with them. But those bacteria that were already in the stomachs of those stat cattle started to ferment the milk into cheese or other dairy products. But it took until 350 years ago or something before the first microbes were actually made visible. Remember, that's when our hunky Draper Antony from chapter one first peered into his microscope. At micropia, you can actually relive this moment of boy meets E. coli for yourself. We have overturned different species of microbes that you can actually see with your own eyes. Varying from bacteria to from that yeast to archaea. When we say microbes, we're basically referring to any microscopic living thing. That includes the bacteria that live on a light switch or the yeast that makes your sourdough rise or even the teeny tiny animals so small that they're only visible under a microscope. Like the tardigrade. I'm not sure if you can call it, cut leave it in comparison to bacteria or fungi or whatever. It has a more cuddly appearance, I guess. Under a microscope, the tardigrade looks a little bit like an 8 legged bear with the hole in the middle of its face. It's sort of like it looks like a teeny tiny gummy bear to me. And it is pretty cute. They're there have been Facebook fan pages for our water bears. There's been a water bear in the new Star Trek series on Netflix. I mean, they're everywhere. They're in South Park. What a bit of water dwelling, 8 legged micro animals. Damn it. They wouldn't have nature's most resilient animals. Studies have shown they can survive the tardigrade, of course, is more than cute. It's also super super metal. The tardigrade can survive extreme conditions like being below freezing and above boiling temperatures and can even survive in space. And one of the ways that it does this is by expelling all of the water out of its body and entering a coma like state for sometimes decades, until it's safe enough for it to resurrect itself. But that's an aside. This love story isn't about water bears or beers. The things that microbes can do, like, say, drive fermentation are amazing. They are life sustaining. But they can also go too far. And the same process if you don't stop it in time, it becomes something you don't like. It starts to rot and you have to throw it out. There is such a thing as too much of a good thing. It's true in love, and it's true in microbes. Chapter three the honeymoon is over. We're arriving at that moment in a relationship. When you realize that the love of your life has a gross side. In micropia, you'll see an exhibit lined with big glass jars. Where different foods take on new shapes and colors. Like a block of cheese, flecked with emerald green and blanketed in a thick white fuzz. This chapter's protagonist is a French scientist. By the name of Louis Pasteur. You might have seen his name in the dairy aisle because he invented pasteurization. He discovered that at the phase of many rotting processes wasn't some random luck. It was microbes that actually caused those processes. So he also found the same thing with diseases. In 1861, Louis Pasteur identified bacteria as agents of sickness. Ushering in a new era of germ theory. On one hand, this was incredibly valuable lifesaving science. It's why we survive bacterial infections that people use to regularly die from. On the other hand, Pasteur's discovery left another enduring legacy. Jasper says a lot of people equate microbes with toxicity, disease, rot and death. And that complicates our love affair a little bit. To, quote, Brittany.

Antony Von Leeuwenhoek Dylan Theras Jasper Bax Draper Antony Draper Antony The Netherlands Amsterdam E. Coli Microsoft France South Park Netflix Coma Louis Pasteur Facebook Pasteur Jasper
A highlight from Tree of 40 Fruits

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

02:58 min | Last week

A highlight from Tree of 40 Fruits

"Today, we're going to Silicon Valley the home of pretty much every tech company you can imagine. There's Apple, Facebook, Google. But it wasn't always like this. In the early 20th century, this place was known as the valley of the heart's delight. The largest fruit producing area on the planet. My dad used to tell me about the cherry and apricot orchards that surrounded the house where he grew up. His own father, my grandfather, worked at a fruit cannery for his entire adult life. And in the springtime, the valley was filled with flowering trees, covered in blossoms of every imaginable shade of red and white. That's all mostly gone now. Suburban neighborhoods and office parks came for the orchards first. And these days, the valley is more about hard drives than fruit harvests. But recently, an artist created a work of art. A living work of art that pays tribute to the history of the valley of the hearts delight. It's a single tree that bears 40 different varieties of fruit. One tree. 40 fruits. I'm Annie eubank, and this is Atlas obscura, a celebration of the world's strange, incredible, and wonders places. Today, I visit the tree of 40 fruits in San Jose, California. Right after this. Sending people money has gotten a lot easier over the years, and that's exactly what zell does. Zell is a great way to send money straight to family and friends bank accounts. No matter where they bank in the U.S. and you can do it right from your banking app. One of the best parts about Zelle is that it's already in a thousand different banking apps, which means it's probably in yours. So no new downloads. Look for Zelle in your banking app today. To make a difference, you have to take action. On lava for good podcast, righteous convictions with Jason flom. I sit down with an active and diverse who's who of thought leaders and change makers. Sir Richard Branson. How do every 8 people who are executed? One person is found conclusively innocent. Ashley jud coming from the coal fields of eastern Kentucky. There was just extraordinary both environmental exploitation and labor exploitation. Alexander McLean. I became interested in the law, especially through learning about the death penalty in America. Listen in as they, and many others share the stories that change the course of their lives on season two of righteous convictions with Jason flop.

Annie Eubank Silicon Valley Zelle Apple Facebook Google Jason Flom Zell San Jose Ashley Jud California Sir Richard Branson America Alexander Mclean Kentucky Jason
A highlight from AT#779 - Maine Windjammer Cruise

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

07:17 min | Last week

A highlight from AT#779 - Maine Windjammer Cruise

"Amateur traveler episode 779. Today batten down the hatches and raised the main solid we're going to do a different type of episode with no fixed itinerary as we head down east to do a main wind jammer cruise. Welcome to the amateur traveler I'm your host Chris Christensen. Let's go sailing in Maine. I'd like to welcome to the show Sharon kurz Sharon Kurtz is a travel writer. You can find her work at Sharon K Kurtz dot com. And Sharon has come to talk to us about a win jammer cruise in Maine, Sharon welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me. And when we talk about a win jammer cruise, first of all, what are we talking about? Well, this is a tall ship in Maine along the coast that travels only by the winds. There is no motor at all on this cruise. And what's your connection with main wind shimmer? Well, I am a travel writer. And I was invited by the main wind chamber association to take this one week cruise with the Lewis R French the oldest wind jammer sailing vessel in America, and I jumped at the chance. Well, and when Sharon wrote to me and talked to me about this cruise, my only hesitation was that if I had her on the show to tell you about this cruise, then they wouldn't invite me and it really honestly made me pause. But Sharon, why do you think people should take a win jammer crews? It is a vacation experience. Unlike any you have probably had. You enjoy the beautiful scenery of mains unspoiled coastline up close. And experience the freedom and joy of sailing by wind. With sailing on a historic schooner is an experience like none other that I can think about. It's not your average cruise vacation. It's more like camping on a boat anchored in the ocean. Excellent. And tell us more about what a cruise is going to be like. Where did you go from? What did you see? And what was life on board like? We went from Camden Maine. The main wind jimmer association represents 9 different historic schooners in Maine. And some depart from Camden and some depart from rockland. So we were on the Lewis R French that is docked in Camden. We flew into Bangor rented a car and drove to Camden departed from the dock there. Okay. We sail all around the penobscot bay. That is the beauty of taking a wind jammer cruise from Maine. You are in this bay that is protected and you're always in view of the shore. And it's rocky shoreline and beautiful pristine waters and sea life and eagles and it's just magical. You can really get away and relax. Now, the perhaps got bay is an archipelago of a number of islands near there, so you've got deer island and swans island and also just a little further north from there. A well-known island with Acadia national park on it. Are you stopping along the way at various places on the shore or what are you doing? Well, we go where the wind takes us and where the captain looks at the winds and decides where the ship's going to go. So there is no itinerary. And when we went, we went around deer island. We didn't make it all the way up to Acadia national park. But we anchored for the night and secluded coves and harbors. And then we would start the next morning and go wherever the wind would take us. And so the entire experience is on the boat. You're not doing anything else exploring the different islands. No, actually, we got off the boat every single evening we would anchor in a cove within daylight hours and then we either we went by the little rowboat to the shore to explore that island. Sometimes it was a little village and sometimes it was a secluded island, but we had lots of opportunities every night of the cruise to get off the ship. Well, and you say by a little rowboat so we should probably put some scale in place. How many people are on the boat? It allowed for about 6, 6 people at a time. The Lewis French had 20 passengers. It is one of the smallest wind jammers in the fleet. And it's the oldest. It's a 150 years old. This year. So we had 20 passengers and there were 7 couples and then a father and son duo. And then there were four singles. So there were 8 cabins for doubles and then four singles and then the crew, there were 5 crew members. Okay. The captain, the cook and tech answer. Yes, the deck hands, there were four decades. And you might be surprised to hear three of them were women. Okay. And they were amazing. They could scramble up those ropes. They could do anything a man could do and better. And faster. Okay. So and the Lewis French is a schooner. I don't know whether we said that or not. And that will mean something to some people in terms of what the shape of the sales are. But it's a relatively fast boat for a sailing. Ship I'm assuming? Yes, it is because and he has won the captain, Garth wells, has won numerous races with his vote. The Lewis our French is one of the fastest in the fleet because it's one of the smallest. Okay. As Gunnar is a historic sailing ship and it has multiple mass two different masks and multiple sales. And no motor. Right. So tell us about a typical day. A typical day, we would wake up as you would like. Some people really love the early mornings and sneak up to the deck and there's also always coffee and pastries waiting for us from the cook's galley. And then we have breakfast together. Now, meals are served on the deck. All the prepared in this teeny tiny galley, you don't even know how they could possibly do it. But they do it beautifully. And then mid morning after breakfast, we start to sail. And that will depend on the winds, whether they're heavy or light and how much sale, the captain decides to put up and we would just

Maine Sharon Camden Chris Christensen Sharon Kurz Sharon Kurtz Main Wind Chamber Association Lewis R Sailing Deer Island Jimmer Association Acadia National Park Swans Island Penobscot Bay Rockland Bangor Lewis America Garth Wells Gunnar
A highlight from 546a Greek Godmother; Lidia's American Dream; Promised Land

Travel with Rick Steves

05:22 min | Last week

A highlight from 546a Greek Godmother; Lidia's American Dream; Promised Land

"Enhance the role of the extended family around special occasions too. For a look at what it means to be named a child's God parent in Greece, we're joined by tour guide, Maria sulus. She's a godmother to three who takes her responsibilities very seriously. Maria, first of all, how did a British woman like yourself end up living in Athens? Well, when I was studying at college in England in the northeast of England, I met a tall dark handsome Greek, and the rest is history. And you've lived in Greece, lived in Greece since 1982. Can an English woman who marries into the Greek community be accepted after three decades? Oh, absolutely. I was accepted a lot earlier than three decades. Really? Part of the community. And that's an intimate part because apparently people have chosen you to be their child's godmother. That's right. So what's the role you heard in my introduction what I described in east Germans, I was so struck by that. Did that resonate with you? Very, very much so religion within the Greek community is you won't find the church's full every Sunday, but it still plays a very, very important part in their lives, and it starts with the baptism and the child is received into the orthodox church, receives its name and is accepted as part of the orthodox community. And basically the role of the God parent is one of like a sponsor or basically answering the questions that have been asked by the priest on behalf of this child. It's very, very important that the role is taken seriously because it's a life long. This is something that you can't just take on. So the friend, the religious friend is there at the baptism sort of supporting the parents and being part of the ceremony and formerly becoming the God parent of that child as he or she is baptized. The most important person apart from the child is the God parent because the parents are entrusting the child to the goddess in a Catholic. Absolutely. Because we have God parents also. There's not the same reliance. No. It stems back from early Christianity when Christians were being persecuted and often they would be killed and they would literally choose somebody to take care of their child to carry on this teaching of the Christian faith because in early Christian was likely to be martyred. Correct, yeah. I didn't realize that's where God parents came from. So you have three Friends apparently that have chosen you to be a godmother who are these friends and they trust you. Good question. It started with it was actually my husband's best friend when they got married they chose us as their best man and woman. Their Cuba, traditionally, it's the Kumari, who become the godparents of the first born child. And that was how it started. And even though I wasn't Christian orthodox, both of the parents got special permission basically from the priest that I be allowed to participate in your Christian but just not Greek Orthodox. And the Greek Orthodox priest said, yeah, that's okay. Yeah, he'd check me out and make sure that he friends this way. So this was it, so they were both Greeks and then my second God daughter, she, her mother is English and the father is Greek. They asked me to be godmother now, Millie's grown-up. She's going to college and they now live in the UK. They come over to Greece, and I love spending time with her. And the youngest God child that I have is nicos. He's just turned 12. He's the light of my life. And his mother is Scottish and his father is Greek. The light of your light. When you said that, it was the joy I felt when I witnessed the little girl running to her godmother and godfather in Afghan when I was there for Easter recently, just delight his love just like having a child. So you said yes three times. a lot of work. I mean, I said yes, because, you know, there's no follow through. My world just okay, and I mean, I'm embarrassed about that. But in Greece, you really it's an ongoing responsibility. What's expected of a godmother in Greece? Well, once obviously the service is over, your main role traditionally would be to ensure that the child follows the Christian orthodox faith, that they attend the church services that they attend communion. But it's more than that really for me. I like to take on the role with them is somebody that I can turn to if there's an issue going on with them that they may be can't talk to their parents about or so it's really to be like a confidant, somebody that they can turn to if they're whatever their problems are, because parents have a certain role that understandably a child might not feel comfortable going so they God mother or father can provide that. That's a beautiful thing. And then there's also you take on the role of things like Christmas and eastern name days that being there for their school parties and school presentations and award ceremonies and swim meets and all that kind of things. So just standing in at some of these orthodox services they last forever and you stand up. That's where you believe it. I was there at Easter. It was like, people have been here for 24 hours. They come and go for a lunch or dinner or something. A regular service on a Sunday will last for three hours. We don't stay for the duration. I hate to do it. British born Maria sulus is called Greece home for more than three decades. Right now on travel with Rick Steves, she's telling us about the responsibilities that come with being designated a godmother for her friend's children. And also the Greek Orthodox traditions, she helps to maintain in their lives. By the way, our conversation was recorded before the global pandemic. So you're doing a good job.

Greece Maria Sulus England Nicos Athens Orthodox Church Maria Kumari Millie Cuba UK Rick Steves
A highlight from Looking for Pawpaws

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

06:44 min | Last week

A highlight from Looking for Pawpaws

"We went for a walk in the Woods. There's no real trail. So we're like climbing over branches and you know, I don't know what we're looking for. I've never seen a pop pod tree. Sarah is my guide. Here is a poison poison ivy vein. I'm not gonna put my foot up on there. And she explained to me that she and she finds a lot of solace to sort of like in wandering in the Woods. This is kind of like her happy place. When I see familiar plants when I'm in a place like this, though, it makes it just gives me a sense of comfort. And so I was, you know, trying to race back to and after a wander and then all of a sudden, she's just like, huh. Look. What? What? Did she find one? And we spotted our first pawpaw tree. This is a baby one. Oh hello hello. Here's just a little tiny yellow one. Look at its beautiful leaves. So it didn't have any fruit when it was maybe one or two feet tall. Okay, so but still, it was like, okay signs of life. Like this is promising, you know? Sarah, that was coming from Ohio. She had not looked for pawpaws in these Woods before. But I guess the forums, the pawpaw chat rooms. Sure. The secret Facebook groups. Dark web pop pot dark web. She had scouted out the location, but we didn't have confirmation that we were in the right place so that this would be it, we didn't know what we would find. Would there be pawpaws there? And if there were papa trees, would they be with their fruit? So we see this baby. That's a positive sign. But no fruit because it's a baby. So we keep walking deeper into the Woods. And we're walking, walking. We kind of knew what to look for because one thing that she had explained that I had read in my research, part of the reason why pawpaws are hard to cultivate is that they're also fussy about the way that they grow. So when they're very small, they're like shade. But then when they get bigger, they want sun. And obviously the tree can't move. So it's surroundings have to change over the years in just the right way. That's tricky in nature. Yeah. So if you're gonna find a big pawpaw tree, you kind of want to find like a clearing in the Woods. Because it needs to be an open enough area where there's sunlight coming in that would have caught a baby paw pow that started in the shade and helped it grow to adulthood. And so we're looking down the way and I see some rays of sunlight coming through dappling the forest floor, and we're looking we start walking towards that way and then now because I've seen one, I recognize the leaves. I said, that's a pawpaw. Is that one? Yes. Okay, okay. But it still looks too so we start going towards it and now we find a bigger pop out and within a couple of minutes we've found another one. Now we're like, we're in the patch. Yes. That one looks a little that looks bigger. Yes. Yes. What is that a papa? That that should be a pop up, yes. So all in all we found, I would say three or four pawpaw trees in a close proximity. The biggest of which were several times my height. As big as a two story house. Yeah. You know, not redwoods, but legit trees. I assume you found a bunch of big, beautiful pop off routes that you plucked gently from the trees and ate with delight. No. Okay. It seems like for a long time, people love. Pawpaws. Like indigenous people ate them early colonialists ate them. I read that George Washington actually grew them. So why don't we eat them now? The fruits that we're accustomed to buying the supermarket have been cultivated and industrialized in part for uniformity. Yeah. The papa has not been industrialized. It hasn't been tamed. And so there can be a wide variation for one tree to the next and also a wide variation depending on how many days since it came off the tree. Part of these white paw paws have not been industrialized is that they're very fickle. And they rot quickly after being picked. So they're not, they don't stay good for very long so they're not great for being shipped all over the place to supermarkets. Especially when you're talking about trees, I mean, you need a pawpaw tree to be several years old before it will even start to bear fruit. So the process of breeding pawpaws to get to the point where you had pawpaw trees that were easier to grow and that would bear fruit that would stay good for longer off the vine or off the branch and be able to be transported. You're talking about at least a ten and probably at least a 20 year project. With an uncertain result. I'm sorry to hear that you didn't find any pawpaws in the wild, but it sounds like your guide Sara actually brought some along for you to try. What did they taste like when you first tried them? First thing you notice is the texture. It's soft, almost custardy, like a very ripe mango. There's a little bit of a stringy flesh to it. But you can literally just sort of pull it apart with your fingertips and it kind of mushes together in your hand. You press on the skin and it just pulls apart and you get to this flesh on the inside. And then it tastes, it tastes citrusy. It had like a very slight sort of earthy function to it. It was delicious, but also sort of like, there's a lot of cognitive dissonance when you're eating it. Like, you know, Dylan, you ever like, you're at a party and you're drinking and everyone has the same color like plastic cup, and you put your drink down. Sure. And then you go to pick up a drink, thinking that you're drinking. You take a sip and it wasn't your drink. Yeah. And you're like, wait, what did I just taste? You were drinking a beer and you pick it up and it's like Sprite. Yeah. And your brain gets so confused because you're like, that wasn't beer, but what was it? Because you didn't expect to just show you that expectations are a big part of the taste experience. So the pawpaw, so in Congress because everything tells you it should be tropical, but you're like in the Woods and the New York metro area or Ohio or one of the Carolinas, and you're like, what? What is this doing here? And so I found it also very hard to wrap my brain around it. I have to say, it feels like pawpaws are making a comeback in a big way. Like I've heard that a lot of people are growing them in their backyards. I know there's a program at Kentucky state university where they grow them and even the fact that we are talking about them, it seems like maybe they are coming back into style. So I think that pawpaws are definitely due for a moment.

Sarah Ohio Woods Facebook George Washington Sara Dylan Carolinas Congress Kentucky State University New York
A highlight from Thanksgiving Thanks 2021

Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

06:38 min | Last week

A highlight from Thanksgiving Thanks 2021

"The extra pack of peanuts travel podcast, episode four 87. Over half of all the turkeys produced in the U.S. come from just four states. What states are they? Latin straw can an open plain, and we forgot this old cities name, see your breath on window pain. Let's just do it strike again. On my way through. I start you on my way through. All right, I thought Heather was looking at my screen. What she was. She wasn't looking for the answer. No, that's okay. You were looking because you wanted to reread the question. So let me repeat the question for everyone else in case you didn't get it. Over half of all the turkeys produced. And that's a weird word to say, produce, but that is, I played with that for a little bit and it just, that was the word you had to use. Produced in the U.S. come from just four states and in fact, you say raised? I was going to say they're raised on fire. Probably the most Turkey that people are eating is not really wild. Okay, probably be better. Over half of all the turkeys raised in the U.S.. There we come from just four states. And in fact, honestly, there's two that are three and four are yeah, okay, I get it. They're on there because they make up a little bit. But the top two producers are the top two. Producers, yes, produce razors. Razors. Firmed farmers. So you're really, really messing this up. And well, here you go, hath. I mean, take a guess. I don't even know where to begin. That's why I was kind of stumped by the question. I really had to take a guess and this probably won't help you, but it might help other people out there. But give me your guess without a hand. West Virginia. Okay, West Virginia not on the list. And here's the other thing about these states is they're not all next to each other either. I thought maybe it would be, oh, there's a pocket where turkeys like this climb is just awesome for turkeys. No, they're kind of spread out a little bit. This might help some people out there. The one state is home to Jenny O, which is the second biggest Turkey producer. Let's call it that in the U.S.. And the other state is home to butterball, which is the number one Turkey producer. I mean, are people suppose this common knowledge? I don't butterball. I have no idea. All right. If you guys get this, good for you. Number one with 18% of all turkeys is Minnesota and that is home to Jenny O, the second biggest producer. And number two is I don't know I didn't give the drum roll from Minnesota, but I thought it was more applicable here because it is North Carolina. Okay. Home of butterball and in fact, $848 million of Turkey is a year from North Carolina. So it might not have the most turkeys, but it has the most expensive turkeys. Not sure. Why? Very interesting statistics today. Turkey production trivia here on the epo podcast. And we talk in Turkey's, of course, because we're talking Thanksgiving thanks. This is a question you might know a little better 'cause your memory is good. What was the first year that we released our Thanksgiving thanks podcast? I don't know. 20 15. Oh, close. I was about to give you the clapping. No. Other way. 2014. 2014, this is our 8th year in a row. Our Thanksgiving thanks podcast. And yeah, it took me a little digging to actually figure this out. Because what year did we start the podcast? 2013. So literally the second year. Yes, the second year. So we've been to 8 years in a row is a long time. And but we love it. We actually even know we're in the midst of changing up the podcast. You guys have been listening, you know, we are doing seasons. The season that we are releasing at this point is the short term rental season where we talk about our short term rental journey. But you actually said to me the other day and I had kind of forgotten about this, hey, we gotta do our Thanksgiving thanks, podcast. We have to we love doing this podcast. I mean, I know that we say this about a lot of the podcasts they were record, but it really is one of our favorite ones because it gives us time to reflect over the year about things that we are thankful for and trav, you also kind of put a spin on it that they're unexpected things. It doesn't. I like to be unexpected. I like to go unexpected. I like to think about and say, all right, last Thanksgiving, what are some things that have happened to our life since that Thanksgiving the past Thanksgiving that I wouldn't have thought would have happened or they weren't on our calendar. We weren't really planning them. On today's list, I actually go from the things that are maybe were more expected to the ones that we never could have guessed on my list. Okay, yeah. So we both do it a little differently because while some of my things are unexpected, they're not all super unexpected. That's cool. That's cool. And the purpose of doing this was AS, I mentioned frustration, but B our whole goal too is if you're listening this and maybe you're traveling for Thanksgiving this year. Maybe you're not, and you're just listening, this comes out right before Thanksgiving. Is to just give you some time to think on what your last year has been like and what are some things that you are thankful for. So we like to do it for ourselves, but also hopefully inspires you or motivates you to take some time ten, 15, 20, 30 minutes, sit down and give yourself some space to think about that. Because usually it takes us about 30 to 45 minutes to come up with our list. And then, of course, now we're recording it. And so that's another 30, 45 minutes. So I had a you had 7, but I still want you to start. Okay, I want you to start because my 8th is one that if you are a veteran of the show, you've listened to all our thanksgivings. You might know what I'm going to end with. It's become a little bit of a tradition here on the Thanksgiving thanks podcast. So it's really I'm not even sure what it is.

Jenny O U.S. Turkey West Virginia Minnesota North Carolina Heather
The Empress Sets Sail From Mumbai

Cruise Radio News Briefs

00:24 sec | 2 months ago

The Empress Sets Sail From Mumbai

"The former royal caribbean ship empress of the eases now sailing again at a new home the indian line cordelia cruises bought the vessel from royal. Last year shortening. Her name to simply empress and was refurbished last week. The vessel set sail on her first voyage from mumbai on a tonight cruise to nowhere. The ship is currently sailing at full capacity with fully vaccinated residents of

Royal Caribbean Sailing Mumbai
Exploring the Inner Hebrides

Travel with Rick Steves

02:24 min | 2 months ago

Exploring the Inner Hebrides

"In some ways. The traditions of scotland survive most vividly in its islands off the west coast. These are the hebrides we've invited to of our favorite scottish guides into the studio to share stories and tips on their favorite islands. Liz listener is from fife. Cullen mirrors is from glasgow. And they're both here with us now to share a little better understanding of scotland's inner hebrides. Thanks for joining us. Thank you he cullen when you Think about the hebrides. We hear that word a lot hebrides. These are the islands off of the west scotland. But there's inner and outer hebrides. What's the story there. So and our hebrides. They're basically the ones that are closer to mainland scotland to hebrides further out. So probably most people going to visit islands of scotland and are of to access lists when you're thinking of the inner hebrides which ones are your favorites in which one's the most popular with tourists. Well open which is on the west coast of scotland is known as the charing cross of the islands as the saying the air unto the lord belongs and all the it contains except the kyle's in the western isles for these are all mic planes mcleans caledonian mcleans of the fatty company. So people will come to open. And that's the jumping off point to go to the islands. So open is the charing cross. Charing cross would be the big train station in london. Somewhere you depart go to different places so open would be the jumping off point. It's the big port on the mainland. From where the ferries go absolutely so. Kyle's what is kyle's kyle's of the stretches of water so the leyland's eye for the straight and on the missiles ago everything the lord's except for the aisles and the waters and that could make prince how the the the metrolink and forwards to the islands they caught passengers. The coty fleet the cardi tourists. So this is the ferry system caledonian mcbrayer because every time i think of an island scene. There's a dramatic ferry coming across. It is just beautiful thing. And you have the jumping off point in the real terminal Open and so people coming from moscow will die sleek connect with the on out so an answer to your question. Probably the most popular are the ones closest mull. Iona we can come back to 'cause i owned is really accessible as d. Are right for a particular reason

Scotland Liz Listener West Scotland Fife Cullen West Coast Glasgow Kyle London Moscow
Wonder of the Seas to Debut in US and Europe, Not China

Cruise Radio News Briefs

00:30 sec | 2 months ago

Wonder of the Seas to Debut in US and Europe, Not China

"Royal caribbean has announced that. Its upcoming mega ship. Wonder of the seas will no longer be debuting. In shanghai china the oasis class vessel will now make her first. Voyages in the caribbean starting in march wonder will operate seven seven night. Eastern and western caribbean sailings from port everglades. All featuring a stop at perfect day in may the ship will then head to europe to operate. Seven-night western mediterranean cruises. Wonder of the seas is royals fifth oasis class vessel and is currently the largest cruise ship in the world

Royal Caribbean Shanghai Western Caribbean Port Everglades Caribbean China Western Mediterranean Europe
Are The Changes Princess Cruises Made Any Good?

Essential Cruise Tips

02:02 min | 3 months ago

Are The Changes Princess Cruises Made Any Good?

"Princess cruises has made so many changes to the way they do things but are they all for the good and more importantly will they satisfy people like me and perhaps you who've cruised on princess and actually like the way they were doing things so have they actually make things better or perhaps a little bit worse so i decided to put the five things that they've changed to the test by booking myself on a series of princess cruises to put those to the tests. I'm here one of those right now. I'm on regal princess and join me as you see how some of those changes actually have changed the way that i think about princess cruises by the way if you knew my name is gary benbridge. My goal is to make it easy and fun to discover plant and enjoy unforgettable cruise vacations. The first change is one that a lot of diehard princess fans are probably disappointed about which is the focus on only bigger ships in their fleet really so during the pandemic got rid of four ships. The much loved pacific princess star. Princess see princess and sun princess and then i'll focusing on bigger ships like the Insist that a mom. Which is three thousand five hundred fifty passengers. Will the new ships like the sky. Princess in china process discovery process which is three thousand six hundred sixty passengers. So that's a little bit on the sad side. The focus on bigger ships however for me. Personally i'm actually quite happy about that trend because it means that these ships. They're all pretty much familiar footprint. They are very similar because it's world class ship and they have the things that i realized then stripped out any of the big popular facilities and venues. That certainly are like as they've gone through this whole change so they still have the magnificent glitzy kind of gold ancient which is the real heart of the ship. And it's real throbbing center probably more so than many other cruise lines. you've got the international cafe. You've got bars you've got shops. You've got the photography center. Quick access into the casino and it really is a great throbbing kind of heart of the ship and during cruises. I've found that a really exciting place to

Gary Benbridge China
Do Viking Cruises Lives Up To All The Hype?

Tips for Travellers Podcast

02:08 min | 3 months ago

Do Viking Cruises Lives Up To All The Hype?

"Can viking ocean cruises ever be as good as their fans would lead you to believe. Before i came on viking. I was constantly told by people who love viking ocean that it is wonderful. it's magnificent. It's unique it's different. It's the best it. Does this better that better. So i bought it my very first ocean crews here on viking venus with a little bit of trepidation and some pretty high standards what i can tell you as you see during the course of this. It didn't entirely go to plan. I was blindsided by things. I was surprised by somethings and some things. Were basically pretty much. As i expected but the thing that really stood out no one had really warning about so. Stick with me to find out what those things were if you knew here. I'm gary benbridge. Welcome aboard welcome aboard viking venus. I'm here to make it fun and easy to discover plan and enjoy unforgettable cruise vacations and is viking cruises unforgettable or not one of the things that are arrested with both before i came on cruise and during the cruise is exactly who or what is. Viking oceans like increases is an independent line it was created and is so chaired by its founder. A man called torsten haagen so viking ocean of course came from rivers they started in european rivers and then expanded to rivers around the world and then are also gains expedition. cruising delivered. Experience on viking is pretty luxury but it's not ultra luxury so probably quite comfortably competes with an fits with lines like say. Oh she anya. As amara perhaps even winstar which is pretty luxurious small ships higher level of service good quality fixtures and fittings however. It was very clear that viking has a significant difference to those lines so people who might like those lines like viking. But they'll find something very different because the experience viking is quite different though to those particular lions because at its heart has a very different philosophy. And that's because it came from riveted started with rivers not with ocean and the whole way that they approach and do cruising is pretty

Gary Benbridge Torsten Haagen Winstar Amara
A Look Around Good Vibrations - The Antique Vibrator Museum

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

02:13 min | 3 months ago

A Look Around Good Vibrations - The Antique Vibrator Museum

"The good vibrations antique vibrator museum is about the size of a living room. And in glass cases around the walls arranged in chronological order are about one hundred vibrators dating all the way back from the late. Eighteen hundreds up to the early nineteen seventies and some of them are these beautiful lustrous jewel toned pieces of plastic others not so much they were super steam punk looking in the early twentieth century in and before they were definitely little machines. This is our tour guide carol. Queen carroll is the museum's curator has a phd in sexology and has worked at good vibrations for decades for a first stop on the tour. Carol wanted to introduce us to one of the oldest vibrators in the museum's collection. It's called the v. d. vibrio tori massager. And whether it was supposed to make you think of venereal disease. I don't actually know that's lost in the midst of time at least as far as my information. Sources are concerned the v. is old school. No batteries no electricity. It's got a hand crank. It kind of looks like an egg beater. If i'm honest and the museum has an old photo of a doctor holding a similar vibrator using one hand to operate the crank and the other depress the applicator end of it against a standing woman's back. Yes her back. In the late eighteen hundreds most people would have come into contact with vibrators in the context of a doctor's office in the vibrators early days it was seen as this kind of cure all for all kinds of medical problems and it was used at first in the doctor's office and then later in the home there is an nineteen teens book that was published by the hamilton dietsch company. Yes the same company that makes the blender that we make our margaritas on friday night which made vibrators and was one of the major vibrator manufacturers. There were many but they're one of the major ones in the nineteen so hamilton beach made a vibe and they published a book called health and how to get it

Queen Carroll Venereal Disease Carol Hamilton Dietsch Company Hamilton Beach
Terry Tempest Williams on Her New Book "The Hour of Land"

Travel with Rick Steves

01:55 min | 3 months ago

Terry Tempest Williams on Her New Book "The Hour of Land"

"Terry tempest williams invites us to celebrate the land and the people. You'll meet at a variety of national parks across the united states in her book. The hour of land. She describes the park. She's visited as breathing spaces each with a unique personality that deserve our patronage our respect and our protection by the way our conversation was recorded before the global pandemic. Terry it's good to have you with us. Thank you read your book. The our land takes us not to the obvious parks but it takes us to some of the less famous parks. You chose about a dozen parks to introduce to us why these parks why not win at the grand and famous ones. Would you believe me if i told you that i saw this as a dinner party. You know my mother was a great hostess and she always said you know. Pick your dinner parties very carefully because who knows what will come out of them so you know here. We have fifty nine national parks in our country. How to choose a dozen. So i really did envision it as dinner party i knew who the heads of the table would be my mother park which would be grand teton national park. The other end of the table. I knew it would be canyon. Lands national park where we live closely to. I could count on them then. I thought all right who's gonna be on the other end of the table holding the space that are reliable and for me. It was a canadian national park in maine and teddy roosevelt national park. In north dakota. I had been to the many times and they were trustworthy. Then i thought okay. Who are the dream guests that i would want that. I don't know. But i know other people who do and we can bring them to the table and i thought of big bend national park. I thought of gates of the arctic national park and effigy mounds. And i thought those were my dream guests

Terry Tempest Williams Lands National Park Terry United States Grand Teton National Park Teddy Roosevelt National Park North Dakota Maine Big Bend National Park Arctic National Park
Things Seasoned Cruisers Do: Always Carry a Passport

CruiseTipsTV Unplugged - Cruise Tips and More

01:31 min | 3 months ago

Things Seasoned Cruisers Do: Always Carry a Passport

"Covered this in our last few Episodes were. We talked a little bit about the mistakes that new cruisers make. But this really bears repeating. Because it's a huge thing right now. And i think that this is a takeaway that cruisers who may be new to our podcast or maybe new to cruising they need to hear this but cruisers in the know almost always travel with about sport. And you know of course you can manage a closed loop cruise with birth certificate photo. Id but it's so much easier and so much less risky to invest in a passport and rather than just saying. Trust me on this one. Let me explain if few things you number one if you get stuck in a foreign country for any reason let's say you test positive for covert on a ship and they send you home through another destination and you don't have a passport. You may have a very difficult time getting home. Another thing in the united states. Did you all know that in the coming years you're going to have to have a real d in order to fly so a lot of people are getting real ideas right now in place of their driver's license but another solution to just to have a passport. And if you have a passport you don't need a real. Id because you can fly with a bass board. So i recommend doing it for grownups for anyone who's looking to travel save a little extra money you know. Eat a few less dinners out. Do what you need to do. It's not that terribly overpriced to get a passport. It does take a long time at the moment so get on it do it early. And just just make the investment

United States
How to Choose the Right Cabin on Your Cruise

Essential Cruise Tips

01:55 min | 3 months ago

How to Choose the Right Cabin on Your Cruise

"So the first thing that smart cruises do once they've decided what itinerary they want and what ship they want is think about the cabinet and choosing the cabin. Why is that really important. A lot of people say cabins are not important as just some way to get changed and sleep however. Let me tell you if you get a cabin. That doesn't suit you it will ruin your crews. I have thousands of people. Contact me around this issue. So what do smart cruises. What did i do for this particular cruise. Well first of all. I never ever take a guaranteed fat guaranteed. Fair is where you choose which kevin great you want about caen. Ocean view sweet. Whatever it is and you let the cruise line choose the kevin full you. I will always take the choose. Your own kevin option. Now it's not always necessarily more expensive. So that's the first thing. I do get control of choosing a cabin secondly i would always choose a cabin where i'm surrounded on all sides by the cabin above me below me either side of me and i did opposite me. I'll make sure there's a cabinet then kind of provides a buffer of from any noisy venues that may disrupt you can potentially protect you from high traffic areas or whatever that is really really important. The third thing i then do is make sure that i'm having a with no interconnecting door to the next room. Unless of course i need one because i'm traveling with someone that against really important because noise and disruptions can seep through and become pretty disruptive particularly people next to you have different scheduled to you. The first thing i do. Is i choose a cabin in the center of the ship so middle of the ship and that's really important because first of all it means that you equidistance for more of the key venues and activities so the restaurants might be at the back of the ship or you might find the frontal ships theater so you kind of middle wise. Also it's really important because it's where you're going to have the least amount of movement so that's also good worried about being seasick.

Cabinet Kevin
Exploring the Disney Springs Resort Area: Should You Stay Here?

1923 Main Street: A Daddy Daughter Disney Travel Podcast

02:40 min | 3 months ago

Exploring the Disney Springs Resort Area: Should You Stay Here?

"We're going to be talking. All about the disney springs resort area. Disney springs resort area. One of four. What i call it the disneyworld neighborhoods. I like to talk about them that way. There's the magic kingdom neighborhood the best one and if you are longtime listener you may remember back in episode eleven quite a while ago we talked about the magic kingdom resort area. So if you want to listen to that and you haven't heard it head on back to episode eleven and then of course there's the epcot resort area and the animal kingdom resort area but today we are focusing on the disney springs resort area. Which is pretty underrated. I think it's i think. It's the most underrated resort area of all because it does not have theme parks associated with it so people just overlook it well. What if you don't like the theme parks or what if you don't know what's actually around there so that's what we're going to talk about today. It's sort of exploring. The disney springs resort area one of our favorite neighborhoods. I think it's grown on us over time. Wouldn't you say that. Oh yeah definitely because you start discovering more and more things you can do. That are not necessarily park related which i mean now with the parks being super weird. That might be a good thing for you to go and try and first. Let's talk about accommodations to start with. Because there are two deluxe disney resort villas properties rate at disney springs. One of them is disney's saratoga springs resort and spa which is quite a nice spa. And the other is disney's old key west resort. Both of these are kind of similar in a sense similar in a sense we prefer saratoga springs personally. Because you know why. I forget why i just know i do. Because it's walkup if you stay in college park it's walkable to disney springs so both of these resorts that's not a plus for me are located on or around lake point of vista. Which is the body of water at disney springs. In case you did not know that also the main street name most of the streets so very popular very popular name buena vista and not is lake boina vista and in this area. You can choose to stay if you wanna stay in. Disney deluxe resort or disney resort. You have to deluxe villas choices and villas are great. Because if you haven't stayed in one we've talked about those a lot. You get kitchens. Basically and laundry and kitchen. That's depending on the size. Both of these resorts are sort of set up like little communities like little subdivisions almost. They're not really hotel. Like in the way that you'd think of other hotels

Disney Springs Resort Disney Springs Disney Saratoga Springs College Park
Tulum, Mexico - New Home for the Digital Nomad?

We Travel There with Lee Huffman

02:05 min | 3 months ago

Tulum, Mexico - New Home for the Digital Nomad?

"Won't places. I always loved the travel mexico. Amazing food amazing. People like so many fun things to do and so today. We're talking about a city. That from what i've heard it's primarily like a playground for the rich and famous. It's called to mexico. I've i've always wanted to learn about it and so it's awesome to be able to have you on the show. No i'm really excited about two may be the other side it to learn that you haven't heard as much about okay right on. So what's your connection to the city so during the whole time. I figured out that. I wanted to go and and move in and try somewhere different worker motley so we looked at places that we were able to really dive deeper into experience the culture but also. I'm a big nature guy and we want to be able to go to the beaches and go to snow taes and get out to the forest and stuff and and to really fit the bill for all of that. It has really everything you would want when you go to place vacation but also if you're looking to go longer term consistently have things to do day in day out and so like when you're working remotely obviously you know. I have a lot of friends. That are like kinda digital nomads. And everything else like that was the there are strong internet connection for you throughout your time while you're there or was it like setup for you'd be able to do that remote work i mean it's incredible out there to be completely honest. It's it's built for people that really want to go out there and actually start building a life out there. There's condos constantly popping up but for the most part restaurants on the beach cafes on the beach and then we had an airbnb that we were able to really improve the internet at and they're really focused on that stuff. You look at airbnb. You look at hotels. A lot of them will will actually include what their internet speed is to make. Sure that you're able to work remotely from there. It's definitely big priority for them. That's also even like when i travel. I'm always like working whether it's on the podcast on my blog or whatever so I love having that high speed internet. No it's crazy. Honestly like i had a lot of friends that would go down to beach clubs for the day and they sit there pay thirty bucks for a beach chair with food and drinks and they work from there the entire day. And it's a really cheap way to be able to get the internet. You need if you're going for a week and you just wanna be able to experience the culture and experience the environment while you're out there as well

Mexico Motley Airbnb
The Historical Importance of Singapore Ports

The Big Cruise Podcast

02:23 min | 3 months ago

The Historical Importance of Singapore Ports

"In modern times. Singapore wasyl is a global poll handing everything from kogo to passengers. What singapore all of his historical importance to the languages. If so when did it become so or was a focused mostly on trade slash kaga. That is a great question and it's not an easy question I mean this is relatively simple straightforward answer But it's one that requires a little bit of context as well. So singapore Was is as alex says very important port and nowadays will up until pre covert you know we kind of saw as a portrait world cruise ships would pull into There was obviously local crazy. There's been local cruising resuming in singapore with with dream cruises not something but You know historically the line. Voyages in the end the passenger ships that used to operate in this part of the world weren't just passenger ships. They were cargo carriers as well. So the the linas. This isn't an arab with thinking about the era prior to the nineteen fifties before jets before containerization of congo. The ocean liners used to be the primary mode of Of of large-scale cargo transportation. Along with things called tramp steamers which you'll see us to carry basically just goes and then i had combination line as well which was small compliments passages and large complement of cargo but the majority of the cargo travelled by ships that also traveling with passengers and in many cases the males as well because that Postal service was the the the subsidies where the backbone of the shipping lines in the early in the early days all the way up until the age of the jet so for singapore It it was an important port for multiple reasons kogo and and Mayo notwithstanding also for passengers because the singapore obviously with at that time was part of the british empire And so britain had connections into into singapore and for example would operate into singapore And also into other major asian ports from their hub in In the gulf of suez and then later when the suez canal was cut through they they obviously do the direct voyages that would go through from the mediterranean under originate in great britain.

Singapore Linas Alex Congo Jets Mayo Gulf Of Suez Britain Suez Canal Mediterranean Great Britain
What to do in New Hampshire

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

01:54 min | 3 months ago

What to do in New Hampshire

"What kind of itinerary are you going to recommend for someone who is coming to new hampshire. Let's say for the first time. So i have a couple actually. Why have one more for the nature lovers and people who like hayek hike or at least see mountains and that brings you all the way up to the top of new hampshire which borders canada. And ideally you see some moose on that type a trip and i can go over that and then there are some other smaller trips that either. Bring you out to portsmouth and the sea. Coast the ride along. The coast is really nice. Brings into main rail fast. But that's still good and there's a few different towns in between that kind of those must sees. Okay we'll shall we start with the first one then with the outside outdoors absolutely. So if you start in southern new hampshire or anywhere else in new hampshire in you head north you can visit flim gorge. It's new hampshire state park. They have tours. they have walking trails. It's much more walking. Friendly than some of the other trails that have boulders boardwalks and railings and all that fun stuff you can either go and visit a small bit of it for free or you can actually go in and get admission and visit more of it now where you say when we start there. We're probably starting somewhere further south. You've already taken us. Almost two thirds of the way up to state to flynn gorge just people on the map to me. That's where all the beauty starts is once you get up in the white mountains in southern new hampshire. It ain't no slacker either. Yeah we'll get into some of the nice stuff in southern new hampshire by having lived around. This area ended massachusetts. I definitely prefer the air up. North is just fresher clean. And you have all these beautiful lakes to kayak and you have mountain views

New Hampshire Hampshire State Park Hayek Portsmouth Flynn Gorge Canada White Mountains Massachusetts
Cycling Southern Spain with Chris Atkin

When in Spain

01:44 min | 3 months ago

Cycling Southern Spain with Chris Atkin

"You'll route started in balance here on the east coast. And you weaved your way down throughout the kennedy murphy. Maria you stop off in granada malaga rhonda. You ended up in gibraltar. How many kilometers woman's did you travel on on the overall. And how long did it take you in told us it was a it was a roundabout routes. It was thirteen. Hundred is also in total acted over. I think six weeks so it wasn't. I wasn't breaking records with my manage but it was more that i was very conscious. I didn't want to just race through all these amazing places. I did actually want to see them. And explore them for myself during the wealth. Spagna takes time to master yourself. I guess that's something. That kind of came through in the book was that this was kind of a quest for immersion in spanish coach and spanish language which you touch upon the various points during During the book inspiration to do this particular room. Why did you want to buy it. I've never done any long distance cycling ato before. And i knew i didn't have much money so the idea of going by bike was that it was i was gonna enjoy some slow travel and the five months preceding my trip. I've been working at panama's largest language school where odd being paid in spanish jewish so my spanish skills that improved bit but i kind of wants to test them and the opportunity to test them in spain. I never been to a new embarrassingly. Little about was definitely a large incentive to to come and visit us

Kennedy Murphy Rhonda Granada Gibraltar East Coast Spagna Maria Panama Spain
Oasis of the Seas Returns to New Jersey After Test Cruise

Cruise Radio News Briefs

00:20 sec | 3 months ago

Oasis of the Seas Returns to New Jersey After Test Cruise

"Royal caribbean's oasis of the seas returned from its six thousand tests cruise over the weekend. The sailing spent six days. Hailing to the bahamas with a representative from the cdc on board if all goes well and all the boxes are checked. The ship will start sailing from the new york city area in new jersey. Down to the bahamas. On september fifth

Royal Caribbean Bahamas Sailing CDC New York City New Jersey
When Is the Best Time to Visit Bangalore?

We Travel There with Lee Huffman

01:31 min | 3 months ago

When Is the Best Time to Visit Bangalore?

"If people are planning their trip to bangalore. What time of year should they plan on visiting is. What's the weather like throughout the year and are are there certain festivals that maybe somebody wants to plan the trip around. A bangalore is a isn't all the time destination. You know that is no specific. Dying usually You know the bangalore's weather is very very pleasant because we are about a thousand meters abbassi level so that gives banglore You know an advantage in terms of weather art temperature remains between you know when i talk about fahrenheit it remains between six eighty eighty five throughout the year which is a very pleasant whether it's never cold over here and it's never too hot either. The only thing about bangla. Rather is the rain. It rains almost six to eight months a year but that rain is not very harmful. You know usually rains overnight. And it doesn't disrupt workflow but that rain brings lot of greenery lot of Drawn queasy to to the weather has a lot of trees A lot of gardens and also everything blows them when when when rain comes at banglar. Bangla becomes very very beautiful so people. Are you know who don't like rain. And all they don't need to worry about it. Because as i said you know most of the time it rains almost the entire night. And you're back to normal during the daytime so and the weather is very pleasant to the so you know. There's nothing like you know. You should not doing this time while that bang. It's all around the you can come anytime and and you can enjoy.

Bangalore
Putting Post-Covid Cruising to the Ultimate Test

Tips for Travellers Podcast

02:24 min | 3 months ago

Putting Post-Covid Cruising to the Ultimate Test

"Can cruising we return post shutdown postcode. It'd be fun. Be enjoyable and be relaxing. And that's what i'm about to put to the test. Because i'm here on board my very first cruise after fifteen months of shutdown on biking venus. And i'm going to find out can cruising post shutdown. Be fun be enjoyable and be relaxing if you knew here. I'm gary beverage and my goal is to help make it fun and easy to discover plan at have unforgettable cruise vacations so what exactly makes for a enjoyable and relaxing vacation. I had a list. But i went out and asked people on the channel and hundreds and hundreds of people replied and everyone came up with the same seven things that i did. Somebody use those seven things to test out about cruising post covet. Now many of the videos. That i've watched and reports that i've read on postcode cruising has tended to focus very much on the restrictions the rules. But that's not what's important. What's important for me is what does it feel like to be backup cruising. Does it feel the same does feel different and is magnificent. The number one item which everybody said universally was key to a cruise being relaxing and enjoyable was being disconnected sets being disconnected from work being disconnected from your phone being disconnected from chores. Walk the dog. Cook your own food. So of course that's absolutely true of postcode. Cruising this is my first cruise in fifteen months since the shutdown and i was able to disconnect as simple nearly as i did before. So that's definitely a tick however it's not entirely possible to disconnect because there's concert reminders of the world that we live in so let's take a look at some of the things that were happening on the cruise. Now i would say though that although they did remind you of the world we're living in. They did actually and other ways make me feel reassured which did help me disconnect so what was in place well first of all come the cruise. It was vaccinated guests only so suddenly that reminded you that restriction in place. Unlike before when you could rive at any time you wanted. There was very strict invocation times in half hour slots you had to show proof of your vaccination status yet temperature checks and ultimately you had to have a pc tests done before you could actually happily sale.

Gary Beverage
What is the Atvidaberg Sun Cannon?

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

02:25 min | 3 months ago

What is the Atvidaberg Sun Cannon?

"Some cannons have been around since the sixteen hundreds some of them were used on ships. The position of the sun triggered them to fire at almost exactly twelve. Pm so everyone on board would know what time it was in the seventeen hundreds. You might also have heard a son cannon in fancy park in england or france or even on a large estate where they were used to signal lunchtime in fact when son cannons were in style throughout the seventeen eighteen hundreds most of them were owned by european nobility and that how a son canon ended up in a small town in rural sweden the sun cannon in all to the body has its own tower. It's up on top of a hill and it looks like a fifteen foot tall version of a rook. That chess piece. that looks like a little castle. it's round made out of brick and there's a long narrow slot carved into the south facing side. It's been here since eighteen fifty three and it was built by the local barron and his family. The all those fats. These days it's cared for by a team of volunteers who call themselves the sun cannon club there a delightful gang of retired people who've taken responsibility for preserving the town's history but the whole organization is totally unpretentious and they're a little loosey-goosey when it comes to the foggy lor surrounding basan cannon but at least three different people including my grandmother told me this story back in the mid eighteen hundreds the barron and his wife took a trip to paris. Supposedly the baroness who was born. A commoner was terrified of boats so instead of making the relatively short trip across the baltic to mainland europe. They'd spent somewhere between two and three years. Travelling to france in a horse and carriage by finland latvia with wayne lia poland. You get the idea. I was able to verify almost none of the story. But i'm told somewhere between one and two kids were born on the way from sweden to france and when the family finally made it there and saw the sun cannon in a garden they thought would be kind of fun to have one of those to fire off parties back at home.

Fancy Park Sun Cannon Club Barron Basan Cannon France Sweden Chess England Wayne Lia Baltic Paris Latvia Finland Europe Poland
Hawaii Governor Tells Potential Tourists Not to Visit

The Daily Mash-Up

01:20 min | 3 months ago

Hawaii Governor Tells Potential Tourists Not to Visit

"The Hawaii governor's telling tourists to stay home because the coronavirus is surging across the islands Now, David Egg Gigi G. Yeah, He's telling tourists to stay away from the islands, he said a news conference Monday. He's telling people to reduce travel to a central business activities, he says. It's risky to travel, not a good time to come to the islands. He said that you're not going to have a typical holiday. When that you expect because there's restrictions on limited capacity access to rental cars, everything. And They said that the surge was was due to people who would go out, I guess. Go and travel home, but they have, like, what is it? They have 62% of their population have been inoculated. Well, I don't think that you can say inoculated. Think we need to be careful with language. 62% have a had at least one dose of the actually 70% have had at least one dose of the coronavirus vaccine in Hawaii. 62% have been have had the full course I'm not going to say inoculated because Innoculate Suggest that there is and then impossibility of transmission or greatly reduced to the point where it's incredibly improbable, and we know that that's not accurate, and I like to follow science. So 62% have had their full have had the full dosage. So what's the problem?

David Egg Gigi G. Yeah Hawaii
First Cruise Ship Departs From California in Over a Year

Sean Hannity

00:32 sec | 3 months ago

First Cruise Ship Departs From California in Over a Year

"Ship headed for the Mexican Riviera set sail from the port of Long Beach over the weekend, the first cruise ship to depart from California in nearly a year and a half. Carnival Corp says the carnival Panorama is on a seven day voyage and will stop at the Mexican imports of couples are Lucas and Mazatlan. Before returning Long Beach hard hit by the pandemic. The cruise industry has battled the U. S Centers for Disease Control and Prevention over health requirements for resuming sailing in U. S waters. The company says its operation protocols for Covid exceed CDC recommendations.

Carnival Corp Port Of Long Beach Mexican Riviera U. S Centers For Disease Contr Mazatlan California Lucas Long Beach U. CDC
Disney Wish to Debut Interactive Experience

Cruise Radio News Briefs

00:30 sec | 3 months ago

Disney Wish to Debut Interactive Experience

"Disney announced on thursday that disney wish. We'll have a new interactive experience called disney uncharted adventure combining technology with imagination. The game will take players around the ship to complete a number of quests using their smartphones at the end of the crews. there will be a life finale. In one of the ships entertainment venues were players will come together to battle a disney villain. Families will be able to play on up to six devices. Together or guests can participate individually. Disney wishes said to debut next june from central florida

Disney Florida
Alfresco Dining Tips From Outdoorsy Diva Lauren Gay

The Zest

02:12 min | 3 months ago

Alfresco Dining Tips From Outdoorsy Diva Lauren Gay

"Let's talk about the food. Let's start with camping. When the weather cools down this is floridians. Time to get out there. So what would you take on a camping trip today. Not cold cuts and pb and j. I'm guessing no no no like so for me. I beat the go-to as those foil. Packet mills that you can kind of prep beforehand and just keep them in your cooler on ice so you can take stuff like shrimp and potatoes with some veggies and season it and have it and you're full packet in. Just throw that puppy on the grill. And your any eat you can use Baked potatoes and stuff from with whatever it is. You like you can eat regular potatoes. Sweet potatoes you can even do like breakfast type of things like with frozen hash browns and your sausage and cheese and all that stuff and prep it and just have it. Ready to go in a foil packet. That's probably the easiest way if you don't wanna like carry a skillet or something like that even just heat up the foil packet and boom like whatever you could imagine that you could do like in a dish like in a in a casserole dish or something you can do it in the packet. I never really thought about that. My imagination is kind of running wild. Now what if you do want to carry a skillet. What are some tools or utensils that you maybe would bring along you. Did i mean you you wanna use something like a cast iron skillet. You don't wanna go putting your you know the that ceramic type stuff on like an open flame so you wanna use something. That's girl friendly on is the biggest thing you want to make. Sure you had your utensils like your spatula. Your tongs on bring your seasoning things like that. I mean it's is nothing to deep is just you know you have to remember if you're camping where you're just driving and you can keep up in the car. Then that's cool. That's great if it's a situation where you're backpacking and you've got a bit of a hike to get to your site. Then that's a whole other beast and so you have to completely rethink kyler gonna do this because whatever you have you have to carry it

Royal Caribbean Breaks Ground on New Cruise Terminal in Galveston

Cruise Radio News Briefs

00:32 sec | 4 months ago

Royal Caribbean Breaks Ground on New Cruise Terminal in Galveston

"Work on caribbeans new terminal three at the puerto galveston. Texas is officially underway. The cruise line and port held a groundbreaking ceremony over the weekend. To mark the start of construction of the one hundred. twenty five million dollar facility. Royal caribbean sunday contract to build a terminal back in two thousand nineteen and we'll lease it from the port for twenty years with an additional four ten year options terminal three will be the future home of the mega ship allure of the seas which will sail seven-night western caribbean itineraries. Starting november of twenty two

Puerto Galveston Royal Caribbean Texas Western Caribbean
MSC Cruises Marks One Year Back Cruising

Cruise Radio News Briefs

00:28 sec | 4 months ago

MSC Cruises Marks One Year Back Cruising

"On monday. Mse cruises celebrated one year since it resumed. Voyages after the industry shut down on august sixteenth. Twenty twenty grandiose became the first ship to restart cruises when it embarked on a seven night cruise from genoa italy. A year later the company

Genoa Italy
The Mississippi River Basin Model

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

01:55 min | 4 months ago

The Mississippi River Basin Model

"If you took a walk a really long walk from baton rouge to omaha. It's safe to say would definitely take more than sixty minutes in the real world. You'd have to be an enormous giant to do that but at the mississippi river basin model. Everyone's giant that's because the model squeezes sixteen states the parts of those states that are all connected to the mississippi river into a couple hundred acres of space to reference. That's about the size of one hundred fifty football fields there. Ever based model is a physical model Physical hydraulic model of the mississippi river basin. This is sarah mcewen and the reason she knows so much about this model is because she's trying to save it. It doesn't go to the headwaters but it is kind of stops at key points along the tributaries that The mississippi river main line would have had backwater impacts. So you have like tulsa omaha nashville. These are all kind of key points that are the upstream reaches and then you have those rivers that flow down until they converge join the mississippi. And then you have the mississippi all the way down to baton rouge about half a century ago. The city of jackson mississippi took it over from the us army corps of engineers but by nineteen ninety-three. It was completely shut down with no vision for its future. It was in the middle of a park. Say you have soccer field. Do you have go kart track. You have mountain biking trails but to my knowledge besides kind of mowing it initially to keep the trees and education contained. That was really all that was diet. I don't necessarily know if the if the thought was there that this could be something

Mississippi River Basin Mississippi River Sarah Mcewen Baton Rouge Omaha Mississippi Us Army Corps Of Engineers Football Tulsa Nashville Jackson Soccer
What's it Like Being a Digital Nomad?

Travel with Rick Steves

02:26 min | 4 months ago

What's it Like Being a Digital Nomad?

"Imagine if your life was untethered to any particular place you had a career that was steady and well pain and traveled. All the time working remotely you are digital nomad. More and more people are doing just that and travel writer and entrepreneur. Mike's with guns ski. He's been the digital nomad working and living in about eighty countries in the last decade. And he's written a book on the lifestyle. Mike joins us today from his home. Base in the republic of georgia in cheers ideas from his book called global career. How to work anywhere and travel forever. Thanks so much for having me on. Rick excited to chat with you so mike. I'm a traveler. And i've had the same job the same phone number of the same zip code now for over forty years and i travel a lot. You're a digital nomad in. That's quite a different kind of traveler. What exactly does that mean. And just very briefly. Where have you gone in the last decade. Yeah so over the last decade. I've been to more than eighty five different countries and a big portion of that has probably been in europe asia south america and a few cents to africa. But i would say africa's kind of the next frontier for me to explore your working remotely as you travel. Yeah so i've been working remotely for more than five years now. For the previous five years. I was kind of showing up in physical locations and finding jobs that were going to advance my career and he just kind of job was kind of steppingstone to get me to where i am now. It must have been kind of a a freeing thing sort of liberation. when you realized. I don't need to look for work. Where i'm traveling can travel where i want to go and Look into the remote travel world for my employment. Yeah once. I kind of had that remote lifestyle. It was everything that i'd always dreamed of having that flexibility to build the pack up my little back back in my laptop and just kind of work from anywhere from the comfort of my home In any location that i was interested in traveling to psychologically. Are you looking for your ultimate home like the place where you really belong or is is the journey itself kind of your goal. I would say right now. I'm looking to have a travel hub. Where i can essentially visit countries and visit the world from. So maybe it's spending nine months in that travel hub and then three months traveling around the world. Whatever the breakdown is. I want to have some sort of location where i can have a little bit more deeper. Connections routes and then be able to travel from that location.

Mike Joins Republic Of Georgia Africa Mike Rick South America Asia Europe