TV and Movies

Netflix and chill with the latest in TV and film, with news on the newest productions to interviews with blockbuster directors. Listen to audio about your favorite screentime shows here, aired on leading talk radio shows and premium podcasts.

A highlight from Tick Tick Boom

Pop Culture Happy Hour

08:28 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Tick Tick Boom

"A that's Q&A with an ampersand. Welcome back, Jeffrey. Hey y'all. So delighted you could be with us. Bear with me, it is worth offering a little bit of background here for the people who are not tick tick boom heads. So the stage musical tick tick boom was originally a monologue with songs in which Jonathan Larson told a fictionalized version of his own story of writing this other show called suburbia that was never actually produced a few years later he wrote rent. He tragically died just before it's off Broadway previews were to start. And after his death, tick tick boom was adapted and edited into a piece for three actors, and that's how it's most often been staged. So the roles are Jonathan, his best friend, Michael, and his girlfriend, Susan. And the actors playing Michael and Susan also kind of pick up the other parts that need to appear in scenes. So that's kind of what it looks like on stage. So filming this as a fully realized movie with a full cast is a big change. Here Andrew Garfield plays Jonathan, Alexander ship plays Susan. Robin de Jesus plays Michael, but you'll also see Vanessa Hudgens and Joshua Henry as collaborators of Jonathan's and Judith light as his agent. And not for nothing, Bradley Whitford as Jonathan's idol, Steven Sondheim, who he spends the entire time trying to impress the action is set in 1990 and it takes place over a few days leading up to Jonathan's 30th birthday and a superbia presentation that's meant to get producers interested. This is all happening against the backdrop of a crisis in his relationship with Susan. And a lot of friction between Jonathan and Michael, who's a gay man experiencing, maybe the one of the worst stretches of the age of crisis in New York City. Michael's in advertising and the fact that he's chosen that and Jonathan has sort of chosen his art is a source of tension between them as Jonathan is kind of trying to decide whether he really wants this life of struggle and disappointment. The film is now streaming on Netflix ayesha, what'd you think? Well, this one is for the theater kids. And I was definitely a theater kid and still love musical theater. And I actually really enjoyed it. I think that there have been some questions about Andrew Garfield being cast and this is a question that always arises when you bring a musical from the stage to the screen. It's like, do you cast actual perform? Like theater musical theater actors? Or do you cast movie stars? And obviously we've seen both iterations of those things. One of the more recent examples was, of course, Dear Evan Hansen, where they capture the same star of that show and put it in the movie version. And unfortunately, Ben Platt, he's playing a high schooler in Evan Hansen, and he was way too old to be playing one on the screen. I actually think that despite the fact that Andrew Garfield is several years older than the Jonathan Larson character here who's supposed to be turning 30 and Andrew Garfield is nearing 40. Actually, I think it works because he surprisingly looks like he could be 30. Yeah. And I think he brings a vibrance and a sort of cocky self assuredness and all the things that this character is supposed to have. His voice is strong. And I also just think that I really loved all of the very specific nods to the musical theater scene. There's tons of cameos. I now know how marvel fans felt at the end of The Avengers the last one for every single avenger comes out at the end and they're fighting. This was totally that. I now know who they feel. This is right up my alley. And I've loved this musical for a while and I think that this is a very good adaptation and I will probably watch it again. Yeah, what do you think, Jeffrey? I agree with so much of what ayesha said. I think that movie musicals are so challenging and so easy to screw up. So I think this is super successful. That said, there are some things that really, really bugged me. So this was, as you said, a one man show that became a three person show that became a movie. And to expand it into a movie, they had to enhance a lot of parts of it. And I felt like they drew so much from the rent musical, and so they're using a later work to inform an earlier work, but also saying that that earlier work inspired the later work and the kind of created like a closed circle there. And they didn't let this movie stand on its own as much as I wanted. They kind of like heavy handed let you know every step of the way that this inspired this in rent and they made it kind of the unofficial prequel in my view. Yeah, no, I definitely agree with you. It is interesting to have these very specific the way it opens is they're like, this is Jonathan Larson's story before he won the Pulitzer, blah, blah, blah. And then it ends in that same way where there's like a bookend. And I do think that this could be the type of movie that is for a very specific audience. I can't see it necessarily broadening out. I think that many different timelines and framing devices work, but if you don't know anything about this, you're gonna be confused. It's not exactly clear always when it's superbia, when it's Jonathan Larson, singing about superbia and then what is tick to bloom itself? How do all those pieces go together? Yeah, I agree. Yeah, I kind of felt like the things that they added in to make this into like a full movie were kind of just like copy paste scenes from rent, and it kind of felt like that bootleg version. And so I just prefer a bit less heavy handed of this character and this person's life inspired this in this show, because it didn't leave room for like imagination. As we know, like Jonathan Larson based rent in part by la boheme, but according to the tic tac movie, it was just all based on people that he met in New York City. He was living with. I enjoyed this a lot as I think what you guys are talking about. I enjoyed it as what it is, which is a smart and canny. I think this was for Lin-Manuel Miranda to do at this moment. And he a number of years ago was in one of these three person productions of TikTok boom and played Jonathan. And so he's loved this show for a long time. He loved rent. And after Hamilton, you kind of got that Lin-Manuel Miranda backlash, I think, where a certain number of people in particular also after there were disappointments about the in the heights movie and things like that. I think people got a little bit tapped out on that guy in some ways. And I think this is such an interesting and smart thing for him to do. I think nobody can take away from him how much he loves theater and loves theater people and has tried to advocate for theater and theater people. You know, it comes through so clearly. And it is the cameos, like not only is there an entire scene full of cameos of performers that takes place in the diner where Jonathan works. But there's also a scene that's essentially an audience full of Broadway composers. If you don't care about Broadway, you're not going to look at them and be like, oh, that's Stephen Schwartz who wrote pippin. That's not going to be a thing where if you're not a theater person or oh, that's Jason Robert Brown, who wrote the last 5 years. It comes from a place of love, and I think because part of this story is that Jonathan Larson is a really difficult dude to like sometimes. And I appreciated the fact that I was like, oh, so this is a story about an extremely talented guy who will eventually become a phenomenon who in order to get to that point really drives people crazy sometimes. I think I can understand why maybe this was the right director. You know? Yeah. Well, also lemon well has a very, very personal connection to it as well, which is that he saw rent when he was a teenager, then he saw the three person version of tick boom when it premiered in 2001. You can't look at in the heights and not think of rent. There's just so many thematic and also just visual cues to that and that show. And so I think that this is a deeply personal project for him and you can definitely see that in the way he has all of those little touches and really and also just this question around this idea of by the time you're 30, what have you done with your life? Right. And that's sort of the driving force of this. And Jonathan Larson unfortunately didn't get to see rent become a phenomenon. He died when he was 35. And women well didn't have his big hit until he was in his 30s. So I think there's just so many layers there that for me at least add a lot of oomph and heft to it that I think another director

Jonathan Jonathan Larson Andrew Garfield Evan Hansen Susan Michael Robin De Jesus Joshua Henry Judith Light Steven Sondheim Ben Platt Jeffrey Bradley Whitford Manuel Miranda Vanessa Hudgens New York City Netflix Alexander Ayesha LIN
A highlight from Adele's 30

Pop Culture Happy Hour

03:04 min | Last week

A highlight from Adele's 30

"Chains to the songs on 30 find Adele reflecting on her divorce in songs that don't shy away from emotional vulnerability or deep melancholy. 30 also follows her recovery from the damage to her vocal cords that forced Adele to cancel dates on her 2017 tour. Letitia you have written about a Delft for NPR music. Give us your thoughts on 30. Yeah, of course. So when easy on me came out, I was like, okay, this is more of a Dell as Adele, you know, nothing new, no new sounds. That's okay. But this album actually is a huge one 80 from what we expect from Adele in a good way. I feel like this is Adele's we've never really seen her. You know, she's no longer leaning just on those powerhouse vocals like you said, Steven, but really trying to experiment with pairing her voice and this new rendition of her voice. So new sounds and exploring what feels good to her. I really enjoyed this album mainly because I'm a sucker for music made in a Saturn return. You know, that's when the planets are back where they were when you first born, you gotta gotta repair it yourself. Learn how to be a human being again in Adele's really feeling her saddle return on this album. I feel like it's also the first time that we really, really know what's going on in Adele's personal life. And it's not as isolated as 21 or 25. So it feels like it's the first time her star power is kind of eclipsed by her humanity. And you know, her ties as like a mother and ex-wife, a woman. And we hear all these strong feelings she's working through. And it feels like a really great Emancipation record, not just from her ex-husband, but her perception of self, and, you know, the ways that she's stuck in her own past and how that's coming up in the present, I feel like she shed a lot of emotional baggage in order to arrive to this point, and with that she's removed herself from the safety of what we expected Adele sound to be. Yeah, I like this record too. I think that it was a little bit slow to grow on me. I think easy on me when easy on me came out. That was familiar. That was the Adele that I know. This is kind of the latest incarnation of someone like you or hello. This very familiar, big, booming, ballad. I found like the song gets stuck in my head and so I find myself sort of singing along with it or singing it afterward. It is a very easy song to sing along to, but it is not an easy song to sing along too quietly. Now you have to be very, very loud. Yeah, exactly. And so yeah, so this song feels very familiar. And I think the rest of the record doesn't as much. You've got a song like, oh my God, which does kind of fit into that rolling in the deep model. It's a little bit bigger and again, more familiar. Can I get it? Sounds like another big hit, but a lot of this record rolls a little bit more slowly. 5 of these songs run more than 6 minutes long. And as such, it can feel a little bit meandering, especially late. I think there's some unusual pacing going on where the third track on this record is

Adele Letitia NPR Dell Steven
A highlight from The Beatles: Get Back and Our Fab 5 Beatles Albums

The Big Picture

04:08 min | Last week

A highlight from The Beatles: Get Back and Our Fab 5 Beatles Albums

"It's fitting repairing her, interview with a discussion on The Beatles because her interest in Kenny G and her film explores whether there is a meaningful distinction between quote unquote good art and bad art. Let's start with what we feel strongly is good art, The Beatles, Amanda, what is get back, explained this project. Okay. Everyone stay with me. So in its shortest form, get back is a three part documentary mini series about the making of The Beatles album, let it be and also what would eventually become a kind of much hated 1978 documentary, let it be, which is hard to see. And the footage, which was directed and restored by Peter Jackson while the documentary directed and restored by Peter Jackson is drawing from footage that was filmed during the recording of let it be, which was in January 1969. And so this is I've spans 22 days. And it is behind the scenes coverage of The Beatles together in various studios and ultimately performing on a rooftop. Make it an album. And what many people know would become their last album. So it is about The Beatles. It is about how The Beatles made music wrote music. It's about how The Beatles interacted with each other, and it is about a last, much contested chapter of Beatles history. And it is absolutely insane that this documentary exists. It feels like a miracle. Michael Lindsay Hague who directed the 1970 film. I don't know, I don't know if he necessarily came under fire, and we learned even more clearly that this was intended as a kind of TV special and then was transmogrified into a feature documentary that feature documentary has been very hard to see for a long time. There's only 80 minutes long. And I think it really only clipped out, not only, but primarily clipped out some of the more dour aspects of this recording process. And so I'll start with this. There's a lot to unpack about this movie and what makes this movie so But this showed the band in all of its forms. It showed the band as a group of friends. It showed the band as a group of friends struggling to stay connected to each other. It showed the band as a creative alchemical union. It showed them as individual artists trying to work things out for themselves. It showed them unified. It showed them moving in separate directions, showed them funny, it showed them sincere. It showed them angry and confused. It was the totalizing picture of The Beatles. Of course, a very distinct period in time, but also it felt representative I think of all of the feelings that we project onto these four guys. So for me, I really could not think of a single piece of art about artists about the creative process about these people paired together that even can compare. I assume you were also gobsmacked by the way it was built together. Yeah, this is as Peter Jackson has said himself. It's the closest you can get to building a time machine and just being in the studio with The Beatles in, obviously, almost every aspect of The Beatles career was a crucial, but this is a really key moment in their history. A lot of things are bubbling up. A lot of things that we have all argued about and speculated about from the reasons they broke up to, you know, who made who angry and who's to blame and just like this stew of how these people worked together and what made them so great and also what made it unsustainable. There's so much here that speaks to all of that. And it doesn't necessarily provide an answer because ultimately, you know, in all complex life situations, there are no answers. There's just a lot of life and a lot of things happening simultaneously. But it's basically like being in the studio with The Beatles for a month. It's crazy. It's absolutely crazy. It's

Peter Jackson Michael Lindsay Hague Kenny G The Beatles Amanda
A highlight from Encanto

Pop Culture Happy Hour

05:08 min | Last week

A highlight from Encanto

"Makes flowers bloom with a wave of her hand, but mirabelle voiced by Stephanie beatriz didn't get a superpower and goes through life having to cope with her family's disappointment not to mention her own uncertain role in life. Soon, however, mirabelle begins to have visions of an existential threat to the magical house that gives the family its powers, but she faces skepticism from her abuela Alma, who is voiced by Maria Cecilia botero. She has to navigate her complex relationships with her extended family, including her estranged uncle Bruno voiced by John Leguizamo, and kanto was directed by Jared bush and Byron Howard, they're the team that directed zootopia, Jared Bush wrote the screenplay with co director sharice Castro Smith and kanto is in theaters now Monica Castillo. I'm going to start with you. What did you think of in kanto? I was actually pretty mixed about it. Even though it's very upbeat, visually, I was very charmed. They have a lot of fun effects. You know, using all those magical powers allows you so much creativity didn't quite love that the story was just so simple. It's just very much about family love. There's no villain. There's no antagonist. There's nothing that, you know, they really have to band together to fight. They just have to band together. So for me, it kind of felt like it lacked any kind of stakes or I think of all the different classic Disney movies that I would have gotten excited for. It fell short. Okay. How about you Carlos? I mean, I liked it. I do agree that there are elements of it that I felt where, you know, perhaps overstuffed, like I feel like there were too many characters and too many things pushing against each other without having a villain and the magic element of are some of the things that, you know, we understand as to why this family has powers, the miracle and all of the things fell a little sort of like big to me. Now that everything has to be sort of like clear in Disney movies, but I do feel like some of these things work. But in general, I feel like the songs were good most of them. You know, there's varying degrees to them. I feel like the ballad is probably my favorite. But yeah, I enjoyed a visual I think it's really a spectacular, and I like that the cast was mostly, you know, Colombians or Colombian Americans, or people with Colombian heritage. So perhaps a little more positive than Monica, but I do, it was probably not my favorite is I released this year and they had like three of them. It's probably not my favorite of the three. Okay. I came down in a roughly similar way. I was mixed on this film and I often I often find myself like one star ahead of other people on Disney and Pixar movies. I usually like them a little bit more than most people do. But I think this one I just came down kind of right in the middle. I will say in defense of the lack of a villain, I had grown very tired of villainy formulas in Disney movies that always culminate in the villain falling into a crevasse or whatever. I'm glad that no villain needed to fall into a crevasse. I don't necessarily need that kind of conflict built up for me. I think my biggest issue with this movie is the songs. The songs are by Lin-Manuel Miranda, and look, I am a Hamilton guy. I'm in the heights guy. I'm a Moana guy. And these songs for me fell really flat. My memory for songs like whatever the last song I heard is the song that is stuck in my head until the next time I hear a song. And so sometimes you know I'll just walk out of a theater and whatever that closing song is is just like beating in my head for the whole way home. And for this, as soon as I stepped out of the theater, the song that was going through my head was from Moana. Just the reverberations of Lin-Manuel Miranda formulas put catchier Lin-Manuel Miranda works in my head. I did find this movie sort of sweet and affecting and with some lovely vocal performances with some very nice and striking visuals. But like you guys, I did kind of come away from it like that was fine. Yeah, I mean, I will say that, as I said, the lack of villains, I think that's been happening in Disney movies in recent years. I feel like when we think about those balance falling off a cliff over now, we're thinking about maybe ten 15 years ago because it hasn't really been a building like that in a long time. Like the frozen movies have rebuilt Bill and frozen two has Nobel and that movie is incomprehensible in any case. I like frozen two. I could not tell you what frozen two is about a magical forces and ethereal sort of like, you know, things in the sky or whatnot. So I do feel like the fact that there are no villains that they've been very deliberate in recent years just to not have any feels to me sort of like a rejection of the real world fact that there are bad people. And I feel like, you know, it's interesting to me that because we want to move forward to conflicts that don't pin someone as a bad person, but there are bad people in the world, you know, and I think that stepping away from that feels to me like perhaps sheltering audiences too much from that. And in terms of the songs, I will say that I did love the Spanish language one, those sort of get us that place sort of like the most

Mirabelle Kanto Stephanie Beatriz Manuel Miranda Abuela Alma Maria Cecilia Botero Disney Jared Bush Byron Howard Zootopia Sharice Castro Smith Monica Castillo John Leguizamo Bruno LIN Carlos Pixar Monica Moana
A highlight from (Episode 266) "What Happened, Brittany Murphy?" Film Composer: Genevieve Vincent.

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

02:22 min | Last week

A highlight from (Episode 266) "What Happened, Brittany Murphy?" Film Composer: Genevieve Vincent.

"Critic podcast. Here is Derek Thomas. Murphy has died. Media justice is surrounded by home that she shared with her husband Simon mon Jack. Simon took her away. He made sure no one could get to her. Hi, her name is Brittany Murphy and I go to the river middle school. Brittany was so wonderful. There was nobody else like her. There was kind of a sweet childish lost quality that she had that just breaks your heart. She was successful immediately. You can not be a teen girl and not love Britney in 8 mile clueless. These are movies that will stand the test of time. Pretty Murphy was super cute, but in Hollywood, you have to be Gwyneth Paltrow. She was not a typical pretty girl. And so many young women in Hollywood are pressured enormously. She had lost an enormous amount of weight, and she was dressing totally differently. She said, that's what I've been told. If I wanted to be considered as a leading lady during a little dip she was having, he came along. And I think that's where her judgment was muddled, and she became pray. Simon said that he was the largest collector of Vermeer, dated Elle McPherson and Madonna. He said that he had been dying from terminal brain cancer and that he had bought an experimental treatment derived from the fins of sharks. Every single word out of his mouth was a lie. We all were scared and freaked out. Like, who? Was this guy? Once they got married, they were holed up in that house. 24 7. Nobody got close to her. We start to think, well, okay. Who gained from her dying. There were more unanswered questions after the autopsy came out than there were answered questions. People start thinking, there's more behind this. There's something else. Simon had all these secrets. He actually said, people in the government were watching them. Britney's dad was sure someone had done it. You visibly see mold. Is the house first? Something made her sick. A

Derek Thomas Simon Mon Jack River Middle School Murphy Simon Brittany Murphy Hollywood Elle Mcpherson Brittany Terminal Brain Cancer Gwyneth Paltrow Britney Madonna
A highlight from Remembering Stephen Sondheim

Pop Culture Happy Hour

08:09 min | Last week

A highlight from Remembering Stephen Sondheim

"Hey, ayesha. Hey, there Linda. So composer, Steven Sondheim died on Friday, he was 91 and where to start Steven Sondheim was mentored by Oscar Hammerstein. The lyricist behind the king and I and South Pacific and the sound of music among other things, sometimes had his first successes on Broadway writing the lyrics for west side story and gypsy. Then he wrote the music and lyrics for shows, including, but not limited to deep breath here. Company follies, a little night music, Pacific overtures, sweat, Sunday in the park with George into the Woods and assassins. Sometimes enormous influence has been acknowledged explicitly by lots and lots of composers and lyricists, including Jason Robert Brown, who wrote the last 5 years, Jonathan Larson, who wrote rent, and one, Lin-Manuel Miranda, who managed to get and answering machine cameo from Sondheim into his recent Larson film adaptation tick boom. Glenn, people have very different entry points for Sondheim. What was yours? Oh, I remember seeing a PBS broadcast of Sweeney Todd that rocked my world is a very young boy. And this is a huge loss to understate it. I mean, he changed the face of musical theater. He also changed how we approach it. It went from being light entertainment to something that had the ability suddenly to encompass more of our collective lived experience. So it did become more Chewy and intellectual. That's what a lot of folks are saying. But I would argue that it also heal out it to have the capacity to address surprisingly raw and intense and really dark emotional stuff. This notion of him being non emotional is kind of bunk. He was grappling with you could argue exactly the kind of dark, complicated stuff that musicals were intended to distract us all from, right? Like mortality, and infidelity, a lot of infidelity. And murder, lots of that. People who say they don't like musicals, they'll give you lots of reasons, but they're always going to come back to this notion that an emotion can be so intense that mere reality can not contain it and people have to burst in song. They just don't trust it. And maybe there's a reason for that because prior to Sondheim, the kind of emotion that came bursting out tended to be very clear, pure, simple emotions that welled up and spilled outward onto the stage. Like some enchanted evening, I could have danced all night, oh what a beautiful morning. Sometimes work, traffic in, and I think you could also say, is weighted with ambiguity ambivalence. Things like regret and melancholy, which are shades of emotion that don't come spelling out all over the stage because the impulse when you're singing them in most cases isn't outward. It's inward. His songs are cross sections of his characters. Their emotional autopsies, they're in many cases, their therapy sessions basically. So they're doing what interior monologue doesn't fiction allows us to see the world through his character's eyes. And just like in fiction, how a character's feeling changes and shapes how they express what they're feeling, right? So in musicals, it changes what key they sing in, how complicated the rhymes are, where the lyric sits, how long individual verses are. And throughout his life, he was often asked if he starts with the lyric or the melody. And he would always empty it diplomatically, but you could tell he didn't quite understand the question because he tended to write them together. The song getting married today is a very famous Petter song from the musical company. It is sung by a nervous bride, right before she may or may not get married. And it is the perfect encapsulation of racing thoughts and panic. This version is sung by the great and good metal and con and it's easily my favorite version and maybe you'll figure out why. Miss everybody, I'm afraid you didn't hear? Do you want to see a crazy, then you fall apart? But if you just normally follow maybe ruining his life, and you know what the fuck he's losing all right? I did this. I tell him my analyst about it. And he said to see a Monday by Monday, I'll be floating in the Hudson with the other garbage. I'm not well, so I'm not getting married. You can smell all right, you notice how she pulled I'm not well out of the verse, just kind of lifted it out, so we could speak it as opposed to pattering it. She did that for a reason because what that ends up doing is showing you that she knows exactly what's going on, and she knows that she's not well, but most people who sing that song they just kind of lied over it. It's part of the verse. By pulling it out of the verse, and this is something that he did. He gave his performers a lot of wiggle room to find things in the music that he had put in there kind of implicitly. To me, I've heard a lot of performers sing that song, and I think that almost none of them get absolutely all the pieces of it because my theory about that song is it is essentially unsingable on purpose because she is so nervous and frantic to try to get the speed of that and the phrasing and it doesn't really have spaces for breaths and to get the actual music of it. There's actually a great clip from the DA penny baker documentary, original cast album company. And Beth Howland, who, by the way, Vera from Alice. Was the originator of this role on Broadway, and there's a little bit where she has been trying to perform this song. And he comes to her and they begin to speak about her performance a little bit. I think we can go off to better start, don't you? I don't want to upset you, but I'd love to have the let me hear it once. How would that be? Sometimes is the one who breaks in there with. I don't want to upset you, but I'd love to have the tune. And it's because almost every performance that you hear, like I said, either there's a running out of breath or a gasp for breath. And I think one of the reasons why I'm Madeline Kahn speaks that phrase is also because you're trying to bring it a little bit under control because it's basically unsinkable. Yeah, I mean, one of the things that I really appreciate about Sondheim and I remember when I was in acting school and college. And one of the things that we were taught was that with Shakespeare, it's all in the text. There may be different ways to interpret it. But Shakespeare gives you everything you need in the text. And I don't think it's hyperbole to say that was up there in that same category of all of his lyrics, like you said Glenn, very introspective, very existentialist to summit degree. And I think that the way in which something like getting married today, it is unsinkable, but that is the point, and it's also just speaks to the way in which so much of Sondheim is, yes, there's lyrics yes, there's melody, but it's also these could be monologues. You could extract these from the show and perform them as monologues. And I think for an actor, what more could you want? It forces you to actually act. And these aren't just platitudes. These aren't just songs about love. Their songs about pretending you're in love or thinking you're in love and how things switch in the middle of these songs. One of my favorite songs from that show is Barcelona. And I think part of that is because this is one of those songs where so many Sondheim songs. There's a progression. There is a journey. Sometimes the journey is small, sometimes the journey is big. And here this is one of to me the most relatable journeys. That sometimes ever composed because you have Bobby and he has multiple relationships in the show. In case you're not familiar with company, this is about a man who's about to turn the 35 and he is having a crisis because all of his best friends are married and he's trying to figure out why he hasn't been able to find love what's holding him back. You know, totally normal feelings and a lot of people have especially in the early 20s and 30s. And in Barcelona, one of the women he's dating April, you go through this journey where she is a flight attendant. She's about to leave. And he's sort of faking this desire for her not to leave. And throughout the song, he at one point calls her June, and she has to correct him. By the end of the song, she decides, actually, I'm gonna stay. Okay. What? House

Steven Sondheim Sondheim Manuel Miranda Oscar Hammerstein Jason Robert Brown Jonathan Larson Ayesha Sweeney Todd South Pacific Glenn Larson LIN PBS Linda Beth Howland Petter George Madeline Kahn Vera Alice
A highlight from Licorice Pizza and the Paul Thomas Anderson Rankings

The Big Picture

04:53 min | Last week

A highlight from Licorice Pizza and the Paul Thomas Anderson Rankings

"I'm Amanda, Robin. And this is the big picture, a conversation show about licorice pizza. Paul Thomas Anderson's 9th feature film opens today in a very few select theaters and it is expanding wide this Christmas, but today for me, this is Christmas, because PTA is my favorite filmmaker and so on today's episode, we will talk a little bit about licorice pizza. I promise we will circle back and dive much deeper into it when it opens wide in theaters. And after that we're going to go through the PTA filmography and rank our favorites. And Amanda is going to open a wide berth here for me. I am, this is, you've cleared out for me mostly on Sofia Coppola and anti Meyers and even the Spencer episodes and I appreciate it, little women. That's another one. This is your time. I already promised you. I did it in writing. I was like, I'm not going to be mean to you. I'm going to support a partner. It's Christmas for you. It's today's Christmas for me as well because I'm finally allowed to put up Christmas decorations. There's a no Christmas decoration so after Thanksgiving in my house. So it's a joyous time. For everybody. Let us now celebrate the works of PTA, so liquorice pizza, tough thing to talk about here because as we were planning this conversation, we were thinking about how to underline what this movie is without giving away what it is. And so the rough sketch, and I think if you've even read a synopsis of the movie, you know by now that this is essentially a movie about a 15 year old guy named Gary Valentine, living in the San Fernando valley in 1973, who comes upon a 25 year old woman around or thereabouts who is kind of struggling with her way in life. The 15 year old guy is an actor and a hustler and a person really on the move and the young woman, Alana is someone who seems a little bit lost. And they meet at this critical moment in their lives and something happens and then things start to happen. Now, whether you want to describe this movie as a romance as an act of seduction as just an episodic journey through this period in history, obviously, Paul is the dawn of the king. Yes, this is really his home more ways than one. And so this is an opportunity for him to kind of paint on the canvas with which he's most familiar. Just generally speaking, let's start. What did you think of licorice pizza? Did you like it? Yeah, because also I feel like any time we do a big throat clearing, like we need to talk about how we're going to talk about this movie. It portends something bad. So let's get this out of the way. Delightful movie. We both really loved it. PTA heads, again, it's Christmas is a happy time. Let's all hug one another. I am certainly not the first of the last person to make this comparison. But while watching this movie, I thought a lot about Once Upon a Time in Hollywood. And I thought about it primarily because I was thinking about Chris Ryan doing PTA yelling at the lights. I'm fucking lights, but in a lot of ways, this movie is him just yelling like the lights. And it is him going back to the valley and a place where he grew up and it is about memory and nostalgia and there is like a hazy dream like good vibes quality to it. It has nothing to do with Manson murders, but it does have a lot to do with old Hollywood and a time where clearly PTA is drawing not just when Gary gets men's memories, but some of his own and his relationship to the movies and to Los Angeles. And to how those two things combined magically on screen. And it left me with a similar warm and fuzzy feeling. Yeah, it's an incredibly heartful movie. I've seen it. I've had a chance to see it twice now. I'll echo your feelings. I love it. Obviously, I'm in the bag for PTAs movies in more ways than one. But I think that this is inappropriate movie for the moment that we're in an appropriate movie for him at this stage of his career, obviously when we think of him we think of this explosive first chapter of his career with heartache and boogie nights and Magnolia. This is kind of like antic frenetic kind of virtuoso feeling. Next chapter is him kind of exploring his heart and his mind and thinking about the ways in which his films kind of fit into the hierarchy of Hollywood and America and Christianity, capitalism, all these big ideas, and then you get to this next phase, and I feel like phantom thread was an entree into this, and this feels like an even deeper, softening of the PTA palette. You know, this is a guy who's got a bunch of kids who's living very happily, who is widely recognized as a master of his art. And this is a movie that does not really feel like it is overwhelmed by ambition. I feel even his absolute best masterpieces are films in which you can locate the ambition instantaneously. This is a movie that is excited to just exist. It is excited to reconstruct these beautiful memories you mentioned Gary gettman, who's a Hollywood producer and a former child actor who you may have seen in the credits of many Tom Hanks movies. He's worked with Tom Hanks for a long, long time.

Amanda Gary Valentine Paul Thomas Anderson Sofia Coppola Meyers Robin San Fernando Valley Hollywood Alana Chris Ryan Manson Paul Gary Los Angeles America Gary Gettman Tom Hanks
A highlight from Introducing NPR's Book of the Day

Pop Culture Happy Hour

05:23 min | Last week

A highlight from Introducing NPR's Book of the Day

"Or just want to keep up with the books everyone is talking about. Here's our pal, Andrew limbong. Hey, it's NPR's book of the day. I'm Andrew limbong. You know those reading ruts where, I don't know, it's hard to get into the mood. Sometimes my brain gets distracted when I'm reading and like 5 pages in. I realize I haven't retained anything. This is where a good thriller actually really comes in handy. You know, you put down that arduous biography of some dude or whatever. You've been trying to finish, and pick up something heavy on my plot and murders and spies and lying liars. And that just washes away. If you're stuck, we've got you. Today we're going to hear about two thrillers, one's a 2015 interview with Anthony Horowitz, about writing a more modern James Bond book. That's a follow-up to the bond classic goldfinger. But first, former NPR host Lulu Garcia Navarro talks to Chris Hadfield. He was an astronaut who just wrote a new thriller set in outer space called the Apollo murders. It takes place in the 70s. And he talks about bringing real world facts into his narrative. Like the secret space station, the Soviets had with a machine gun mounted to the top. Spies and space, it's fun stuff. Here's the interview. Ground control to me. ISS commander Chris Hadfield was orbiting the earth at thousands of miles an hour as he sang David Bowie's space oddity in 2015. You really made the great unlike major Tom, he made it back to earth and began writing bestselling books about the final frontier. His new novel is called the Apollo murders. It follows a fictional Apollo mission 18 during the space race and the Cold War in the early 1970s. And he joins us now, hello, Chris Hadfield. Hello, Lulu, how are you today? I am very well. through the plot a little bit about what the ostensible mission of the space flight is, but what the secret mission is because there's two things going on here. Oh, yeah, there are a lot of things going on. But the Apollo missions, of course, went to the moon. And there were supposed to be Apollo 18 and Apollo 19, but Nixon canceled them for financial reasons. So the plot is, he went to the air force, the U.S. Air Force to get enough money and use the real military astronauts to be the crew of Apollo 18. And part of the reason that the military wanted to do it was, at the time, the Soviets had a secret spy space station for real called almaz that for real had a machine gun mounted on the outside of it. And part of the mission was to go up and get a better understanding of that secret space station Alma is and maybe do something dubious there. And then to continue on to the moon because in reality, the Alma space station mysteriously malfunctioned in the spring of 73 and de orbited it and so that works into my plot. And then going on to the moon where there was Soviet rover called Luna hood, driving around, which also, in real life, mysteriously malfunctioned in the spring of 73, and that works into my plot of the American astronauts and some cosmonauts and the Soviet space program of American space program, and then coming coming back down to the big exciting final climax at splashdown just north of Hawaii. Yeah, I mean, you mentioned the machine gun and that is I don't want to give too much away, but it's a very important plot point up in space where you basically imagine what it would be like to have a gunfight between two different space capsules. Yeah, I was a fighter pilot during the Cold War. Soviet bombers that were in North American airspace with a fully armed FA team. And sticking out the back of those Soviet bombers was a great big tail gun. And the amazing fact that they took one of those bombers tail guns and mounted it on their secret space station, most people don't know about that. So it was fun to get all the details and get them right and make that an intrinsic part of the plot of the Apollo murders. Will you talk about the sort of ancillary purpose of this book? Not just being a cracking good yarn, but also taking you into what it is like to be an astronaut what people talk about. And one of the ways this really works is because the action is in space and the protagonists are very far away from help and home, but the book pivots sort of back and forth between Houston and the teams in space or Russia and the teams in space. What did you want to get at about that dynamic? Well, it's the reality of it. You're in space alone and you're facing the actual danger by yourself. But we have the world's ultimate help desk there with you all the time, you know? And you're talking to an astronaut who's on earth who's sitting in mission control, they have that huge team there in mission control to talk to you. And I was lucky enough to work in mission control for 25 shuttle missions in a row. I was NASA's chief capsule communicator. So I got to work in the same room that is set in this book for where they would have been talking to the crew and working with gene krantz. You know who Apollo 13 failure is not an option, you know, that gene krantz. So that crossover between how it actually works. Give people insight into that.

Chris Hadfield Andrew Limbong Lulu Garcia Navarro NPR Anthony Horowitz James Bond David Bowie ISS Lulu U.S. Air Force Soviets Nixon TOM Air Force Hawaii FA Houston Russia Gene Krantz Nasa
A highlight from 142: They Call Us Thankful 2021

They Call Us Bruce

04:20 min | Last week

A highlight from 142: They Call Us Thankful 2021

"Pot luck. Let's go. Hello and welcome to another edition of they call us Bruce. Conversation about what's happening in Asian America. I'm fill you. And I'm Jeff Yang, and welcome to our annual Thanksgiving episode of the show. So one of the things that's actually happened this year is we've seen so much Asian stuff come out that we actually haven't been able to catch up on all of it. And as we head to the end of the year, we thought we'd do some special critics corner episode. It's bringing together some of our best Friends, most respected collaborators and voices to just round up some of what we've missed. And so this week, we have with us senior editor of culture for salon and co host of our sister podcast on potluck, good pop culture club. Han win. Welcome to the show. And we have entertainment editor and journalist, PS and how Roy. Yay, thank you, thank you guys for coming on a Sunday Night to join us for the show. So like I said, we have a lot to talk about. I mean, you know, we, with all good intent, wanted to do episodes on stuff like squid game and the eternals and now cowboy bebop is out in full. And the fire hose is honestly getting so fast now that we're having trouble drinking out of it. And I think that's something to be thankful for, right? That there's just so much to talk about, but there's so much to talk about. I thought we'd just, you know, before we let an even talking about squid game is like, you know, that's like, that feels like so two months ago or something else. So but, you know, we didn't want to let it pass entirely without at least acknowledging the phenomenon of it. And in addition to all these big pop culture explosions that are happening, many explosions that in and of itself would have been like the event of the year had it just been that thing alone in any previous year, you know? So this is kind of a like Jeff said like an abundance of things to be thankful for. I mean, let's talk about it, we'll see, I think. What should we tog first? Let's talk about squid game. I mean, I feel like in a way we gotta talk about both as a phenomenon and not really so much as a show, but also as something that's clearly getting a second season. I think that announced. And maybe we can actually speculate a little about where this is going to go, I guess. Yeah. You guys have watched it, right? Like 500 billion other people. I only saw you at the FYC event Phil. That's right, right. It's like the only public I've event that I've done in recent in like 18 months has been this awards screening thing that we went to for squid game and I saw you there. So jealous, I have spent ten years ten years in this industry working on staff for all these prominent places. And the one year I don't have a job on is the year that there's all this. Maybe it's me, maybe me sort of, you know? Heading out in the industry. Is why we got all of this, but yeah, I saw all these amazing people come together for the FYC event, this great game. And I was like, insanely jealous because you were all together and I wasn't there. I got to tell you, I don't even know how it's invited, so. I'm the one watching. I don't know how I was not invited. I feel a little bit miffed. That is a little odd. I do have to say. Hey, Netflix. What's going on here? We'll talk about it later. But no. So let's talk about, let's talk about squid game first. And I think that we should just we have to acknowledge that squid game is just has been a gigantic phenomenon. And the gigantic miss of the phenomenon in some ways, underscores something we've been saying all along, which is if you actually put together content that is provocative and smart and engaging and grossing, people will fucking read it.

Asian America Jeff Yang Good Pop Culture Club HAN Bruce ROY FYC Jeff Phil Netflix
A highlight from Billie Eilish & Finneas - 'No Time to Die' & 'Billie Eilish: The World's a Little Blurry'

Awards Chatter

04:56 min | Last week

A highlight from Billie Eilish & Finneas - 'No Time to Die' & 'Billie Eilish: The World's a Little Blurry'

"Hi everyone and thank you for tuning in to a very special 415th episode of awards chatter. The Hollywood reporters awards podcast. On the host Scott feinberg, and my guest today have only been on the scene for the last 6 years, but they are already two of the biggest pop stars in the world. With their music streamed and videos played, literally billions of times. They're already instantly known by one name in the way that Madonna prince and Brittany, but few others ever have been, and, in a freak odds defying occurrence right up there with one family producing arguably the two greatest women's tennis players of all time, these two happened to be siblings and best friends. Billie Eilish and Finneas O'Connell. Described by NPR as two of the most influential artists on earth right now, their collaborations, most of which have been recorded in O'Connell's childhood bedroom, have been co written by the two, produced by him and feature vocals by her, starting with the 2015 SoundCloud upload ocean eyes, then the 2017 EP don't smile at me. And subsequently two albums, both of which debuted atop the billboard 200 chart. The first was 2019s when we all fall asleep, where do we go? At one point, 12 of its 14 songs were simultaneously on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, along with two others by Eilish for a total of 14 besting by one Cardi B's record for a female artist. The album's 5th single, meanwhile, bad guy became her first song to top the Billboard Hot 100 dethroning Lil Nas X's old town road after it spent a record breaking 19 weeks in the top spot. And making Eilish, the first artist born in this millennium to have a number one song on the Billboard Hot 100, and the youngest female artist to do so since lord, with royals. Just the year after its release, the album was ranked among Rolling Stones 500 greatest albums of all time. The second album released in July was happier than ever. 6 of its 16 singles cracked the top 40 on the Billboard Hot 100, the highest charting being therefore I am, which reached number two. The duo were big winners at the Grammys in 2020 and 2021. In 2020, Eilish won 5 and O'Connell won 6 statuettes. He became at just 22, the youngest ever winner of producer of the year. And she became only the second person after Christopher cross, the first female and the youngest person ever at 18 to win all four main Grammy categories. Best new artist, record of the year, song of the year and album of the year in a single year. Her album of the year win also made her the youngest ever winner in that category, breaking Taylor Swift's record. And at the end of that ceremony, O'Connell said, we wrote an album about depression and suicidal thoughts and climate change. We stand up here confused and grateful. Then, in 2021, they each picked up two more Grammys. One each for the single everything I wanted, which one record of the year, making Eilish the first solo artist since Roberta Flack in 1973 and 1974 to win that category two years in a row. And the other for No Time to Die, the theme song for the 25th Bond film of the same name, which was recognized as the best song written for visual media. A quick side note, the song's inclusion in the film made Eilish the youngest artist ever to write and record a Bond song. And people clearly liked it. It debuted at number 16 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, months before the film's release. Eilish, who was still just 19 has been described by The New York Times as one of the planet's biggest pop stars. By The Guardian, as a strong contender for the voice of her generation, and by V magazine as the new pop archetype, arguably the Britney Spears of Generation Z no less an authority than Elton John has said, I don't think there's ever been such a young pop artist to write songs that are so personal. Billie Eilish's songs come from within her. She reminds me of Billie Holiday, Sarah Vaughan, a totally old soul from a vocal point of view, she doesn't sound like anybody else today. O'Connell, meanwhile, is now 24, and has been described by The New York Times as a pop star's secret weapon. Lately, he has been producing for not just Eilish, but others, too, including Camila Cabello and Selena Gomez. And November brought the release of his debut album as a solo artist, optimist, which he wrote performed arranged and produced entirely on his own, save for the first tracks violin and cello. This Oscar season, Eilish and O'Connell could factor in to two different categories. In the best documentary feature race, look out for RJ cutler's documentary feature. Billie Eilish the world's a little blurry, which impressively chronicles both siblings rise to prominence. And their bond song is the tune to beat in the best original song contest. Having already been recognized as the years best original song at the

Eilish Billie Eilish Scott Feinberg Madonna Prince Finneas O'connell Cardi B O'connell Connell Grammys Brittany NPR Christopher Cross Hollywood Tennis Royals V Magazine Roberta Flack Taylor Swift Grammy The New York Times
A highlight from House of Gucci and Top 5 Ridley Scott Movies

The Big Picture

03:28 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from House of Gucci and Top 5 Ridley Scott Movies

"Location, restriction supply. It's a me, Shawn fantasy. I'm Amanda dobbins. And this is a bigger picture conversation with the house of a Gucci. I didn't even get to practice that. That was just like you went right into it. Amanda later in this episode, I'm gonna have a conversation with Chris fryer in one of the filmmakers behind DMX. Don't try to understand it's the latest installment in ringer films music box series on HBO and HBO Max, the film debuts on Thanksgiving Day. So tuck into a nice meal, set down on your couch, fire the movie up with your family, I would really appreciate it. This movie was shot and completed while DMX was still with us. In 2019 and 2020, one of my favorite artists, there's something very bittersweet and beautiful about this movie. I hope you will watch it. But now let's talk about our feast. Let's give thanks, let's give thanks to Ridley Scott for doing two things. One bringing House of Gucci into our lives and two really uniting me closely with our Gladiator are matchstick man, the growing alien baby inside of us all. It's Chris Ryan. Hey guys. You gets this? But I got it. Think that, you know, sometimes it's tough for the expectations of when I come on this podcast and everybody's like, oh, is he gonna do crazy voices? And sometimes when you do all these crazy voices, you start to wonder, does anybody know my voice? And maybe I should just be myself today. But then I think to myself and I need to fly like a beach. If you are wondering why we are acting so foolishly. Please put 18 air horns over that. We're talking about one of the funniest movies. One of the most fun movies that has been released frankly in years, not just in 2021, but in a long time, that movie is House of Gucci. This is the new film from the great filmmaker Ridley Scott. Has an absolute cavalcade of movie stars in it foremost among them, Lady Gaga, Adam Driver, Al Pacino, Jared Leto on all of the drugs and rainbows. And it's a fascinating piece of work. We've been anticipating this movie for a long time on this show, and I'm really excited to talk to you guys about it and I'm excited to talk about release Scott. We're going to talk about our top 5 favorites from Ridley. He said, one of the longest and most productive careers of any filmmaker in the history of Hollywood, there's a lot to choose from there. Let's start with House of Gucci, though. This is based on the 2001 book, the house of Gucci a sensational story of murder, madness, glamour and greed by Sergey forden. Amanda. What did you think of House of Gucci? Absolutely. Yes. We did it. It's what I wanted if you like these trailers and you're like a cool person with a sense of fun. Then you will love this movie. I was grinning at it. I think it's important to clarify when you said it's like the funniest movie that has been released this year and maybe in several years. That is very true, but it's not funny because it's bad. It's funny because it's in on the joke. It knows what it is satirizing. It knows what it is doing. It understands it's ridiculousness.

House Of Gucci Amanda Dobbins Chris Fryer HBO Ridley Scott Amanda Chris Ryan Shawn Adam Driver Jared Leto Al Pacino Sergey Forden Lady Gaga Ridley Scott Hollywood
A highlight from Ep 225. A Bloody Show

Teen Mom Trash Talk

05:34 min | Last week

A highlight from Ep 225. A Bloody Show

"It's so nice to see you today. It's so nice to see you. I can't wait to see you again later, too. I want to see you all the time. We do a pretty good job at that. Yes, I know. You know what's so funny? My mom's like, you and know all are very close. What is this new? And I'm like, yeah, have you ever met her in the wall? She's very nice girl. Fred, I lived with you basically. Because she gets a really close, yes, thank you. I know everything you cook because I need every single thing that you make thank you for in my freezer that she got me at Costco, like we're all a big family here. It's just so funny she made it like I just met you. Like we were like on the Internet. Fast Friends. Yeah. You Chris got closed really quick and it only took 25 years. So because if you want to hear more about our love affair, go over to Patreon dot com slash trash talk podcast. And you could sign up for our Patreon, which gives you access to our favorite podcast BS where we just kind of, you know, we just a little bit. Also, big news on that, we're going to be doing 90 day fiance, the single life over on Patreon. And you know, all the stuff. And also, if you ever want to get this podcast, the day we recorded up to a week early, you could join our top tier. So go check it out. There's a whole bunch of different tiers. There's all different levels. All different levels. There's levels to this shit. That was funny, right? That was good. I like that. Yeah. This is what they mean on Reddit when they're chasing things. She's so much funnier than she is. It's like, you know, they're right. No, but she is funny. But also correct. Right, but remember, okay, so real quick, the other day you posted, I posted it to what your name is in the urban dictionary. Yeah. That is who you are. I know, that was like a party is in fun without you. Everybody's like, can you come to the party or it's not going to be fun? Because everyone loved you. Everyone loves talking to you. Make everybody happy. And it's the truth. I read it, and I was like, oh, I hate to say it, but this is so on point. Thanks so well. But it is. It was you. But at the same time, I do make me laugh more than anyone else. I need to be resuscitated sometimes. I think I make myself laugh so hard. That's what I'm saying, yeah. So when people are like, they think there's so much funnier. It's like accurate. That is absolutely accurate. I can't even. I'll upvote that comment. Yeah, I know that I think I'm funny because I am very self laugh. Yeah, that's okay. Because we are self aware contrary to popular belief. We're here to talk about teen mom OG season 9 episode, what episode was it? I didn't write it down. I think 12. Nearly positive, it's 12. It's definitely not 12 because it's in the 20s. And I'm going to tell you. Oh, the young and pregnant as well. Young and pregnant is 12. So I looked at it today and I was like, oh, wow, it's episode 12. It's 24. 26 seasons. Yeah. Young and pregnant season three episode total. Yeah, because I saw that young and pregnant was solved so I assumed the OG was, but, you know, so it was this the season finale? Yeah, for both of them. Oh, okay, good. I know it's all about it. I don't know about a tell all for young and pregnant. They didn't show any anything, any whatever previews, but they did for OG. Okay. There's a reunion next week. So we'll figure it out. We're going to jump into the McKenzie. Okay. So her dad is still there. And she doesn't know what to do with the kids for the summer. Well, what do you do with your kids for the summer? 'cause she's gonna be leaving. Right. She's gonna be working and her dad's gonna be leaving and Josh is always working. But why can't you hire a nanny? Send them to camp. I was gonna say sent him to camp. Shouldn't these kids be in some kind of educational camp because they're struggling in school? Well, I thought that I thought that two of them needed help during the summer. That's right, Jackie and dannon. Right. And that needs health frogs. I thought that they were both going to have programs for the summer. Yeah, well, that's what you thought. And that's why it's probably what I was thinking. Right, ganon's the one that doesn't need help. Canada is the one that hates everyone. Again, it's like guys. I'm running out with my friends. I just worked construction for 12 hours today. Can you please leave me alone? Can you miss me with this parent coach bullshit? He's so over it. You know what, if anybody should be going back to Oklahoma, it's ganon. Okay, so there's a very weird dynamic here. Her dad's leaving in a few days. So they take him fishing. Right. There's a big very big fishing family, very fishing centric. They are very fishing centric. And I did not know there were many places to fish in Oklahoma, just saying, I guess Lake fishing in Oakland. Yeah, it has to be. I don't think they do a lot of ocean fishing. I don't think they're doing like salmon fishing. I think that they're doing a lot. Well, salmon's river. But I have a salmon is super cold. Yes. That is, yeah, that is Alaskan Sam, right? Yeah. Right. Yeah. See how smart we are? We really are. Maybe they get sockeye salmon from the sockeye river that runs through Oklahoma. Sockeye. Yeah, it runs straight through Oklahoma. It runs perpendicular to the Mississippi. And

Costco Fred Reddit Chris Mckenzie Dannon Ganon Josh Jackie Oklahoma Canada Alaskan Sam Oakland Sockeye River Salmon Sockeye Mississippi
A highlight from Ep 148. Born To Cry

90 Day Fiance Trash Talk

04:18 min | Last week

A highlight from Ep 148. Born To Cry

"More of us than you've ever wanted, probably ever. Trust me. Yeah, no, no, no, you trust me here. We're going to start off this week with our first couple, Steven and Alina. They came in, right with them. Usually they're like an afterthought. Yes. But here we are, front and center, applying for a marriage Visa applying for the marriage license or just applying for marriage in general, because they have their paperwork together. They're Visa expires in three weeks. Nothing like waiting until they're very last minute. They can't even get married in time, but they're going to pick a date. They'll have to get married go home and then come back. That's so crazy. So I'm assuming they're going home and then they'll meet in Russia. I guess, I don't know. I think so. She doesn't want him to go home though because he'll talk to other girls. Oh my God, as soon as she says this, I'm like, girl. What? I don't understand. Nobody likes this guy. Ali is the only person on Planet Earth that likes the sky. Okay. Number one, yes. Number two, if you can not trust your husband to be away from you for a minute, what kind of life are you going to lead? Right, you can't be away from your husband for. Because he's going to cheat on you because he's going to cheat on you and you think that that's good. She's that girl that thinks if you put a choke hold on a man, that's what keeps him faithful. Yes. Yes. So basically, she knows he's a cheater. So maybe don't marry him. Yeah, I would think. Yeah, because the thing is Alina, you're very pretty. She's doing much more ridiculously. I know. I mean listen, is she having some frizz problems in Turkey? Yeah. Yes. Yes. But in the confessional oh, she's so pretty. She's attached her face. She's so pretty. She really is. Yeah. All right, so he asked if his hair is okay. And I think that he was projecting probably because her hair wasn't. Yeah. I think he was. Okay. That was a dig. They given the documents. And he said that he's getting hot, he wants to take off his sweater in the lawyer's office. He's being like a bad boy. Okay, but he's always bad. He acts out. Anywhere he goes, he acts out. Alena. This is gonna be the rest of your life. Right, why do you want this? I have a baby. I don't even want this for you. No, I don't want this for her at all. I want better for her. All right. Well, they're going to get married. Wednesday at 5 p.m. and they only have two days to plan a wedding. And he's like, well, if the universe is telling us to get married, I guess we have to. He is not happy about this. But also, why are you even planning a wedding? You're just going to use this a wedding to plan? You knew what you were going to do, right? Right. What do you mean planning a wedding? No one's coming. Why can't you just, I don't know. Why didn't you bring a little white dress to wear? But that's what I mean. Why didn't you bring like an outfit to wear? And you don't need anything else. Where are you going to get a florist? You know what I mean? Like, what are you talking about? Well, here's your answer. The day before the wedding, she shopping with her Russian wedding planner. Right. That she randomly hired. She wants an arc with flowers in a beautiful location, Alina. You're going to court. Right. So what are you talking about? Just go to court. I'm so confused by this. She thinks that this is going to be magical and special. She's wrong. She's very wrong, but also if she's only doing this for Instagram pictures that's the only way that I will understand this. Agreed, yes, agreed. So she tries on this Turkish dress. Okay, but it was so cute. It was cute. Listen, did she look like the Pope? Yeah. It was very Game of Thrones. It was. It was like I was going to say it. It was like a princess. Yes. It was like rapunzel. The headpiece was it a good time. I agree with her. But I hope she put some serum in for the big day.

Alina Steven ALI Russia Alena Turkey
A highlight from House Of Gucci And What's Making Us Happy

Pop Culture Happy Hour

04:55 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from House Of Gucci And What's Making Us Happy

"Of pen fed. Federally insured by NC UA. House of Gucci is a whole lot of movie that's for sure. Lady Gaga and fur hats Adam Driver in huge glasses and Jared Leto using an Italian accent so thick, it will stick right to your pasta. It's all in service of a spin on the true story of the Gucci family. It's got fashion, it's got tragedy, and did we mention Jared Leto's accent? I'm Stephen Thompson. And I'm Linda Holmes and today we're talking about House of Gucci on pop culture happy hour from NPR. Also with us from his home studio is Glen Weldon of the NPR arts desk high Glenn. To me, you get it, let's go here. And also here is ayesha Harris. Hey, ayesha. Bob the sun house loved you. That's fine. Okay, so. House of Gucci is based on a true story, Adam Driver plays the wealthy maurizio, Gucci and Lady Gaga places wife Patricia. We meet them when they're young and first falling in love over the objections of his father played by Jeremy Irons, but they get married, and she starts to push him to assert himself about the famed family fashion business. That leads to a battle for control of Gucci with his uncle. Aldo played pretty broadly by Al Pacino and his cousin Paolo, played for pure comedy by Jared Leto. Leto's Italian accent has already been compared to Mario and Luigi from the world of Nintendo with good reason. Salma Hayek also shows up as Patricia's psychic, who ultimately gets involved in the unhappy resolution of patrizia and Mauricio's disintegrating marriage. Ridley Scott directed from a screenplay by Becky Johnston and Roberto Benin. And the whole thing is based on a book by Sergei Ford and I have given you all the details I possibly can. I don't really know where to start with this movie Glen do you want to kick us off? Well, choices were made and giggled at many of them. Not always the ones I was supposed to be. Look, there are two ways this film could have worked. Number one, option one, the one I'm leading toward, you chop the sucker down to an hour and a half. And you the director, you gather your actors around you. You say, y'all see what Jared's doing? Like if a chef on a pizza box came to life, you know, you bring it all the performative nuance of waluigi, cartoon camp, like you said. Gaga's got the right idea. She's over here widening her eyes and flaring her nostrils and heaving her bosoms like she's seething like a Disney villain. Let's everybody get on that page. We're gonna have some fun with this. Don't think about it too hard, this is a pulpy dark comedy. It's got Gaga, it's got fashion that's got 80s needle drops. We're gonna give the gaze, everything they want. Or that's option one. Option two, and I don't recommend this. You leave it at this running time, but you pull all your actors back from the brink. You the director, you gather everybody around, but instead you say, okay, y'all what Adam's doing? Acting? Where he's playing a human being. Naturalistic. With recognizable emotions and an actual inner life, no, Jared, I said inner life inner. I get it, it's not your thing. But hear me out. And guys, we've been taking it around and let's not do these accents. Like, I just worry that if you all had crazy Italian accents, it might get distracting. You know? And we get, we don't need your actors, right? So you're all Italian, you live in Milan, just talk to you normally talk. I just worry that if we start doing these accents, you're going to slide out a character into caricature. So let's just tell the story, right? It's a pulpy thriller. Let's just tell the story. What we get is hovering limply between option one and option two. We get mostly option two with flashes of option one, and no sense of unifying identity to this thing. Every scene starts, you're like, so which movie we were watching? Yeah, and Jeremy Irons is kind of on Adam Driver's team, but he is capable of being on Jared Leto's team, as you know, if you've watched him in like Watchmen and stuff like that. So he can be on either one of those two styles, but here he seems to mostly be on Adam's driver's team. And I should point out Adam Driver has a light accent. He just doesn't have the same kind of accent as Jared Leto. So you felt Glenn like it lingered between those two things, Stephen, what did you think? I was sitting next to you while we watched this movie. Yeah, and I got to say I wish I could share my notes with listeners to show that I wrote down basically what Glenn exist exactly said about if you take this film and I still think this is actually possible. If you do an edit of this film, where you cut out the most boring hour, you might be left with a roughly 90 to a hundred minute camp classic. The problem with splitting the baby in two and making it this length and this pace, you have a potential camp classic that's just too boring. Yeah. There are laughs in this movie.

Adam Driver Jared Leto House Of Gucci Stephen Thompson Linda Holmes Glen Weldon Ayesha Harris Lady Gaga Becky Johnston Roberto Benin Sergei Ford Patricia Jeremy Irons Ayesha Maurizio Glenn Gaga Patrizia Leto Al Pacino
A highlight from King Richard

Pop Culture Happy Hour

05:35 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from King Richard

"One NA member Here with Aisha and me today is daisy Rosario, she's an executive producer at stitcher with the show's celebrity book club with Chelsea Devante. It's in its first season right now. Hey, daisy. Hey, how's it going? It's going great. Great to have you. Also joining us is Monica Castillo. She's an arts and culture reporter with Colorado public radio. Welcome back Monica. Glad to be here. Glad to have you. King Richard is an unusual sports biopic in that it's not focused on Venus or Serena Williams so much as the overbearing man who drew up a 78 page plan for their success, Richard Williams basically raised his daughters from birth with the idea that they would grow up to be tennis champions, though he and his wife, brandy, played by ingenue Ellis, have children from other relationships, together the Williams trained Venus and Serena on abandoned tennis courts in their hometown of Compton, while also looking for coaching help from an overwhelmingly white tennis world. The movie follows the family through Venus and Serena Williams early days from their training as kids through Venus national breakthrough at a competitive tournament when she was 14. We see Venus played by Sinai Sydney, as she develops her killer instinct and we see Serena played by Demi singleton as she first begins to escape her sister's long shadow. But mostly we see Will Smith as Richard Williams, a stubborn flawed ambitious, hard charging father figure whose plans succeed wildly sometimes it would seem in spite of himself. The film was directed by Ronaldo Marcus green and written by Zach balin and it's both in theaters and streaming on HBO Max daisy. I'm going to start with you. What did you think of king Richard? I ended up really liking it, which I say in that tone because that's not what I was expecting when I sat down. In part for kind of everything that you have explained in the intro, you know, I'm a huge fan of the Williams sisters. They're definitely was a question in my mind of like, okay, why are we telling it this way? You know, I'll give it the benefit of the doubt, let's see. There are also details about Will Smith's performance that I kind of had to get used to, I guess, this is how I'll put it in the start, but I would say it's kind of a movie that once I settled into it, then I really enjoyed it. But the cast, you know, I know that this is like definitely Will Smith Oscar bait and I'm sure we'll talk a lot about that too, but the rest of the cast is so charming in particular, the girls who play not just Venus and Serena, but the rest of the Williams daughters. I mean, those parts of the movie just really made me emotional, you know? And so I really, really ended up enjoying it. And I also saw it with an audience that was into it, which was fun. This is probably the most raucous audience. I have been in a movie theater with since the pandemic. And so it was fun to be in a theater full of people clapping and ooing and awing and having serious emotional reaction to the story of this family. So, yeah, I was not sure, and then ended up really enjoying it. Yeah, it is a crowd pleaser. Monica, were you part of a crowd that was pleased? I was certainly part of a crowd that was pleased. I had the privilege of getting to see it at Telluride. So it was one of the first audiences to see it and they were also really into it. That was a great experience. And it kind of I think helped my enjoyment a little bit. I definitely also ended up on the like side on this one. It's not maybe my favorite movie that we're talking about for potential Oscar consideration. But I like it for what it is and what it is is that inspiring sports, biopic, but it's told from a different perspective. I also was a little skeptical going into it, wondering why are we telling the story of these amazing women through the eyes of their father? But there's enough going on in the background about parenting and that pressure and all these different things and conversations that come up that this is a different version of that story. And I appreciated it for what it did. All right, thank you, Monica. Aisha, what did you think of king Richard? Well, I think I'm going to be the person of the cloud over the I mean, look, I actually did wind up liking it more than I thought I would. When and with very low expectations, if you know me at all, you know how much I really, really just don't like biopics as a general rule. I think what most surprised me was that it's not as much of a haggis as I thought it was going to be. Yes, there are a lot of scenes of Richard Williams being this inspirational figure. But there are some scenes that kind of undercut that and sort of challenge the fact that maybe some of the things he does aren't always in the best interests of his daughters and maybe he is sort of self serving. And there's a really great scene between him and oracy and played by Adrienne Ellis, who basically says I'm staying with you because of the kids, but you have all of this baggage. You came with all this baggage, and I've dealt with it. They sort of briefly mention the fact that he has way more kids than are even in this movie. There's 5 total and some of them are her kids from a different marriage. But he has other kids or whatever. So it's interesting to see that he had an entirely different family before this. And he may or may not have abandoned them and that it suggested is that. I think the thing about this movie is that America and sports movies and any sort of biography, they tend to have this sort of pull yourself up from the bootstraps, mentality in general, the way these stories are told, and it's always the person who's coming from nothing from as Will Smith's character said several times, but ghetto

Venus Richard Williams Serena Daisy Rosario Chelsea Devante Serena Williams Monica Castillo Tennis Sinai Sydney Demi Singleton Will Smith Williams Ronaldo Marcus Green Zach Balin Max Daisy Aisha Monica King Richard Smith Oscar
A highlight from New series: dot com (episode one)

Death of a Film Star

02:24 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from New series: dot com (episode one)

"If you had told me when I was 12, that one day I would have a machine on my desk at home that would answer any question that I had. You know, I would have said, well, that's crazy. That's never gonna happen. And then here comes the rub if you'd said to me, it will all be free. I would have said, now I know you're crazy. Now I know you're talking nonsense. And yet I'm living in that world now. I mean, what kind of Brave New World are we living in? I mentioned Star Trek earlier and we're living the Star Trek now. It's the sum of all human knowledge, the 5th most visited website in the world. Anyone can edit it. It's the only top ten website whose founders aren't multimillionaires, or multi billionaires. It's written entirely by volunteers. Plus, it's free. I'm Katie puckering. I use Wikipedia every single day. I use it in my work. I get a B in my bonnet when I see something on TV that I don't think is right and I got a fact check it. I see something interesting on my daily walk, and I have to research it, right now, I'm looking up myself and right off the bat, I'm cracking up because the picture they have of me is just horrendous. I'm all red and sweaty, and there's a vain bulging out of my forehead. So, great. Thanks for that. Wikipedians. I want to know who do I blame? Who do I call? Who are these people behind the screen? The brains behind the words. How did something that started off so small become so huge? And in a world where the line between fact and fabrication can get a little blurry, can we trust it? This is dot com, the Wikipedia story, episode one. Don't bite the newbies. Facebook, Twitter, they all point to Wikipedia. Yeah, sure, it's just a little website. Yeah, but it's not. For many people Wikipedia is this mysterious kind of box that they come in they read. There's so much more to it, the philosophy so much bigger than that. You'll never see the horizons of this thing. It's bigger than you. It's bigger than everybody. It's bigger than anything we've ever known.

Katie Puckering Facebook Twitter
A highlight from Ghostbusters: Afterlife, Tick, Tick ... Boom!,' and Our Top Five Feel-Good Movies

The Big Picture

05:20 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from Ghostbusters: Afterlife, Tick, Tick ... Boom!,' and Our Top Five Feel-Good Movies

"I'm Shawn fantasy. I'm Amanda avins, and this is the big picture, a conversation show about busting ghosts, which makes me feel good. Later in this episode, I'll have a conversation with Mike Mills, the director of films like beginners and 20th century women, his latest movie come on come on is quite simply one of my favorites of 2021, Amanda and I will chat a little bit about that movie later in the show, but I hope you will listen to this conversation because Mike is really a terrific interview, wonderfully specific about all the choices he makes as a storyteller. I love this movie. From the sublime to the ridiculous, we're going to be talking about a few more releases today. Theoretically movies that make us feel good and we'll talk about our favorite feel good movies. I'm talking about two new releases Andrew Garfield stars as rent creator Jonathan Larson in Lin-Manuel Miranda's tic tic boom, which is on Netflix right now. And ghost starring in ghostbusters afterlife, let's talk about ghostbusters after life Amanda. This is Jason reitman's revive efficacy of his father Ivan reitman's famed film series. This comes 5 years after Paul feig's also revive a vacation or attempted revision of this franchise with a largely female cast, which became a lightning rod for conversation. This movie did very well to box office, made $44 million over the weekend, especially considering the pandemic era, and I have a lot of feelings about this movie. I feel very bent out of shape about it. I want to know what you think about it before I go into my jag. I thought it was a fine movie for 7 year olds. And it seems like that's what happened at the box office that it was primarily families going to the movies together to see a very PG version of and really just child friendly version of ghostbusters. Remade for 2021. And I guess it's sweet and I guess it has nice things to say about family values or whatever. But is it the ghostbusters that you and I remember from childhood? No, it's not. It's not. So you're right to locate the children's interest because kids are really the stars of this movie. Mckenna Grace and Finn Wolfhard play Phoebe and Trevor, these two kids who arrive at their late grandfather's old farmhouse in Somerville Oklahoma with their mom after they've been evicted from their apartment, their mom is played by the great Harry coon, who I hope she got paid a lot of money to appear in this film. For about an hour of this movie, it is a very cute coming of age, story, a bit of an amblin like Ron Howard, early Spielberg kind of a movie, sort of, but I do think that's giving it a little bit too much credit. It's not quite as accomplished or nuanced. It's just like some kids and their mom. And they have to move somewhere new, and then, you know, they make some knock knock jokes about ghosts or other things. I actually like the 9 Mac jokes. Mckenna Grace, I think is probably the best part of the movie who's the girl who's the young girl who stars as Phoebe. But the movie does often feel like a pencil sketch over a Xerox. You know, there is this feeling like there's a very bind numbers aspect to the story, so much so that the movie has been, I think both celebrated and criticized for this overwhelming amount of fan service. You know, obviously Jason reitman as I've been son has talked quite a bit in the press about his desire to honor the legacy of his father's film franchise, which seems kind of weird to me. And here's why. So ghostbusters and ghostbusters two obviously very meaningful to someone who is 39 years old. You can imagine I had the ecto one. I had slimer. I had all of the action figures. I watched the animated series. I was all in on ghostbusters. But ghostbusters was a self aware, aspirational kind of comedy. It was like it made young kids want to be older and cool. It didn't make want adults want to be kids. And that inversion of trying to make something youthful for older people rather than something excitingly old for young people is kind of what has me at cross purposes with this movie because at a certain point about an hour in after we've spent some time with our main characters, it becomes clear that this isn't just a new movie in a ghostbusters franchise. It's basically trying to do the same thing with The Force Awakens, where it's like, here's all the stuff you love from the first Star Wars that we're gonna put in the back half of our movie. Now you don't usually care as much about the IP wars and I don't think this sense of nostalgia necessarily bugs you as much as it does me. But what did you make of the kind of decision to throw so much Zulu and the gatekeeper and the key master and the little stay puft marshmallow man, all that stuff getting into the movie? This stay puft marshmallow men or characters I the original character I feel a great affection and connection with. That scene was the real low point because that is definitely takes place in a product placement Walmart ad. And there was just a lot of time spent of Paul Rudd showing you the various deals available at Walmart before all of the tiny marshmallow men who are also being advertised as product to sell to your next generation of children are running across

Mckenna Grace Shawn Fantasy Amanda Avins Manuel Miranda Paul Feig Jason Reitman Amanda Mike Mills Finn Wolfhard Jonathan Larson Harry Coon Andrew Garfield Ivan Reitman Phoebe Netflix Ron Howard Somerville Mike Trevor
A highlight from (Episode 265) "Little House on the Prairie" Actor: Karen Grassle.

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

06:34 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from (Episode 265) "Little House on the Prairie" Actor: Karen Grassle.

"Kerry grassley's phenomenal actor known for her legendary role as Caroline my angles on the iconic Little House on the Prairie Karen. It's an honor and a privilege. Welcome to the podcast today. Oh, thank you so much. Karen, I want to see before we get started. You have and I told you this off here. You have some wonderful assistance, namely, Jamie Megan, Olivia. I wish my other some of my other guests had the same type of wonderful positive support that you have. Thank you. Well, I am very fortunate. You know, and I want to start off with something completely random. I just want to tell you as somebody who's an older dad for the first time, how much I appreciate your narration of children's books, like so great. Yeah, it's so well done. And I never really kind of like, I mean, until I really heard you speak and get into it, you really have a beautiful narrator's voice. It's so effective. Oh, thank you. I felt very comfortable doing that. Yeah, and you're a natural at it. We're going to talk about your life and for those listening. The phenomenal book, bright lights, Prairie dust reflections on life loss and love from little house a little house is my what a really great title that is Karen. So let's talk about your life. Let's kind of hop into it here. You grew up in Ventura, California. I feel like growing up your parents fray, am I pronouncing that correctly with your mother? Yes. Friend and Eugene. You know, reading the book and kind of researching your life. I kind of know what life might have been like for you. But hearing it from you, what was it like? Do you feel like, you know, I know dad had his struggles, mom is just this iconic Beacon of strength, right? But give you some more insight from your point of view for those listening. Well, you know, I was one of the lucky kids whose parents wanted more than anything to have children to have a family to really do a good job raising their kids and send them to college. They were devoted parents. So I was the beneficiary of that. Even though we had alcoholism in the home. So my folks really put in a lot of energy as parents. You know, they worked really hard. They taught us how to work hard, my sister and me. And when we got an idea or an activity that we were interested in, they got behind it. Just like, oh, you know, some dads might go to their kids, football game or their little league, my mother was so in costumes for our dance performances and letting me be in the brownies and helping me with my little business I had when I was about 8 years old to sell Christmas cards. And, you know, they would really get behind what we wanted to do. Yeah, and you know, you go into a lot of detail in the book and in the book, I can not stress how good it is for those of you listening. You really go into this very specific detail. Dad struggles with alcoholism, but even in that Karen, he did have this positive side. You mentioned he was supportive of what you were doing. So when you look back, is a bit of a mixed bag. I mean, I get from reading the book and just your life, that there was a lot of things going on. But when you reflect and you look back on it, do you see them both as having each of their own unique personalities, both positive and negative? Is that how you perceive that? You know, when I finish this book, I realized these were great people. I mean, great people. They had a lot of challenges in their lives. And they just came through it, just tough. And, you know, like, my father, he had a great sense of humor. So even when he was struggling, you know, with his business and the pay bills and the try to get that next deal, he was doing things like teaching us to ride a bike and wiggling his years and making pancakes if we had a girlfriend overnight, you know? I mean, I feel I was very lucky. And this friend of mine that helped me with my book on Sean Sunday. She pointed it out. She studied the book like you did because she wanted to ask me the right questions and she said what she really noticed was that I'd come up with some thing I wanted and they push they give me pushback. They give me pushback and yet when they saw it, for example, that I had to quit school and go into the theater and they got behind it. They did want it. They tried to steer me another direction. But when they saw that that was it for me, they got behind it and helped me. Yeah. And I'm going to be very careful in surgery because I don't want to give out too much of the book because I really feel like there's some stuff in there that should be heard for the first time as people are reading not so much during the podcast, but we can talk about that. There is a really an emotional scene where your mother talks about how your dad tried to take his life. And the way you describe your mother, it's just the way it's the same way I feel my mother just such admiration and just so brave and just like I said, this Beacon of strength. That was a tough conversation I imagine. Where she's talking about how the exhaust situation is out of memory that's tough for you. Is that a memory that how does that age with time for you Karen? Well, it's a very powerful scene. Yes, yes, for sure. What I say in the book is that's the day I became an adult. Because I could see my mother in a different way. You know, it wasn't just about me. It was about her. It was about what

Kerry Grassley Prairie Karen Jamie Megan Karen Little House Caroline Olivia Ventura Eugene California Football Sean
A highlight from Harvey Keitel - 'Lansky' [LIVE]

Awards Chatter

01:11 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from Harvey Keitel - 'Lansky' [LIVE]

"Hi everyone and thank you for tuning into the 414th episode of awards channel. The Hollywood Reporter's awards podcast. I'm Scott feinberg, the host, and also a trustee professor at Chapman university's Dodge college of film and media arts. And this is a special live episode being recorded at Chapman's felino theater in orange, California in front of an audience of my students and other members of the community of this great film school. Today we are honored to be joined by a brilliant actor who made his name in the new Hollywood of the 1960s and 1970s in films like main streets and taxi driver. Who was a pivotal figure in the indie boom of the 1980s and 1990s in films like reservoir dogs, the piano and Pulp Fiction, and who continues to do great work well into the 21st century. A product of the celebrated actor studio with which he has remained associated ever since. He has worked with many of the finest filmmakers of his time. Often, in the ultimate compliment to an actor, more than once. Indeed, 6 times with Martin Scorsese, three times with James tobac, twice with Ridley Scott, Alan Rudolph, Jane campion, Abel Ferrara, Wes Anderson, and of course, Quentin Tarantino, and the list goes on.

Scott Feinberg Dodge College Of Film And Medi Chapman's Felino Theater The Hollywood Reporter Chapman University Orange California Hollywood James Tobac Alan Rudolph Martin Scorsese Ridley Scott Jane Campion Abel Ferrara Wes Anderson Quentin Tarantino
A highlight from Cowboy Bebop

Pop Culture Happy Hour

05:27 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from Cowboy Bebop

"It. Joining me from his home in Denver is writer and film critic Walter chow, hey, Walter. Good morning space cowboys. Welcome back. And also with this is writer NPR music contributor and co host of the bottom of the map podcast Christina Lee welcome back Christina. Glenn Walters are happy to be here. Great to have you. All right, now U.S. audiences might remember the original cowboy bebop Japanese anime from the 90s, it aired on Cartoon Network's Adult Swim programming block. And in the intervening years, it's proved hugely influential and attained cult status, and given its limited run, which is unusual, just 26 episodes in a movie, it continues to serve as many people's introduction to the anime format. That's one reason this live action adaptation has been so anticipated. As we mentioned, John Cho plays a bounty hunter named spike, whose teamed up with Mustafa Shakira's gruff but lovable jet black on the spaceship bebop. They're soon joined by Faye Valentine, played by daniella Pineda, she's another bounty hunter with a mysterious past. Mysterious pass are kind of this shows whole thing as each character is haunted by the life they used to lead. The villain of the piece is the appropriately named vicious, a crime boss played by Alex hassel, who's now hooked up with spikes X Julia, played by Helena satine. And it all takes place in a grimy future of terraformed planets and moons after the earth has been rendered unlivable. It's now streaming on Netflix. Christina, let me start with you. What's your history with the anime? And what did you make of the new show? Man, I wish I had cable when this one was out in the 90s. Unfortunately, we were not that type of household. We were squarely a PBS household. But I actually came to watch the show literally just over the past year as shut in orders were in place. I asked myself what areas of pop culture and my missing, like what can I catch up on and cowboy bebop just happened to be one of those shows? So I watched it, literally over the past year. And what do you think of the new show? I fall squarely in the middle, I think there are moments that are really terrific. And then there are others that I think are controversial for a reason. So I mean, for me, whether it's at its best moments or is most controversial moments, I think it's a good reminder of how great the original actually was. Walter same question for you. What's your take on the original series and what did you make of the new one? Well, I love the original series. I loved it a lot more 20 years ago. What I had had them on VHS. I was kind of a early subscriber to it. But I rewatched the entire series just in the last couple of weeks, just right before watching the live action series just to refresh myself. And I have to say, I don't feel like it aged as well for me as I would have thought it did. And part of the reason probably is the original series is so influential with anything that's so influential when you go back and look at it. It seems less fresh now through the lens of all the other art that's inspired it over the last two decades. Now it doesn't seem as cool. Yeah, the postmodern condition. Exactly. Yeah, exactly right. And so there's a little bit of puerility. I think in the original, especially in Faye Valentine's costume, I know that was a little bit of an Internet kerfuffle when the early images from the live actions that came out. A lot of people were complaining about how Faye Valentine's costumes were not as revealing and sexy as those in the anime. And to be honest, you know, and the actress daniella Pineda responded, I'm sorry about 6 foot with two inch waist and double DD breasts. I think she said. And yet, truly, there's a lot of puerility I think in terms of the way that she's depicted visually in the original series. Now, in terms of character depth, really beautifully handled. But all those things that are great about the original the form of it, the function of it the depth of the characters of the development. I think those are the things that are missing in the live action. The series feels to me like, I don't want to really piss off the enemy, leverage, but I also want to welcome the newcomers to it. So let's soften the weirdness of it and the idiosyncratic Ness of the original. And let's make something that has a traditional story arc. There's a traditional villain arc that has lots of flashbacks. That makes, you know, vicious of main characters that have a mysterious supporting character. For me, it's just didn't work. I had a hard time with it. That's interesting, because listeners might wonder why I'm asking what your experience is with the anime series and then inviting you to compare them, that is just inevitable. This show goes out of its way to where that enemy on its sleeve. And I was trying to figure out the reviews of this thing are all over the map right now as we tape this. And it seems like that until you start to pick out a through line. Critics who know the anime series well, kind of were split down the middle. They find the live action version either a big misfire or unnecessary while critics who don't know the anime very well. Hi, seem to like it well enough. I like this well enough. I am definitely in that letter camp. It did make me curious about the NMA, which for better or for worse, everyone is sitting right next to it on Netflix the next tile over. Frankly, after watching 7 of the ten episodes that were supplied to critics, I started watching the anime and I haven't gone back to the live action series yet because the anime is breaking news hot take pretty good. It just seems so much tighter so much livelier. It moves better. And usually I prefer an overarching narrative to the monster of the week episodes of X files or small Bill. The live action series seems to be forcing that overarching narrative. And again, maybe it's unfair to compare these two series, but it's inevitable. There are just so many shot for shot scenes so much dialog, so many camera movements

Daniella Pineda Faye Valentine Walter Chow Christina Lee Glenn Walters Mustafa Shakira Alex Hassel Helena Satine Christina Walter John Cho Cartoon Network NPR Cowboys Netflix Denver PBS Julia U.S.
A highlight from King Richard and Top 5 Sports Movies With Bill Simmons

The Big Picture

05:24 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from King Richard and Top 5 Sports Movies With Bill Simmons

"Sean fantasy. I'm Amanda dobbins. And this is the big picture, a conversation show about king Richard Will Smith. And sports movies. Later in today's episode, you can hear a conversation I had with king Richard director Ronaldo Marcus green. I hope you'll stick around for that. But first, let's talk about king Richard and sports movies with the erstwhile sports guy himself Bill Simmons Bill. Welcome back to the show. Good to see both of you as always. Let's start with king Richard. Huge movie. BS you saw it this week in theaters, many of you saw a couple of weeks ago. It's obviously been touted as an Oscar contender for a couple of months now. Will Smith right at the center of the frame starring as Richard Williams, father of Venus and Serena, the movie essentially tracks him raising them in Compton in the 1990s along with her mother or scene in their sisters. Bill I'll start with you. What do you think of king Richard? Incredibly well acted. Yeah. Really manipulative. I was in, I was in the whole time. My big takeaway was that I kind of had forgotten how incredible the Williams sisters story is. And, you know, we did a 9 for 9 documentary about them in 2013 called Venus versus that hit a little bit, but it was only an hour. It didn't really go into it. I think they've been in our lives for so long that the genesis of it, I just kind of forgotten. And, you know, this was manipulated by the media in a lot of ways, but the perception of Richard Williams in the 90s was that he was a lunatic dad, and it was the era of the lunatic dads and we saw it in tennis and all these other sports and was the first time people really started writing about it and there were bad ones and, you know, he just seemed like kind of a Mimi, me kind of dad and what you realize in this movie is that there was a lot more to it, which is the best kind of movies or documentaries about real-life stuff are the ones that kind of make you rethink what you thought about stuff and why you thought the certain ways. And for me, that was it. I thought the actors Will Smith his wife and the two daughters and bernthal. Those 5, I love Tony goldwin. All of the key parts were really all at the top of their games, and that's why I was so much fun for me. Yeah, Antonio Ellis is or seen the mom and cinea Sydney and Demi singleton who Bill you may recognize from showbiz kids, the documentary that we worked on with Alex Winter, who was a young girl trying to get jobs in the middle of that documentary and lo and behold, she's playing Serena Williams in a movie two years later, unbelievable stuff, Amanda, you're a hardcore tennis fan, and a hardcore Serena fan. Will Smith fan. That's right. And a hardcore biopic fan. I'm the only person who will defend the manipulative genre. I mean, absolutely love this. I wept multiple times, which as we were putting together our sports movie list, which we'll talk about later, that for me is the key determinant. If I cry at least three times during a movie, then we know it's working. We know I'm being successfully manipulated to bill's point. Well, to be fair, you probably are more easily crying these days. In this case, I'm a cyborg and I almost cried twice. I was looking around. I mean, that is very true, but to your point about kind of forgetting the first decade of the Williams sisters career because it has been decades at this point. And I'm a few years younger than Serena and Venus and have always been a tennis fan if not a tennis player. My parents tried so hard. And it didn't really take, but so I remember watching them as like a young woman and watching them transform this sport and I think in the last ten years as they've become the most dominant athletes in the sport, I was taking them for granted. And I was taking just the excitement and the improbability of what they achieved. I had kind of forgotten just like you, Bill and so for it to be recreated with such heart and also precision. You know, down to like, I remember specific things that they wore or specific matches. I also think by the way the tennis in this movie is really great. And I mean, it can be hard to make tennis exciting, even in life for that though. There's some CGI. Yeah. And I think that's been the biggest problem with tennis movies over the years was that it was so hard to recreate how realistic the tennis had to be. In this case, I think they were doing a lot of chicanery with the tennis and a good way to make it seem more realistic. Yeah, and a lot of it, like the quick cutting and everything, but it was exciting. Totally. You were into the sport of it, which I can't really say for most tennis movies. So I was completely delighted. It had a real mid 90s wholesome sports movie vibe to it that is what I grew up on. And I just am always ready to welcome back. Yeah, that was part of why I wanted you to be on the show bills as I finished watching the movie and I was like, damn, this is a real throwback. This feels like a movie that could have come in 1996 in a very good way. We don't get a ton of stuff like this. And it feels like it happened because Will Smith maybe is having some feelings about fatherhood and his own father, and he wrote this memoir that he's been on the campaign trail talking about recently and I had the same reaction that you did to the Richard Williams story. My perception of him has not a serious tennis fan.

King Richard Tennis Richard Williams Sean Fantasy Amanda Dobbins King Richard Will Smith Ronaldo Marcus Green Bill Simmons Bill Serena Bernthal Tony Goldwin Antonio Ellis Cinea Sydney Demi Singleton Alex Winter Venus Bill Smith Compton Williams
A highlight from #850: House of Gucci / tick, tick... BOOM! / Spencer / Golden Brick Noms

Filmspotting

04:20 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from #850: House of Gucci / tick, tick... BOOM! / Spencer / Golden Brick Noms

"What kind of a show you guys putting on here today? No. No, look, we're going to do this thing. We're going to have a conversation. From Chicago, this is film spotting. I'm Adam Campana, and I'm Josh Larson. It is an empire. You can help the family. Gucci is not exciting, and everybody knows it. At least it's my name, sweetie. Our name. Sweetie. Ah yes, what signals Thanksgiving week more than the sound of a bitter family squabbling. Hadn't thought of House of Gucci as a Thanksgiving movie, but I guess it works. Ridley Scott's true crime drama with Lady Gaga and Adam Driver is one of the titles. We'll get to in this week's roundup of new releases. And we'll talk about the nominees for this year's golden brick award. That and more. Gucci Gucci Gucci. Oh boy. I had on film spotting. Welcome to film spotting. So hear me out on this Josh. You actually weren't part of film spotting when the golden brick award was created, but I'm putting forth a petition to change the name to the Josh Larson. Golden brick award as you're apparently the only one who sees any of these movies. Well, maybe this year that's the case. And that's too much pressure for me. I don't want it. I reject it. Okay, fair enough, and you know what? It's not really accurate anyway. I've done some homework. You're gonna get my take on a couple of these golden bricks shortlisted titles. And I'm gonna throw one into the mix as well. Excellent. More on those golden brick nominees later in the show, but first, we have seen some movies Josh just not all of the same movies recently, and it occurs to me that all three of the films we're going to talk about here are based on real people, though, probably fair to say that none of them could be described as traditional biopics. Let's start with House of Gucci, which open wide on Thanksgiving eve. That's one. You saw that I have yet to have the pleasure of catching up with House of Gucci is the second film in about a month. We've gotten from director Ridley Scott, his period ethic the last duel with Ben Affleck Matt Damon Adam Driver and zero, crazy accent, so I'm told came and went from theaters pretty quickly despite some very positive reviews. That's one. We both are hoping a screener arrives soon for Josh? Yeah, that would be nice and I mean, I'm pretty sure I forget if it's Damon or Affleck, but one of them sports a whopper of an accent I've heard. I've heard. So hopefully we'll get a chance to enjoy that ourselves. Okay. I have been misinformed. Adam Driver returns here in Gucci as maurizio Gucci grandson of the founder of the iconic fashion label. It's the 80s. He's married to Lady Gaga's Portuguese, who has ambitions to shake things up at Gucci. This is all based, of course, on a true story, and also in the film playing Gucci's. How about this merger's road, Josh? Al Pacino. Jeremy Irons, and Jared Leto. A concoction of American and British actors playing Italians with varying degrees of commitment to the accent work. The reports I've seen suggest that it approaches camp maybe it goes so far past camp that we don't even know what to call it. What would you call House of Gucci? Well, that's the question with this movie. And I think, you know, the marketing has kind of set itself up to make that the question at least the trailers that I've seen, even the early stills that were released of Adam Driver and Lady Gaga suggested a camp approach to this. I think if audiences go in, hoping for a two hour and 40 minute, I believe it is. Maybe a little longer. Hoot, they are going to be disappointed because a lot of this is quite dull. Now, other portions do approach camp. And here we go to that tricky question of what is can't mean to you. I've always kind of defaulted to pure camp for me. Are people who are taking the material seriously. Are perhaps aware of its melodramatic possibilities and tendencies and may nudge things a little in that direction here or there. But otherwise, have respect for the material. I don't consider camp to be what Jared Leto is doing in this movie, which is like massacre theater in the heck out of this role. You have a gift I'm

Adam Driver House Of Gucci Josh Larson Adam Campana Josh Gucci Gucci Gucci Ridley Scott Golden Brick Award Lady Gaga Maurizio Gucci Chicago Ben Affleck Matt Damon Affleck Jared Leto Damon Jeremy Irons Al Pacino
A highlight from Ghostbusters: Afterlife And What's Making Us Happy

Pop Culture Happy Hour

04:30 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from Ghostbusters: Afterlife And What's Making Us Happy

"The ghostbusters franchise produced two blockbuster movies in the 80s, as well as a 2016 reboot. The latest film is called ghostbusters afterlife. It brings together a new generation of ghostbusters who discover that they need to pick up where the old 80s films left off. I'm Glenn Weldon. And I'm Stephen Thompson, today we are talking about ghostbusters afterlife on pop culture happy hour from NPR. Here with Glen and me is NPR's White House correspondent ayesha rasko. Hello Aisha. Hello. Also joining us is NPR contributor, Serena toro. Hi Serena. Hey, Steven. It is great to have you both. So the history of the ghostbusters franchise is complicated. The original 1984 movie starring Bill Murray Dan Aykroyd Harold Ramis and Ernie Hudson was a massive comedy blockbuster, but from there, it gets messy. Ghostbusters two came out in 1989. It got mediocre reviews, but it performed well at the box office still efforts to continue the series languished and we didn't get another ghostbusters movie until 2016 when a reboot directed by Paul feig, with women as the ghostbusters got swept up in the culture wars and underperformed commercially. Now, ghostbusters afterlife reconnects with the original timeline while introducing a bunch of new characters, Carrie coon plays the estranged daughter of Harold Ramis's character in the original ghostbusters, she moves to Oklahoma with her science loving 12 year old daughter Phoebe, played by Mckenna Grace, and her 15 year old son Trevor, played by Finn Wolfhard, they're the family has to contend with a new Supernatural threat as well as the legacy and the equipment the original ghostbusters left behind. The family is joined by a summer school teacher named mister grooberson, played by Paul Rudd, as well as a junior podcaster who goes by the name podcast, don't we all? He is played by Logan Kim, the movie is directed by Jason reitman, son of Ivan reitman, who directed the first two ghostbusters films, Jason reitman co wrote this script with gilkin. It's in theaters now. Now Aisha, I'm going to start with you. What is your relationship with the ghostbusters franchise and what did you think of ghostbusters afterlife? Okay, so I am a kid of the 80s, so I love the ghostbusters. I remember it, you know, all the stuff about New York City. Obviously, I was from the south, but with my father was from New Jersey so the idea of like the city and the slimer and all that stuff, I really liked it. There's something about those 80s, New York movies that just, it hits something, right? Like it brings the nostalgia, right? So I really like that. And I also love the second movie had a Bobby Brown song that I listened to. I will jam out in the car today. I will probably listen to it after this. I listen to this. It's like great stuff. So I came into this and I, you know, I was a little concerned because I feel like ghostbusters is one of those movies that it was just of a moment. And I think it's hard to recapture. You know, I think the movie's coming to America and stuff like that. They were great, but they're also like of a moment. They capture a moment. And so with this, I don't love it. It's okay. It's okay. I really like the characters. I like podcasts. The little kid. I like, you know, Phoebe. You know, Paul Rudd is great as the summer school teacher and possible mom love interest. And so they're likeable, the kids don't have much supervision. I do think putting it in a rural area, it kind of took away from it a bit because like the New York was like a part of the character. Of the movies and then you go to this town and it's not really a part of it. Like at the end, I will say it did kind of warm my cold cold heart a little bit. Just a bit, but it still didn't completely justify like, why do we need this movie? Why does this add anything? I feel like the creed movies when you look at them compared to rocky, they added something. Like, you got the nostalgia, but you also like added something, I'm not sure this adds anything. And so I might just watch the original movies. Of watching this one. But I don't mind it.

Harold Ramis Glenn Weldon Stephen Thompson Ayesha Rasko Hello Aisha Serena Toro NPR Paul Feig Carrie Coon Jason Reitman Mckenna Grace Finn Wolfhard Mister Grooberson Ernie Hudson Logan Kim Gilkin Dan Aykroyd Paul Rudd Bill Murray Phoebe
A highlight from Remembering Petra Mayer

Pop Culture Happy Hour

05:34 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from Remembering Petra Mayer

"NPR music, hi Steven. Hey, Linda. Also, with us, is Glenn Weldon of NPR's culture desk high Glenn. Hey, Linda. Also joining us is our friend Barry Hardman, senior editor at NPR investigations. Thanks for being here, very high. So we are sharing some very sad news today. We're so sorry to have to share with you that our panelists and our friend Petra mayor, who was an NPR books editor and a treasured fourth chair for us died suddenly on Saturday of what's believed to be a pulmonary embolism. On today's episode of NPR's pop culture, happy hour, we wanted to take some time to remember Petra. Petra was 46, she had been at NPR for more than 20 years. She had most recently been working on the culture desk, but she also directed and produced for NPR radio shows. She's one of those people who's had half the jobs at NPR. If you followed the wonderful growth of NPR books in recent years a lot of that was Petra, she worked on the summer reader polls, which are one of those massive projects that everybody loves that you can't always see all the enormous amount of work that go into them. She was instrumental in developing the book concierge, which is so beloved, which same thing. She edited book reviews, she brought in new critics and she was also I think the main voice of NPR books on social media. Boy, she had a ton of passions, romance fiction, science fiction, Doctor Who, the great British bake off, her cats, her friends, her family. It is a lousy and awful loss. Glenn you and I have talked about how instrumental Petra's interest in genre fiction was to the way NPR coverage evolved. Yeah, absolutely. And first up I want to say, I think Stephen will touch on this, but I am so grateful to this show that so many people had the chance to get a sense of the Petra that for sure. We all knew here, so smart so funny, so passionate. that ignited your curiosity about the thing that she was passionate about. She wanted to bring you into the fold. That's what marked her as a nerd. But that's the public face. What listeners may not have as clear a sense of is how good she was at her job. Her position at an organization like NPR made her a de facto gatekeeper. I mean, she assigned many book reviews, which meant she assigned the books that got coverage, but she also assigned who would write or talk about them as well. And yet her mindset was about as staunchly anti gatekeeping as I can imagine. She was adamant that a platform like NPR feature the work of writers or critics of color, queer writers, from the disability community, body types. She sought out. And not just featured not just highlighted, but championed writers. That I don't know if NPR might have ever done without her. And that's within and without genre work. And the thing that I remembering about her now is that she brought such deep knowledge. Such a deep cultural context to every conversation, one over key roles here was completely invisible to the public. She was known for interrogating story ideas as they bubbled up. That's beautifully said. Whether they came from within and without the building, before we spent any resources on them, if someone noticed a trend, if someone pitched a half assed idea that intersected with the world of books, she was there to send. A very direct but polite email, warning editors that this trend that has just been identified wasn't new. If we do this story we'll come up like NPR thinks it's discovered this and it's been part of this committee for decades and will reek of cultural tourism and of privilege every time. I would see one of those emails, I'd send her a note saying thank you once again for keeping this organization from showing its entire ass in public. We're all navigating the personal loss and by the way, if you're shopping around for stages, I recommend anger. Yeah. I've got a time Sharon denial, but I am taking up some permanent living space in anger. But we're all going to deal with a personal loss the way we do. This organization, I can't get my head around what a loss this is for who we are and what we do. Absolutely. Barry, you worked with Petra for a really, really, really long time. What kind of thoughts do you have? So I worked with Petra she and I both actually are those people that while our hearts and home were in books and culture, we both did a ton of news. I'm in news right now. Yeah. So we always recognized each other when we were in a breaking news situation. It was like, hey, hey, I see you. I see you thinking about something else right now. And not the price of oil. Yeah, I've known her for quite a while. And we both worked on weekend shows and the weekend shows are a really lovely space where there is a lot of space for culture. And we became close when we both were books, editors, and the thing that I was remembering about Petra, I was re listening to a wonderful episode of pop culture happy hour that we all got to do together, Linda. And we had so much in common in a way that we were always really surprised by down to the fact that we both learned to ride a bike in our 40s. Now, I was not brave enough to do a whole story on the radio about that. Which she did and will live in the Hall of Fame of just pieces of radio and pieces of courage. So there were those kinds of things both like nail polish jewelry color. Like there were a lot of sort of aesthetic choices we had. Oh my God, she was always the first person to know if I wore a colorful dress or something. Petra was always the first person who wanted to know where'd you get the dress, where to come from where can I get it?

NPR Petra Glenn Weldon Barry Hardman Petra Mayor Npr Radio Linda Glenn Pulmonary Embolism Steven Stephen Sharon Barry
A highlight from Silk Sonic

Pop Culture Happy Hour

08:40 min | 3 weeks ago

A highlight from Silk Sonic

"Feel the way. The Grammys were actually an appropriate launch point for silk sonic given that Bruno Mars and Anderson pack have 15 trophies between them, and the sound of an evening with silk sonic seems ideally suited to add to their total. It takes classic funk and soul sounds and updates them for the present day. The album is even introduced by the funk legend bootsy Collins who gave the band its name. Ayesha, I'm gonna start with you. Where do you stand on one Bruno Mars to Anderson pack and three their new incarnation as silk sonic? Brito Mars, I stand I think he's sort of a consummate showman in the best possible way. You know, I did not actually really really start getting into him until around the era of uptown funk and when he started really just going all in on the recreating these previous eras of music, his last album was very heavily focused on the new deck swing era, had 24 karat magic and finesse. I thought it was really, really fun. I was not a fan of his earlier pop hits with sounded a little bit more generic for that era of the early tens, like locked out of heaven. I was like, eh, you know, they're fine. Grenade. Grenade, yeah, lazy song. Not my thing. But when he started going all in on these sounds, I was all about it. Anderson pack, the first time I discovered him was at governors ball, festival, like several years ago, I'd never heard of him, and I just happened to be by the stage and I was like, who is this dude? He's like playing the drums, he's rapping, it's awesome. So I've been a fan since then. And I think it's just this is just a really great example. Silicon is a great example of kismet. I think they are meant to be, they both been pulling from these sounds and are very old school in retro net way. And so to hear them collaborate on this, I wouldn't say that the album is like perfect. And I do feel it's a little bit slight in some ways, but overall, I really enjoy the sound. And there's a few songs that I've been bopping for forever and are now permanently lodged in my brain. So they've got this down pat. I'm into it. How about you, letitia? I think I'm in a limbo state with this album on one hand, I think it's a very significant sonic achievement, just like I used to was saying, it's from these two perfectionist music powerhouses that just know how to make hit after hit. And it's also hilarious. You know, not in a clever way, just in a wow, look at those fools by their full flag so freely. Yes. And even in its prestige, you know, it's true to form they have those passionate lyrics and Mars impact bring them life by like moaning and crying like they're jodey in the desert. Those explosive drums, the screaming horns. I think I am much more of a pack fan than I am Bruno Mars fan. And this album feels way more skewed to Bruno's sound and his little funk retro thing that he always has going on. But, you know, on the other hand, I have to ignore like oodles of misogyny noir. And the commercialization of black music to really enjoy it fully. Which I can do from tipsy, but it's a little harder from sober. So I'm like, this is certainly fun. It's very, very fun. I'm not always in the mood for it, but when I am, it's really, really fun. It sounds like I'm more or less on the same page with you guys in terms of coming into this record, more of a pack fan than a Mars fan. Like Aisha, I kind of came to appreciate Bruno Mars somewhat slowly. I really wasn't into his early work. I originally tagged this guy. And I've probably, I'm sure I've said this on the show before, but I have thought of Bruno Mars as the leader of the Bruno Mars rockin sole review for carnival cruise. And when he first came out, that's really what he felt like to me was just this very, very game try hard showman. And I think he's he's come into his own. He's kind of figured out who he wants to be. And as ayesha said, a lot of that is putting together pastiches of older styles and kind of freshening them up in interesting ways. And that's certainly what he's doing here. I actively love pack and have really, really liked his records and if you haven't seen his record setting tiny desk concert that has been viewed 80 million times. Classic classic. It's really saying something that of all the tiny dust concerts we've done that is the one that has had the most views. And really speaks to just the amount of showmanship that he brings. This record for me, it's really interesting. I've been thinking about the slightness of this record that you guys are referring to. There's an intro and then it's 8 songs in about 30 minutes. And to me, I really view that slightness as a strength. I think that if this record were 60 minutes long, I would probably hate it. Yes. But I think the fact that it kind of gets in and out, it doesn't all sound the same. It's playing around with a few different sounds and approaches and styles and speeds. And it kind of moves the fact that it's called an evening with silk sonic. It's a pretty short evening. Which I think is probably true to life. But I think that that kind of works for it here. And so I found it growing on me. I will say like one of the first words that popped into my mind hearing this record was perfectionist. These guys are perfectionists and everything they do, but really the first word that popped into my head when I heard this record was smarmy. Oh, that's a great word. It's true. It is a little hard to get past the smart. And if you've heard, leave the door open, which if you're listening to this, I'm sure you already have a million times. It's been a hit pretty much all year. It is really leaning hard into the smart. You know, you thinking about housewarming is even reminds me that what's really missing from this record is like sexiness. I think this is like the least sexy adaptation of funk music ever. That line from smoking out the window when he's like, she was gripping on me tight, screaming Hercules. That is so unsexy. Actually hear that moment. It's worth visiting as we're talking about it. Just see the nurse it was gripping numbing to ask him, Huckabee. Who among us? Really? That's just like so unsexy. I get the reference, obviously, and I get how they want to make it this cute, tongue in cheek, like, oh, look at us. We're so fun. But it just takes away all the drip from what objectively could be a very cool and like fly album. But I think that unsex just really sends it home on the hilarity of it. It's just something to laugh at, more than it is to vibe with. Laughing is still fun too. Absolutely. I kind of want to push back on the idea that this is more of a Bruno project than an Anderson pack project. Please. At least in the sense that, I think that when it comes to the smartness and the joking and the constant winking that's happening on these songs, yes, that is very much Bruno Mars. A little bit less Anderson because I think Anderson on his own is just cooler, generally. But Anderson has been kind of dipping into these styles for a while now. Like his last album of Ventura, he has a song with Smokey Robinson. It could have fit easily onto this record. Like it's very that song has a very groove to it. It feels like sort of late 70s, early 80s, smoky Robinson. And even his side project, no worries, which is probably my favorite iteration of Anderson pack. And that's a collaboration with the producer knowledge. They're pulling from so many references to classic soul songs and those things. So I feel like it still feels to me like an Anderson album, but the over the top cheesiness just is all Bruno. I also curious, brutal Mars has been accused or criticized for being a sort of cultural appropriator by some black music critics and listeners because he's not black, but he's really come into his own and made his money borrowing from new Jack swing from Michael Jackson from all these artists. And I'm curious what you all think about that because I think it's a little bit more complicated than some people might say it is in part because he's not white, but also because despite how silly he can be and how try hard he seems. It does feel like he respects this in the way that a, I don't know, a Robin Thicke or someone.

Bruno Mars Anderson Brito Mars Bootsy Collins Ayesha Letitia Bruno Aisha PAT Smokey Robinson Huckabee Ventura Jack Swing Michael Jackson Robin Thicke
A highlight from (Episode 264) "Hell or High Water" Actor: Dylan Kenin.

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

05:38 min | 3 weeks ago

A highlight from (Episode 264) "Hell or High Water" Actor: Dylan Kenin.

"Listened to your interview with Chris browning, who happens to be a friend of mine. And I heard you talking about that. And I thought, well, that's fabulous, you know? He's a funny guy. He's a funny guy, Chris. Interesting dude, talented actor. What a life story. Amazing life story. He goes for being homeless. And like, I didn't even know this. I mean, not that it's my business anyway, but he's dating Natasha henrich the entire time and he never said it like you think you know my wife or the person I'm seeing or whatever. These Mary, but it's just kind of an oh by the way. She's just like this huge sci-fi actor. It's just, you know what I'm saying? Like he's very humble. Yeah, I don't know, maybe I'm just looking at it from a fanboy perspective. Right. Of course. I mean, you know, who's he'll play it pretty close to the vest, right? Why not? Yeah, and he's got he's such a great dad. You watch him on Instagram. He's so good with his kids, so it's just such a good dude. Yeah. Yeah. He's always dude. Yeah, you guys are like it somewhere. You guys have an awesome filmography. Well, he beat me out for the role in book of Eli. And you know, well deserved because he killed it. And I can understand why they cast him. But I have both have worked extensively locally in New Mexico. So our paths have crossed a bunch. He used to play baseball with a good buddy of mine. Et cetera, et cetera. So it's not as if we're in buddies and call each other on the weekends. But I'm certainly well aware of his career and what he's doing and keeping a loose tab on him. And it's always just impressive and I'm always so happy because it seems like his path has not been the easiest one, but the more he climbs the ladder, the more awareness people have of him, it's just like everybody wins. So that's cool. Yeah, I mean, that's well said, yeah, he's a really good dude and I think the world of him is a really nice guy. But let's get it to your great life. I mean, all right, so you're born in New Mexico, right? Some really great iconic shows there, Breaking Bad shot there, Better Call Saul there from the outside looking in, just seems like such a good-looking place. My mother and sister live in Nevada and it reminds me very much of the layout and landscape. How long Dylan were you in New Mexico for? Yeah, you're not wrong. It's all interchangeable the southwest. You can go West Texas, New Mexico, Nevada, Arizona, southern Colorado, and you're going to get a piece of everything in there. Born and raised in New Mexico immediately at 18 graduated high school went to college in Los Angeles and I've been here ever since. So I'm going to jump a little bit, okay, so I feel like the Internet believe it or not may not be completely reliable here. It says you had you got your BA in 95, but there's no way you're the same age as me. You're much more handsome, you're much younger than me. I graduated in 99. So I did start in 95 at USC and that ages me quite a bit. Unfortunately, but here we are. No, but there's some interesting tidbits here, right? So I read something about ice hockey at USC true or false. Oh, yeah, absolutely. So the back story on that is when we were kids, my brother and I and our group of friends, you know, ranging from about ages 7 to 15 all told, used to shovel the ponds up at Christina Wilson's place in the winter and just stick and puck, whatever. Fast forward, I was a senior in high school and we had a sort of a house league, a farm league team, if you will. That we put together our parents and the local very small town mind you city council had put together a skating rink in the middle of the park in the middle of town and get Carson park. And so we had a legitimate illegitimate team and I was the captain of it in high school. And then came to USC where there is a club team. And we play the PAC 12 teams and we travel across the nation for national tournaments. And so I played hockey for four years at USC, which is astounding to most people because they can't even imagine ice in Southern California. Yeah, but you know, it's a club team which I get, but that's competitive, right? I mean, a lot of those pack ten teams, you know? For sure. There were guys on my team that, you know, we're only not in division one hockey schools because they had also brains and they got a scholarship to USC or whatever, you know what I mean? They were not, they knew they weren't going to go on to play competitive professional hockey, but they were definitely competitive and professional level players, not myself, obviously. I was just doing it for the fun of it. I loved it. Do you still players have been a while? No, it's been a minute. You know, I used to go home and play Christmas time. By the way, my high school went on to be state champions like 7 years running directly after I graduated and left town, a billionaire moved to town and donated a bunch of money and put together a rec center with a skating rink and they were off to the races, the high school now has one of the winningest records in I guess it's not much to say the southwest because you don't think of hockey.

New Mexico Chris Browning Natasha Henrich USC Nevada Instagram Christina Wilson Hockey ELI Chris Mary West Texas Carson Park Saul Baseball Dylan Arizona Colorado Los Angeles PAC
A highlight from 10 Irrational Best-Picture Oscar Predictions and Why Belfast Is the Front-Runner

The Big Picture

05:24 min | 3 weeks ago

A highlight from 10 Irrational Best-Picture Oscar Predictions and Why Belfast Is the Front-Runner

"I'm Amanda, Robin. And this is the big picture, a conversation show about the Oscars. Once upon a time this was a podcast dedicated to the Academy Awards. We're going to go back to our roots today to discuss Kenneth Branagh's autobiographical feature Belfast, a leading contender for best picture at the moment, and the state of the race so far. Later in this episode, I have a conversation with Alison claimant, a documentarian who has made films about AI weiwei and Steve Bannon. Allison's new film is called jagged. It's an intimate portrait of Alanis Morissette. During the making of and subsequent landmark success of her album, jagged little pill. Jagged is the latest in ringer films and HBO's music box series. I'm a producer on this series and have been hard at work on it with Bill Simmons and our team for more than three years. Over the next 5 Thursdays, 5 new films from the series will debut on HBO and HBO Max. Every week during that period, I'll have a conversation with one of the directors. I hope you will stick around for my conversation with Allison, and I appreciate you watching these movies. Now let's do the awards dance Amanda. Award season is here, sort of, this month announces several major Oscar contenders, Belfast is the first true, heavy hitter. I just want to give you one data point before we begin our conversation of this movie and the race in general. It's a 131 days until the Academy Awards. 131. Great. The Academy Awards are on March 27th, 2022. We could be destroyed by an asteroid before that. That's a 131 days. Which, compared to last year, is just like the peak of efficiency. Just so you know. Do you remember last year's awards season was somehow 45 years long, even though there were three movies in it. And we knew which movie was gonna win on like September 2nd. That's very true, but I feel like that was only because every day felt like a year during the first year of lockdown, it went from September to April. That's so long. That's the majority of a year. It was bad. It was it. I gotta say though, march 27th is way, way, way too late. There's no Golden Globes this year. This should have been happening like February 8th. The idea that the Winter Olympics or the Super Bowl were somehow going to interfere with the ability to promote the Academy Awards is ludicrous. I can't do this with you for 5 months. What are they doing? You don't have to make it about me. It's not about particularly. It's just like, I can't do this. No. I mean, I agree with you and I was home in Atlanta last weekend and talking with my dad who loves movies. And he was expressing his frustration that he's happens every year, but seems like really sharp this year, he's heard about all of these movies. And I can't see any of them. And it's like, what am I supposed to do? You're going to talk to me about these movies for like four months and I you know, I told him that all the movies I'd seen early and he was like, what good does that do me? I can't see them, which 100% true dad. And so, you know, I think you and I feel that if her cheek, particularly because the Oscar race is alive to us and many people listening to this podcast have not had the opportunity to see almost all of these films. And probably won't for a while, which is I guess theoretically why the Oscar date is later in order to give people time to see the movies, whether it's in a theater or whether it's at home, to accommodate for all the confusion and the varying distribution models, but it just it's so long. And it doesn't seem to be building to anything for anyone. It's so long. And the thing is in the past movies had a two month four month 6 month year long shelf life in the consciousness of American popular culture. Movies get a weekend now, maybe? I mean, eternals is gone. It's like not a movie that anybody's gonna talk about ever again. It came about ten days ago. That's incredible. Sure. Well, it was bad. And no one liked it. So that's part of the reason. And not even bad in a fun way, no one liked it and no one really wanted to talk about it, except for the ways in which it was a failure. I didn't even get to talk about the ways in which it was a failure, but that's fine. I'm moving on with my life. No, it's fine. It's okay. Someone just go read a book of Greek mess and call me some other time. But I think that's true for the most part because there aren't that many movies that people want to spend a lot of time with, that a lot of people have access to and also want to spend a time. A lot of time with. Dune being the exception. That's a very interesting way to put that. Doing is obviously a movie that many, many people have seen both in movie theaters and on HBO Max. And I think that that has somehow become a secret sauce this year. You know, we talked about Spencer last week. We're about to begin a conversation about Belfast. These are movies that are opening in modest, wide release and are going to roll out theoretically and more and more theaters and then find their way to VOD. The thing is, it's hard to predict what's going to work on VOD and these modest releases, the arthouse rollouts have not been terribly successful. That side of the business has not really recovered in the way that some of the IP franchise entertainment has recovered. So this is very challenging. Dune's the only move and we'll get to this when we talk about the best picture race. But doing the only wide release blockbuster movie that I feel like has any clout in the race this year, there's a couple more things that are opening before the year is out. But I don't know. Let's just go to the big picture big picture, which is all

Academy Awards Alison Claimant Steve Bannon Ringer Films Belfast HBO Allison Amanda Oscar Kenneth Branagh Ai Weiwei Alanis Morissette Bill Simmons Oscars Robin Golden Globes Winter Olympics Super Bowl
A highlight from Below Deck

Pop Culture Happy Hour

04:18 min | 3 weeks ago

A highlight from Below Deck

"Young junior, he is the host of the pushkin podcast solvable. Welcome back Ronald. Ahoy, mate. And also joining us is a meal in the Aussie sheet is a culture writer and panelist on the CBC's pop chat. Welcome back a meal. Hi, it's really, really good to be here. Yeah, it's a pretty special day, I think, for all of us. As I mentioned, below deck came to bravo in 2013 as one of the networks. Many shows about young hotties who live together or work together or both. Each season, it features 8 or so crew members who work and party and sometimes have sex, obviously, as they take care of various charter groups who go out for a couple of days at a time. Since then, bravo has added below deck Mediterranean and below deck sailing yacht, and there's more to come with bravo announcements of shows called below deck down under. You can probably tell what that is. And a more adrenaline oriented show called below deck adventure. Now Ronald. How did you come to be a below deck man? Below deck extreme. Sorry, that's all I heard when he said post. So I became a fan of below deck the way anyone becomes a fan of any bravo show. I was flipping through channels on the couch and there was a marathon on it. And I was like, huh, this scene is interesting in the next, you know, 8 hours later, I had watched a full season of below deck and I'm like, oh, wow, this is a fantastic. What I love about this show is that it's so easy to watch. Like, for me, this is why I like bravo. I don't like bravo for, you know, the big flagship shows the housewives shows the real estate shows. I like it for these very low Bates and it's young people hanging out discovering their lives. It's almost real world adjacent 'cause I was a huge fan of the real world where these people have real jobs and they're stuck together the whole season, and I love watching it. many different things between the hierarchical structure of the crew. For real. The deck crew versus the interior crew, which I'm sure we'll get into more of the drama between the romances and people loving each other. You know, I used to work at a summer camp briefly for two summers. And I can attest that this is how it goes. It doesn't matter whether you're working for the super rich or if you're just at a YMCA summer camp when young people who think they are going to live the rest of their lives, get together in the summer and they have nothing else to do. They are going to hook up with each other. They're going to have fun. And the show is that it's a lot of fun. I enjoy watching it. Yeah, all right, Emile, how about you? How did your below deck fandom come to be? My journey started in 2018 when I read that very young people were watching this show and I was just completely confused, thrown for a loop. So I said to my husband, I was like, we're going to watch an episode of this show. I don't know if it's good, but I read that, you know, young people love it. And instantly, we binged every single season and now it's a show that like, you know, you have shows with your partner. And if one of you watches recent episode without the other, it's like full out war. Right. We PVR, the below decks. Right. When the kids go to bed, that is how we relax. Very nice. Something about watching these beautiful goofy young people trapped on a boat trying to learn their jobs very awkwardly is just like instant relaxation for me. Yeah, I have a theory about one of the reasons why this show is so addictive. What I like about this show is like in order to charter one of these yachts. You have to have a lot of money, right? It's a very expensive thing to do. But you don't have so much money that you have your own yet. So it's these people who are rich, but they are impersonating people who are even richer. They're like the very rich but not the very, very rich. So I always feel like there's this air of hostility in terms of they're trying to get the most bang for their buck. In terms of how many ridiculous requests they can make now, there have also been guests who have gone on Instagram or other places on the Internet and said, look, you're obviously encouraged to be ridiculous and because it's bravo and television. But I also think there's a part of it

Bravo Ronald CBC Mediterranean Bates Emile Instagram
A highlight from Asghar Farhadi - 'A Hero' [LIVE]

Awards Chatter

04:23 min | 3 weeks ago

A highlight from Asghar Farhadi - 'A Hero' [LIVE]

"I'm Scott feinberg, the host, and also a trustee professor at Chapman university's Dodge college of film and media arts. And this is a special live episode being recorded at Chapman's felino theater in orange, California, in front of an audience of my students, and other members of the community of this great film school. Today we are honored to be joined by a brilliant writer and director who at just 49 is already the most accomplished filmmaker ever to emerge from Iran. The Hollywood Reporter has said that his films have revolutionized new Iranian cinema, pulling it out of the much beaten path of realism and self reflection pioneered by directors like a basket or Sami and mohsen mock mob. And onto a new, highly dramatized and theatrical road. They explore contemporary life's complexities and moral dilemmas, via brilliant screenplays that the Los Angeles Times has compared to a Russian doll, with stories that are inside each other close quote, and that NPR has likened to an onion. You peel one layer and there's another layer, fresh ready for you. Quote. 5 of the 9 feature films he has directed were chosen by Iran to represent it in the race for the best international feature Oscar. 2009s about Ellie, 2011s a separation, 2013s the past, 2016s the salesman and 2021s a hero. Two of them a separation in the salesman were nominated for that Oscar, and both won. A hero, which Amazon is due to release in December, may well follow in their footsteps. Regardless, he is already a member of an exclusive club of just 6 filmmakers who have directed multiple winners of the best international feature Oscar. The other 5 vittorio de sica, Federico Fellini, Ingmar Bergman, Rene Clement, and Akira Kurosawa. Talk about special company. And so without further ado, would you please join me in welcoming to Chapman university, a true master, mister Asgard farhadi, accompanied by his friend and translator, a filmmaker in his own right, right on. He can thank you. It's an honor to have you here. And on this podcast, we really go back to the beginning. So for folks who may not know, can you just talk about where you were born and raised? And what's your parents did for a living? I just want to say hi to all these students who are here. Whenever I'm really students in here else, it gives me a very great energy to return to your question. I was born in Isan in 1972, river four brothers, and I'm a second brother. My mother works at home and my father has a freelance job. Nobody around us we're working in cinema related to filmmaking. But my grandfather and grandmother were very quite close to poetry. And my childhood spends more sleep in my grandfather. In the small city that was close to is one, but it wasn't itself. We didn't have a theater. We didn't have a cinema. And we had to drive along this thing for me to get a chance to watch movies. The first time that I watched the movie, I kind of escaped with my cousin to see go and watch a movie. It was an old theater swan and we got in the middle of the film. So we didn't watch the half of the film. And we had to start watching the snake stuff. It was a family Iranian film that one of the teenager in the film would do something heroic in the middle of the film. And while we were watching this film, I was just keep looking at my back and I said, we're the slightest coming from how these things is showing on the screen. And when we came out of the theater for a long time, I was trying to make the first half of the film in my head. And filmmaking was a starter there for me. Can you tell me about when you would have I think you would have been 7 years old when some major changes obviously happened in Iran with the revolution. I just wonder how it affected your life and things around you and just what changed with the revolution? Is what I'm talking about. I'm going to give you an example to show you how it changed that happened in my life at around 7 when I was 7.

Scott Feinberg Dodge College Of Film And Medi Chapman's Felino Theater Chapman University Mohsen Mock Oscar Iran Vittorio De Sica Rene Clement Mister Asgard Farhadi The Hollywood Reporter Sami Federico Fellini Los Angeles Times Ingmar Bergman Akira Kurosawa NPR Ellie Orange California
A highlight from ABBA

Pop Culture Happy Hour

01:52 min | 3 weeks ago

A highlight from ABBA

"Joining Glenn me today is Sophie Hernandez Simon Nevis, she's a production assistant for NPR music. Welcome, Sophie. I also excited to be here. It is great to have you. So on November 5th, the world got its first new ABBA studio album since the visitors in 1981. And that 40 year hiatus between albums had long seemed like it was going to be permanent. The group had famously turned down massively lucrative offers for a reunion, and its members long since moved on to other projects and solo careers, but in 2016, ABBA's members agnita felt Bjorn ovas, Benny Anderson and unafraid Frida lingad got together to celebrate the 50th anniversary of their creative origins, which led to the band making their long awaited 9th and final album. Of course, the old abbe songs have never gone away, the greatest hits collection Abigail has sold 30 million copies since it came out in 1992. The jukebox musical Mamma Mia! was a hit on Broadway that spawned two feature films, and the group was inducted into The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame back in 2010. We're going to get to the new album in a little bit, but first, let's talk ABBA Glenn, you are an enthusiast. How did you come to know and appreciate the band and its music? I mean, my personal experience is that they were kind of the background noise to my childhood. They were every long car trip. Not because my parents owned any of their albums, they didn't, but they listened to the easy listening station. Philadelphia's WW SH stereo one O 6 all day all night all nice. Literally the call letters are a calming sound. Absolutely. And they were on such heavy rotation that I considered them like everything my parents liked to kind of square and kitschy and nice. And then one day I was 8 or 9, I was taking a nap. I was hovering in between waking and sleep and

Sophie Hernandez Simon Nevis Bjorn Ovas Benny Anderson Frida Lingad Npr Music Roll Hall Of Fame Sophie Glenn Abba Glenn Abba Abigail Philadelphia
A highlight from We Didn't Start The Fire (James Dean)

Death of a Film Star

05:31 min | 3 weeks ago

A highlight from We Didn't Start The Fire (James Dean)

"Star series, and I wanted to tell you quickly about this other pod I do with my superb friend Katie. Now this is a history pod it's called, we didn't start the fire, and it is the only podcast started by the Maestro himself, Billy Joel. We've just released an episode on James Thein and I'm pretty sure you'll love it. So here it is just for you. And if you want to hear our other episodes on people like Marilyn Monroe, Marlon Brando, although it's they, to search for, we didn't start the fire. This is a crowd podcast. This is we didn't start the fire, the only podcast started by me, Billy Joel. Einstein. James Dean. Now we're talking. Can you see this? There's a light in your eyes. Hello again, and welcome to episode 43 of we didn't start the fire. The history podcast that cracks open Billy Joel's rockham socom, action packed hit song for the most surprising stories of the late 20th century. I'm Katie Parker. And I am some full ice. Tom, how did we get to where we are today? Billy thinks it might have something to do with James Dean. Katie, isn't it nice to have an episode where we have heard name and then haven't looked at each other blankly, where we already know a little bit of stuff about the thing we're talking about. Yeah, there's a lack of glaze on our eyeballs where we're like right in there with opinions already to go. Very handsome man, James the number one, what I found myself wondering as we've prepared for this episode is how good an actor he was. So you knew that you were sexually attracted to him? There is amazing. Or at least to his hair. And yes, he is an amazing actor. And again, a little bit like Brando, that kind of thing where he's forging a new path. He's performing against these wooden mannequin actors from an earlier tradition, and he's just like mister natural. Yeah, there's an amazing clip isn't there when he's acting with Ronald Reagan, which I'm sure we'll talk about later on. And it is like watching someone acting against the wooden door. Yeah. That's it. Ronnie was not the finest actor of his generation, maybe James Dean was. We shall find out more Katie. Speaking to our guest this week, Jake Lambert is a comedian he has his own podcast guest list, most importantly for us Katie, he is a huge fan of James Dean and Katie. He has come in a windshield. It's not red, it's black, Jake Lambert. Welcome to the show. Hello, thanks for having me. So, it's very hard with James Dean because we have so many preconceptions, and there is so much we can talk about. We can talk about what made him we can talk about what he did in that very brief career when he only made three films. But let's connect it to you. What was it about James Dean? The first made him jump out for you. I was at university, not really knowing exactly what I wanted to do with my life. I was studying film, and I watched this film and I saw this guy, and then suddenly just something, I guess it was because of rebel without a cause, where that's basically what you feel like you are at university. I mean, I wasn't. But you feel like he represents something that you're sort of striving to be. But at the time, the reason he was so relevant was because he was one of the first of the generation where people perform and had like wars to fight, and suddenly he's like a young man who sort of angry, but basically has not much to fight against which basically of why he is sort of personification of a rebel without a cause. Well, yeah, he's like the emblematic of a teenager. He is like the first teenager in a way, because it's coming after the war eras and people don't they're not just automatically plugged into the military and they have all of that angst that has no purpose or no goal. And of course, speaking as a lady, there is nothing more attractive than a young man in pain. Like there's just something so deep and poetic about it. So all of that inchoate angst is catnip for the girls. Where should we start here then Jake because you could start with those films? You could start with rebel, you could talk about giant least of Eden. You can talk about his look and his legacy, but his childhood is not just picaresque. It's dark in so many places. Yeah, it is. It is dark. His mom, from what we know from his childhood, was his best friend. The dad was very distant, so when his mom died of cancer, James was sent back to Indiana from California to live with his aunt and uncle. And why was that? I mean, that seems so ridiculously harsh, I mean, imagine being a little 9 year old boy and your mom goes and then dad just ships you off to what the grandparents are something? That is footage of his aunts after James has died. And she is saying in a documentary the James Dean story, and she says we've read reports that suggest that he was disposed of and handed back to us. And she said, that's not the case. And she says, we knew that my brother couldn't take care of him.

James Dean Billy Joel Katie Jake Lambert James Thein Katie Parker Marlon Brando Marilyn Monroe Einstein Brando Billy Ronald Reagan James Ronnie TOM Jake Indiana Cancer California
A highlight from (Episode 263) "Manchester by the Sea" Composer: Lesley Barber.

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

07:44 min | 3 weeks ago

A highlight from (Episode 263) "Manchester by the Sea" Composer: Lesley Barber.

"Just go away? No. He had a great wife. Come on, pull it out. So I love you, I want to say first, I love your website, right? So I'm gonna start off with something completely not music related. Maybe it is, I don't know. So you said your passions are good food, great cities and interesting company. So when you say, you give me an example of something you just absolutely love. So I'm not gonna really tempted to ask you if you had one last meal team, but I feel like that's very dire if I say it that way. What's a food that you really love? Give me something that you really love. Oh gosh, I would say shellfish except I just found out I'm allergic to shellfish and so I can't say that anymore. No. Lobsters are so I just I like our cars, the food that I love a great French meal or Italian or American any kind of American fusion. Yeah. Great wine. It's always an awesome experience. That is so because I gotta say, I love oysters. I love steamers. Like I'm so sad that you are now, you know, but lobster is absolutely delicious. I always feel ever since I've owned a dog. I become overly sensitive, and every time I walk past a lobster tank in a supermarket, I feel like the most guilty person on the planet. I love lobster. It's such a hypocritical thing that I do. You know? There's that too. What's a city that is really I'll use the word breathtaking? What's a city that you absolutely love a city that you've been to that's just blowing? I'm sure there's been many, but one in particular that blows you away. Oh. These are really good questions. I mean, I feel so happy when I'm in Los Angeles. I always have an amazing time there. And the views from every angle are always interesting. I also lived in London for a while and write a stone stroll from selfridges, right in the heart of mayfair for a while by the dorchester apartment hotel pardon me. And really enjoyed the vibrancy of London. And then moved to Notting Hill, which I really loved. And I was just comparison a little while ago and remember just how much how beautiful that city is and how every day can give you an experience that takes your breath away. Yeah, that's a great answer. I love you that takes your breath away. Yeah, and speaking of great cities, you know, you're born in Toronto, Canada, speaking of a very Dyson, breathtaking city, Toronto has a great reputation for being beautiful as well, right? It does, if we have great restaurants here and we have a extremely vibrant film community and you're always a drive away from an incredible, beautiful countryside and nature, which is wonderful as well. Yeah, and you know, I feel like I've gone on a trend where I feel like many of the composers have been interviewing lately are from Canada and many of the actors as well. It's amazing how that works. And I will say this and people listening are probably so sick of me saying this, but I got to tell you the Canadian kindness is a real thing. That exists. I'm not trying to isolate any other country, but I'm telling you now, Canadian kindness is a real thing. Well, that's great. Yeah. It is, it is, it is. So the fact that I'm looking at your life, right? I'm trying to process how you get to where you are today. You know, the idea that you are self taught just I have a tough time like processing it. Listening to your music, listening to your work, listening to what you've done. To know that your origins are self taught, some of them, it's hard for me to wrap my mind around that. It's very hard for me to do that. And it screams volumes about your abilities, right? Just talk a little about your beginnings and music because it's pretty impressive. Well, I am self taught to an extent, although a lot of my relatives are on my father's side, were great, amateur musicians. So they knew how to stick the right piece of music in front of me at the right time. I actually just remembered that one of the first pieces I learned my father bought the sheet music for me for killing me softly. And I just met Charles Fox who wrote that. Wow. He played it. I just heard him play at sing at middleburg, Virginia, a couple of weeks ago. And it was really moving experience. But yeah, so I was self taught, but I did have relatives who could just put the right piece of music in front of me at the right time and show me how to notate my own music. And just, you know, here and there, they just listen to something I'm doing. And just give me a little, you know, like I found what the next step might be. But I certainly spent hours and hours writing music as a kid, and then took some more serious panel lessons. I would say in a later high school so that I could get into university and then, of course, I went on to really become much more trained at orchestration and composition and conducting and also a lot of computer programming and synth programming, which I was drawn to very quickly. And so once I got to university and got into those master studies and those sorts of things, I just drenched myself in a lot of different disciplines and traditions of music. Yeah, that's a great answer. You know, it's really refreshing for me to hear that you had, it sounds like you had a supportive musical family, right? Because many times artists have to make that choice, right? I go down the road of acting or composition or directing or whatever. Versus getting that steady and there's nothing wrong with that to steady 9 to 5, you know, they have to make a choice of family versus, you know, chasing what they love, and it's refreshing for me to hear you say that. It almost sounds like your family was super supportive in your journey. Yeah, I think so. I mean, I think they just knew that I wasn't really going to listen to anybody. I was just sort of doing what I wanted to do and yeah, they did they gave me a lot of support along the way. Yeah, because you mentioned your work at the university of Toronto, you did study composition for those listening the focus is on electronic music and orchestration. Are your the music that you love coming into that? Are they music composers? Are they, you know, composers that we've heard about throughout history? Who are like, and I know you've been asked this many times, but I think it's an important thing. The influences or maybe movies that really kind of sparked you, but I feel like you've been doing it since you were young, so maybe that didn't exist, but I'm sure as you go along as an artist you're always evolving and changing anybody responsible for your like love and just your passion for your craft. Well, I think, you know, I was immersed in pop music growing up, but.

Dorchester Apartment Hotel Toronto London Notting Hill Mayfair Canada Dyson Charles Fox Los Angeles Middleburg Virginia University Of Toronto
A highlight from 140: They Call Us The Good Asian

They Call Us Bruce

03:55 min | 3 weeks ago

A highlight from 140: They Call Us The Good Asian

"Pot luck. If it's about being a good engine. I literally don't know what I'm gonna say, and that's that could make very interesting like radio. Hello and welcome to another edition of they call us Bruce. An unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America. I'm Bill you. And I'm Jeff Yang. And on this episode of the podcast, we have a friend of ours a friend of the podcast, someone we want to talk to you for a while. Porn site showed, author editor, television writer and creator of some of the most mind bendingly awesome comics, the world has seen. If I'm selling it too hard, it's only because we really love him and his stuff so much. Welcome to the show. Thank you so much for coming. And thank you for writing. Infidel and our new favorites, the good Asian. For the title alone, it's awesome. Thank you. But as a comic, it's just, first of all, thank you for having me. Is this such an honor to be on the show to just see you guys? 'cause I haven't seen you guys in ages now. I mean, I didn't see the world in you. It's one of those weird things that where you say like, I haven't seen you years, but you're like, oh yeah, you haven't seen anyone in yours. So that's just the world we live in. But yeah, no, it's fantastic to talk to you guys like formerly, but it's like see you guys and at some point after this, we will offline about we really need to catch up. Absolutely. So like Jeff said, we wanted you on the show for a while now and then the occasion of say of the trade paperback, a volume one of the good Asians seem like a good excuse, but the first issue landed in my inbox, like a while ago, actually, and it's one of those things I think you reached out to me and I failed to respond totally absolutely. But I was like, that looks good. I want to set aside the proper time to read that and it kind of never came. You know what I mean? So get you on the podcast to kind of forces me to I gotta read this because I really do think this sounds awesome. And voila, I read the first volume, and it is amazing. It's awesome. We gotta talk about where this comes from and I mean, the title alone is a conversation starter. I have to ask what you say when you're like, people are like, hey, what are you working on? Well, got this common called the good Asian. And then what happens next in that conversation? Well, so here's the thing. Okay, so yes, you would think that that would be a big conversation. But you have to remember that my last book was called infidel. And it was about, you know, American Muslim woman being haunted by racist ghosts. And it was like using hard to talk about islamophobia, which was fine after get out came out. But because I've been working on it for so long, there was a lot of awkward and I remember at the time where I was doing research, I would talk to a lot of those limbs a lot of Pakistani Muslims. And I had to and again, this was before get out. I'm like, yeah, I want to do like a comic book about and it's like, oh, you mean, like Persepolis? Like, well, it's kind of a horror book. And it's called infidel. And I was just like, that was such a good Asian is such an easier conversation to have. And one of the things that I actually enjoy about is I didn't expect this, but it's been fun to watch it go online because people are just kind of like, do we like this title? And then usually it's up an agent that chimes in. Like, no, it's cool. And here's the history wine and they're like, I don't know about this. But it's been a really I did not expect it, but I guess this was always sort of in my head, but one of the things that became clear when the title came out was, oh, wow. I knew this and I did it. It's very much speaking to Asians.

Asian America Jeff Yang Bruce Jeff
A highlight from #849: Passing / Eternals / Bright Star (Campion #7)

Filmspotting

01:08 min | 3 weeks ago

A highlight from #849: Passing / Eternals / Bright Star (Campion #7)

"To film spotting. Chloé Zhao has won a best directing Oscar Josh. I don't know if you believe it or not. That was just earlier this year. I don't believe it. This world is too bitter and cruel for something like that to ever have happened at him. That was the last two films the best picture winning Nomadland and 20 18s the writer received nearly universal acclaim from critics, but her marvel debut, eternals, which hit theaters last weekend, has been mostly a critical bust, with reviews so far that put it in the company Josh of unloved marvel efforts like Thor the Dark World and Iron Man. Hey, hey, hey. Ease up on the dark world there, all right? At least there wasn't love for Iron Man two. I wasn't able to catch up with the turtles on its opening weekend, but you will share your review of the film later in the show and maybe you can convince me to catch up with the Czechs notes here, carry the one. Two hour and 37 minute film. Yeah, I don't think that's going to happen, but we'll see what I can do. Also later in the show, the final movie in our Jane campion Uber review, it's bright star. But first, a more than worthy film to substitute

Chloé Zhao Oscar Josh Josh Jane Campion
A highlight from Red Notice And What's Making Us Happy

Pop Culture Happy Hour

07:44 min | 3 weeks ago

A highlight from Red Notice And What's Making Us Happy

"Of pen fed. Federally ensured by NC UA. What has a wisecracking Ryan Reynolds, a glamorous Gal Gadot, Dwayne The Rock Johnson and a very convoluted story about priceless eggs, it's the new action comedy red notice that's got cars and boats and secret safes to crack. It's got ballroom dancing, and a jailbreak, and you can check it out on your couch because it's come straight to Netflix. I'm Linda Holmes and today we're talking about red notice on pop culture happy hour from and PR. Here with me is one half of the two bossy games newsletter and one third of the appointment. Television podcast, Margaret Willis and welcome back Margaret. Hi, Linda. Oh, so joining us is Ronald young junior. He is the host of the pushkin podcast solvable hello Ronald. Hi Linda. And last but not least, we have our pal and our punching and fighting specialist, right or Chris climate. Great to have you back Chris. Hi Linda, I want to say I'm also at least two thirds of the degree absolute podcast. Remember the other guy's name on that one? I'm really feeling the mana here. Serious mana, serious model. I hear ya. I hear ya. It's a little bit pointless to talk about this movie in terms of plot. But such as it is, here it goes, Dwayne Johnson plays a guy named John Hartley who's an FBI profiler chasing an art thief named Nolan booth, played by Ryan Reynolds. Now you get no points for figuring out that this odd couple will eventually be forced to work together, specifically to chase after an even better art thief known as the bishop and played by Gaga dot. This was written and directed by Ross and Marshall thurber, who's worked with Johnson before in central intelligence and skyscraper, by the way, skyscraper, still very proud of my headline. Building size giant fights giant sized building. As you might expect this movie has got action sequences and every drop of smart, intentional knowing smart that you can extract from Ryan Reynolds. And you should know that the whole thing hinges on three jeweled eggs that were supposedly given to Cleopatra as gifts. Everybody's looking for the eggs, hiding the eggs, chasing the eggs. So not be unfair to point out as I have, and now will again, that this movie has an egg, macguffin. What was your impression of this bit of silliness? My impression was, I mean, having conducted a long-term study of the filmography of Dwayne Johnson. Now, I discussed skyscraper with you and Margaret on this very show. I wrote about skyscraper. I wrote about central intelligence. I just, in terms of cinematic appreciation, what I want to ask Dwayne Johnson, do you even lift bro? Because I really feel like the biggest movie star in the world has never seen a movie that he didn't star in. So, I mean, this is really just right perfectly into his filmography. It is a 27 way tie for second place if you try to rank them like everything is sort of a watery vague version of a better movie. If you like the sort of fizzy escapist quips and intrigue, milieu that this movie read notice is trying to create. Let me point you towards the 2015 man from uncle reboot that Guy Ritchie did. Not a hit, but much sharper, much funnier, more buoyant and elegant. Also real locations. I mean, I can't really slam this the way I want to slam all the marvel movies because I know it was shot during COVID, but you know, there is a section of the press notes for this movie red notice that is headlined, not even making this up Atlanta, gateway to the world. This is a bunch of screen savory green screen BS you do not get the exotic locales, the sense of travel that you get watching a Bond movie, watching tenant, watching any Mission Impossible, which was also shot during COVID, and they still didn't shoot it at a parking lot in Atlanta. So you get the production value that you are supposed to get from a movie like this. Like it's okay, but I watched it like two nights ago and I've already forgotten 95% of it. I think that's fair. Ronald how about you, bud? I think this movie, I think one of the words that came to mind for this was smug. This movie is very, very smug. It wore on me for a while from the very beginning because it felt like The Rock showed up to do a normal rock movie and be his serious self, but they didn't even really let him get the crack jokes in this movie, which I think kind of took away from it for me. It just made it just a smug off between Ryan Reynolds and Gal Gadot. And I think maybe about two thirds of the way through the movie I realized that Ryan Reynolds was just being Deadpool without a mask, and I really had a problem with that because at one point he actually references how they were going to rob one of the eggs. As he's explaining this to The Rock, he mentions feature to extras. And I'm like, okay, so he's breaking the fourth wall in this movie. I'm like, I don't understand why this is happening or why he's acting like this in this film. And maybe I'm going to end up going after Ryan Reynolds a lot for this movie, but it felt like after seeing something like free guy or any of the other Ryan Reynolds work that he does, he has more range than this, but it felt like he typecast himself in this film, particularly, and it kind of it was hard to watch for me for that reason. All of the things that Chris said I agree with, I felt like watching this movie, I'm like, this seems very cheap. And I remember also thinking that universal probably got the better end of this deal by selling this to Netflix as that's how it ended up on Netflix because this is 100% a Saturday movie that I wouldn't even pay attention to. I would just like pick a different task and have this all the background. I wouldn't even face the actual television to watch it. But that being said, I mean, there was one joke that I did laugh at that was towards the end of the movie, which was they pointed out that there's a point where Ryan Reynolds is eating some cheese and Gal Gadot says to Ryan Reynolds, that's not Gouda. That's uncooked pork. And I laughed out loud. And I remember thinking, why could the whole movie just be more of these types of jokes? I mean, I laughed at the part where Reynolds was seen drinking his own brand of gin and then in the next scene, Dwayne Johnson has served a his own tequila. Again, I feel like movies are just brand extension for Johnson in particular. I didn't even notice that. When he gets to the house in Bali, aviation gin has a very specific bottle and he just pours a little bit of that liquor right into a glass and I was like, this is a moment, Ryan Reynolds where I bet you wish you had a celebrity tequila brand like everyone else instead of a gin brand because you know what you don't do with gin, drink it straight. Second generation. I've had them. But they're not a common thing, and I doubt that aviation gin is that. As soon as that happened, I started counting down. It was like, okay, we're gonna get the Terra Mona bottle in three, two, there it is. So other than the sipping jam. Other than the gin spotting. Yeah, what'd you think? What was my experience with this movie? Well, as Chris says, I'm on the record as being a fan of skyscraper or as I like to know it, die hard XXL. But I gotta say that this one, Thomas crown of fair colon Tokyo drift didn't. I found the experience a little bit like drinking flat soda. You can taste all of the places where the fizz is supposed to be. There were definitely lines that I went. I recognize that structure, unless I am tickled by this. And we had someone talk about Dwayne. We had someone talk about Ryan. I'm here to talk a little bit about gal. I found her just staggeringly flat in this role. And they were just scenes where like I wanted her to pop more than she was. And obviously stunning, fight choreography was pretty cool. There was a great fight sequence at the beginning that almost had a little Jackie Chan, a land where Ryan Reynolds was climbing scaffolding and pulling pins out, making people fall. I was like, got in here for this. But by and large, there were a lot of things that didn't work for me. Yeah. You guys.

Ryan Reynolds Dwayne Johnson Gal Gadot Linda Linda Holmes Margaret Willis Ronald Young Chris Climate John Hartley Nolan Booth Gaga Dot Marshall Thurber Netflix Margaret Ronald Chris Atlanta Guy Ritchie Johnson