Audioburst Search

Sustainability

Go green with the latest in sustainability news.

Hurricane Season Will Be Above Average, NOAA Warns

Environment: NPR

2:35 listening | 5 d ago

Hurricane Season Will Be Above Average, NOAA Warns

"Hurricane season is coming and federal forecasters are predicting that there will be between six and ten hurricanes in the Atlantic this year. That's above average Jerry. Bell is the lead Hurricane Forecaster at the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration. The Twenty Twenty Atlantic. Hurricane season is expected to be busy one. Npr's Rebecca Hersher reports. If the forecast turns out to be correct. This will be the fifth year in a row with above average hurricane activity in the Atlantic. That's the most consecutive years ever recorded bell says we're expecting yet another above normal season and now is the time to make sure that you're getting prepared. The Federal Emergency Management Agency is asking state and local governments to consider issuing evacuation orders earlier than they would have in the past in order to give people more time to safely leave their homes while maintaining as much social distance as possible. Carlos CASTILLO OF FEMA says Americans in hurricane prone areas should also pack different supplies than they would have be prepared to take cleaning items with you like so panna tiger disinfecting wipes or general household cleaning supplies to disinfect surfaces. You may touch regularly. Fema is also urging people to stay with family or friends or in hotels rather than in shelters if they can forecaster Jerry. Bell says the main reason for the large number of storms in the forecast is phenomenon called the Atlantic multi. Takeo Oscillation basically the wind temperatures in the Atlantic have been really good for making strong hurricanes since about nineteen ninety five that will probably change in the next few years as normal climate fluctuations happen that's separate from manmade climate change but climate change is making the storms that do form more damaging for one thing bell says sea levels are rising sea levels mean more storm on Dacian as a hurricanes approaching and warmer air and water mean that hurricanes are more likely to drop catastrophic amounts of rain. When they make landfall think hurricane harvey in two thousand Seventeen or Hurricane Florence in twenty eighteen and he says rain and storm surge affect more people than they used to our coastlines. Were built up tremendously over the last several decades so that there's potentially many more millions of people in harm's way every time a hurricane threat together normal climate variability plus the effects of human caused climate change plus the pandemic add up to a potentially deadly summer and fall hurricane season officially begins on June first and runs until November first Rebecca Hersher NPR needs.

Hurricane Bell Atlantic Twenty Twenty Atlantic Hurricane Florence Forecaster Federal Emergency Management A Jerry Rebecca Hersher Npr National Oceanic Atmospheric A Rebecca Hersher Takeo Oscillation Harvey NPR Carlos Castillo Dacian
Jochen Zeitz on the Power of Fashion to Drive Sustainable Change

The Business of Fashion Podcast

9:40 listening | 5 d ago

Jochen Zeitz on the Power of Fashion to Drive Sustainable Change

"Good afternoon you can. How are you today? I'm very good high Iran from America. You're in new. Mexico is that right. Yes shattering at home because our officers are still closed until later this month. Okay and tell us a little bit about where you're at in New Mexico. You have a home there. I know but you. You spend your time in quite a few different places. So why did you choose New Mexico as a place to sit this quarantine out because Just being appointed to the position of senior and president of Davidson then the company's movable key and to and I'm only one time zone away from Milwaukee so I'm headed. Us publicly listed company now. And and hence. Why I'm a US together with God it well that I guess. Pratt for practical reasons that makes perfect sense though. I hear that New Mexico's also very beautiful and I can imagine that doesn't hurt. It certainly doesn't enter this still lots of opportunity to ride a motorbike as well. You know. Yuck and before we get to the topic at hand I think you know that This week on the business of fashion. We've really been focusing all of our content and discussions around building a responsible business so it strikes me as very interesting that you've taken this new role as the president and CEO Partly Davidson because apart from the fashion industry and maybe the Energy Industry the transport industry is one of the most damaging industries in the world when it comes to our planet and so I know you have this incredibly long and sustained career in focusing your professional time and energy on building more responsible sustainable businesses. So you can you tell us a little bit about you know why this opportunity at Harley Davidson was so appealing to you. Well first of all because I believe that sector leaders and iconic brands have a tremendous opportunity to contribute to a change in consumer behavior. As a whole and I've done that in my boss lie that coma as both carrying also helping them said business. The Independent initiatives at the time being called. Ppo hold now carrying. And I just believe that sector is an iconic brands have that opportunity and we should use it as a as a way not just to be more responsible but the actually looking at it as an opportunity for jobs in the market. You're seen as a kind of turnaround specialist. You know. You've gone in from a very young age at Puma. I think you were the youngest. Ceo in Germany of a public company. At that time. And you took Puma and really help to not just turn it around from a business standpoint but also really inject some of these principles That we've been focusing on this week at B. O. F. into that business so I guess you know in the first instance someone who's operated in this space for a very long time. I mean how is it that you defined what a responsible business means now but a sustainable socially responsible business means how do you articulate that to people in your teams or elsewhere when you're trying to kind of gain further? Bienne that this is the way you more businesses need to be thinking your lipid limit. Stop with the first part of your statement rather than Christian and calling me a turnaround specialist. I would look at myself as as a change. Agent more than a turnaround specialists and the foster. The world changes the boy. I need to be a change agent and an still change it. What you do in Your Business and I guess ozone our private life if you look at how the world has changed especially in the last few months so I don't look at myself of turnaround specialist but somebody that's challenge the status quo and to come back to your question is when you when you look at the State of planet. Today we recognize that we are taking more resources away from old planet leaving if irreparable damage that means we have to change and hence we cannot just look at shareholder. The value growing a business any longer but we have to look at it responsibly. But at the same time also as an opportunity and how we can actually do better as a business but doing so by keeping our stakeholders robin just showers minded. Our Planet is key stakeholder because without our planet we won't be able to function so that's clear and then the corona virus crisis hit in the last few months and businesses throughout various sectors. Have been hit hard including Harley Davidson the industry that we work in the fashion industry. I mean how. How do you see this kind of responsible? Business thinking in light of the crisis that we're now all experiencing both from kind of public health and an economic standpoint. I'd say even going into the crisis you start to see change. In a lot of companies more and more companies that may be compared to five years ago where it was handful of select leaders and companies that we're promoting a more responsible way of doing business And I think this is only going to accelerate. I think investors are asking the question that was one of the missing links in the past that quite often investors. We're not really looking. Yes G. or sustainability as a as a an important Harrasment based on which one should just judge investment. That has been happening. I actually see this accelerating post-crisis that you can make the business case for a planet And you can say what we experiencing now with. The virus is just a false way of experiencing climate change that will happen over decades but the resolves is creeping change or planet which will have negative impacts on how live operate and work hence something. We need to get our hands around on. This virus is is a testament for a needed cross change in order to deal with a much bigger crisis that the would it be affecting our lives wrong world in twenty thirty years to call. So we've been talking this week as I mentioned about. You know the idea that. The fashion industry needs to clean up. Its Act and you have the very unusual position now of WHO's operated right at the very heart of the fashion industry as you mentioned both at home on caring and I know you stepped out of the industry some time ago but I'm sure as an observer and you know someone who was kind of closely embedded in this industry previously. You've been watching and I'm curious to understand your like. How do you see the fashion industry now? In light of this need for the industry to clean up its act and you know some of these things that you were talking about for years. These principles around sustainability and creating a business that simply extract resources from the planet and exploit people businesses that really found a way of operating while respecting these different stakeholders. I mean as a as a as a former insider now an outsider. What are your thoughts now on the fashion industry on this journey of of of kind of shaking things up when I look at every crisis in opportunity. It's an opportunity to really look at your own south. It's an opportunity to look at Your Business and how you operate and say what can we the essentially change to adjust our says to the new noma coming out of this crisis. I would say it's it's a given that they will be do a which is affecting our lives which is effective way effecting the way we we by the way we triple. A. And our consciousness about critically shes of our world advising domestically I think that's if businesses don't ask themselves that question you know you would be history of rather than the future attempts to fashion industry. I always believe that you need to embed sustainability into the DNA of Your Business and of your brand. You don't want to be the one shouting. We are sustainable. Be less understandable and others Jimmy. It's a definition of quality and a new way of looking at what is quantity in the future versus what was deemed the poss. When our Resources Ltd I would just simply say as quantities. Such an important driver luxury and desirability. If you're not sustainable. You don't actually operates with quality products that that's the new definition for me. That embed sustainability in every decision. You make us a business as a business leader as design as a manufacturer and and we need to look at this very seriously at and not just a setup sustainability departments that only scratched the surface but actually embed the word sustainability into our day to day operation.

Harley Davidson New Mexico Puma President And Ceo Mexico United States Iran America Coma Milwaukee Pratt CEO Resources Ltd Jimmy President Trump Germany
How COVID-19 Has Changed Fast Fashion Forever

Good Together: Ethical, Eco-Friendly, Sustainable Living

6:59 listening | 6 d ago

How COVID-19 Has Changed Fast Fashion Forever

"We've all heard how fast fashion is damaging to the people and the planet. What you probably haven't heard is that the covid nineteen pandemic has created a crisis for garment factory employees around the world amid this unprecedented event workers factories and brands are losing wages and are being forced to make difficult decisions to keep their businesses running while protecting health and safety orders are being produced postponed or canceled. Lockdowns are preventing work in some countries and viral exposure on the job a threat to workers and their families in this episode of Good Together. Liza and I discussed with Jessica Andrews Deputy Fashion Editor Bustle. How Fair Trade? Usa is mobilizing to protect garment workers. Jessica's years of experience in the Fashion Journalism Space and her passion for fighting back against the negative impact of industry make for a fascinating and timely conversation at the intersection of Human Rights Fashion. An advocacy. Hey Jessica welcome to good together. Were so excited to have you so for listeners. Who aren't familiar with Jessica. She is the deputy fashion editor at bustle overseeing all things fashion from red carpet roundups to trend reports Before she went she was at bustle. She did stints at refinery. Twenty nine teen vogue an has also contributed to places like L. Vanity Fair New York Times essence. Just like all of the wonderful news sources. I could say so. We are thrilled to have her on a speaking about all things fair trade USA. An ethical. Fashion so Jessica. I wondered if you could give us an intro As to your background I know I just covered a little bit of it there. But you know why you got into The the ethical fashion space specifically. And we'll just kind of take it from there. Good why I love The you because it really sums up my career. I've done a little bit of everything I've worked in housing brands and as a freelance writer and I found that I was really passionate about not just about fashion though. I love beautiful clothes. But like the ethical aspect of it on whether that's diversity on the runway or treating garment workers fairly and being conscious about the environment and I think for me. My passionate about environmental issues really developed from my sister. She's a climate analyst. She works out of DC. And she's always been really passionate about how we can make the world a better place four to leave behind our kids and that really starts with us being more responsible about our carbon footprint and I always loved hearing her talk about it because she's so passionate but I didn't realize how much it crossed over with the fashion industry until I started my career and I saw just how wasteful the industry can be An also I learned about Rana Plaza and I was devastated to know all the garment workers who lives were lost that day And I really felt like I could make a difference through my platform and my jobs by speaking out about this because I thought if I wasn't aware of you know how the fashion industry was contributing to climate change and just that like lack of environmental responsibility that they had I bought. There must be other people that feel this way to you know so. I I realized could really use my platform to spread awareness. And you know working with my sister. Her name named Sabrina and other advocates in this in this space like Rachel weighing who was established for the fair trade. Look book who such an inspiration to me. I was able to learn more about these issues and then find a way that I could cover them at all the different places I've worked so that's been something that really rewarding for me to do to feel like I'm helping make a difference in somewhere. So yeah it's good to hear how you of got into ethical fashion and you absolutely kind of Nailed it in terms of like when you feel like even you don't know about it and I think at despite the fact that we are in the fair trade ethical fashioning still we all know about the staff we are super passionate about you know spreading awareness about what happened. Rana Plaza by the way for our listeners gives you know Rana Plaza was a factory collapsed in Dhaka. Bangladesh holding tire factory collapsed on Apple. Two fourth two thousand thirteen killing over eleven hundred people garment workers and it kind of gave Was fuel behind the ethical fashion fashion pollution moods which is With we we've been through so much over the years of the seven years now It's you absolutely right. Not everyone knows about it and spreading awareness solely incredibly Just so everyone knows what was happening the because again. We are so so disconnected this days. from the people who are making basically every product. Not just the that. We're wearing but products that we eat with for the run our with in the house Absolutely right with that So you also mentioned that we wear fair trade campaign ride UA one of the Bruins women spokesperson for the we wear trade campaign that was launched last month right and time of professional dilution week buy fair trade. Usa. Can you tell us more about it? Yeah of course so. It's interesting that you brought up Rana Plaza again because that really inspired it And Fair trade originally launched the where fair trade campaign last year on during fashion revolution. Week to honor the Rana Plaza Garment Factory Collapse And I think doing it. This year felt really urgent as well. I'm just to raise awareness around how garment workers are still being impacted today on and then also especially considering the effects of cove in nineteen And how you know. Fashions most vulnerable people are impacted during a crisis even more so this campaign we wanted to really highlight that Rachel Wang again She was the stylist and the creative director. She collaborated with B. Y. T. NYC too short film And that would really moves me so much just to hear about how these different advocates started getting active in the space and why fair trade is so significant to all of

Jessica Andrews Rana Plaza Rana Plaza Garment Factory Fair New York Times Editor Rachel Wang USA Liza Dhaka Analyst Writer Usa. B. Y. T. Nyc Sabrina Bangladesh Apple Bruins
Are There Zombie Viruses  Like The 1918 Flu  Thawing In The Permafrost?

Environment: NPR

6:48 listening | Last week

Are There Zombie Viruses Like The 1918 Flu Thawing In The Permafrost?

"Now we take you to the top of the world to the Northern Coast of Alaska where a cliff is crumbling and exposing ancient hunting site. There's another head back there. GonNa head right here head right their main body right here. Across the Arctic these prehistoric settlements are being unearthed. And the reason why is climate change as NPR's Mike Lean do cliff reports? Scientists are worried about something that could be lurking inside. These settlements Zombie pathogens up on top of an ocean. Bluff team of archaeologists is trying to pull off an emergency excavation. Here we have ribs and vertebrae other long bones. That's Dominique Tulu. Student helping to dig out hunting cabin. He's found a stash of animal bones at the other end of the house. Glenis on shows me where someone was storing fresh. Kills so this. Is this skin right here? At my feet are mummified seal. These seals are incredibly well preserved. You can see their skin their whiskers and this odsal paw. Oh Paul everywhere they dig. There's another surprise owing us. This is ridiculous. That's an Jensen the archaeologist leading the team they're out of coastal site near Ukiah that the town wants known as Barrow. They're rushing to save a piece of history before it falls into the ocean the cliff where the cabin is buried is going breaking apart because of climate change bird bird after bird after bird stack up in their skin. There there is the whole boy. Things are getting super stinky. The birds are thawing in rotting. That's right when students hands covered in black king bird flesh. Oh yeah hands. Oh my gosh. Oh now Johnson starts worrying about something. We can't see even flu virus. Oh norovirus yes. The team realizes there could be bird-flu hidden in these carcasses. You he all across the. Arctic climate change is causing the ground to warm soften like butter and there are a lot of things buried this ground. Not just animals but also their diseases tinkering take a rank colleen. You're GONNA drive yourself seriously. You need a break cooling. The major as a student she puts on gloves. Yeah you should probably do that hand. Because I mean a lot. Dunkin you at this point. In the excavation something even crappier happens. A human molar appears really human tooth. Now the site rat isn't a burial ground. There shouldn't be bodies right here but the two does make them pause because it reminds them that there aren't just animal diseases buried in the Arctic but also possibly human diseases. There are tens of thousands of bodies hidden in the Arctic permafrost. Jensen knows this better than anyone. I've gone a lot of burials. Yeah I've probably Doug as many variables was anybody. Some of the people buried up here. They died of smallpox others from the nineteen eighteen flu. Have you ever seen human remains like as well preserved as this seal? Oh Yeah Yeah Yeah. Yeah well the little the little frozen girl from rookie. Avic ARE NYACK. Yes she was. She was actually much better preserved than the seal. The little girl was just six years old. She was carefully wrapped in duct skin. Parka WITH A FUR-TRIMMED. She had this little sled with her. She died about eight hundred years ago. Water in around her burial I think and she was socialist. Basically encased in ice. We're able to take her out in a block of ice. Her body was so well preserved that Jensen shipped her to anchorage so doctors could do a full autopsy. One of those doctors was Michael's Zimmerman a paleobiologist at the University of Pennsylvania. I've done the number studies on frozen bodies in Alaska and when you open them up the organs role there and they're easily identified. It's not at all like Egyptian mummies where everything is shrunken and dried up. So it's easy to see what a person died up for the little frozen girl. It was starvation. But Zimmerman has seen infections embodies excavated from permafrost in one case a mummy from the Aleutian Islands. Looked like it had died of pneumonia and when he looked for the bacteria inside the body there they were frozen in time. We can see them microscopically in the in the lungs. There's this fear out there that once human bodies are exposed by melting permafrost. The pathogens in them could come back to life like Zombie pathogens. It's not unheard of anthrax. Can do it. It happened just a few years ago. In Russia a massive reindeer burial ground thought in the anthrax that killed. The reindeer woke up and started an outbreak. Were these new moon. You bacteria still alive. Zimmerman tested it. He took a smidge tissue from the lungs warmed it up fed it and tried to revive it. Nothing grew not one single cell though. I was happy because I didn't have to worry about catching anything. Zimmerman says he wasn't surprised. Bacteria were dead. Anthrax is a special case. In general bacteria that make people can't survive deep-freeze we're dealing with the organisms. That are hundreds of years old at least of the stuff. I work out of their frozen for hundreds of years and I really don't think they're ready to come back to life. I asked him if the same is true for viruses. I think it's extremely unlikely we've never been able to Culture any living organisms out of these bodies in nineteen fifty one a pathologist from San Francisco. Johan Halton decided to test this out. He went up to a tiny town near nome Alaska in dug up the bodies of five people who had died of the nineteen eighteen flu a virus that killed at least fifty million people Holton told. Npr Two thousand four that he cut out tiny pieces of the people's lungs and try to grow the virus in the lab. I hope that I would be able to isolate living virus. And they couldn't they ours is dead. And in retrospect of course maybe that was a good thing a good thing. But here's the crazy part. Holton tried to capture the virus twice. He went back to Alaska when he was seventy two. In Russian. Scientists like Holton have intentionally tried to revive smallpox from bodies in their permafrost. They recovered pieces of the virus but couldn't get that to grow either so maybe when it comes to Zombie Diseases. It's not melting permafrost. Me Need to worry about but what scientists are doing in the lab mike do cluff NPR news.

Zimmerman Alaska Anthrax Arctic Jensen Holton Mike Lean FLU Dominique Tulu NPR Nyack Smallpox Ukiah Aleutian Islands Paul Colleen
In Defense of Wet Markets

The Trip

8:25 listening | Last week

In Defense of Wet Markets

"I mean any of this. Had you imagined that markets would be at the center of kind of global controversy. I did not in fact I had planned on being a spectator like everyone else in reading about what was going on and I had an interest in what was happening in the public health level and was surprised when people started talking about what markets and making comments about Chinese Diet's and as someone who's lived in Asia and is interested in in markets. I took an interest in the story so just basic terminology. What is a wet market? Yeah there's so this question of what is what market actually is important. Because there's a lot of confusion about that in the news about it. The term wet market originated in Asia in Hong Kong and Singapore and it was used to distinguish wet markets from dry markets markets. Where they sell packaged goods durable goods. A good example would be the textile markets. You'll find in a lot of Asian cities. A wet market is a place where you sell fresh produce meat fish and seafood. And it's called the wet market because often they are wet One of the ways that these markets clean down all of them. Some of them is that they would hose down the floor. And so that's one reason why it's wet. Also the fish and seafood markets often isis used for packing them. And so that also okay sales. So I'm just I'm just being macabre. It's not wet because it's drenched in the blood of you know of chickens or something. It's it's wet because of is from C. Food and from washing it afterwards. Exactly and actually one of the confusions about these wet markets is that they don't all have live animals. It's very uncommon for them to have wildlife animals and less common for those to be exotic wildlife animals. One of the things. I always make a point here. In the United States talking to people about what markets is that this is actually a normal way for people to get food in Asia in Europe In most places outside of the United States and people don't do one stop shop shopping at a supermarket at. It's more common for them to go every couple of days they WANNA get fresh cheap food and the best places do that are often these local vendors. It's an amazing conversation. Imagine a world in which not. Everything is bought at a win. Dixie imagine a world where not. Everything is packaged sanitize in Saran wrap. That's that's the other thing. Is it even one hundred percent certain that we know that wet markets were the the beginning point of this pandemic? That's a great question. Actually 'em so the reason there is all of this. Interesting markets is because there is a a a wet market Hunan Seafood Wholesale Market in the city of Wuhan had a bunch of people who were among the first that China identified as testing positive for the virus. Now since then alternative. Hypotheses have come out one of them. There is a lab that studied other viruses. Some people speculated it might have accidentally got out most scientists. Say this is probably unlikely. But it's a possibility. I also think you can't rule out the possibility of habitat encouraging their colonies of bats near near the cities. And it's possible that people had moved into the those environments and got an expose that way so there's a lot of uncertainty about where it might have come from. I think one of the reasons why this story as circulated is because pandemic win. These kinds of threats are coming. It's really common for people to want to look for some way to say that this is not going to affect me so they very quickly looked for some evidence that this is because of some other things from other people and so people looked at the United States and in Europe said. Oh it's these wet markets. It's weird bizarre Chinese habits with food. They eat. This isn't us and it was a way to sort of scapegoat. Their anxieties at the danger. In this of course is that it causes people to ignore out their own cultures. Have these risks also causes not to take at measures to protect themselves from the epidemic in so many places were slow to respond to Africa in our own country? I think you'd mentioned lay all the famous food market in the center of Paris as an example of of how we have lost touch with With this mode of shopping as city urban planners have come through the gentrify and kind of clear out the the messy noisy organic chaos that any great market necessarily includes. What have we lost here in the West in moving away from this style of shopping and and and eating you lose that sense of community for the family businesses? They can't live elsewhere often. They live near where these markets are. And it's not practical for them to to move their stand to the new markets and so often the end of those family businesses food markets are deeply integrated into the local communities. And that's one thing that gets lost another thing that gets losses. I think in consumers in especially in the United States but you can see this happening in Europe as well lose a sense of where their food comes from so in the past the the wet market. The food market would have been At the entry point of cities would have been at ports river ways. The food would have been there at if they had live animals. People have seen the animals that they didn't they at least would have seen you know the the animal carcass and had a sense of where the what what the food and the meat was coming from as it gets moved backstage outside cities like the way we haven't the United States people who are seeing package wrapped foods and they don't have a sense of where that food is coming from and it often these moves because they're pushed by the city. They often favor as certain companies often bigger companies over the smaller smaller vendors interest so it also contributes to to that change through a long. You know a century long battle for PREMACY IN TERMS OF SHOPPING HABITS. Do you do you think. Wet markets will survive. Are we doomed to kind of a corporate Supermarket Culture. You know throughout the world. I hope wet market culture survives. I also think there's an ass I think there is a growth and supermarkets in Asia. And I'm sure that after this crisis they will probably be more successful than a lot of these Margaret. Because THEY'RE LARGER COMPANIES. They have kind of cash reserves to handle the kind of crisis. They're more likely to take their business online. So even in China has been a growth in online shopping and they're probably going to capitalize off the concern about safety in wet markets and the perception. That if you package food and you processed food it's safer and I say perception because again. There are plenty of outbreaks in the United States. That we've had in terms of packaged produce or in terms of meat that can be traced back to our EILLY industrial system. So it's not. It's not unique to wet markets that said. I hope that what markets will continue in there. Some sort of irony in that. There is a growth in interest in these kinds of markets. They're popular with tourists. You can see this hike place in Seattle so the popular tourist. Because it's Kinda more. It seemed to be a romantic authentic way of getting a sense of local food culture. There's a lot of interest in farmers markets in the United States because people want to have a more connection to the people actually produce food right. I think even though the big story looks like the rise of supermarkets and disappearance of these markets. I think there will be a continuous of them.

United States Asia Europe Hunan Seafood Wholesale Market China Hong Kong Singapore Saran Wrap Seattle Dixie Africa Wuhan Paris
Farmer creates nature-based planting calendar

Climate Connections

1:20 listening | Last week

Farmer creates nature-based planting calendar

"I'm doctor. Anthony lies wits and this is climate connections as the climate warms growing seasons are becoming more erratic that uncertainty makes it harder for farmers to decide when to plant and harvest crops. David Baas is a farmer in northeastern Minnesota. We cannot rely O- May I we plant lettuce. It just doesn't work that way anymore. So instead of Bosnia's basing decisions on natural signs of seasonal change like Robbins arrive in spring the Marsh marigold first flowers or snow buntings migrate. He's matched up records of those natural events with thirty years of his own planting and harvest data. That's allowed him to see which events are good signposts so when the Dan Line Flowers. We might be planting potatoes and transplanting lettuce. After a few years of experimenting Abbasi created a site specific farming calendar based solely on natural events. This year. He plans to rely on that instead of traditional dates. He's optimistic that the approach will help maintain good harvests in a changing climate. And he says the process has been rewarding in other ways to its forces me to observe and what's better for farming than for farmer to be observant?

David Baas Robbins Dan Line Flowers Marsh Marigold Bosnia Anthony Abbasi Minnesota
GOOD NEWS: How to Be A Better Ancestor

Important, Not Important

5:42 listening | Last week

GOOD NEWS: How to Be A Better Ancestor

"Welcome to important not important. My name is Quinn. It and I'm Brian Calvert. Kennedy this is the podcast where we dive into a specific topic or question affecting everyone on the planet right now in the next ten years kind of the entire point at today's conversation It can kill us for most of us or turn us into data from Star Trek. We are in our guests. Are Scientists. Doctors. Engineers POLITICIANS ASTRONAUTS. Even a reverend and we worked words. action steps. Our listeners can take their voice their vote and their dollar friendly reminder that you can send questions thoughts feed-back drawings on all mostly cookies to us on twitter at important not in or email us at fun talk at important not important dot com and you can actually also leave us a you know complementary or threatening voice messages at the. Lincoln are shown to be clear. You can't send cookies Danny of these things but if you make great cookies send us a note and we'll give you the correct address. Mean you'll go so you can go pick them up. You can also join thousands of other smart people and subscribe to our free weekly. Newsletter comes out Friday most of the time at important non important DOT com. This week's episode is talking about how crazy shit is out there. We've recognized that we see you but despite all of that turns out you can actually Plan for the future and save the world at the same time amazing. We have with us this week. A Beena Venkataraman. She's the author of the forthcoming book. The optimists telescope is Great Bryan actually found out that not a real telescope body was telescope. he was a little bit but he's excited again because as awesome. She really was fantastic. And I'm excited for this book and I love that. She wants to the episodes great. We used to do that. And people didn't like that. Yeah right right and I was about to again. They would say. Why did you talk about it when you're about to talk about it? We were young. We didn't know that was years ago. Okay here we go. Let's go talk to being okay. Our guest today's Beena Venkataraman and together. We're GONNA talk about planning for chaos strategies when it's basically mad Max out there be welcome. Thank you so happy to be here. We are very happy. Have you being if you don't mind? Why don't you tell anybody who you are and what you do? Sure I'm trauman. I'm the author of the optimus telescope thinking ahead in a reckless age new book and I teach in the program on science technology and society at Mit where brainwash young college students. Perfect you one of those people like a good brainwashing mill. Right right right it's different good brainwashing straight. That's what Lennon bought too but No that sounds great. We yeah we're again. We're so happy to have is going to be a great Combo then just as a reminder to everyone and so you know I don't know if we talked about it before the before reporting We're just GONNA go over some. Oh we did great. I was listening. We're going to go over some Context for our for our question Our topic today and then dig and do some Action oriented questions that get to the core of why we should all care about it and you and what we can all do to support you sound. Good it's great awesome beano. We'd like to start with one important question to set the tone for things and I know you said you listen to some episodes of one. My apologies For All that time you can never get back to. You cheated a little bit but if you could just tell us why you are vital to the survival of the species am I know I. I think I'm I'm vital. Because everyone's vital to the survival species. I think to be alive today. We're facing critical tipping points. The Melting Arctic the rising seas We're all right. If you think about us in the fabric of time if you think about the generations of people alive today we have such extraordinary power to shape the future we have such extraordinary power To do things at scale the scale of the planet and we know about what we're doing we know the half-life of our radioactive as we know How long are pollution is going to linger in the atmosphere and heat up the planet. And so I think is one among many It's it's sort of like we all have to act. It's going to take action other levels to do something about it. That said I just had a friend. Tell me she said you need to be the nightingale. Like what a did like. She was smoking something and she wasn't sure sober and what she said. Was you need to sing the song that people feel in their hearts that haven't yet brought into sound into words? Sure wasn't smoking. I'm sure but you know this idea. And she said that's how the revolution starts about was how she ended it like L. Singing to another nine going on. It's like no pressure. Just have to the song that's in people's hearts but I can think of like the ideal case of of the book I just wrote. I mean yeah I hope I am like bring two words and bringing into action by the deepest highest aspirations that we have to actually care for the feature actually be good ancestors for future generations be remembered as the people who who actually saved the planet instead of instead of cursing. It

Beena Venkataraman Brian Calvert Twitter Quinn Kennedy Bryan Danny Lincoln L. Singing Lennon
Upcycling Using the Lessons Learned During this Time

Maya 's Upcycling as both Art and Function

2:31 listening | Last week

Upcycling Using the Lessons Learned During this Time

"Using the lessons learned during this time it seems that this car virus has left. Everyone waiting is some shape or the other to see what is next. Everyone is looking hoping waiting to see when this will finally be over when life can return to what was home truthfully and one. Almost everyone is afraid. Life has been settled been put on hold in most parts of the world but I think about all the things I have learned from up cycling. And how resilient than purposeful. I have become when using resources I think of how I have learned do. Things in ways that do not only save money reuse things and in so many ways a more natural and intern healthier for me and my family and less wasteful. When I first started this podcast I spoke about what upside is and I said that it has probably been around since the beginning of time long before I was giving in in many societies people. Still Upcycle if you will and it is just a way of life much of the world has had somehow lost that ability. Assadi idea of upside as related to social class but things had begun to change as we saw how our waste was damaging the environment while now here we are with the spend Democ the time to use. Those skills is here that many of us have been practicing reuse more of those glass bottles for story food off. The Islands. Make official out of that piece of clothing. You know the use. Use LEMON PEELS IN. Orange peels to clean as supplements some of the disinfectants. Look around your house or apartment Some of the items that you may have overlooked that can now be used and repurpose was something you need right now. Obviously life is getting to be more and more difficult as some cuts are short supply and there is no getting around that but upset and is about recreating something better out of something that could no longer use as it is or can no longer the serve the same purpose. I get up every morning hoping that. It is finally over. But it hasn't and no one knows what we'll be over and how everyone's life in the world would change but remember life is about possibilities in non impossibilities to next time stay

Intern Official
Flights Into The Stratosphere Study Changes To Atmospheric Rivers

Environment: NPR

3:32 listening | Last week

Flights Into The Stratosphere Study Changes To Atmospheric Rivers

"Is the global pandemic making. You wish you could take a quick break from planet earth. Our next story will help you do to stop over the past six months. Scientists have been flying high over the Pacific Ocean into the stratosphere to study weather phenomena called Atmospheric rivers these rivers in the sky can deliver huge amounts of rain and snow to the West Coast and they may be getting more intense. Npr's Nathan join them for a flight. Confession I don't always pay attention to preflight briefings you know the whole insert buckle seatbelt thing. But most flights don't have emergency masks with compressed air pressure you'll need like coordinator returning says because if something goes wrong above forty thousand feet here get sucked out of your lines okay. He's got my full attention heading like just about everyone else on this flight. Works for Noah the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. They're wearing smurfs. Blue flight suits with patches that read Hurricane Hunter because these are the folks if light through hurricanes when it's that time of the year this like far over the northeast Pacific Ocean shouldn't be nearly as bumpy because collecting data on atmospheric rivers is a little less invasive instead of flying through the band of moisture will fly over it at about forty one thousand feet just shy of where you can see the curvature of the earth. The weather event we're studying is far below. But let's have the expert on the jet. Explain starting with you know what the heck is an atmospheric river. Yeah sure so. They're basically like a river in the sky. Which is why that name got coins? And Wilson is with the scripts institution of Oceanography. So it's sort of a long narrow corridor of strong Moisture Transport so lasted water vapor and lots of wins mostly at low levels water vapor that starts in the humid tropics and then snakes its way across the ocean until it hits a landmass like a river hitting a damn that collision can be good and that brings much needed water to places like California but it can also be bad. Because when Wilson says lots of water vapor she means lots and atmospheric river on average can transport as much water as a twenty five Mississippi of Earth Atmospheric rivers are to blame for flooding events in California Washington and Oregon just about every year and scientists expect strong ones to increase in frequency with the warming climate similar to hurricanes because warmer air can hold more water hence the need to better understand with heading coordinating over the radio to know engineers at the back of the jet ready. A piece of data collecting equipment called a drops out the packing tape on there. The Drop Zone Jeff. Hart burgers hand is about the size and shape of to soda cans stacked on top of each other. He loads it into a shoot near the back of the jet. Careful not to touch the exposed sensors on its top and other engineer Stephen. Paul readies released switch. Paul flips a switch valve on the bottom of the plane opens sucking the sensor out and ripping open a parachute. The sensor will fall for more than fifteen minutes through the Atmospheric River below beaming back data. Along the way data that will be used to improve weather forecasts immediately and data that will help. Scientists better understand atmospheric rivers into the future eighth UNWRAP NPR

Atmospheric River Pacific Ocean National Oceanic And Atmospher Nathan Wilson NPR Paul Hurricane Hunter Hart Coordinator Noah Institution Of Oceanography California West Coast Stephen California Washington Engineer Mississippi
California startup aims to help polluters recycle CO2

Climate Connections

1:12 listening | Last week

California startup aims to help polluters recycle CO2

"Factories and power. Plants often release a lot of carbon pollution and without government tax on that pollution. There's not always a clear financial incentive for companies to reduce their emissions. Etosha cave is co-founder of open. Twelve the California star developed technology. She says could motivate companies to invest in capturing their co two emissions to me. It just seemed like an elegant solution to provide a revenue stream for co two instead of throwing it away. The company's technology breaks down Carbon Dioxide and Water. Then combines them to create other molecules those molecules can then be used to make materials such as alternative fuels or plastics. It's basically a way to recycle. Co Two that would otherwise end up in the atmosphere. One product for example is jet fuel. And you can imagine using the jet fuel in commercial flights. Another product made us. Polycarbonate polymer the lenses in most sunglasses and eyelashes are made from that. Now we can make that from co two. Oprah's twelve has already built a small version of its technology. The company still needs to build bigger units improve. Its commercially viable. But at scale cave says this technology could make it profitable for companies to capture their harmful

Etosha Cave Co-Founder Oprah California
Researcher says EPA power plant rule does little to address global warming

Climate Connections

1:19 listening | 2 weeks ago

Researcher says EPA power plant rule does little to address global warming

"I'm doctor. Anthony lies words and this is climate connections last year the EPA repealed the clean power plan an Obama era policy aimed at reducing carbon pollution from power plants. The agency replaced it with the affordable. Clean Energy or ace rule. The new rule does not place limits on power plant pollution. Instead direct states to prioritize energy efficiency improvements that power plants. The ideas that more efficient plants will burn less an unfortunate kind of unintended consequence of that approach. Is that those power plants then become more cost effective to operate and tend to run more. Kathy Allen. Lambert is with the Harvard Center for Health. Climate and global environment her team analyzed. Epa Data about the expected impact of the ace rule because some plants will likely run more an old power plants may be kept online longer. Over a fifth of Power. Plants were estimated to have an increase in co two emissions overall. The new rule is projected to drive down emissions. Less than one percent beyond. What would likely happen without any policy at all? The bottom line when it comes to the ace rule is that it does virtually nothing to confront climate

EPA Barack Obama Kathy Allen Anthony Harvard Center For Health Lambert
A Lawsuit Seeks The Removal Of The Directors For Park Service And BLM

Environment: NPR

1:58 listening | 2 weeks ago

A Lawsuit Seeks The Removal Of The Directors For Park Service And BLM

"A lawsuit filed today seeks the removal of the controversial acting directors for two federal agencies. The agencies are in charge of millions of acres of public land energy development and the country's national parks. Npr's Kirk siegler reports the National Park Service and the Bureau of Land Management Have Not had permanent Senate confirmed directors for the entire trump presidency. That's a violation of the Constitution which requires Senate oversight of these key positions according to a lawsuit filed by to Washington DC and Idaho based conservation groups. And they're just a freewheeling detouring around the constitution in allowing these lower level political appointees to be running a show Peter Jenkins is senior counsel for Public Employees Environmental Responsibility the overall pattern is to weaken the environmental bureaus and allow state interests in private extractive industry interest particularly in the case of Bureau land-management to be able to call the shots. This lawsuit is the latest to shine light on the trump administration's unprecedented use of acting agency. Heads but the group's suing have long been suspicious of William Perry pen-li in particular leading the B. M. His temporary appointment has been extended now five times since taking over the agency last summer. Penalty once advocated for transferring ownership of the very public lands. He now manages over two states and private interests but in a recent interview. Pen-li told me that is not part of president trump's agenda regardless of what I've said in the past the one thing is clear is I'm a marine. I understand how to follow. Orders follow orders in this case in a statement the trump administration called the lawsuit that seeks to oust penalty and David Vella the park service. Baseless and a distraction as the park service in particular is trying to safely reopen national parks during the corona virus. Pandemic Kirk Siegler. Npr News Boise.

Kirk Siegler Senate Donald Trump National Park Service Public Employees Environmental NPR Bureau Of Land Management David Vella Peter Jenkins Idaho William Perry Senior Counsel Washington Boise President Trump
The Longleaf Alliance Speaks for the Trees

In Defense of Plants Podcast

6:46 listening | 2 weeks ago

The Longleaf Alliance Speaks for the Trees

"Am a plane ecologist and I've been working with Ground cover in Langley ecosystems for a long time so ever since graduate school. Back in the day I've worked in and around Longleaf Pine Habitat S- Focusing on a lot of the flowering ground cover species that you find in these systems so whether it's with pitcher plant species to wire grass and other upland species. I have been working in it since since Grad school like I said And after Grad School did some work down in central Florida and then move back up and was a A technician at the Jones Research Center and southwest Georgia where really took a deep dive into ground cover ecology on the ecosystem of Longleaf and after the Johnson are worked with the Atlanta Botanical Garden and then finally came back around to Longleaf alliance and said it started with the LONGLEAF alliance back in two thousand eleven as the ground cover specialists so I was the under story coordinator with the Alliance until just this past November where I took over as president of the organization so have been with a pro while my my role has evolved. But I'm really excited to be leading the group. Now that's fantastic would agree journey end from one under story person to another. Let's give a big shoutout to the less woody species that make these ecosystems what they are just as much as the trees do themselves. Yes the little guys on the ground floor. Yeah absolutely among my favorites not to take away from the trees at all but You know was this always about plans for you. When did you really realize that plants? We're going to be your focus. And what brought you guess to deciding to study them in Grad school and make a career out of it? What you know. Oddly enough. I I've always. I started out as a biology major in college but I started out as premed which is strange. I was I was convinced I wanted to be neurosurgeon or which is really really very different from what I'm doing now who's the little. But then I took a field. Botany course and I was lost after that point down the road. Without looking at at plant species growing in the ditches on the sides I was basically lost two plants at that point so No no turning back so it's been. It's been a great journey. Let's fascinating learn. I mean I think that is probably a whole of people. Start OUT IN BIOLOGY IS KIDS. At least for me in my cohort. It was oh you wanna make money in biology. Got To be a doctor. You're GONNA grow up. You're going to be a doctor. Oh you're so smart. You should be a doctor in. It's it's really beat into you that that's the only route for biologists to take but sometimes all it is being introduced to something outdoors at. You never paid attention to before suddenly The world of biology expanse to oh all living things are biology absolutely absolutely. I think I made a decision. Yeah Yeah and so thinking about where you're at today. You're the president of the long alliance and I'm a huge fan of everything your organization has going on but all of it is centered around as the name suggests the idea of the long leaf pine which is a really important in North America. Not just from a cultural perspective. But from an ecological perspective it forms such unimportant community for biodiversity of this continent. So let's talk a little bit about like history. What is the long leaf pine? And why is it? The center of your focus at the LONGLEAF alliance well lovely. Pine ecosystem played such an important role in just the southeastern United States. I mean taking it in its in its original range in. Its coverage originally This species basically occurred on around ninety million acres in the southeast from Virginia South to Florida than West to the Piney Woods Texas. So it conferred incredible range. So that's ninety million acres of that ninety million about sixty million that was dominated by Longleaf. An amazing thought to think about how much of our region was covered by this tree. Species and the ecosystem that it lives in and of course when European settlers came into this area they saw these strays and it was an obvious part of the landscape. And it's a very strong sturdy tree and that can be used for a number of different purposes for human human use so it says superior building product so we. We cut a lot of these trays to basically build the south and actually further than the south as well. The problem is is. We didn't really do as sustainably. We didn't harvest a lot of that sustainably. And so over the course of a century the long leaf basically was nearly eliminated from the southeast so from the estimated ninety million acres originally. We got down to around three million acres pine. And so that's dramatic. You hear a lot about the rainforest rainforest disappearing but you're not brought up learning out this ecosystem that was so native to this area and how it is nearly gone and so the Longleaf alliance was created in nineteen ninety five to really work at bringing back Longleaf None of us believe that will ever get to ninety million acres. There's just not enough land coverage or not enough area for long lead to be established in that amount of space anymore just because most of southeast is developed but we didn't want to see it continue to decline and so the founders of the LONGLEAF alliance Red Johnson ending gear. Dad said we need to get together. We need to bring in our partners with three commissions other nonprofits other agencies. To really try to reverse that downward trend of long leaf. And so there's been a lot of work done since nineteen ninety five. There are a lot of really great partners that we work with Across the southeast to increase acreage and and protect habitats of Longleaf.

Longleaf Alliance Longleaf Grad School Red Johnson President Trump Florida Langley Atlanta Botanical Garden United States Jones Research Center Technician Coordinator North America Georgia DAD Virginia Piney Woods Texas
Just Sitting Around Waiting for the World to End

GrowthBusters

4:06 listening | 2 weeks ago

Just Sitting Around Waiting for the World to End

"We have a really exciting guest today on the podcast. Joshua spotted and our main topic. Today is sustainable living. Not Your job or mine. Do we all get to sit on our butts and do nothing waiting for our unsustainable system to change now. I'm being a little bit snarky about it but I hope that makes my point. You know where I stand don't you? Well I'm Dave Gardner Growth Buster in chief and with me. Today I'm Erica. Areas Co host and Co producer of the growth busters podcasts for cutting edge information about our cultures unsustainable love affair with growth. And what we can do about it. Visit Growth Busters Dot Org so date before we dive into another informative episode of the Gret Busters podcast and before we introduce Joshua ahead and dig into our at box for some listener feedback. Let's do it. We've got a long but very interesting and informed email from Rob Bowman in Oregon and I'm just going to share a little bit of it which it because like I said it's long rob wrote. Hello I just listened to podcast number. Thirty five uncoupling nonsense. That episode was actually called de-coupling nonsense wasn't at Erica. Minor Correction I could send a lot of stuff and I'm in the process of developing a website. But for now you might find this interesting. I call it the fifteen criteria points of genuine meaningful sustainability. What people commonly referred to as sustainability is not truly sustainable. This appoint one. For example people will refer to sustainably harvested. Lumber lumber may be harvested in a manner that is not destructive of forest ecosystems but in order for lumber to be sustainably harvested not only would the chainsaws and logging. Trucks need to be running on something other than fossil fuels but the chainsaws and logging. Trucks would need to be manufactured using something other than fossil fuels when you consider the amount of energy required to make a large metal object like logging truck. It is clear that even Forest Stewardship Council certified. Lumber is far from sustainable. Interesting point number. Two genuine meaningful sustainability is defined by a rigorous set of criteria including but not limited to the use of non-renewable resources and the impossibility of infinite growth on a finite planet point three it therefore follows that achieving genuine meaningful sustainability is a dauntingly complex remote far-flung ideal it will be very difficult to achieve number four as difficult as it may be genuine meaningful sustainability will be achieved because to do anything less is unsustainable whatever. The human family fails to do voluntarily. We will do in voluntarily. It is possible that we will become a sustainable advanced complex civilization on the other hand dust. Blowing in. The wind is sustainable. Point five and this is the last one. I'll share here the longer we wait the longer we procrastinate delay and make excuses more wrenching and traumatic transition to sustainability will be we are squandering precious time and resources presently. We have used up approximately half of our one time. Geological allotment of fossil fuels. The remaining half will be increasingly more expensive and energy intensive to extract. We should be feverishly using the remaining half to construct the post fossil fuel infrastructure that we will need this is especially the case when considering climate change fully preparing for life without fossil fuels could take decades also. It is not at all clear. Just how everything we do with? Fossil fuels can be accomplished with wind solar and biofuels the time to begin that transition is not when fossil fuels are dwindling and the economy is collapsing.

Erica Joshua Rob Bowman Gret Busters Forest Stewardship Council Co Producer Dave Gardner Oregon
Shedding Light on Bats and Covid-19

Eyes on Conservation Podcast

8:05 listening | 2 weeks ago

Shedding Light on Bats and Covid-19

"Welcome to the is on conservation podcasts. I'm Gregory Haddock and I'm joined here with Kristin how you doing kristen. I'm doing great despite you know. Despite Dave forty four forty five forty six. I don't even count anymore. What's know what's the point now? It's a win Big Day. Quarantine. That's right five. Eighty to one hundred four. You know. There's just numbers that's the old world and we're on the new world down we are. We are so yeah. I'm excited to be here today to talk to you about one of my favorite subjects. Yes we definitely are looking forward to this conversation. I in particular now people who are listening to the show right now may not realize that. Kristen is actually directing and producing a feature length film called the invisible mammal all about the life of bats. And obviously right now. That's a really strange timing right. I don't know how you might define that. But I know for a lot of people at home hearing all these different things about bats and how they may or may not be responsible for the situation. Take it away like what's been your experience. You've had a obviously talked to a lot of different experts in this field. What's what's been the outcome of that. Basically I had big plans for twenty twenty. A lot of people had big plans. For Twenty twenty my big plans for this year all revolved around doing a lot of field work in filming the work of Bat Scientist Bat researchers across North America. You know here in California. I was going to go back to Michigan Upper Peninsula and I was probably also going to go back to Texas to film the Work of these amazing bat scientists who are stopping at nothing to find solutions to the bat pandemic of White Nose Syndrome. That has been just decimating populations across the continent east to West. North to south. Since two thousand six like I said I had plans I had shoots lined up and then incomes Karinna virus and I'm still hosting fundraising events and all of a sudden people at my fundraising events. Start asking me about corona virus and whereas that's not necessarily the focus of by film or had not been now it definitely is and because the scientists are no longer able to do any more about research out on the field. Do any research in the field right now no since April tenth the. Us government suspended all field research but on top of all of that the researchers themselves have decided voluntarily that because they don't want to use any additional P P that could be going to hospitals and healthcare workers that they themselves have been stopping. The field research during the pandemic is just safer for everybody at safer for the bats and safer for all of the healthcare workers who are trying to do their jobs right so as a result of not being able to do any filming out in the field and no fundraising events and no nothing. I decided the best thing to do. Would be to try to set up some interviews with the experts through online meeting and some guests here so tell us a little bit about them. What would you have for us today? Said the first interview is going to be with Dr Winifred Frick who is the chief scientist at Bat Conservation International and she's also an associate research professor in ecology and evolutionary biology at UC. Santa Cruz and Dr Frick is of the characters in my film the invisible mammal the connection between bats and current virus and couvert nineteen. I knew that she would be the right person to talk to to get the facts to clear up any misinformation and just to share the knowledge that she has about bats with Oliver Listeners. Will share it with us. What's your okay. Let's go thank you for joining us. My pleasure to be here. How has the coveted nineteen pandemic changed the focus of your work at Bat Conservation International? Like most people here in the United States and really over large parts of the world were sheltered in place. We're doing our part to prevent the spread of the novel current of Iris. And so you know for our work here at BCI by Conservation International. We do a lot of travel. We do a lot of field work. And so of course. We put a pause on that but the focus of our work stays essentially the same. Organization's mission is dedicated to protecting bat populations around the world and ensuring that no bats go extinct and of course the most fun parts of that job getting out into the field and working with bats directly and visiting the places where in their habitats where they need to be protected. But there's lots that we can do to protect bats from our home offices and so where everybody. Fbi is still working hard every day and doing like everybody around the world of working on our work. Life Integration of homeschooling our kids while working hard on data analysis report writing scientific publications and connecting with our partners to around the world. Making sure everybody safe and doing everything we can to protect bats and protect ourselves so most everybody around the globe is in the same situation. Our lives have just been completely changed by the colonel virus pandemic and everyone is also following the news and the connection between bats and current virus. Can you explain how scientists were able to make that connection? It's important to know that we don't yet know how the novel current virus spilled into the human population and the the pandemic that we're experiencing is caused from human to human transmission of this novel strain of Corona Virus. What we do know from pass work by some really excellent scientists who study zone attic disease so diseases that are caused from viruses that naturally occur in wildlife populations. Is that this group of Beta current viruses. Which is sort of the family of current viruses that the SARS covy to which is the technical name of the virus that's causing the CO vid pandemic cove. It is what we call the disease caused by the virus and SARS Cova to is the technical name of the virus itself more commonly called the novel Corona virus so SARS Kobe to the novel. Current virus is part of this. Beta Kerr virus family and what we know is that there are lots of different. Beta Corona viruses found in wild bat populations. It's presumed that the original strain of this. What was likely in a bat in China but how it then got from the bats into the human population is still a scientific mystery and something that people are working on. Oftentimes those spillover events happen through an intermediate host in the case of SARS which is closely related to this current virus it came through an intermediate host of civic cat which was harvested in in markets. And there's some evidence or there's been some work that suggests that perhaps penguins are working as the intermediate host in this case although that's still under active investigation and it's we just don't know yet. Exactly how the spillover event happened

Bat Conservation International Twenty Twenty Kristen United States Scientist Dr Winifred Frick Gregory Haddock Dave Santa Cruz Conservation International Michigan Upper Peninsula BCI Kristin FBI Cova Texas Oliver Listeners California
How The Coronavirus Pandemic Is Affecting Environment

Environment: NPR

7:50 listening | 2 weeks ago

How The Coronavirus Pandemic Is Affecting Environment

"Since the pandemic hit air travel in the. Us is down ninety five percent the morning rush hour. Traffic report has become a necessary. Many of you are asking what impact all this is having on the environment. So Lauren summer is with us. She covers climate change for NPR. And it's good to have you back. Lauren Hi Ari. Let's start with a question that a lot of listeners have asked this one comes from Walker in Ames Iowa the oil consumption due to know car travel and almost no air travel must be much less. Is this lack of carbon dioxide production low enough to meet the goals of the Paris accord is more than enough just to remind listeners? The goals of the Paris accord that was to keep global temperatures from going up two degrees Celsius with an aim of less than one point five degrees Celsius What's the impact of this slowdown of the global economy? Lorne yes so as you might expect. It is having effect on global carbon emissions largely because demand for oil and coal has really fallen. And this is all over not just a US right. I mean so. Scientists are starting to put out studies projecting. What would this look like by the end of the year? If activity continues you know we all stay locked down a little bit and they're coming up with maybe an eight percent drop in carbon emissions For this year now okay. That would actually be unprecedented. I know it sounds like a small number. That's bigger than the drops during the last recession or World War Two But here's the thing that is about the level scientists save. The world needs to be cutting emissions every year until twenty thirty to avoid the worst impacts of climate change. That's you know that one point five degrees Celsius that you mentioned and I think scientists are also pointing out you know shutting down. The economy is not the way to kind of reach. Those long-term emission cuts right right. These bigger and missions changes like switch to renewable energy. Okay we got a lot of questions. Also about some of the short-term environmental impacts of the pandemic. This one comes from Lois in Raleigh North Carolina. This is the most beautiful spring filled with crystal clear low humidity days here in. North Carolina is having fewer cars on the road or the factories closed affect the weather brought about the global shut down factories. Might that be affecting the weather here. I've heard a lot of people wondering about this actually clearer. It is yes in a lot of cities it's gotten cleaner you know. People are driving less in some cities. I mean car. Traffic is down. Forty fifty percents. Planes are not flying either. So that's actually helped improve local air quality But it is very important to say. The weather plays a huge role in your local air pollution. So if it rains you know it clears the air and the spring typically is not like the summer. It's not our worst season for air pollution. Other places actually though haven't really seen much of a drop because there are things like factories and refineries that are still emitting and you know trucks are still on the roads. Goods are still being delivered to stores. Right I understand you've been talking with some scientists who are studying the effect of having so few cars on the road and the well. What are they trying to understand? Exactly yeah I mean. This is a particular interest in cities that have really problematic air and in those cities you know. They have to try to figure out. What can we change to improve air quality? I mean this is actually kind of just a real world test of that one. Scientists told me that you know this would be like if in Los Angeles for example. A third of the cars on the road were switched to all electric cars. Don't burn gasoline. They get electricity and in California. A lot of that comes from solar and renewable. So it's cleaner. We have one listener. Who wants to know whether this pandemic environmental damage? Here's Valerie in Arizona. We hear a lot about the air pollution being reduced but not much about the increase fiction styrofoam especially in food service. What about the possible? Negative effects on the environment from Corona virus. That's a good point. All these restaurants that have switched to delivery or takeout. That's a lot of plastic. Yeah I think people are seeing a lot more containers. People are also seeing masks and plastic gloves kind of thrown on the grounds. I think the pandemic is affecting our efforts to reduce plastic waste For Example California. Just put a sixty day pause on its plastic bag ban and that's out of concern for frontline workers right. They're the ones that are handling people's reusable grocery bags when they bring them into the store. Starbucks also is is not refilling those reusable coffee mugs for that same reason. It's about reducing exposure and are groups. You know they've been largely supportive of these temporary measures because people's lives are on the line but I think they're keeping a close eye to make sure that these are actually temporary measures. Right and these larger initiatives to reduce plastic waste kind of comeback at some point if you have a question for NPR's Lawrence Somerset to us at NPR dot org slash national conversation or on twitter use the HASHTAG NPR conversation and our next listener question comes from Laura Intel Keaton Alaska. What effect is this virus having on? Wildlife? I'm thinking of the fact that there's less people out and about and that means there's more room for wildlife I've seen some photos of a Lotta ducks resting in a parking lot while bores and sheep walking down the street. There's a lot of this on social media. Is it just that were home more? So we see the animals more or the animals actually coming out in places that they didn't ordinarily yeah. I mean that's hard to tell right. A lot of us are kind of just looking out the window. Maybe seeing things we didn't see before but some of it is a hoax. Right on social media you know. Maybe you saw those dolphins that were. They weren't actually there. Yeah I'm sorry about that but this they're actually real effects. Scientists are trying to study. You know I spoke to one wildlife rescue center in California. That said you know right now. It's seal and sea lion pumping season. You know every year some pups are concerned because of human interference like people or maybe dogs getting too close and so they're kind of that this year they merely a reprieve for them because some beaches are closed Another really good example is Wales. There's just less shipping traffic right now. And so. The oceans are less and wheels are very sensitive to sound. It's actually Something scientists after nine eleven because there was also a drop in shipping traffic and scientists could actually measure that stress hormones in right. Whales went down during that time period. Interesting we got a question about what's happening to environmental regulations during the pandemic Mike in Portland writes to the EPA suspended environmental rules so companies. Don't have to follow them any longer. Lauren Bizarre Policy Change while everyone was focused on the disease. Yeah in in March the EPA announced that it would not be finding companies if they failed to report their pollution data during the pandemic so an example of this might be that a refinery is reporting. It's air emissions to make sure that they're complying with Federal Clean Air Laws. The agency said that this needed to happen. Because the pandemic is making it harder for staff to collect the safety data and and do social distancing at the same time environmental groups really push back quite strongly. They felt this was too broad. It sent a message to industries. That maybe they would have the freedom to break environmental laws if no one was really checking during this time period just on our final moments so many of the changes were talking about depend on social distancing when the economy returns to something like normal are the gains. We've seen going to be reversed right so we all are starting to get back in our cars and fly. Go back to work industries ramping. Up You expect these of short-term Games are going to go away. I think there's some hope that the behavioral change though like maybe we'll all work from home it's possible. Npr Science correspondent Lawrence Summer. Thanks for answering these questions tonight. Thanks

California NPR Lauren Summer Paris EPA United States Raleigh North Carolina Iowa North Carolina Walker Starbucks Los Angeles
Wolf Girl

PODSHIP EARTH

6:33 listening | 3 weeks ago

Wolf Girl

"Can be challenging. It was for everyone around me. I was your garden variety. Rebel with DOC MARTIN'S A chip on my shoulder and love for mischief. It wasn't till I ended up on a farm in Vermont that they understood my context to the rest of the world and it took me being immersed in nature to comprehend my relationship to other people and to the universe for every team listening today. I feel your pain being cooped up at home and for every parent okay. Give a teen right now. I have the same advice trying to escape. Even if it's for quick breath of fresh at this week I talked to Doniger Martha God who at fifteen left a note for her mom that she was taking off for the entire summer and back in the full that hitchhiking adventure was only the beginning of a quest that led Doniger to tracking wolves in Alaska. Doniger now runs a regenerative farm in California with family and is the author of dawn again tracking. The wisdom of the wild and the just released book will fail. Finding myself in the wild doniger has also featured in the upcoming movie. Kiss THE GROUND. I catch up with mismarked God to hear her amazing story firsthand. Donga where are you right now? I am in. Half Moon Bay California on our home ranch and It's right right on the coast in between San Francisco and Santa Cruz and it must be. I mean it's a stunning beautiful day. Must feel very kind of remote and isolated from the rest of civilization. Yeah on the ranch and out in nature it's just spring is in full bloom right now. The wild flowers are incredible. The Morning Birdsong. And it feels like when we're out here. There's a huge celebration of life and considering the Horrific things that the world is going through I feel that nature's very resilient and we will make it through this and the journey that brought you to this place is amazing it starts with you in Snoqualmie up and beautiful pot of Washington state in the cascades falling off a horse. Tell us about that experience. It was during a time when I began to question my role in life. Those teenage years where You're beginning to rebel and figure out your own identity and Where you WanNa go with your life and it just sort of woke me up and so I was thrown off my horse when I was getting ready to compete and I was knocked unconscious. And there's this whole segment of my life that I can't recall and during that time I had this experience where I was out of my body looking down at my body in the hospital bed and feeling just this incredible piece and seeing the beauty around me in this sort of alternate reality and after I had that experience things really changed for me and it was during that time that I started noticing more. And maybe these things are all around me. But I started noticing more life that was abundant around me but would also come about show itself in certain times and that were. I couldn't describe it other than synchronicity than just decided to go and he wrote this note deal. Mom saying mom. Don't worry about me. I'll be alright. I'll be back before school starts love Doniger and you just hit it off your sister and a friend had of that occurred you at the time to just feel like I gotta get out of here at felt like wow. This was an opportunity to go on an adventure and do something other than what were sort of programmed to do which is go to school. Get a degree get a job. Enter into the workforce and at that time that wasn't my passions were not being ignited So I was looking for a way for my passions to be ignited and also just to figure out what was out there in the world and it was a very rebellious thing to do and I hope my kids never do that but it showed me a lot of things that were not very positive it could have been really detrimental to my to my future and I'm just thankful I must have had some someone watching over me that I made it safe through putting myself into dangerous situations. I mean I feel very comfortable putting myself in to survival experiences in nature and other things in nature however when it comes to humans I have lost. My trust sounded really exciting. And you know doing things like dumpster diving for all the food you needed but at the same time you assaulted. They really wanted to share that part of my journey because in particular. There's so many young adults out there. Teenagers that go down a really dark path and they their form of rebellion might be sex or drugs and I wanted to share that. That's not always The smart thing to do. And there's other ways that you can feel what it is you're searching for and you can experience life without putting yourself in those types of experiences and doing the things to your body that could be irreversible

Doniger Martha God Doniger Doc Martin Vermont Half Moon Bay California Alaska Snoqualmie San Francisco Santa Cruz California Washington
Though Closed To The Public, Bryce Canyon Still Teems With Life

Environment: NPR

3:17 listening | 3 weeks ago

Though Closed To The Public, Bryce Canyon Still Teems With Life

"We're going to spend a few minutes now in Bryce Canyon National Park that's in Utah. At typically visitors flocked there this time of year as winter melts into spring but Bryce Lake other national parks is closed due to cove in nineteen. So we got in touch with Park Ranger. Peter Dennis Moore. He is Visual Information. Specialist at Bryce sharing photos videos of the parks deep red canyons and towering rocky. Who's on social media? But we asked him what the park sounds like right now. Without the home of hikers tourists spring comes late here at eight thousand feet. Were still kind of in what feels like the tail end of winter. Not Quite sure whether or not to start fully celebrating spring or to be braced for a snowstorm. We're coming into the breeding season and so the birds are coming in with beautiful plumage as well as their most complex songs. I'm personally waiting for the humming birds to return once they've returned to the park. It's safe to begin really celebrating. Spring and Summertime Utah Prairie Dog. They make quite a lot of sound to and often what we're hearing from them. Are these keeping squeaks. Often of their alarm calls take the time to observe these colonies. Find your attention drawn to things that you might not have noticed that the cradock certainly maybe coyote Red Fox or a Golden Eagle or some other rafter above visitation is usually on its way up spring break beginning in March usually signals unofficial beginning to our season. It's surreal to have visitors here and understanding the history of the National Park Service in our national parks. I've found that you can't ignore the fact that their existence has been so dependent on often individuals. You know that were transformed by these landscapes to the point that they engaged in advocacy for them or or made other remarkable acts on their behalf. That without which you know we might not even have them as national parks today. Being outdoors is really just provided a sense of stability in uncertain times. I actually feel kind of unique pressure to step up to this moment and try to provide people a window into this place thinking about a Mary. Oliver quote that the world's otherness is antidote to confusion. And standing in that other nece can re dignify a worse stung hard. That's Peter Dinsmore ranger at the currently closed Bryce Canyon National Park in Utah.

Bryce Canyon National Park Summertime Utah Prairie Dog Park Ranger National Park Service Utah Bryce Lake Peter Dennis Moore Peter Dinsmore Oliver
'Why We Swim' Looks For Answers In People And Places Across The Globe

Environment: NPR

5:21 listening | Last month

'Why We Swim' Looks For Answers In People And Places Across The Globe

"And humans came from. Dust says ECCLESIASTES DIS but Bonnie Sui us that humankind also wants sprang from end still seeks. Water why we swim is her latest book which Texas from Ponds Pools to surfers racers and a few who have survived icy currents Bonnie Soy who writes frequently for the New York Times in California Sunday magazine. Join just for more home in Berkeley California. Thanks so much for being with us. Thanks so much for having me Scott. You begin with an amazing story about a man whose name I will not chance to even try and say March Eleven nineteen eighty-four what happened on this planet. Good Liquor Thorson. He's an Icelandic fishermen and fishing trawler with his crew. It's calm waters it's cold it's forty one degrees and the boat overturns with forty one degree water within twenty to thirty minutes we die from hypothermia but he did not everyone else did and he ended up swimming six hours and when he finally got to the hospital the doctors weren't able to discern his heartbeat or read his temperature on the thermometer but he didn't show any signs of hypothermia and he was only a little bit dehydrated. He was a strong swimmer certainly but was he also saved by his own biology. He was like the story very much. Because it is this the distillation of what makes swimming so special for humans. We have to learn how to swim. we're not born knowing how to do it instinctively and yet there are sort of traces of that evolutionary past still within us that our evolutionary past that came from the sea and so with good liquor for. Thorson turns out that his body fat was two to three times normal human thickness and more solid and so he resembled a Marine Mammal. More than terrestrial mammal. And that saved him. Did you grow up feeling? Pull into the even. If it was only Jones Beach in New York I did. I mean my family origin story is at my parents met no swimming pool in Hong Kong. We grew up with swimming family and so we grew up at Jones beach in the pool. Lifeguards swim team. I just always remember feeling more comfortable and happy in the water actually than on land. I mean there's just a sense of magic that you get from being in the water and buoyancy that you just don't have on land you in this book talk to swimmers all over the world right nearby you though you you swim San Francisco Bay without a wet suit and there are people including I gather you who believe that's actually good for you in all ways it can be. I mean I have also talked to scientists and researchers who say cardiovascular risk. Don't go into sudden shock cold water because it could stop your heart that aside a wr decided there are benefits to cold water immersion. And there's been quite a bit of research in recent years where your dopamine levels go up in your over time that your cardiovascular system is strengthened and you know there are people there are things that we knew from across cultures around the world that there was a water cure there. Was you know jumping in cold? Water was good for you and jumping in hot water and then jumping into cold water and so we didn't know why exactly in the science kinda starting to catch up. What is this Brown fat you talk about in this book. Well this was really interesting. I did not know about Brown fat until I started swimming with a Dolphin Club swimmers in San Francisco Bay and so I went to ucsf to talk to the foremost researchers in Brown fat and it turns out that mammals are born with two kinds of white fat which we all know about the energy stores of our bodies and Brown fat which actually Burns and produces heat energy. We kind of start to lose it as we get older but there are ways to do what's called the Browning of white fat which is to kind of turn it into energy burning tissue. That fat is called Beige Fat. And so what? Kind of encourages. The development of beige fat is cold water exposure and exercise among other things. But those have been proven to be causing this change in our bodies. Wonder if you have any words for people who aren't able to swim these days you know. The water is a draw for us no matter what and so even if you can't get in the water if you can walk near it can look at. It can see it can You know have some what a wall Nichols calls domestic waters in your house and you know. Take about the shower. Just look at imagery watches surf movie. I mean those things. Make a difference for our souls and our the way our bodies and brains work. Click we respond to those set points in the environment and even if we can't get in the waters right now you know the ocean will be waiting for us. The pools we waiting for us on the other side of this Bonnie Choi. Her book why we swim she in the Water

Thorson Bonnie Sui San Francisco Bay Jones Beach Berkeley California Bonnie Soy Bonnie Choi Ponds Pools New York Times Hypothermia Texas Hong Kong Scott Dopamine Brown California Sunday Magazine New York Nichols Ucsf
In Other News...

The Sustainable Futures Report

9:09 listening | Last month

In Other News...

"This week. I bring you a of stories that you may have missed stories that I found in the Guardian on the BBC at medium dot com the hill dot com from the ethical cooperation and via Google alerts among other sources. Let's start with nuclear news. Nuclear Engineering International Reports. That the new plant flaw veal in northern. France is now scheduled to start operation in twenty twenty. Four this is twelve years later than the original target date hate for operation of the reactor as well as being late. The plant is significantly overrun. It's budgeted costs one of the most serious ongoing problems as being the detection of faulty welds in the reactor vessel leading to costly and time-consuming remedial work to react to a Silla design are currently under construction at Hank Hank appointed appointed Somerset. Somerset. Uk. Uk. This plant was due to begin production in twenty seventeen but is now scheduled for twenty twenty

Hank Hank Somerset Nuclear Engineering Internatio Twenty Twenty UK Google BBC France
How a drop in oil prices today could fuel tomorrow's energy transition

Climate Cast

3:58 listening | Last month

How a drop in oil prices today could fuel tomorrow's energy transition

"Oil prices take a roller coaster. Ride I'm NPR. Chief meteorologist Paul Hotter here with climate. Castor oil prices fell below zero this week as much of the world shelters in place but the pandemic may also feel a six percent drop in greenhouse gas emissions. This year that's the biggest drop emissions since World War Two. So what does it mean for greenhouse gas emissions and energy as we rebuild the global economy marketplace correspondent Scott? Tong focuses on climate and Energy Scott. Welcome to climate cast. Paul needs to be with you so oil prices dipped into negative territory this week and then they spiked again. Put this into perspective. What's going on with the oil market so demand for the world's oil which until now had been kind of steady by one hundred million barrels of oil every day worldwide. That's fallen by thirty percent and now markets are Kinda flipping out trying to adjust to this whatever you call it. This pandemic normal were in now. Scott the lack of oil demand is also translating into a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions the world meteorological organization now predicts a greenhouse gas emissions will be down about six percent this year and the UN estimates global emissions must fall by around seven and a half percent every year from now until twenty thirty to stay within that one point five degrees Celsius goal on global temperature rise. How can we keep some of these emissions cuts and get the economy working again? I think there are opportunities in. There are also some challenges here. We've lost one in twenty million jobs you know. That's about one. Out of eight of us in the workforce so something has to change but the opportunity is to lock in some telecommute. You know we've learned that a lot of us can do most of our jobs Without having to commute to work there also might be an opportunity as far as our use of oil in the market right now. A lot of oil companies are in tough shape and so they're not investing in finding more oil. So what happens down? The road is if they don't find as much in demand comes back then. The kind of won't be enough in prices are GONNA go up. Then that makes it more affordable to find cheaper greener option. Say to buy electric vehicles and that kind of thing. I understand that if you shut off a well it's not easy to bring back on. Can that push markets in a cleaner greener direction right now in the oilfields of West Texas? They don't make money at the price where it is now. And so those wells are shutting down and a lot of other places that's happening to and for the older oil wells right. They need pressure from underground bringing oil. Backup and if you turn it off. In some cases it doesn't turn back on if oil. Some of that oil has to stay in the ground. Then we kind of have a scenario like Europe right where we're gasoline is just expensive by policy and in places where gasoline at tends to be more expensive greener options become much more affordable and we've seen renewable energy jobs booming. We know that climate solutions can produce jobs. Of course now. We see the oil sector jobs in kind of a bus cycle. So are we likely to see more job shocks and transitions going forward? As our energy balance changes we've seen a lot of oil jobs disappear already. I've done some reporting long distance reporting talking folks in the Permian Basin in West Texas where there had been a lot of energy jobs in those drying up pretty quickly so there are going to be winners and losers in every kind of transition for sure. The job search going to migrate to the industry's tomorrow. Marketplace correspondent Scott Tong. Thanks for sharing your perspective on climate cast today. Of Course Ball. Nice to be with you. That's climate cast. I'm NPR chief meteorologist Paul.

Scott Tong Paul Hotter Chief Meteorologist NPR West Texas Europe UN Permian Basin
Youth-led Earth Day strikes go digital

Climate Connections

1:12 listening | Last month

Youth-led Earth Day strikes go digital

"Eighteen year. Old Shia best eater grew up in a small town outside Mexico City where she saw the effects of both drought and flooding. Then when she was thirteen she moved to New York City and learned about the damage hurricane. Sandy caused there. She realized global warming affects communities all around the world and felt driven to do something about it. When I saw the first global strike being called my school and I got six hundred kits to walk out with me. I thought that would work with me. She says it helped her realize how many other young people are worried and ready. Act since then. She's helped organized weekly youth climate strikes across the city now because of the corona virus youth activists have taken their actions online along plan Earth Day. Strike is being held. Digitally with online teaches virtual gatherings and social media campaigns. Whether young people are on the streets or in cyberspace best data says they bring a sense of energy and optimism to the climate movement. Now no way in which you are naive about the situation we are in but just truly believing that when we come together we can change the world

Sandy New York City Mexico City
Paul Ehrlich - Uncensored on Earth Day 50th Anniversary

GrowthBusters

8:08 listening | Last month

Paul Ehrlich - Uncensored on Earth Day 50th Anniversary

"This is the growth busters. Podcast about sustainable living. We are deep into overshoot. So we're busy trying to save the planet. If we succeed with your help maybe there'll be something left for the next generation and the one after that. Sometimes we talk about simple things we can all do in our daily lives to shrink our footprint. Sometimes we dig into deep heavy duty subjects like it's been fifty years since the first Earth Day. What the happened. I'm Dave Gardner. One of your guides on this journey to sustainability and I'm Eric Areas Co host and Co producer of the growth busters podcast for cutting edge information about our cultures unsustainable love affair with growth. And what we can do about it. Visit GROWTH BUSTERS DOT ORG. The special day episode is really extra special because we are joined by. Stanford biologist. Dr Paul Ehrlich the man who launched me on this path of planet saving. But before we talk to Paul. I have a couple of quick bits of News Erica. We also want to do a quick follow up on her last episode forty to the silver lining of Kobe induced recession with Brian. Check Executive Director of the Center for the advancement of the steady state economy. We discussed how reduced economic activity like we're having now during. The Corona virus lockdown is actually a step in the right direction for preservation of her life. Supporting Ecosystems will since we published that episode. Erica to interesting. Commentaries have been published. That are quite relevant. Maybe even read it. We should talk about briefly but try to keep this pretty quick. Because we know everybody's waiting to hear from Dr Paul Erlich. There's one that I hesitate to even mention. I really hate to give it any oxygen. It was called. Beware the left's De Growth Movement and it was written by Stephen Moore. He's got a syndicated column which is a tragedy in itself green and that name may ring a bell to you. Stephen Moore was floated for a while as potential fed position. Donald Trump wanted Stephen Moore but the guy just looked qualifications and eventually they had to pull his name basically works for these think. Tanks that are propaganda machines for growth pushers and growth profiteers. So this piece. Beware the Left de Growth Movement by Stephen Moore. We just want Issue a warning about I guess and you know what I remember. Erica evening that I I read that. I sent you an email with a link to that and boy. I got your attention. If you know growl when I get mad and this article definitely deserved a few girls from me. I found it hilarious. How Stephen Moore? Who is supposed to be? You know sort of a big deal out there in his area. I thought it was really funny that he refers to the growth movement as sort of this chic fad as if environmental protection which is the quintessential of the De Growth Movement. Somehow became fashionable. Sure let's go ahead and talk about how sexy climate changes and all the catastrophe that's happening because of the climate change. Let's go ahead and talk about how sexy that as people started carrying about the planet a longtime ago when it became apparent that there's an everybody else's health and social wellbeing are actually dependent on the planet's ability to support kind of water is all about in fact because that was kind of the peak of environmental care little. Did people know back in nineteen seventy that. It was peeking. They thought it was just beginning and we should talk about that a little bit so we will include Lincoln the show notes to this piece of garbage. And if you do go and read it be sure to scroll down and read the notes because there are some good notes in effect. Brian Check. Who was our guest on the last episode about the silver lining of the coveted induced recession? Rebrand check wrote a comment to that piece that made a very good rebuttal and it didn't take him long because the truth is this thing is just full of unsubstantiated generalizations. Wouldn't you say Erica? But there's hope because we got the antidote and shortly after sent you the link to that I sent you a link to this really amazing and wonderful essay that we cannot recommend to highly. We're GONNA definitely put the link in the show notes and all whatever I can do to star in highlight it and bring it to your attention will and we have to sell it because it's I don't know it takes a little while to read a little bit a time. Rating that myself. It's titled the end of Economic Growth by going to butcher those SAR Mitijda sub Ramadan survey on an Subramanian. Somebody awesome somebody. I'm GonNa Start Worshiping so a shout out to you. Sobre Mista and forgiveness for butchering your name. But boy we love you in your work and this is actually going to be in the May print issue of mcleans which is a big magazine in Canada but they posted at mcleans dot ca on April fifteenth. And we will put a link in the show notes so online. It's called the end of the economic growth and imprint. The headline is the death of growth. I think we've kind of already obscene. That disasters have a way of slowing climate. Change not to mention slowing down economy and when we also start to see oil prices decline and suddenly there's no more funds available to invest in all these green technologies that all of our techno enthusiasts friends have been raving about. What do we do what we left with? Is Technology still going to save? The world is at saving the world right. Now it's kind of a really scary time that I hope. More people are starting to question whether that is going to be the fix for everything going forward and another positive thing. I took from. This article was just hope for the future where people begin to see how one person's or even just a group of people's misfortune collective misfortune affects all of us economically health wise a now more than ever those most vulnerable to climate and deuce catastrophe while this might seem like it's such a faraway problem and that doesn't directly affect us. I hope that we're starting to see that it really does. It really does. And it's only a matter of time before it does directly affect us. I think what excites me? Most about this is. This is a really Almost like a little mini course for for people with short attention span. Or if you don't have the time or you can't find a good semester long college course in real economics that understands that the economy is a subset of the Environment. This is a good primer. She talks about polar limits to growth Vaclav smell than I think. One of the most important things in here is this notion. And apparently more and more economists and other smart people are starting to talk about the fact that you know what comic growth is slowing down. And maybe that's just a normal part of the process. Maybe that's a sign of a a mature economy. In fact a she mentions a book called fully grown. Why stagnant economy is a sign of success. Imagine that I mean this is blasphemy to somebody like Stephen Moore. But this is intelligent. This isn't full of unsubstantiated generalizations. This is a really good piece. That's required reading. So if you're a little bit new to the idea that pursuit of robust economic growth is a suicide mission. This'll be a good primer for you if you've been following along with what we've been talking about for years now and this isn't a new idea to you. This is something you can share with somebody who might be rational enough and open minded enough that you can say that's what I'm talking about.

Stephen Moore Erica De Growth Movement Brian Check Dr Paul Ehrlich Dr Paul Erlich Dave Gardner Eric Areas Co Stanford Kobe Co Producer Donald Trump Paul FED Executive Director Canada Lincoln