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A highlight from A decline in flying bugs sounds good for humans, but it's bad for the environment

Environment: NPR

04:14 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from A decline in flying bugs sounds good for humans, but it's bad for the environment

"At making cancer history dot com. Summertime is fast approaching, that means more bugs, but a new study from the United Kingdom shows a dramatic decline in the number of flying insects, 60 percent since 2004, while fewer buzzing biting bugs may appeal to some people, it could spell environmental disaster in the future. Matt shardlow is the CEO of bug life, a conservation group, which conducted the study. He joins us now. Thanks for being with us, mister Charles. Hello, thanks for having me very much. Please help us understand that number and the perspective 60% drop over 17 years. I mean, 60% of our wildlife effectively, because invertebrates absolutely critical to ecosystem health. Support our wildflowers through pollination, fertilize the soil through burying dung and other matter into the ground. They keep our rivers clean. And they provide the food to all the other animals that we see in the countryside. So losing 60% of them just 17 years is a pretty big crisis. And what are some of the reasons for why it may have happened? Well, it's a bit complicated because we're dealing with thousands of flying insects here, but we think that there's some clear patterns in that data. So we're seeing bigger impacts in the southern parts of the UK and that's where the habitats are most fragmented and also where climate change is starting to hit most already. May I ask how do you get the data? It can't be easy to count flying bugs. Absolutely difficult. What we've done here is built on a scheme that was first piloted by the Royal Society protection of birds actually in the UK. In 2004, and they got their members to go out and clean their number plates on their cars, drive a journey, record that journey, and then count the numbers of insects that had hit the number play to the car. Number plates are licensed plates in the UK. Yeah, that's right, yeah. We've updated that a bit and bug life, which is the insect conservation charity in the UK. And Kent wildlife trust, which is a local wildlife charity. We have both put together a new app, so that it's much simpler, but basically the principle is the same. What would be necessary to reverse the decline or is it too late for that? It's never too late. Really, what we need is repair to the landscape. So we need connectivity. So what we're promoting in the most cost effective way to do this is to put stepping stones a wildflower rich habitat back into the countryside. So you create corridors across the landscape where you're restoring the sorts of habitats that those invertebrates need to move. And if we can get them to move again, start so that they can actually adapt and respond to climate change, then they've got a chance of surviving climate change. If we don't adapt our landscapes in this sort of way, then they're in real trouble. Mister shardlow this summer when some of us feel a bug buddy at the back of our neck and begin to go like that, should we think twice? Well, you're not going to damage the population by doing that. So these aren't the sorts of things that we need to worry about when we're talking about the health of the environment. That is about habitats, maintaining the quality of habitats, getting a better distribution restoring habitats, and also making sure that landscape is safe generally. And that's reducing things like light pollution that we know is impacting on moths and lots of other invertebrate populations, reducing the other pollutions, particularly pesticides, and the neonics, which we've banned over in the EU and the UK because they damage bee populations. That is something that in America should be banned tomorrow. It's outrageous that they're still using the index when we know that they're damaging bee populations. The CEO of bug life in the UK, thank you so much for being with us, sure. Thank you very much. Reveal the economic patterns all around us. While you swipe right and left, understand money better with the indicator, one of NPR's daily podcasts. More voices, all ears, NPR podcasts.

UK Matt Shardlow Bug Life Mister Charles Royal Society Protection Of Bi Kent Wildlife Trust Mister Shardlow Cancer EU America NPR
A highlight from In Alaska, warmer days can bring catastrophic flooding as frozen rivers break up

Environment: NPR

03:50 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from In Alaska, warmer days can bring catastrophic flooding as frozen rivers break up

"Sometimes it is tough to keep up with everything going on in American politics, the ups, the downs, the ins and outs, the decisions and policies. We get it. At the NPR politics podcast, we'll break things down so that you can make meaning out of all the noise. Get clarity on what decisions are being made and how they matter to you. Every weekday on the NPR politics podcast. When spring finally arrives in southwest Alaska, people are eager to get outside. But longer warmer days can bring catastrophic flooding as frozen rivers break up, Emily swing reports. Every Thursday, Mark Leary walks across the frozen Cusco coim river in bethel to measure how thick the ice is. That's what I've been doing every week. You should probably stay behind me. Okay, I'll stay behind you. Dark, grayish blue spots and lots of hairline cracks in the ice, mean it's weakening. Leary works with bethel's search and rescue crew. He's wary of having me along because I don't know this river like he does. I grew up in that house right over there on the bank, so the river was always there and where I was trying to figure out when we could get on it. And when we could get up, what we had to get off it. When he finds a good spot, Leary bores a hole straight down with a long, spiraling drill bit. Then he drops a weighted measuring tape down the hole. So this was 32 inches Lester Thursday. Now it's 29. Leary is part of a network of local observers that help the national weather service and the state monitor flooding potential during the spring. Chunks of thick ice can jam up and cause problems. Ice cream flooding tends to be the greatest source of either major or moderate or just very devastating floods in Alaska, Selena van brocklin is a hydrologist with the national weather service. If we're trying to predict the likelihood of ice jams or where ice jams will form, that's not something that we can model from the office. It's something that we really have to see from the air. Thanks to local knowledge about the river, van brocklin knows exactly where to fly to look for signs of ice jams and flooding. Oh, okay, so that's our first pressure ridge that we've seen this year. Oh, right there, I see. Yep. And that's where we've started to actually see some movement over here like on this sheet of ice that's right underneath us. You can see some of the shear lines or the ice is like been forced up on the side. To enormous slabs of ice have slammed into one another. Spring is here. But one flight over the river and ice thickness measurements all winter doesn't tell the river's whole story. One of the things I really learned is to ask more questions and do more listening than talking, especially when speaking with elders and locals, local elders like Alaska native Robert le candor. It all leads you here that I should be making noise like I guess maybe like a trade going down just la candor has spent nearly 8 decades living along the Cusco quim river, and he says the effects of climate change are clear. The ice is thinner. Three feet thick before it was 5 to 6 feet when I was growing up. But la candor says there's one thing that hasn't changed out here. The river is still a way of life. For NPR news, I'm Emily

Leary Emily Swing NPR Mark Leary Cusco Coim River Alaska National Weather Service Selena Van Brocklin Bethel Van Brocklin Lester Robert Le La Candor LA Npr News Emily
A highlight from California just ran on 100% renewable energy, but fossil fuels aren't fading away yet

Environment: NPR

04:07 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from California just ran on 100% renewable energy, but fossil fuels aren't fading away yet

"California hit a major milestone for clean energy last weekend for part of an afternoon, the state produced enough renewable energy to meet a 100% of demand for the first time. But that doesn't mean fossil fuels are going away quickly. Shoulder and wind power have been booming, but getting off fossil fuels completely could take decades even. In California, Lauren summer from NPR's climate team joins us learn, thanks so much for being with us. Hi there. Even if only for a moment, how did California set the record? So California has been stalling a lot of wind and solar. Renewables have more than tripled in the last 15 years. And the day their record fell had ideal conditions the sun was shining, the wind was blowing, and it wasn't too hot yet, so the state didn't need a huge amount of power for air conditioners. But there's a catch, natural gas power plants were still running at that time. California was making more power than it needed, so it was sending some out of state. So technically it was enough renewable energy for a 100% of demand in state because even if California wanted to, it can't actually turn off all the natural gas power plants. Why? Can't they turn them off if they're getting enough from solar and renewables? Yeah, it has to do with a very tricky time of day, which is when the sun sets, all that solar power goes away quickly and California has to replace it with something. Natural gas power plants fill in that gap, but that means a lot of them run all day because these huge industrial facilities take hours to turn on. So if you need them in the evening, you can't turn most of them off even if you have solar power you could be using instead. California is looking at other technologies that might replace natural gas. Yeah, and that's mostly giant batteries. So the idea is to store solar and renewable energy and batteries during the day, and then use it later in the evening when it's needed. Batteries are growing, but they're still a small fraction of what's needed. So when I talk to fossil fuel companies in California, they don't sound too nervous. Alex mackler is a vice president at Calpine, which runs a number of natural gas power plants. We very much support new technologies and innovation and decarbonizing the grid. But there are certain things that the natural gas fleet and it does very well. And it can not be easily or at this point economically replace. So what does this mean for California's goal to become carbon neutral? Is there a projection for how long fossil fuels will still be here? Yeah, that's what's interesting here. California has led the country in climate change policy. You know, the state's trying to reach a 100% carbon free power by 2045. Energy experts I speak to Mark spec at the union of concerned scientists say that renewables and batteries have come a long way and they're going to keep making progress. We should be doing everything we can to build huge amounts of solar, huge amounts of wind, huge amounts of energy storage, and that's going to get us at least like 90% of the way there to a clean grid. It's really that last 5 to 10% where it starts to get much harder. That's because there are rare events. Like going many days without sunshine or wind, where you would need something else. That could be energy storage that lasts a long time. It could be using natural gas power plants if you're burying the carbon emissions underground so they don't warm the planet. You know, California's really a bellwether in this quest to go carbon free and it shows even where there's been a lot of progress, the road to fully eliminating fossil fuels is still being figured out. Lauren summer from NPR's climate team, thanks so much for being with us. Yeah, thank you. Brush up on the latest in foreign policy. While you brush your teeth. Get three essential news stories and all you need to know from up first, one of NPR's daily podcasts. More voices, all ears, NPR podcasts.

California Alex Mackler Calpine NPR Lauren Mark Spec
Grants help Wisconsin nonprofits purchase electric vehicles

Climate Connections

01:30 min | 5 d ago

Grants help Wisconsin nonprofits purchase electric vehicles

"I'm doctor Anthony Liz, and this is climate connections. Many nonprofits operate on tight budgets, so if they need to buy a car or van, electric vehicles are attractive, because EVs cost less to fuel and maintain. But the upfront price of EVs can be a barrier, and nonprofits can not take advantage of tax credits that are available to individuals or companies. If we can get these vehicles into the communities that need them, it's going to save them money over a long period of time, and it's going to help our environment as well. That Sam de nisky, a renewed Wisconsin. Last year, his organization began offering grants to help nonprofits and low income communities by electric vehicles. The grants cover 20% of the cost of a new or used EV. So far, they've gone towards cargo vans, grounds keeping vehicles and a taxi for seniors. In return, grantees promote EVs to their communities. For example, by hosting ride and drive events where people can try out any V for them to just see how great these cars work, how quiet they are, how nice they are. To nice, he says he hopes this helps more people get excited about driving electric. These vehicles are for everyone. They're not just for rich and affluent people. They can really have extremely good benefits for every individual or organization that chooses to get one. Climate connections is produced by the Yale center for environmental communication. To hear more stories like this, visit climate connections dot org.

Anthony Liz Sam De Nisky Wisconsin Yale Center For Environmental
A highlight from Power Dressing with Costume Designer Jessica Worrall

Wardrobe Crisis

05:51 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from Power Dressing with Costume Designer Jessica Worrall

"For you. What does that conjure for you? What comes to mind? For me, it was like the classic 1980s sharp suited corporate woman, showing the men that you can rule, right? In the 80s. But actually, even though the phrase entered popular parlance for us then, it goes way back. It goes as back as far as fashion does. If you were an ancient Roman, it meant the right to wear purple or gold. I think it had to be royal for that. And actually royals love a power dressing moment, don't they? And also, of course, all the courtiers around them. They want to look like they belong like their climbing the ladder whose closest to the monarch, all that stuff. Think about Versailles, power dressing is the finest brocades and who gets to wear them in the laces and all of it, all the kind of jewels. But last week at the Met Gala, the theme was the Gilded Age, so it's all that kind of richest New Yorkers of the 1890s, 1900s. It's the society snobbery. The white satin, the diamond tiaras, it's showing off your social status, your money, it's who belongs and who doesn't. Now at the Met Gala that translated as Blake Lively. She was in Versace, inspired by the Statue of Liberty. And it was amazing. It was so grand. It was like the train went halfway down the carpet. Halfway down those stairs. And she had to have assistance to remove the top train to show the underlay and it changed color from copper to patterned verdigris, all that. It was amazing. I mean, who beat that? Actually, lizzo. I think lizzo might have beaten it. And it is a game. They are trying to win. So she wore black embroidered with gold Tom Brown. It was like a dress with a cape, but I read that it took 22,000 hours to make it. Come on. So it's all the handwork. But lizzo herself described it thus. She said, giving 1888 baroness ready to take the throne vibes. I mean, power dressing in this context is just who can afford to pay for it. Whether in cold hard cash or equivalent press coverage doesn't matter. Yeah, I'm going to talk about Kim Kardashian. So Kim borrowed the dress that Marilyn Monroe water seeing a happy birthday mister president to JFK in 1962. And it was said to have cost $12,000 then, because of all the hands on crystals. The designer was Oscar winning costume designer Jean Louis. Who worked on the misfits and something's got to give. And they were Maryland's last two films. But what you need to know here is that in 2016, that dress sold at auction four drum roll please. 4.8 million bucks. So Kim had the power and status to get that dress. Now, lots of people got very upset about this. People were angry because she crashed dieted to fit into the dress. So, oh, the pressure to be thin all that. Museum curators were upset because, well, celebrities shouldn't get to treat museums like extensions of their wardrobes, right? It undermines conservation work. It means that fragile, valuable, cultural artifacts can get damaged or risk damage. So I get that good point, but I want to talk about another reason why people got offended by Kim, and I think it's not a good point and not a good argument. It's something I really didn't like. It's like a frontier. How dare she? How very dare she compare herself to an icon like Marilyn? There was so much attacking of her about this. And here's an example of one typical news site article I just chose it a random Monroe's legacy lives on 60 years after her death. When that time comes for Kardashian, it's hardly likely she will endure for so long. And then the wearing of that dress was an absolute disgrace, a tacky photo opportunity aimed at aligning and failing, right? To aligning her with one of history's most captivating women. Now, don't forget that in her time, Marilyn Monroe was subject to exactly the same kind of crap that Kim gets. That she wasn't good enough for classy enough for smart enough, whatever it is. But then collectively, and I think this is really interesting. As a society, we've kind of decided in the decades since her death, that Maryland should be placed on a pedestal now. So forget that people didn't like her when she was then, but now her image we own it. And we're going to charge it with all these kinds of meanings that she had no saying. So it's power, but who wield it and who benefits and importantly, who is it used against? Now you might disagree with me, please feel free to do so and I'd like to hear what you think. But I raise this because it's very relevant to this conversation that you're about to join about women, status and power and who gets to decide how they ought to dress. It's actually not about the Met Gala, it was recorded before. My guest is the British costume designer, turned collage artist Jessica warrell. And I found her through her fashion collages. They're amazing. They mash up like old masters of portraiture of society women from the 16th and 17th century with modern runway looks from big name runway designers, couturiers. And as such an interesting visual play on power dynamics, modesty, status, dressing to show how rich

Lizzo KIM Blake Lively Marilyn Monroe Tom Brown Statue Of Liberty Versace Jean Louis Baroness Kim Kardashian Maryland Oscar Marilyn Kardashian Monroe Jessica Warrell
Therapy dogs help wildland firefighters relieve stress

Climate Connections

01:30 min | 6 d ago

Therapy dogs help wildland firefighters relieve stress

"I'm doctor Anthony Liz, and this is climate connections. Battling wildfires is dangerous and exhausting work. But some firefighters are getting support from a team of four legged Friends. Heidi Carmen is founder of first responder therapy dogs, which is based in California. Her group brings certified crisis response therapy dogs to wildfire base camps and fire stations, so firefighters can spend time with the dogs. They don't even have to say any words, but there's just this magic that happens between a firefighter and the therapy dog. Firefighters often see homes go up in smoke. They may see their colleagues injured or even killed. They work grueling hours and can be away from home for months, so they face high rates of anxiety, PTSD, depression, and even suicide. And the risks are increasing as climate change causes more extreme fires. I am definitely seeing the stress on the firefighters, especially the last couple of years that are overworked, exhausted, Carmen hope spending time with a therapy dog helps relieve their stress and reduces the stigma around mental health. My goal is to just help them feel better. And maybe even help them feel okay to ask for help if they need it. Climate connections is produced by the Yale center for environmental communication. To hear more stories like this, visit climate connections dot org.

Anthony Liz Heidi Carmen California Ptsd Anxiety Depression Carmen Yale Center For Environmental
A highlight from Incandescent lightbulbs are on the way out. So which new lightbulb should you choose?

Environment: NPR

06:40 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Incandescent lightbulbs are on the way out. So which new lightbulb should you choose?

"Revolution in the lighting industry. The old energy hogging incandescent lightbulb is going away, and new LED or light emitting diode bulbs are taking over. There are really good reasons to switch to leds. Later, we'll learn how using them can help you sleep better. While they are a bit more expensive, they last a lot longer. So you'll change bulbs less often, and they use a fraction of the energy old bulbs do. That's important for addressing climate change. The energy department estimates switching to LED bulbs across the country saves the amount of electricity produced by 44 large power plants. Interior designer Aaron Shakur says that's good for your budget too. Here's the deal. You're going to save so much money on your electric bill by transitioning from regular incandescents to LED bulbs. So that's the first no brainer. Aaron owns Shakur interiors in Chicago. And she knows how to use light to enhance your space. She often talks about the role of light fixtures like this. And like that badass hat that you put on right before you walk out the door, or the beautiful piece of statement jewelry that you're like, oh, this just made my outfit. Yes. I'm ready to go. And I'm rocking this look. Aaron says leds allow her to be more creative because they're small. You no longer need a big, ugly lightbulb poking up from a metal base. She says manufacturers are coming up with all kinds of interesting new fixtures. And assuming you have the cash, firms like hers can even design a custom fixture with leds. And then you've got this amazing statement piece that is calling, you know, what's that milkshake song? Calling all the boys to the yard. So to speak. It's better than yours I could teach you. So here's our first takeaway. The LED revolution has made the lightbulb aisle more complicated, but there are big benefits to switching to LED lighting in your house. You can save energy and money and you can be more creative. So now, assuming you're sold on leds, Aaron says it's really important to think about how you want a lighted space to feel. What happens in that room? That can affect what lightbulbs or even what light fixtures you buy. When you're sitting on a sofa sectional watching the game, you're not interested in high glaring lights right on your face, your head and coming into your sort of view while you're watching the TV. So we would like this footprint within the room one way, usually with dimmable recessed fixtures. But in the kitchen, Aaron says you want to flood the space with light. It's a workspace where it's important to see things clearly. That's our second takeaway. Think about the space you're lighting and choose bulbs and fixtures that complement what happens in that space. Aaron says if you're renting, you can use floor and table lamps. Those can be pretty inexpensive. Once you make those fixture choices or those lamp choices, now you can easily make a bulb choice. And to do this, we need to learn a few terms. Watts, lumens, and Kelvin. Watts refer to energy consumed lumens refer to brightness and Kelvin is the color of the light. First watts. The old way of picking a lightbulb focused on watts. I always thought that was an indication of how bright the bulb is. 100 watts is brighter than 60. But actually, watts refer to the energy the bulb consumes. And since leds need less energy to produce the same amount of light, those bulbs have really low wattage numbers. The simple formula kind of rule of thumb is to multiply that number times 5 to understand what kind of light output you're going to be getting in a lamp or fixture in the room. If it says 12, you're going to be getting 60 watts of light. But the real measure of light output is lumens. That's the second term you need to know. Many manufacturers still use both watts and lumens. They'll say something like this is equivalent to a 60 watt incandescent bulb, and that's 800 lumens. You don't need to obsess over any formula for this. Just know that more lumens is brighter and less is dimmer. Another term you may really want to pay attention to is Kelvin. That's a measure for something called color temperature. Now if you're confused already, don't worry, Aaron was there too. In the beginning, it confused all of us. So designers and architects alike were like, wait, what? Aaron says color temperature is a scale. And the most important thing you need to know is on that scale. 2700 Kelvin is about the same color as a typical incandescent bulb. It's got a slightly warm glow to it. And I think from my perspective, when I see it next to a 3000, oh, the 3000 makes me so happy. So is there sort of like a general guide, like the lower the Kelvin number, it's closer to this color and the higher the Kelvin number. It's closer to that color? Yes. And so when you start going lower, it gets very gold. Very yellow and you can in almost that Edison bulb that retro Edison bulb kind of looks. So lower number is going to be golden. And if you go higher, what are you getting to? You're getting blue. It just gets bluer and bluer and bluer. For our third takeaway, we need to learn a few new terms. Lumens measure light output, the higher the number, the brighter the light, color temperature is measured in kelvins. Lower numbers look more gold and higher Kelvin numbers look blue. If you're still a little confused, we have all this written out, search NPR life kit and lightbulbs. So we've covered a lot here, but you may still have questions. Aaron Shakur suggests skipping the big box do it yourself stores for answers. She says go to a lighting store instead. So, that's the place to go, where you can have someone who just is specializing in lighting, not in screwdrivers, and lumber, and lighting, and power tools. And I might spend a few more pennies on the bulb or the fixture, but that's all right. That's worth it. It's totally worth it because you're not changing it out. In three weeks or in three months. And a specialist can help you pick that perfect fixture or bulb that will be the best fit for the space you're trying to light. That was NPR's Jeff

Aaron Aaron Shakur Shakur Interiors Kelvin Watts Energy Department Chicago Lumens LED Edison NPR Jeff
A highlight from Solar projects are on hold as U.S. investigates whether China is skirting trade rules

Environment: NPR

01:48 min | Last week

A highlight from Solar projects are on hold as U.S. investigates whether China is skirting trade rules

"Worth of carbon free energy capacity at risk. The investigation alone is wiping out a decade of solo job growth. It's stunning. Abigail Ross hopper of the solar energy industries association says as many as 100,000 jobs are at stake. At a time she adds that was supposed to be the green economies moment in the sun. We have a president who believes in climate change and addressing the crisis. We have a house and a Senate that are controlled by Democrats. The problem scope is still emerging and Indiana utility says it has to postpone several solar projects and keep a coal fired plant running years longer than planned. Yes, zoom and boom thinners are out there. I've seen all the headlines. That's my moon rasheed. CEO of oxen solar, the small California panel maker that petitioned the government to level the solar panel playing field. Rashid's since been condemned by many in the industry, but he says, fair trade is fair trade. I think the business models will need to be reassessed and will be reassessed so no one is going to walk through from hundreds of millions or $1 billion businesses. But for now, the sector's recent surge is sputtering. At the main solar plant, construction supervisor Adam farcus gives a wistful look to the untouched site next door. Seems a little bit counterproductive to have these goals for climate change and then at the same time you're not letting us build anything. We shall be building. Investigators are expected to make a preliminary finding in August. The solar industry and its political allies are calling for a speedier review. For NPR news, I'm Fred bever in falmouth Maine. Brush up on the latest in foreign policy.

Abigail Ross Hopper Solar Energy Industries Associ Oxen Solar Adam Farcus Senate Rashid Indiana California Government Npr News Fred Bever Falmouth Maine
A highlight from Prairie Island Indian Community uses nuclear waste fund for net-zero carbon goal

Climate Connections

01:19 min | Last week

A highlight from Prairie Island Indian Community uses nuclear waste fund for net-zero carbon goal

"Since the 1970s, members of the Prairie island Indian community of Minnesota have lived in the shadow of a nuclear power plant, and nuclear waste is stored next to the reservation. Obviously, our tribal members are nervous to be living next door to all of this. We don't even get our power from excel energy, which owns and operates the Prairie island nuclear generating plant. That's tribal council vice president Shelley buck. She says that in exchange for storing nuclear waste on the island, excel energy pays into a state fund. A few years ago, tribal leaders successfully pitched legislators on an idea. Using that fund for projects that helped the reservation reach net zero carbon emissions. Over a three year period, the tribe plans to install solar make energy efficiency upgrades and convert buildings to run entirely on electricity. Our history and our energy story has been negatively linked to the nuclear power plant nuclear waste storage site. We want to change that narrative and use that energy production as a positive force not only for our tribe today, but for the next 7 generations as our Dakota waste teach us. Climate connections is produced by the Yale center for environmental communication. To

Prairie Island Shelley Buck Minnesota Dakota Yale Center For Environmental
A highlight from Electric cars have been slow to catch on in Wyoming. Some hope that will change

Environment: NPR

03:29 min | Last week

A highlight from Electric cars have been slow to catch on in Wyoming. Some hope that will change

"The big infrastructure Bill that President Biden signed in November offer states $7.5 billion to build and improve charging stations for electric cars. But that might not move the needle much in Wyoming, where distances between towns are vast and the population is low. Taylor stagner with Wyoming public media reports. A rusty blue Ford Bronco pulls into a gas station entire shop in central Wyoming. One of several Mike Bailey's family has owned since the 60s. Bailey could apply for a federal funding to add electric car chargers, but he's not sure he will. Sometimes those technologies work out and sometimes they don't. So, you know, we'll see. The bill is sending Wyoming $25 million to install electric car chargers, but unlike some other states, its Department of Transportation isn't planning to do that work itself. It's leaving it up to private industry to apply for the money and do the work. Wyoming's economy has been based on fossil fuels for more than a century, and many people here would like it to stay that way. And Bailey says the federal grants don't cover the full cost. You can spend a half a $1 million pretty easy on that. So even if they pay for 80% of that, that's still a $100,000 that you've got to show that you could make that return on your investment over time. Adam Davis is a researcher at the University of California Davis. He says Wyoming is already way behind the rest of the country when it comes to publicly available electric vehicle chargers. Waning is probably somewhere on the lines of one tenth as far along as California, which is the fastest state in the country, and something like a third to half as far along as the rest of the national average. A big reason is that Wyoming has the lowest population of any U.S. state with fewer than 600,000 people. Since many rely on the energy industry for their paychecks, people here can be hostile to alternative energy. The Wyoming Department of Transportation says that there are only 500 electric vehicles and the whole state. You need chargers to support electric vehicles. But if you don't have electric vehicles, then the Chargers don't make sense. And getting those things balanced is really, really, really tricky. But there's at least one guy in Wyoming, who's determined to get more electric cars on the road. Patrick Lawson. He says he's been into electric cars since way before the first Tesla rolled out. When I was really little like 6 years old, I put together a little car, F two solar panels and electric motors and made it so that I could make a change directions by putting my hand over it. Lawson, who's northern arapaho, works for his tribe's Internet company. His side hustle is wild west EV. A business he started that's installing chargers in central Wyoming. He lives in riverton and sees progress in electric car adoption. And I found quite a few people in town actually. You've got them now over the years. So there's, I don't know, maybe a dozen of us or so, which doesn't sound like a lot, but it went from one to two to four to 8. And then if you look at the numbers nationally, the EVs are almost doubled in sales every year for the past ten years. Lawson started his business in 2016. So far he's helped businesses set up chargers and 5 Wyoming towns. He's working on applications for the federal funding to help set up more and expects to start submitting them

Wyoming President Biden Taylor Stagner Chargers Bailey Adam Davis Mike Bailey Bronco Wyoming Department Of Transpor Department Of Transportation Patrick Lawson Ford University Of California Northern Arapaho Davis
A highlight from Volunteer pilots rescue sea turtles stunned by cold water

Climate Connections

01:19 min | Last week

A highlight from Volunteer pilots rescue sea turtles stunned by cold water

"I'm doctor Anthony Liz, and this is climate connections. Hundreds of volunteer pilots across the U.S. have offered their time and planes to fly rescue missions for sea turtles in need of help. We are all about taking care of these endangered species. Leslie Weinstein is president of turtles fly two. The nonprofit coordinates emergency flights for sea turtles that wash up on the shores of Cape Cod and elsewhere, suffering from cold stunning. It's a reaction the animals can experience in waters below about 50°F. They become lethargic. It starts to shut down their organs, and they can die without medical care. So when stranded turtles are found, Weinstein's group can be called in to help fly them to rehabilitation centers in the southeast. Weinstein says over the years, his group has gotten busier. We're getting larger numbers of them becoming cold stunned. And climate change may be partly to blame. Research suggests that as the ocean warms, some turtles are spending more time farther north in the summer and fall. Then, when winter temperatures arrive, they may end up stuck in waters colder than they can handle. So the need for rescue flights is growing, and Weinstein and other volunteers are ready to help.

Anthony Liz Leslie Weinstein Cape Cod U.S. Weinstein
A highlight from Forest loss in 2021 emitted as much carbon as India does

Climate Cast

04:02 min | Last week

A highlight from Forest loss in 2021 emitted as much carbon as India does

"Climate cast is supported by Bank of America. Financing clean energy initiatives and advancements in renewable energy and spurring innovation in the growth of environmentally focused companies, markets, and jobs. Bank of America NA, member FDIC. Just seeing the rate of loss from ecosystems that really should be doing a lot of work for us. Climate solutions usually focus on putting less carbon into our atmosphere. That's critical, but there's another side to the carbon in carbon out equation. Forests, they remove carbon from the atmosphere and store it in trees. But earth lost millions of acres in 2021, and that emitted the equivalent of India's carbon emissions. And refried man wrote about that for axios, hey Andrew, thanks for talking with us on climate cast today. Thanks for having me, Paul. So these numbers in your piece are astounding. The tropics lost 27.5 million acres of tree cover during 2021, northern boreal forest had their highest rate of tree cover loss on record last year with 16.1 million acres lost due to wildfires. How big of an impact is this on climate? It's potentially a really large impact. Scientists are looking at the carbon budget, so to speak. So the same as you look at your budget as a family. They're looking at the planet, carbon budget, carbon in, carbon out, and just seeing the rate of loss from ecosystems that in theory really should be doing a lot of work for us, absorbing carbon dioxide. The tropics lost basically the equivalent area of New England. And a lot of these were what we call primary forests. What are primary forests and why are they so important to curbing climate change? Yeah, the primary forests are really those forests that haven't been disturbed by humanity. So there's a really like the prime jewels of biodiversity. And it's some of the most productive forest, meaning it's taking in some of the highest amounts of carbon dioxide. And you wrote about the Glasgow climate summit countries committing to halt and reverse forest loss by 2030. What's your take on that and how effective are these commitments? So it's interesting, if you look at 2021, you would think that that commitment was pretty hollow, right? That it completely failed. But really, that commitment came in November of 2021. And most of the deforestation, most of the tree cover loss that we saw had already happened by that point. So really the test is going to come in 2022 and see what happens. And how serious countries are. I know that the U.S. has had a special envoy former secretary Kerry going all over the world, one of his main things that he's been talking about with government counterparts is slowing the rate and extent of forest loss. And we've been seeing examples of how countries can put in place policies, domestically, that reduce their forest loss rate. So Indonesia has had a declining trend in their forest laws. Over the past 5 years, when you contrast that with countries that have very different policies, like Brazil, where they've actually been encouraging development in parts of the Amazon and we've seen a real big spike in forest loss there. So the Glasgow declaration was widely celebrated, it's not binding. But there is pressure to follow through and the data in the coming years really going to see how that's playing out. Andrew Friedman with axios, thanks for making us smarter on climate cast today. Thanks for having me. That's climate cast. I'm NPR chief meteorologist Paul hunter.

Bank Of America Hey Andrew Northern Boreal Forest Fdic Secretary Kerry India Paul New England Glasgow U.S. Indonesia Brazil Amazon Andrew Friedman NPR Paul Hunter
A highlight from Moms push Massachusetts utilities to transition to renewable heat sources

Climate Connections

01:15 min | Last week

A highlight from Moms push Massachusetts utilities to transition to renewable heat sources

"The state's utilities to help consumers transition from natural gas to clean sources of heat. They say that continuing to use fossil fuels is bad for the climate and people's health. The future of our children is at stake, the future of our planet, and it's very hard to sit back and do nothing as mothers. We want to protect our children, we want to protect all of life here on earth. Kathleen scanlon, a Brookline Massachusetts, is part of mothers out front, a nationwide group pushing for climate solutions. Last November, mothers out front delivered more than 3000 postcards to Massachusetts utilities from customers who wrote in support of the group's future of clean heat platform. The platform demands that the utilities make plans to help buildings run entirely on renewable electricity. It calls for subsidies that make electric heat pumps affordable for all, and it asks for more investment in large scale geothermal heating and cooling systems. Instead of natural gas pipelines. There's all kinds of new proven technologies that we are more than ready to start implementing, and the market needs to catch up. Climate connections is produced by the Yale center for environmental communication. To hear more stories

Kathleen Scanlon Massachusetts Brookline Yale Center For Environmental
A highlight from Consumers and Climate Action

Switched On

03:50 min | Last week

A highlight from Consumers and Climate Action

"On to be any of podcast. For a lot of us who look at climate and emissions data, I think many of us have a moment where they think how are my actions having an impact on warming. It certainly happened for me a few years back and I tried to go on a carbon diet, if you will. I started by looking at movements all around me for inspiration. There were the zero waste folks, the vegans, the different shared economy business models and the secondhand options. Then were the things that I needed to do to upgrade my life, like how I heat and insulate my home and looking at my transportation choices. It was a long list and in all honesty, it took me a year of incremental changes to evaluate all of these aspects. And guess what? I am still not personally net zero, not without carbon offsets. So where I landed at the end of this year of carbon dieting was at my actions were really a little bit less about the individual missions gains and more about the consumer market signals I was sending to companies. It was about what I was and wasn't buying. My story is not unique, nor is it unique to people focused on climate. So today, I speak with you Bromley, who focuses on consumer trends for us at the NES. He recently wrote a research note titled boycotts by cots, lifestyle choices, and discursive acts. Today, we're going to talk about some of this framework and the examples of things that people are doing right now in regard to these categories. Hughes research really tends to focus on surveys, and he'll talk a bit today about what they might be telling us about what people are thinking and doing. As a reminder, be any app does not provide investment or strategy advice, and we've got a full disclaimer at the end of the show. Also, if you get to the end of the show and you decide you want to read the research that he was referring to, it can be found at B Neff go on the Bloomberg terminal unbeaten F dot com or via our mobile app for our subscribers. And now, speak with you. So Hugh, thanks for joining today. Let's start a little bit by explaining what it is that you focus on researching at BDF because it's not our usual technology adoption and looking forward price curve sort of situation. What is your primary area of focus at the moment? I have had a little bit of an unusual role at being, as you say, where my primary focus is producing analysis on consumers. It's not marketing research or market research per se. I'm really thinking about consumers as a vector for transition and decarbonization. So that's attitudes to climate change and energy and transport technologies and how they're behavior is affecting the pace of change in the speed of the compensation. This is a topic that I'm keenly interested in, but I think you have a much bigger theme within this, which is how do all those little actions that are leading us closer, but not personally actually there in many regards to that zero. How does that have a potentially larger impact on the political and corporate environment that we all exist in? So let's start by asking, what is a political consumer, which is a deliberate term that you used throughout your research on this topic? A political consumer changes over time for each topic. And we think about climate change. It starts off with a pretty fringe group of society caring about a topic right at the edge of the social radar climate change or different environmental issues. But over time, those ideas become more mainstream around emission reduction or around the emissions related to big consumption, for example. And as they do, obviously, the population involves the populistic cares about this topic grows. And it enters what we call the lifestyle politics of that minority. And still, it keeps growing and growing and suddenly at this critical mass. A political landscape that changes the commercial landscape as well where companies see an opportunity in catering to this growing minority soon to be majority. By

BDF Bromley Hughes Hugh
A highlight from Site of retired Iowa nuclear plant to become a solar farm

Climate Connections

01:25 min | Last week

A highlight from Site of retired Iowa nuclear plant to become a solar farm

"I'm doctor Anthony Liz, and this is climate connections. I was only nuclear power plant shut down in 2020. Now there are plans to build the state's biggest solar farm on and around the site. We are quite excited about bringing meaningful amounts of additional solar forward here with these next number of years. Fenley Perry is with alliant energy, the utility company that will own and operate the project. It will include enough solar panels to power tens of thousands of homes, and batteries to store energy for times when it's needed. La Perry expects it to be up and running in 2024. He says using the site of the retired Dwayne Arnold nuclear plant will be cheaper than building elsewhere, because the facility is already equipped with the infrastructure needed to connect to the grid. And so those facilities are already there. And so there'll be some improvements to them, but at modest costs, which is important for the economics of the project. And though the solar farm will not replace all of the energy and jobs that the nuclear plant provided, it will generate hundreds of temporary construction jobs ongoing tax revenue and income for property owners, who are leasing land to the project. So it will provide an economic boost for the local community and get more renewable energy on the grid. Climate connections is produced by the Yale center for environmental communication. To hear

Anthony Liz Fenley Perry La Perry Dwayne Arnold Alliant Energy Yale Center For Environmental
A highlight from Help pollinators (and get a break from mowing your lawn) by joining 'no mow May'

Environment: NPR

03:23 min | Last week

A highlight from Help pollinators (and get a break from mowing your lawn) by joining 'no mow May'

"Do you need an excuse not to cut your lawn? Here's one. Scientists say leaving your grass a little longer in spring can actually help bees and other pollinators. A few dozen U.S. cities have joined a program called no mo may. Here's Czechoslovak of member station Wu WM in Milwaukee. Matthew Norman Sullivan standing in the small side yard of his house in Appleton, Wisconsin, and he likes what he's starting to see, hulk through the ground. You can still already see the dandelion Stein to pop up, get a little bit of the creeping Charlie, a few small violets, a lot of daisies as well. But they'll all be flowering kind of at some point during May and providing pollen to these pollinating insects. Those plants will flower in May because Norman Sal says, he'll be leaving his lawn mower in the garage and joining about 500 other Appleton residents taking part in a city backed program to not mow at all for a month. This community of 75,000 has become a U.S. leader in the no mo may movement, which began in England and has spread to more than 30 cities, mostly in the Midwest. That's where may is considered a key time for pollinators to come out of hibernation or their winter habitat, Israel del toro teaches biology at Lawrence university in Appleton. He says an initial study of yards in the city shows a 5 fold increase in the number of bees, and they're very hungry in the spring. So when we leave our weeds are things we would normally call weeds to grow. Those are like little cheeseburgers for our pollinators and they're able to get some cheap calories, really, really fast and put on some weight that will give them a leg up for the season. In many U.S. cities not cutting your grass and may could get you a citation, but communities taking part in this initiative have agreed to waive that. Appleton mayor, Jake Woodford is taking part in the no mole program too, and it's, you know, not been without a hiccup, so, or it's frustrations from some community members, but by and large, there's just been incredible support for the effort, a lot of buy in a lot of participation. But hearing about increasing pollinator populations has not convinced everyone of the value of letting the lawn grow. At the service area of the north side power center in Appleton, Steve schick says doing a rainy springtime, the grass can grow really tall by June. Now you've got a struggle getting it back under control. And a lot of people will have a problem with their Moors when they try to get back under control and the lot of times it'll damage them. Backers of no mo may advise raising the lawnmower blade height in June or using a string trimmer first, Appleton is one of about 150 communities with a B city designation under a program coordinated by the organ based, exercising society for invertebrate conservation. The group's Matthew shepherd says while valuable, not mowing, is just a first step. It's not like the end point. And we can't say, gosh, we've let our lawn grow, we've saved to be. Shepherd and others say they hope keeping lawn mowers and storage for a month will further habitat awareness and

Appleton Wu Wm Matthew Norman Sullivan Norman Sal U.S. Jake Woodford Stein Milwaukee Lawrence University Del Toro Wisconsin Charlie North Side Power Center Midwest Steve Schick England Israel Organ Based, Exercising Societ Matthew Shepherd
A highlight from Startup tests technology to recover minerals from mine waste and recycled batteries

Climate Connections

01:28 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from Startup tests technology to recover minerals from mine waste and recycled batteries

"I'm doctor Anthony Liz, and this is climate connections. Getting more electric vehicles on the road will require more batteries to power them. But some of the minerals used to make lithium ion batteries are in short supply, and China controls much of the existing industry. And so without these materials, we won't be able to fully transition to this clean energy economy that we're all really striving and pushing for. Megan O'Connor is CEO and cofounder of a startup called n-th cycle. Her company is testing technology that uses electrical currents to extract and refine minerals from mine waste, low grade ore, and recycled battery waste. So the minerals that we're able to extract are cobalt nickel, manganese, three materials you find in battery cathodes today. She says N cycles extraction system is small and modular. So that we can actually go to wherever the waste is instead of having to worry about shipping all that waste to one centralized facility. And she says it uses less than half as much energy and emits only a quarter as much carbon pollution as traditional mineral refining technologies. So she says it could offer a more sustainable way to access untapped mineral resources in North America, and help the U.S. transition to a clean transportation future. Climate connections is produced by the Yale center for environmental communication. To hear more stories like this, visit climate connections dot org.

Anthony Liz Megan O'connor China Yale Center For Environmental North America U.S.
A highlight from Rewilding Earth Podcast Episode 78: Iowa Rewilding and Big River Connectivity With Mark Edwards

Rewilding Earth

03:23 min | 7 months ago

A highlight from Rewilding Earth Podcast Episode 78: Iowa Rewilding and Big River Connectivity With Mark Edwards

"I'm still Just in the throes realizing how wild it is where i live and yet where i live is the most biologically altered state north america. We've converted roughly ninety eight percent of the state for ume needs farming mostly roads highways and cultural kind of things like that. And so. I feel like i've been really lucky. I have a numerous france that i still maintain visiting one. Those main couvert island and so for example. And so i get to go to these places still. But i really like teasing him in particular like wait. You left i with this front on it. We don't figure out here where we're gonna figure it out. I mean he wanted to go over. There was something left a lot of friends in that but it became clear to me. I go visit those places like going to wilderness areas. But really the wildness is about more my relationship to my place wherever i am and so i've really come to love. I will bear very deeply and lake. I love it a lot. Because of what's been done to in a very short amount of time and yet i see potential there that i don see other places and i think that's really how i got into the reviled and so here. I am with the re wilding nut connecting with the people. I know and so i met roger. Ross give for this process and we kind of formed a partnership and Ross is extremely important in my life at that time because he's very challenged to me. We both agreed on. We were following rewinding We at read most all the same odd. We read most all the same books in southern deep understanding the language of each other but we came from past history a whole different way as was a local agricultural a business And here's mine trying to work with all the different environmental organizations trying to learn every plant species all that kind of level and between the two of us. I challenge each other tremendously and that's I think would really Catchers be wild Wild ethic that we're trying to do. We're both trying to learn how to be wilder and what rewinding me. And it's changed me tremendously. I just keep reading and reading a read most of this stuff before. How do i apply that to my own thing about. I don't have to wilderness anymore. I used to go a lot and well supposed to grow up. I still love places. I still find that interesting. But i have never been a wilder place in one sense of the word than i am where i live now on. I and i'm surrounded by corn beans. Two thirds of the statements covered into animal species. It's absolutely frightening how that green curtain and what's frightening is how people look at it and see that as a agreeing healthy thing on the national level what was being addressed was wilderness series or what we have stuff that's left. Where can we

Science Biology Wilderness Wildlife Environment Nature Rewilding Conservation Ross North America France Roger Wilder
Trees Could Be a Mental, Physical and Climate Change Antidote

Environment: NPR

02:02 min | 8 months ago

Trees Could Be a Mental, Physical and Climate Change Antidote

"Is well known. The trees help counter climate change by soaking up carbon dioxide. Now there is a growing body of research to point to many ways of dose of trees can improve our mental and physical health. Here's martha bebinger member station. W. b. you are on how and why the tiny sapling robin williams planted thirty years ago towers above her boston home. I raise this tree when i raised my children and look at this look at that. She says there's something about being near this tree. It makes everybody a little bit happy around here when you're looking for strength you can't do better than looking at a tree and there's evidence williams may will be gleaning any number of direct or associated health benefits a longer life. Bitter birth outcomes lower stress levels lower risk of heart disease. Dr howard lumpkin. Is it the university of washington school of public health. Lower risk of diabetes reduced symptoms of adhd proximity to trees is associated with a ridiculously broad range of health benefits. I wish we had pills. That were this good for health. A few countries notably japan and south korea have invested in a practice known as forest bathing which is spending time among trees as a preventive health measure but prescribing time in nature is still pretty far outside mainstream medicine in the. Us from can says that. Maybe because there's a lot we don't know what doses needed. Do you need to walk. Among trees is sufficient just to look at the trees from outside your window. Do you need big trees or do small trees do the trick we you know. We're not able to tease the forest from the trees. Peter james at harvard medical school aims to answer a lot of those questions. He's merging health data captured by phones. Real time surveys about wellbeing and mood and street. View mapping data to dig into. What's exactly within view. Is it trees. Is it flowers and how those things are related to help behaviors and health outcomes.

Martha Bebinger W. B Dr Howard Lumpkin University Of Washington Schoo Robin Williams Boston Heart Disease Williams Adhd South Korea Diabetes Japan Peter James Harvard Medical School United States
Pittsburgh Wants You to See Constellations

Environment: NPR

02:03 min | 8 months ago

Pittsburgh Wants You to See Constellations

"When astronomer diane turn shack move to pittsburgh in nineteen eighty-one she noticed. Something big was missing from the night sky. When i grew up in new england you could just walk outside and look up and see the milky way. But when i arrived in pittsburgh the sky had started to decline in quality. Still she says at the time her students at carnegie mellon university were very familiar with the milky way they knew about stars and constellations. That is not the case anymore forty years later. I have to explain what the milky way is and describe what it looks like in a show pictures and they think those pictures are fake. Because of light pollution major constellations can be totally invisible in cities. The pittsburgh city council is now trying to do something about it with the help of scientists like turn check. It passed a dark sky. Ordinance last week to reduce light pollution. This city is going to replace streetlights with warm tone. Led lights and they're also going to install shields so that late doesn't travel up what we're trying to do is cut out the light at the blue end of the spectrum because blue light scatters more easily than red light in the atmosphere rate. That's why the sky is blue. So blue light scatters everywhere. It doesn't stay where your lighting and to measure progress. She has some help in the higher ups in august. The astronauts on the international space station took some pictures of pittsburgh for on a clear night. And that's the before shot. The astronauts are gonna continue to take pictures of pittsburgh so we will have during pictures and after pictures. Terzic believes that as the sky's get darker more people will look up. In wonder that means more people more children will be able to see it and the benefits of being connected to half of our universe. I can't overstate that. It's a spiritual thing to feeling of connection with the universe she's hopeful it will peak young people's interest in the stars above and encourage them to pursue subjects such as

Diane Turn Pittsburgh Pittsburgh City Council Carnegie Mellon University New England Terzic International Space Station
The Not so Digital Workforce

Think: Sustainability

02:04 min | 8 months ago

The Not so Digital Workforce

"You may think of the digital workforce as zoom meetings and shed google docs but this trend encompasses a wide range of industries and types of work. This labor refers to a really wide suite of different types of work quite often The moment is being used to refer to digital knowledge. Work so any works. That's that can be undertaken through computers. I virtually remotely roth than having to be in a specific geographical location. That's david vissel. David is a human geography at the university of melbourne and he researches the changing relationship between people and place. There's a wide spectrum of other types of works that could equally be referred to as digital works so the economy in in cities. So things like uber and delivery and all of those new types of services that we're seeing springing up in in our cities that are absolutely reliance on networks of connected mobile phones and algorithms that drive that drive both the workers and consumers so even sectors threats we traditionally associate with being very different and very not digital say things like mining for example are increasingly using. Ai and different types of autonomous developments. So yes a labor certainly a massive consideration through across a lot of different sectors of the moment and it's very variable bull people participating in the digital workforce than ever before this rapid change is something. That's come out of necessity with the emergence of the pandemic but as david explains this influx of flexible and digital workers has an impact on the way how cities function well hit potentially involves all of us in terms of the effects that it has so even if you don't work at all and no doubt you purchase things and you use different online services so even consumers are using dish labor.

David Vissel University Of Melbourne Google David
Fighting for Food Sovereignty in Kenya and Uganda.

Breaking Green Ceilings

01:47 min | 8 months ago

Fighting for Food Sovereignty in Kenya and Uganda.

"Thank you susan. Leonida for being on the breaking green ceilings podcast. Today we want to talk about the implications of free trade agreements. On african women specially from food sovereignty perspective. But i will start with our standard introductory question here on the podcast. Which is what role has nature played in your life and i can start with the anita or interest wondering for that first. The iba the videos descends to nature because he document shower penalties or by the social food at of a economic committee's report i'm raised from finding community and finding for so we actually directed me when we're producing Another thing i'd like to talk for example when you're relaxing use nature of that alexa eastern To league or whatever he thought we offer meaningless. Nfl but so you're connecting with a natural acid and of course that aspects appreciation mitch Your ruin susan lesser very interesting question but just to say that we alive because later is alive and if we look after it looks to us just the same and i think in the last two years we have seen exactly what nature can do when they tell you that you need one hundred million to get about for sitting as a boxy jam when mitch as playing to you realize the narrative changes as what we are we are leaving it and it's accommodating us. I don't know if we're being kind too for that's another story but

Leonida Susan Mitch Your NFL Mitch
A 20-Year Megadrought Threatens Hydropower in the West

Environment: NPR

02:09 min | 8 months ago

A 20-Year Megadrought Threatens Hydropower in the West

"A twenty year. Mega drought in the west is threatening hydropower. For millions of people so the federal government is taking emergency action it sending water from other reservoirs to lake powell to help. Keep the power turbines. They're spinning. here's michael. Elizabeth sack is from colorado public radio at elk creek marina. People wait in line to back their trailers into the water to pull their boats out. And some like walter. Slut cough are frustrated. Resumes legua up and down many times. But we're not happy with it this year. Of course because we're all getting kicked out early and we pay for slips for the season. Blue mesa is colorado's largest reservoir. It's already less than thirty percent full. And now it's being forced to sacrifice more water to send to lake powell eric. Logan is head of operations at elk. Creek marina he had to shut down six weeks early because of the low water levels. It's a big hit for us for sure. There's a bunch of employees. That doctor would be employed into october and suddenly they're out looking for employment in middle of august. The deepening drought in the west has dealt a double blow to blue mesa this summer with climate change there's less snowpack and warmer temperatures increase. Evaporation so less water is making it into the colorado river and reservoirs like blue mesa and now the federal government is taking water from this lake into other reservoirs. If we were full it wouldn't be that big deal but since we're already so low and we're barely hanging on by our fingertips on trying to stay open. You take eight feet of water and suddenly we got shut the doors and move everything out to deeper water and there's nothing we can do about it. Lake powell on the utah. Arizona border hit its lowest level on record earlier this summer. Logan worries the reservoir will need even more water from blue mesa. If the drought doesn't improve the question is are they going to release whatever we get. That would become a very big problem for everyone around here. Blue may sat and the other reservoirs were built in the nineteen sixties for times of drought. It's a bank of water that the states can tap when they need. It says john macleod. A water lawyer in colorado. The water always goes to lake. Powell and this release is part of the plan. And it's using the reservoirs for one of their intended purposes

Elizabeth Sack Elk Creek Marina Blue Mesa Powell Eric Creek Marina Colorado Federal Government Powell Logan Walter Michael Colorado River Mesa Lake Powell Utah Arizona John Macleod
White House Climate Advisor Says Despite Recent Disasters, Don't Lose Hope

Environment: NPR

02:03 min | 8 months ago

White House Climate Advisor Says Despite Recent Disasters, Don't Lose Hope

"Deadly flooding wildfires heat waves and droughts these have been the headlines all summer in the us with similar disasters around the world to visiting new jersey earlier this week to survey the damage from hurricane ida president biden said we're at an inflection point every part of the country is getting hit by stream weather and We're now living in real what the country is gonna look like and if we don't do so we can't turn it back very much but we can prevent it from getting worse. Abidin administration is pushing bills. Which would be the most sweeping climate change policies ever enacted in the us. But right now. They're still facing major hurdles in congress here to talk about this with us is president biden's national climate advisor gina mccarthy. We'll come back to all things considered thank scott. I know you often talk about the fact that you are optimistic. And even more optimistic than you've been before about enacting the climate policies. But it's been a really frightening summer and a lot of people see these disasters and they wonder. Is it just too late to prevent the worst of climate change. Why is that view wrong. Because a lot of people haven't first of all having these disasters happen and be experienced personally by one out of three people in the united states. Which is what's happened over the past just few months. It's not the way. I really wanted people to get familiar with climate and get active. It certainly would have liked action earlier but this is a tremendous opportunity. We have and. I don't want people to give up hope and i'll tell you why i'm not giving up. Hope number one. I think the president is on target in what he's asking congress to support. I think we'll get it over the finish line but also i want people to understand that we have opportunities with already existing solutions on climate. That will get us where we need to go and get us on. The trajectory to net zero i- job is to deliver the solutions. That's what this package that. The president has been negotiating in pushing his all about

Hurricane Ida Abidin Administration President Biden Gina Mccarthy Biden United States New Jersey Congress Scott
What's Stopping Weed Growers From Going Greener?

Climate Cast

01:36 min | 8 months ago

What's Stopping Weed Growers From Going Greener?

"So i've read. It takes the equivalent greenhouse gas emissions of tank of gas in your car. To produce an ounce of cannabis that seems surprisingly high. Is that accurate. Yes that is accurate in to be clear. It's a high energy efficient car not one of your trucks. That's gonna run a lot of gas. It's a pretty. We're looking at somewhere around forty miles a gallon. So i'm guessing electricity for the grow lights. is a big factor there. What else causes all those emissions. When you produce cannabis so cannabis is predominantly grown indoors. And you mentioned the grow lights create huge amount of energy consumption but what happens in addition to the lights is that these lights are really hot and so then you have to bring in a c. You have to bring in a lot of other systems that also take electricity to keep the climate perfect for growing cannabis. So this number jumped out at me. When i started reading about this cannabis. The industry's footprint. Already accounts for more than one percent of us electricity consumption and ten percent in massachusetts. How is the industry addressing those emissions. The problem right now is that no one's really thinking about this terms of how do we reduce the energy consumption. Some states are passing some laws massachusetts. For example is requiring growers to use led lights which does reduce the energy consumption. But a lot of states. Don't have these rules and the federal government overall just isn't talking about this.

Massachusetts Federal Government
Brianna Parmentier: Do Cows Get Exploited for Their Milk?

Real Food Real People

01:46 min | 8 months ago

Brianna Parmentier: Do Cows Get Exploited for Their Milk?

"So some people are really concerned that animals are like being exploited to produce milk for us to drink all dairy products for farms to profit. Or whatever what's your take on that you manage the cows on this farm your the the herds woman are these cows happy are they okay so we wouldn't be able to get quality of milk or volume of milk out of the cows at all if there were any sort of stress so it is not any. I'm gonna say farming in general their best interests to have stressed animals so by providing twenty four hours of feed and misters in the parlor. When it's hot and fans and most of these cal- pens have cow brushes in them just enrichment and that sort of thing. It provides them the most stable environment constant today today for them to go about their life thermal or an eat get milked of the pressure and consistent so by that consistency we get the most out of product. Cows don't really like change for one. I've been told no they dislike the same thing every day. I wouldn't want to eat the same thing every day but they seem to do pretty dang. Well yup no they. The heat is one thing the l. weather's out of everyone's control but it's in our best interest to try to keep it somewhat the same every single day so the barnes provide a nice stable temperature that we can kind of control with fans to keep the air flowing because air quality makes a really big difference in the animal. Health is their their pooping. They're coughing. They're doing all normal animal statham

Statham
Should Beauty Retailers Boycott Unsustainable Brands?

Green Beauty Conversations

02:15 min | 8 months ago

Should Beauty Retailers Boycott Unsustainable Brands?

"So i think first of all. Can you tell us a little bit about pretty well. Bt and about what you do. And then i really wanna get stuck into the sustainability story with you. Sure so yeah. Pretty what beauty at multibrand conscious beauty and wellness marketplace that. I launched a little over two years ago based here in new york city but we are global or getting there we shipped to canada into the uk as well as throughout the us and we launched. We launched with twelve brands. Now we have a little over thirty ranging in skin care. Makeup haircare bath and body products his products. A whole lot of it all. So yeah. i'm really excited about you. Know what i'm building and just sort of where it's going and i'm really excited about a lot of the brands. I just started taking on. Of course you know. The brands carry including one of your graduates. Lawrence buys so ya. Eric clayton fulsome so obviously in a clean piece is very important but so is sustainability. So can you tell me a little bit about first of all. Wise sustainability is one of your core pillars of what you're trying to achieve with that. Well i think it really just kind of goes back to the whole concept and understanding that without sustainability practices in place. We may not have a place for our future. Children and grandchildren to be able to live and be able to thrive so way thinking about how improve our lives in more circular way in eliminate overharvesting. Waste is something that i'm very very passionate about and so of course because this is something that's very passionate about you know in my personal life it's gonna bleed over into my business because my business was born out of my own need and necessity to define beauty products that spoke to my ideals and standards for clean 'em sustainability so. Yeah it's very important that something that we speak quite a bit about what. i'm betting. the brands pretty won't even something that's sort of a continuous conversation. How not only myself. But also the brands themselves can continue to improve in. Push the envelope in that conversation lowered so that they can continue their mission of

Eric Clayton New York City Canada Lawrence UK United States
Art and Climate Fatigue

Think: Sustainability

02:03 min | 8 months ago

Art and Climate Fatigue

"My name's zoe set a kiss ski. And i'm a senior electra. At the school of design at ut and a lot of my research is around how we can visually communicate ecological issues like climate change and biodiversity loss in a way that engages people in mexican think about action that they can take and ways that we could adapt to live differently for a more sustainable future. So what is comet fatigue. And why don't we feel it. Yeah climate fatigue and eko anxiety. This lots of tomes for these things And it's it's very real. I mean i feel a sense of grief and anxiety often in the research that i do But i think what's really important is starting to accept and engage with those feelings and not hide behind them feeling the feelings it seems straightforward but when we're experiencing such lodge ecological shifts at a rapid right. Zoe explains that. We must reckon with the inevitable. Greif of that experience in order to create change. One of the. I guess the the incredible moments for me. We call it a disorienting dilemma was. When i'd been overseas i was on a research trip overseas in november twenty nine and so i actually missed the start of the those horrific bushfires that blackened seve knee and i arrived at after a month of being away and as the plane flew into sydney. I just saw the red sun that you could barely see through. And i felt broken because i was homesick. Can i was ready to come home. But i flew into a home that i no longer recognized. There's a term for the switches. Solis style and it's a feeling of homesickness for a place that you a still with eaton

School Of Design UT Greif ZOE Sydney Solis Eaton
Shea Dunifon on Outreach to the Younger Generation

Words on Water

02:19 min | 8 months ago

Shea Dunifon on Outreach to the Younger Generation

"Tell us about yourself chez. Where do you work. What's your role. Semi formal title is education coordinator. And i worked for pinellas county utilities out of the south cross by advanced water reclamation facility in st petersburg florida's. Let's a really really really long name. And i do a little bit of everything to be honest when i started here mostly k. Through twelve so kindergarten twelfth grade education. But i also work a lot. What the local technical schools colleges universities basically anyone that has a title water. Which is everybody. That's absolutely right so for our listeners. Could you give us a little more sense of the municipality like how many treatment plans the capacity of the one that you sit out those types of things and whereas pinellas county in florida. So we'll start with where county is. We are just outside of tampa. So we're like little peninsula on the peninsula's i call it so west. Coast of florida kind of west central. If you're looking at a map of florida right on the very coast golfing mexico and pinellas county. Utilities owns and operates. Three facilities. One is drinking water facility. That's up on our north county. And then also in the north county we have our done facility which is wastewater and water reclamation and then down in the south county we have facility. That is it. It is the south cross by events. Water reclamation facility so between done and south across south crossed is a thirty three. Mgd plant so it is also the largest in the entire county not just owned and operated by the county but it is the largest is so that's one thing that makes us really cool. We have a lot of really unique features here facility for instance we have a On so we actually make fertilizer which is something that when we do towards people think is really interesting because they actually get to see kind of what happened to their number two which most people don't think about right but we also have things like our tetra denied filters so that's what makes us advance so we get to point out those kinds of things we also have primary tanks. We have two parallel trains. Emily i know i'm getting into the technical stuff but those are really cool things to point out even to the public and to the engineering community.

Pinellas County Florida North County St Petersburg West Central South County Tampa Mexico Emily
Solar Energy Could Power 40% of US Electricity by 2035

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 8 months ago

Solar Energy Could Power 40% of US Electricity by 2035

"A new federal report says solar energy could provide as much as forty percent of the nation's electricity in fifteen years but it would require billions of dollars in federal investment the energy department says the US installed a record fifteen gigawatts of solar generating capacity last year it shifts toward renewable dominant power grid to address the threat of climate change solar now represents just over three percent of the electrical supply but energy secretary Jennifer grant Holmes says solar could produce enough to power all homes in the U. S. by twenty thirty five to do that however the department's renewable energy laboratory says the country would need to quadruple its annual solar capacity installing thirty gigawatts per year between now and twenty twenty five double the current rate and sixty gigawatts double again over the following five years Ben Thomas Washington

Jennifer Grant Holmes Energy Department Renewable Energy Laboratory U. United States Ben Thomas Washington
Infrastructure, Jobs and Climate Change

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

02:27 min | 9 months ago

Infrastructure, Jobs and Climate Change

"So i wanna start with your giving us an overview of the infrastructure. Plan as you understand it you know what do you what do you see is specifically in it. And what do you think the priorities are. Well thanks so much john. And it's a pretty comprehensive plan. And i think the general theme to keep in mind for your viewers is. This is very much a jobs plan. But there's no question in the minds of anyone who's read or in the administration that the belief behind the plan is that it at the same it deals with really four interwoven challenges that the administration is facing and of course the first is the post pandemic reality. The second is the economic downturn. The third is the climate crisis and the fourth is inequality and racial equity and the disproportionate environmental harm and other harms had replaced on low income communities and communities of color. No not putting those in any kind of priority. They're all of the utmost important but the general theme is that the road to economic recovery is through climate action and so it isn't infrastructure. A jobs plan. But there's no question that it very very intentionally addresses the climate crisis in a number of ways and know that the bite administration signaled his plans. He's been remarkably consistent with messages of last summer. If you saw the the biden clean energy biden plan he had a whole blueprint around clean energy and environmental justice and he has come through with flying colors in this plan. You know first and foremost it really is a building up of the clean energy sector the job-generating clean energy sector and the lesson from two thousand nine. As you all know now from the stimulus that then vice president biden worked on it. It just was simply not enough. Finding it wasn't enough finding it wasn't enough where the energy sector so this is gonna largely come through in the form of an array of renewable energy tax credits various forms and which are wildly popular and successful Those are really important. We'll certainly get the support of the business and there's something called a direct pay provisions that is important to renewable energy developers for those who may not have the adequate tax equity to benefit from a tax incentive. That's built into the into the whole thing at this point. I want to say that. There's something called justice. Forty which is outlined from the very beginning. President biden made it clear that forty percent of the benefits of his investments would go to underserved frontline disadvantaged communities

Biden John President Biden
Environmental Groups Call for Postponement of Climate Talks

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 9 months ago

Environmental Groups Call for Postponement of Climate Talks

"A coalition of environmental groups this call for this year's climate summit to be postponed arguing that too little has been done to ensure the safety of participants amid the continuing threat from Clevedon team the climate action network which includes more than fifteen hundred organizations in one hundred fifty countries says is a risk that many government delegates civil society campaigners and journalists from developing countries may be unable to attend because of travel restrictions the UN climate conference cop twenty six is scheduled for early November in Scotland however the British government has quickly rejected calls for postponement saying a recent scientific report shows the urgency for the leaders to tackle the issue without further delay I'm Charles Taylor that's my

Climate Action Network Clevedon UN British Government Scotland Charles Taylor
A Young Activist Is Working to Shut Down Oil Drilling Across Los Angeles

Climate Connections

01:11 min | 9 months ago

A Young Activist Is Working to Shut Down Oil Drilling Across Los Angeles

"Niamey. Cobo was nine years old. When she started experiencing headaches nosebleeds asthma attacks and other ailments. i suffered a lot healthwise. Her symptoms coincided with a major increase in activity at an oil well across the street from her home in south central. La oil drilling uses toxic chemicals. That can be hazardous to human health. When breathed other people in cobos neighborhood were complaining of similar symptoms so the community launched a campaign to stop. What she says is a dire and preventable health hazard. We don't need to rely on fossil fuels anymore. There's no needs to be drooling where we're living in twenty thirteen. After three years of community pressure and growing scrutiny from public officials the oil companies shut down the site near cobos home indefinitely. Now cobos twenty. And she's helping push for a citywide phase out of all oil drilling. There's so many people and so many wells that are in our area. Nearly six hundred thousand people in los angeles county live within a quarter mile of an act of oil or gas well so kobo shares her story as she fights for a future in which all los angeles residents can breathe clean

Niamey Headaches Nosebleeds Asthma Attacks Cobos Cobo Los Angeles County Los Angeles
Cities Build Splash Pads to Cool off Residents

Environment: NPR

02:05 min | 9 months ago

Cities Build Splash Pads to Cool off Residents

"With just a bit more than four thousand residents carro is the biggest city in tuscaloosa county. About one hundred miles north of detroit. There's a growing danger from heatwaves in the patchwork of rural communities like this one all across michigan in the state's largest local health department heat related pediatric emergency room visits. Have almost in just the last couple of years. Carro is landlocked surrounded by farms to the north and woods to the south. But today city manager matt lane is ready to get drenched. If you hear blood-curdling screams of just a freezing water touching my skin. That's not it's fine. Lean has traded in his shirt and tie for a swimsuit to try out. The city's new splash pad. He takes a deep breath and steps into the cold spray on a day. When the temperature is pushing ninety degrees he's headed for an oversized bucket about four feet tall. And almost as wide diameter perched on a tower of pipes and bound lane asks the kids playing here where to stand lane says this new public water feature is a way for kids to get out their energy on hot days. Shelly volmer says it's working. She's here with her daughter. And i can't get him to leave. They don't wanna go splash pads like this are popping up in some surprising places in small cities across the northern us. Burlington north dakota rothschild wisconsin and sars l. Minnesota have all recently installed splash pads that perfect summer to have our first year. Lashed has been really hot. Has we that at ninety quite a few days this year nikki sweeter organizes community engagement for sars l. She says those once ray or ninety degree days are more common now than she remembers in an odd twist. It's actually been so hot and dry this summer. That the new splash pad has had to

Carro Matt Lane Tuscaloosa County Shelly Volmer Detroit Michigan Burlington North Dakota Wisconsin Minnesota Nikki United States
Interview With Saumya Roy, Author of 'Castaway Mountain'

PODSHIP EARTH

01:24 min | 9 months ago

Interview With Saumya Roy, Author of 'Castaway Mountain'

"Journalist for many years. I used to write about financial inclusion among many other topics into ten. I left to start my own nonprofit. That was the time. The economy was booming. There was a lot of consumer loans available for different things. And yet if you didn't live in the right address if you want very wealthy all of those financial services suddenly not available to you like how redlining works. They would literally hang up on you. If you said you lived in slam or you lived here or you were even of the wrong religion etc and so i started a small nonprofit in two thousand ten to work on micro-finance thousand contini began getting with because from this garbage mountain where i had never been and will do truly with their hands. Pick up this waste and sorted the and recently traders plastic traders metal class streeters etc and so worried that what kind of businesses this loans are going to go back if we listen to you and they would make. It seem like this was a place of great opportunity like you know. This is an employer. That's never going to out of work. Do you think we have to reduce will. Never run out of work. So i said okay. Well show me what you do. I guess my join us dick. I began going the chew house. Show me on sorting. you know. Little shed on the you work so we began walking up the garbage mountains on. I guess that's where this dark fascination with what they do began

Contini Chew House Dick