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Can Men Express Emotion

Say What Needs Saying

05:47 min | 1 d ago

Can Men Express Emotion

"Back to say what needs sank. Zach now brandon and today. We are here with ben and jason from the threads. Podcast life unfiltered ben jason. Thanks for joining us guys. Thanks for the opportunity us. Thank you so much. This is kind of weird for us because usually wearing your seat and we're in viewing the guests we just got done with the podcast legit. I'm gonna tell you right now. Legit i cried because the lady prayed for us. We're we're christians and churches been shitty right now because of covid and i don't know it was amazing like literally five minutes ago ben in our bolts gearing up or like holy shit. We got a report on somebody. Else's i know and ben ben has ever been on anyone else's podcasts. Have you yes. Oh you have who eric sane. I'll that one doesn't count. He was he we were. We were on his show as paid sponsor through. That's right but anyways i've been on a few shows But never been in is duo. So i'm excited for this here. For the dynamic duo experience yes you got it so so yeah we. We've been recently. We've been bringing on some podcasters to to talk about issues that are important to them to say what needs saying to talk about the things that are often ignored in not talked about. So we we want to bring this platform to people where people feel comfortable talking about whatever it is that they need to say and not feel afraid of being condemned for their thoughts or their views or what they are deciding to talk about. You know things like that and so we get into some of these sensitive subjects and source objects. That people don't like talking about so. I want you guys to kind of bring us into speed immigrants. So what we're going to be focusing on. Today's men suck taking care of their mental health. A let it slide. And they look after their families if they're married or they look after their significant others or whatever the case may be men for whatever reason by nature are horrible when it comes to taking care of their mental health. And what do i mean by mental health. I would say the thoughts that go on in their head about who they are what their role is in the world That they may be carrying around with them. Perhaps there's even some depression all these things. Doubts fears anxieties tuition. We live in a world. That's that men are just supposed to suck it up and show up and make it happen and never deal with that stuff. And i'm fed up about it. You know yeah. I completely agree. I mean there's so many times where these the my community. I hear a lot of people say you know. Just people like people express their you know their perspective as means now and i saw one. That says a personal say. I'm good until they're in a dark place a depression. But are you are you okay. I'm good no matter what it is you know. You said you're not supposed to be crying. Your man are you out of your mind. What type of hostile. What level of hostility mrs harbor. Or you know what level of detriment comes from harboring this level of emotional expressionist being. What's your jason. Yeah i mean. I have to. You know i saw brandon. Real quick and brandon is black. And so i know in the black community. Mental health is worse in the community. So that being said. I'm kind of flip the question on you. Have you experienced that a little bit member. We're we're fellow podcast sir. So we're gonna flip it and you experienced that kind in. Do you feel like it's like that and in the black community. I'll give you this. I recently because this valentine's day coming up this sunday. yup. I saw post that Why are men now. This is from the communities from other african americans or other black they said why are men nachos yvonne times day is for women and i quote that this gay that is specifically for women and that term alienates any feminine or even you know quote unquote especially your insider liking hours of wanting chocolate or one. You can care for wanting a gift on the day. They express his love for a couple chastised to have this. Like you know. I'm about to get a gift for the first time from ivonne signs. They should i not. Should you take more money in the flowers back. There's always the joke to the serious side of really such a pivotal point because it affects. How people even correlate love and responsibility to their kids and to their why into their spouse and men not even being emotionally available for me to be you know. Do they even get so point of marriage or are they even able to sustain a real relationship with their kids so you can follow us really. Show love to the show. A love should look like you know what i mean. I think. I think they can show love to their daughters. They struggled showing love to their son's. Yes just because all. You're a man your boy. You're not so sure. Show those feelings going back to the gift of valentine's i mean yeah. Do i want flowers for my wife. I wouldn't be like oh this. Is you know you had said like. Oh this is gay which is bad to say anyways. But i wouldn't say that. I wouldn't be like oh that's weird but it wouldn't be like uncomfortable for me.

Ben Jason Ben Ben Brandon BEN Jason Zach Mrs Harbor Depression Eric Yvonne Times Valentine Ivonne
How the pandemic is impacting Bay Area small businesses

Voices of the Community

05:16 min | Last week

How the pandemic is impacting Bay Area small businesses

"This episode is part of our series exploring covid nineteen impact on nonprofits and small businesses in the san francisco bay area back in april of twenty twenty when we decided to create this ongoing series on covid nineteen impact i or nonprofits and then on small businesses in the san francisco bay area. We like you had no idea how long the pandemic would go on. And what the health and economic impact would be in our community going into twenty twenty one. The pandemic is now killing more people shutting down more nonprofits and small businesses on with wiping out the livelihoods of families neighborhoods and communities. We will continue to shine a spotlight on the nonprofits and small businesses that make up the fabric of our community along with the founders and staff who are struggling to deal with the impact of the covid nineteen pandemic on their operations services is an ability until we can all get to the other side of the pandemic along the way we will also share with you all the amazing solutions that are nonprofits. Small businesses foundations and government leaders are working on to help us all get to the other side of the pandemic and come together to rebuild our communities with more economic social and environmental equality. What is very clear is that business owners are challenged right now in a way they never have been you know open close and indoors outdoors. You know p p what is it. What do i do with it. Who do i give it to so many challenges right now and our goal is to really help is many of these small businesses weather this storm so to speak as best we can and for that reason i like to encourage businesses to reach out to us especially work with a business advisor. This is the district director of the small business. Administration's san francisco district office julie. Cows over these ten plus months we have been sharing the voices of small businesses and covert nineteen s- devastating impact on their survival with the latest round of federal funds now being deployed we wondered host julie to help guide our listeners through the funding opportunities available to both nonprofits in small businesses. I'm joined remotely via zoom by julie. Cows the district director of the small business. Administration's san francisco district office. Thank you for being here. Julie thank you for the invitation. The sba is one of those government departments that for a lot of people. See it as a black box where it's going to require all these forms all this information i don't have so i think it would really be helpful if you could provide a background on the sba here in san francisco. That's the district to manage and how you work with small businesses and really now nonprofits. Absolutely i do think. There's a lot of preconceived notions about who. Spa is what they do and who we help. But we are a federal agency where an independent agency and our mission is to help. Businesses start and grow and continue to prosper. And we do that. Offering a variety of programs and services can kinda break those into four buckets as an easy way to talk about it. A so there's the access to capital bucket. Which may be where most known for but we actually have programs that go from microfinancing loans of fifty thousand dollars or less all the way on up through venture capital and then our bread and butter program kind of is our loan guarantee program which is loans through commercial lenders up to five million but we also have government contracting assistance so we help with federal certifications. We actually work behind the scenes with other agencies trying to get them to utilize small businesses as their contractors so we do a lot to help small businesses kind of break into federal contracting and be successful the third bucket we have is business advising free business counseling and low no cost training and honestly. I think this is probably the most invaluable service. Sba offers so through our network of grants resource providers. You may have heard small business development center score women business centres anna veteran business outreach center we provide free business advising and especially in this challenging times right now. This is an invaluable resource for businesses. You will never be charged for the advising services and you can talk about any issue that you have that's pressing or if you wanna strategize with somebody look at them as a visor to help you think about your future and how you weather the rest of this cova pandemic and then the fourth bucket which is kind of been a theme for the last year is our disaster assistance program. We typically will go in on declared disasters in provide financial support loans support to cover uninsured losses and to help with economic injury for small businesses and nonprofits that has now become kind of the focal point of the assistance. The covid recovery assistance for small businesses in nonprofits so as a district office. We're here to kind of administer. Some of these programs do some oversight but really warrant at grassroots level of sba engage with the community engage with our small businesses. And make sure that they are tapped into the resources that can benefit their business

San Francisco Bay Julie San Francisco SBA Anna Veteran Business Outreach
How can we learn to embrace boredom?

The Big Story

06:17 min | 1 d ago

How can we learn to embrace boredom?

"Jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story mark. Hawkins is a counselor and the author of a book called the power of boredom. Hello mark how're you doing. Honestly i'm bored. I feel like i've been board for months. What have you been with your boredom over the past eight months. And what have we been doing in general during this time I find myself definitely reading a lot more. Certainly i have not been able to do all titties especially social activities and going to restaurants and so I've tried to do nothing at all sometimes But also doing what. I like to call a low engagement activities like You know reading or you know sitting on the couch and you know this chilling out and try not to give into sort of my restless urge to go in and do something whether it is you know go eat or you know maybe go have a drink or or something like that something along those lines. Let me ask you this when you say you try to. Just sit on the couch What do you do when you sit on the couch watching tv or you on your phone laptop well not to watch tv like if my purpose is to sit there and and do nothing. That's what i tried to do You know maybe. I will just to kind of sit there and just be there as long as i can. Sometimes you know. I have a pretty good view from where i live so i think it is a bit easier to stay out the window. Sometimes they do that But i just tried to be as a little engaged as possible and you know it's not always easy for me like i think that it is a. It's a process that i'm still learning to be more comfortable with boredom and learning more about how it affects me. Well let's start. I guess where your book starts. It's a term that we throw around all the time especially during long months of lockdown but what is boredom well boredom. It's really hard to pin down. Really because it i mean i call it an emotion but you could also call it you know a mood or a state of the human condition. Really what it is is. It's the lack of anything to do. It's the lack of finding something worthwhile to do with our time or something that we deem as important or that engages our minds and so in some ways it's an emotion because you know we're feeling it and think oftentimes it appears as a restlessness But it's also like a more sort of It's a mood right in the sense that it's a way that we are experiencing the world. There is a great quote. I think in the book. Where is everything around us. Seem to be drained of its meaning. It's not that we're board but everything around us has lost. Its purpose to us has lost. Its shininess. It's newness right and then it doesn't engage us any longer. See that i bet. Many people who are listening can identify with that feeling a lot things around our home that we use to you know look forward to getting home and enjoying or spending time with now just surround us twenty four seven and they no longer feel like. We should look forward to doing you know. Yeah i was really interested in. Why is it that when we have nothing to do. Why is it that we feel this. Need to go into something. And i thought that really spoke to something strange about the human condition in general. And that's that's where i'm coming from is i'm a student of the human condition you know. It did. My counseling degree In meaning and purpose and then phd also related to to meaning and purpose and along the way of doing that research. I discover that is very much related to boredom. And as i was doing all my research i came to the point that it seems that movement in some form. Another whether it's physical or psychological. Is something absolutely necessary for us as humans. And actually if you look around the world everything moves. Everything is always in flux and then obviously the contrast of that is boredom right so in some ways. We're meant to be moving all the time. And it's really you know if you think about it. Our our hunter gatherer ancestors if they didn't move all the time whether it was hunting forging making spears or whatever it might be they would have died and so it's almost a survival instinct to keep moving forward yet today. I think we're in such a state that we're going way too fast so we need to rein it in a little bit just like we're meant to eat. You know certainly meant to eat every single day. But we're not meant to eat. You know ten thousand calories. And i think that's where we are today is that were meant to move. But we're just not meant move and as fast as we are and so that's why it has become so uncomfortable for us to board and proud to why we need to be more board and really listen to what's going on in that space when you talk about our need to move and the fact that we're moving more and faster than ever before let's leave the pandemic for a second. We'll definitely talk about that. You're not necessarily talking about physical movement right. yes exactly you know. I think like animals. Obviously you know. They're always physically engaged but humans justice psychologically engaged. I think it's just as as needed for us right. Yes diving into something that engages our minds so so given that then Shouldn't the past twelve months have been really good for us in some way that to give us a chance to to slow down and not have Places to go and people to see all the time yet know for sure. I think it has been a good opportunity. But i think the problem is. Is that you kind of have to be a student of boredom to actually take advantage of it right and most people came into the pandemic with the attitude that most of us had for most of our lives. Which is it is a bad thing that needs to be avoided so therefore a lot of us just filled it up with something different right and maybe that's a good thing. we discovered new things that we enjoyed. And there's nothing wrong with

Jordan Heath Rawlings Hawkins
Over The Dystopia

Sidewalk Ghosts

06:05 min | 2 weeks ago

Over The Dystopia

"More big fan of science fiction right and who's happened and science fiction has is not about the future. It's about the now through different lens. And i get very frustrated with a lot of distance stories. You know the stories that are bout was miserable. The end times it's going to be this So when i look at the world. I see a lot of problems. You see a lot of harshness. Souci lot of this union and and disorder in distress. And and i thought often about the fact we don't have community places to have real exchanges and i've insert myself into those into those conversations. You know where. I don't agree with what they're saying. But i try to find ways sometimes to to sort of say. Hey i here. You're saying book. Let's actually have a dialogue about. Let's let's find some commonality and so far. I've walked away generally unscathed you know. There's there's usually resistance what are you doing. Why bother me but if you approach it the right way you actually find. Maybe not agreement at the dinner. You haven't swayed somebody else over but you've actually found a place to have a conversation and maybe you're nodding your head a little bit about what they're saying and maybe they're actually nodding in return which we don't get otherwise we've lost so many of these and replace them with memes and news feeds and mistakenly think that those actually activate that commonality at first impression of his resume it can be assumed. He's a man driven by list of temporal accomplishments. Yet as he shares of who he is and as we take the chapters of his introduction. It's easy to see the humility that resides within him with the mind that but what's to come thinker. He not only ponders of the world in which we're living but imagines the world where walking into he recalls. Simple moment years ago when i work more directly and in comic books and and i would get invited to stores signings autograph sessions instead of things and i got invited to this one in west texas think it was west texas this texas definitely somewhere texas big place and and you know was all full of myself and went to the store and nobody showed. Nobody like nobody cared. That i was there so i sat there for hours. Stacks of whatever it was assigned except for this one. Kit showed up and young. He had a couple of stories and maybe illustrations he had done. And i had nothing else to do so i just talked to the kid. Most of the day gave him pointers joked with them. This that and the other thing didn't think twice about it. And i had a driver that day because it was so far away west texas. The driver was sitting there that whole time. And we got back in the car at the end of the day and the driver turned to me. And i wasn't thinking about any of this and he said that kid will never forget this day for the rest of his life and as a pretty talking about you know he was making the point the fact i had given that kid attention and encouraged his doing but i had an intended. It wasn't like i was leaning into it but sometimes it's those at those things that maybe are just small gestures. You don't even think about but they they can make a hopefully they do make an impotent and they add up over time as opposed to well. I'm gonna do this big thing and speak programs big. Whenever baby steps and commonality he suggests speaks of how small or large the wakes of even our smallest gestures can radiate asks us to not get so caught up in our own accomplishments disappointments that we don't take time to truly see those around us. Perhaps he is gently challenging us giving us reason to look over the walls of a plausible dystopia future and as he does he releases. Each of us sincerely consider the links that bind us. I think that there's an inherent need for connection. And you owe it to yourself to discover that and if you can do that on your own through introspection or finding a philosophy finding a faith some type of therapy. If that's what's necessary cracked the code on yourself at no matter what point or stage you on your life. Well i'm fifty. whatever. I'm i'm past the point of doing that or i'm twenty. I'll still figure it out on my own home. Take the time to figure it out. You owe it to yourself and it's okay to be selfish in that way being separate is not worth it. Yes he has achieved a degree of success yet. When he speaks of his priorities he mentions no quest for wealth even admits his work is secondary to what he feels most important simply. His role was a loving father as a caring husband as a good friend and as a contributing citizen to this world in which we share so it is as we take a pause to absorb the voice of today's stranger. Now friend dan. My we open our hearts minds and actions pass any barriers. That just might be of our own making back to dan. I would say ask the person next to you. What matters to the most because when you understand that about somebody else you see yourself more clearly and then you. You understand them better. I think if we understand that and the answer is honest if we listen we truly listen. Go beyond the go beyond. I can't understand that now. There are all these factors these burdens that we carry. And it's hard to think about the other and not just within yourself. And i think every one of us can find something relatable and that's what we should aspire to

West Texas Texas DAN
How the San Francisco Comunity Music Center is thriving in the pandemic

Voices of the Community

07:16 min | 2 weeks ago

How the San Francisco Comunity Music Center is thriving in the pandemic

"Of our counters died from complications due to hiv and aids. I'm the remaining survivor. There are many who supported a stirring that time but having navigated losing dancers choreographers audience members weekly similar to what we're seeing now and yet the differences so many people were unaware and didn't care you can tell. The pain still sits with me the trauma and i think that we are in that now. We will be in that period of time. I would say decades of time where we will be sitting with. What wasn't done. What was left unsaid. What was not attempted for the safety of people over profit. This is the co founder and executive director of dancers group wayne hazard. The dancer group was born in the middle of the aids crisis and has over the decades into a service organization providing wrap around fiscal sponsorship programs and services to incubate and support artists and the dance community as well as their historical roots at presenting unique grassroots base. Dance to the san francisco bay area. I'm joined remotely via zoom by wayne hazard the executive director of dancers group. Thanks for being here win. Thanks george it's my pleasure on martin luther king junior day twenty twenty one yes quite a solemn day and quite a powerful day so segue to our first question. Which is i think. The audience probably doesn't know dance group which is an interesting can of service group model. So if you could give us a little background on the dancers group and some of the really unique the of eighteen programs while it's my favorite topic obviously vance's group has been around since nineteen eighty two and we were founded in san francisco's mission district. We really started out. As a collective of choreographers of dance makers looking to have support space and camaraderie and ways to be in relationship to one. Another and really. That hasn't changed thirty nine years later. I like to call us now. Hybrid organization. Because i think it kind of clicks with people one and two. It's kind of what we do in terms of providing direct services to dance makers dancers those interested in dance and we also present dance at timmy's and i say that in that way because we do commissioning of work but we also have large programs of the your leg bay area dance week where pretty The pandemic we had twenty two thousand people in the spring. Take free dance. Classes all over the bay area from hip hop to who led to back to tap to beginning movement classes. Were children to adults. Dance for people with parkinson's you name it. We probably haven't morale-booster over the years so the services we do really are about you know supporting people where they are classes. Discounts performance information discounts on those and. Then we provide direct services to dance makers through our fiscal sponsorship program. We have over one hundred and twenty five dance companies dance projects that fundraise under us so each year close to one point. Five million raised less than we redistribute through expenses back to those entities where over generally pandemic times of three hundred thousand people attend those company and artists activities classes and performances though this last going on ten months with covid nineteen and so much of obviously performing arts and dance especially is a personal experience. How has the dance group dealt with the covid nineteen and economic meltdown. And then how do you feel like. It's impacted all of the dozens of dance. Performance groups that you incubate and work with big question. I'll start by saying that. Dancers groups founders along with myself win through the aids pandemic in the early eighties. All the way into the nineties and still continuing today as a worldwide pandemic beget really not seeing that way. Because of i think broadly and it's changed a bit but seeing as a gay male disease. Two of our founders died from complications hiv and aids. I'm the remaining survivor. There are many who supported a stirring that time but having navigated losing dancers choreographers audience members weekly similar to what we're seeing now and yet the differences so many people were unaware and didn't care you can tell. The pain still sits with me the trauma and i think that we are in that now. We will be in that period of time. I would say decades of time where we will be sitting with what was done what was left unsaid. What was not attempted for the safety of people over prophet so specifically to your question. I think one of the first things we did as an organization is aboard said. Are you okay and we. We talked a lot. We said to staff your job is there. We like many organizations applied for support both private foundations and others to help us navigate this time. We are very fortunate in the bay area to have major foundations. Like the hewlett some rain ins and haase's and fly checkers Really step forward and then we just looked at getting information out early on also. Many organizations were creating cove relief funds and the area had going. i and i was approached by a donor. Saying here's a large took money. Let's get this out to dancers. And i said well what if we join forces with theatre bay area would if we not created just one more fun but just was able to get more money to one fund and so the funder liked that the donor like that theatre bay area. Love that inter music. Sf joined as well and so there's a performing arts workers relief fund on theatre bay area dot org site it's also on dancers

Wayne Hazard Aids Dancers Group Parkinson's HIV San Francisco Bay Martin Luther King Vance Timmy George San Francisco Haase Hewlett
Ibram X. Kendi And Keisha N. Blain On The 400-year story Of Black people In America

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

04:54 min | 2 weeks ago

Ibram X. Kendi And Keisha N. Blain On The 400-year story Of Black people In America

"Professor planes. You've got the top box. I'm going to start with you. This is a different kind of history book right. It's a history book where some of the ninety writers aren't even historians collectively who are the writers. And why are their voices so important so we asked an array of writers to contribute to the volume. And as you point out so many of them are not professional Journalists to contribute we asked philosophers to contribute We asked creative writers to contribute as well as poets end. What we wanted to do was really grapple with four hundred years of history. And not you know. We really didn't want it to feel like a typical a history book. I and of course asking ninety historians Would have i think a taken away from the the sort of you know tone that we were trying to set which was bringing together a diverse community which met people coming to the history writing about the history from their own experiences but also from their unique trainings whether in the field of journalism are in the field of law and so it was important for us to create something new something special something original and that meant bringing in writers from a wide array of backgrounds. Professor professor blaine just talked about the fact that you have poets in the book and you write quote sometimes. History is best captured by poets out. Some more there's anything. I've learned in my time writing history. That is that it's deeply complex. Variegated story that in many ways. We have to imagine things that we don't have a speculate on on on decisions that we don't have a specific for that we have to stretch archive especially when writing on on people's particularly working class. Americans certainly working cost black folks who haven't left an archive who haven't left on speeches and and necessarily written records and so you know. Poets have the capacity to really show the depth and complexity and the imagination and creativity of humanity. And and so when we when that comes to bear on history. And i think they were really able at the end of each section to really flush out and contextualized. You know forty years. When i was in school. Professor blaine We're going way back like the nineteen seventies nineteen eighties black history The way we're talking about today just wasn't taught. Slavery was a chapter and not exactly told honestly the accomplishments of black americans were diminished if they were even acknowledged so has anything changed since the seventies in the eighty s. What needs to change. So i think some things have changed You know when you look at how history textbooks written. We're certainly at a place where the textbooks that are produced today or even in the last ten years i think are better than the ones that were a public. Maybe twenty years ago does not mean that we still don't have work to do. In fact we have a lot of work to do. Especially i think in the last two or three years. We've been talking about textbooks in places states like texas for example where they're still a debate about how you talk about the civil war and how you talk about slavery and like you. I certainly encounter textbooks. That didn't really flesh out are the nuances. You know an even the trauma of of the the experience of slavery in often times a glossed over eight or or perhaps had a little box to focus on martin luther king junior but other than that not really center a historical figures i and so a lot has changed in part of that. Change is directly tied. I think to the work of a professional historians. We've been working very hard odd to excavate the history in in in order to help people better write about the history. I in a way that reflects the richness than the complexity and diversity of the black experience but particularly in a way that centers black agency which is key that black voices appear. That black ideas appear in. These textbooks are still some work to do. But i think we're making progress. I think four hundred souls is certainly the kind of texts that would help us move forward in that direction.

Blaine Just Professor Blaine Martin Luther King Texas
Lets unmask the confusion about masks

The Big Story

05:25 min | 2 weeks ago

Lets unmask the confusion about masks

"I'm fought macedo. Sitting in for jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story. Jennifer mcdonald is a doctor physical medicine and rehabilitation in ottawa. And is one of the five hundred signatories on a letter calling federal and provincial governments to seriously address the aerosol transmission of covid nineteen. Hi dr mcdonald. Thanks for joining us. Thank you for having me so. I'm really curious about how this letter came about. Can you tell us a little more. Would its goals are and what the purpose was of writing and sending it to all the governments sure so it came about actually for me on my end. I was actually on maternity leave. And was reading up on the science of covid nineteen transmission and notice that there was quite a bit of controversy even between a leading experts and wanted to see more interdisciplinary collaboration. So as a rehabilitation doctor we are experts in interdisciplinary collaboration. And i thought while i am by no means an expert in nineteen i could bring my expertise in that collaborative approach to bring these disciplines and hopefully come to some sort of consensus on the science of transition. So that's how we got writing this letter and bringing these people together. We have doctors. Relevant scientists occupational health and safety experts as well as engineers as a part of the team. We're sort of like a loose coalition all with interest in promoting this route of transmission which is air assault or airborne transmission. So that was the goal of the is to ask our country as a whole as well as each province to better acknowledged the importance of aerosol transmission as well as to implement appropriate measures to combat it so clearly. This wasn't happening because you had to write about it. I i noted in the in the letter that you you mentioned or all signatories mentioned that international scientists came together to i bring up this issue. In july of twenty twenty and yet nothing has been done in canada since and the public's understanding of transmission seems to have become murkier and honestly more confusing. So i'm wondering if you can explain how the virus is transmitted is it. Airborne is transmitted through aerosols. And and what's the difference really Yes and i think that's kind of the heart of the issue is that term airborne and it's very contentious amongst some experts in public health as well as infection prevention and control. They reserve that term for diseases that have ironclad proof that they transmit through the air at very far distances in after a long period of time so an example is musil's that We have proof that it can be transmitted between faraway rooms and if a person left that room in that someone else came in an hour later they would get infected so basically the they're not wanting to use that term to describe covid nineteen since we know that in the majority of cases people are getting transmitted at close contact so when they are With somebody close to them so in terms of how covid nineteen can be transmitted. There's sort of three modes that we hear about in. That's full night's droplets and airborne or aerosol transmission so in terms of how someone can get infected by code nineteen truffaut mites. That would be if an example of that would be you. Wipe your eyes. You have copa. Nineteen and then you shake someone's hand and then that person wipes their ira reps their nose and they get infected So that's off. We focused on hand hygiene now. Interestingly full might trent full night's transmission is not found to be the main mechanism. And that's actually recognized by most of the big public health bodies that yes it's likely important but it's not the main issue so then we get to droplets and aerosols so you can think of a large droplet at transmission as a large saliva canon ball or spitball coming at you and basically that's protected from the person off when they're coughing or sneezing and would land on your eye or on your mouth and therefore Make entry into your body. And infect those cells in the nose or mouth or is in the upper respiratory tract and the thought is over time. It might migrate down into down into the lungs causing more dangerous viral pneumonia. What has been ignored in medicine. I must as dr. I was not taught about this. Possibility is the idea of aerosols being important at close ranges well so a good example is to think of smoke and if someone smoking and you're standing next to them and they breathe a big plume of smoke directly in your face while you're gonna inhale quite a bit of that smoke in it's coined probably to make you cough and turn your head away. So imagine aerosol says smoke and they're going to be most concentrated when you're close together so eric. Short range aerosol transmission or airborne transmission at close contact with. Someone is still an important vote of transmission. It's not really being discussed. And so basically the difference between airborne and air assault is more semantics. Actually i think it's actually easier if we use the term airborne to describe it 'cause the public that makes sense to

Macedo Jordan Heath Rawlings Jennifer Mcdonald Dr Mcdonald Musil Ottawa Canada Trent Pneumonia Eric
Unity, And Gamestonks

Say What Needs Saying

03:45 min | 2 weeks ago

Unity, And Gamestonks

"All right. Welcome back to say what needs saying. I'm zac. I'm seeing to brandon and we are coming back with season. Two of say what needs saying. We are excited. We're gonna jump into everything that we missed everything that's happened since the last time that we talked with everyone and there is quite a bit. That's gone on and the things have been kinda crazy these last couple of weeks. And when you say crazy what exactly do you mean like what is probably besides the end a twenty twenty two where we're at right now on the six of black history month. What exactly is the craziest thing has happened in your eyes. Craziest thing. I mean crazy. Things got to be the game. Stop stocks The not wall street bets versus wall street and everything that happened with that. So explain to me. Whoever's listening what exactly happened with with wall street bench game stop. Why two people care about a blockbuster all of a sudden who's blackberry since it's been eleven years since anybody's used blackberry messenger. What exactly happened. And i also can time to just know so i mean basically a bunch of people. Shorted game stop stock. So that's when you borrow stock to pay back at a later date and actually before we jump in. I'm gonna admit some people that just jumped in on the zoom chat and we go all right now. Everyone's in Yeah woke member onto the season two. I live episode but anyway so yet shorting a stock you know you borrow stock so that you can sell it when it's high and then pay back the debt of that share later when you believe that the price will be lower so everyone did this with game stop and did it immensely Shorted it too. I believe they shorted hundred forty percent of the available stock and so the Read it wound up finding out that it was heavily. Shorted and decided to call their bluff and bought a ton of game stock game stock stock game stop stock and improve the priming through the roof but yeah it was not. It costs the hedge funds. A ton of money back you. What sounds like you got. Hit by ricky ralph. I don't know what happened on. How can you hear me now a bit. Yeah i kid you knocking at you now. I'll let you know. I was just saying it's just crazy because you know they. They cost the hedge funds so much money in they. Basically it was unprecedented right. It was something that had never really happened before. At least not in the near the near past. I mean what do you expect when you tell when you when when you have billions of dollars and you laugh at the common person and say you know we'll give you two hundred dollars. You're not going to do anything with you need it. We're going to give you six hundred thousand and you. You don't need it and what they did is a lot of people out of you know jen next. Gen z millennial said. Yeah we believe in game stop you know they china on empathetic side and we believe in these comes. We're going to make it big and rid a stick it to you so a lot of people but those stocks in unison in solidarity to what. This was how we know what this was causing on wall street. The headaches and the seven point some odd billion dollars. They lost to sell their goods stocks. Are there good options. Or whatever to remake up or recoup from the losses from their expert station so yeah no. It's it's i think is necessary on one end some. I have heard some people say it was irresponsible of the people on. Read it so. Go ahead and do this but i don't know i'm kind of not anarchist but i'm on the side of the people who's always been given the season the state.

Ricky Ralph Brandon Gen Z Millennial JEN China Headaches
Interview With Caty Caldwell And Jessica Odeyemi

Technically 200

04:48 min | 3 weeks ago

Interview With Caty Caldwell And Jessica Odeyemi

"This is the first of a series of technically two hundred talks or roundtable conversations. Where it's not just a one on one. But one onto plus. And i am very excited about this one because we have miss jessica odor yemi once again from ibm technical product manager. And we've got Ms katy call technical program manager at facebook. Such a pleasure to have you both here to night so i just wanna start with one question for each of you in. Why don't we start with katie. Katie what's your first memory of being excited about tech my first memory of being excited about tack. It has to be. I think in my freshman year computer science course. It's like an introduction a computer science. I just remember. I had started at princeton as a chemical engineer and i was just like i was in my first chemistry class. I was like this is like watching paint dry like this is not like the chemistry. I know from high school and i was just really excited about this idea. Setting chemical engineering. But when i took my first computer science course everyone had worn me before the course that was going to be so challenging difficult and i just remember just like enjoying every assignment and every assignment just felt like it felt like a puzzle. Felt fun and i. I felt like i was spinning. Just an inordinate amount of time. Just focus on by computer science work over my chemistry homework and i hadn't even got into sort of like the chemical engineering courses yet and i was like this'll make sense. Why by studying. Something that i am like. Great like begrudgingly. Getting through versus has studying something that i love so i just remember just being super excited about the next assignment and computer science like always wanted the next one wanted to do like the extra credit. I love that and jess unless you that same question. Yeah so let's see. I got into the tech industry per se a little bit later in life. But i remember the first time i was excited about anything. Simulated was an elementary school. When i found out I don't know if you've ever heard of them ike rube goldberg projects Like i don't know if you've ever seen a movie pee wee's big adventure. But at the very beginning he has all these contractions that connect to each other to do different things. But i kind of find out found out an elementary school. There was. We were introduced to the the concept of a rube goldberg project. In thought it was so cool. So i did something similar for science fair project and i thought it was the coolest thing ever As far as you know the tech industry goes. I think that happened much later in life for me. So that probably didn't happen for me until i was working and i think we've chatted about this a little bit before but i was working in the oil industry and it just occurred to me that i was out on the rate drilling wells and that was great but there was this whole other world behind what we were doing. You know software insistence. That was kinda powering. Everything that we were doing out in the field. So i think that's when i first got into Tech per se jessica. I did the rube. Goldberg is file. When i was younger. i've loved it. I went to the. I went to the national competitions. Like and since. I'm so close to purdue growing up so i would go to indiana. Just go see what the students The cooking up so had logged. Rube goldberg did that. When i was like what is the most extravagant way to crack in a like the prices so so member game mouse trap. I love that like that.

Jessica Odor Yemi Ms Katy IBM Katie Princeton Rube Goldberg Facebook Jess Goldberg Jessica Indiana
What the pandemic has revealed about the real value of college

Modern Ruhles with Stephanie Ruhle

05:25 min | 3 weeks ago

What the pandemic has revealed about the real value of college

"We've got a moment. We're in crisis. Can we do better. Ron lieber is asking that very question in his new book. The price you pay for college is the author of the new york times personal finance column your money ron for years and years and years. We weren't thinking about the price of college the value of college. Is it worth it. Well i think you have to start by asking yourself what college is right. what is college for. I wasn't sure what the answer to. That question was so i asked you know scores of families and i heard the same things over and over again colleges for getting an education for having your mind grown in your mind blown. It is for kinship. It is for finding the people who will carry you through life. It is for getting a credential whether it's the gold plated one that will open doors or just the degree that will allow you to grasp hold of the middle class and hopefully stay there and so in order to answer. The question of whether college is worth it. You need to find it for your individual family that we as a nation can dictate for any given individual but then how did we get to this place right. My dad worked in the summer and put himself through school and had a tiny bit of debt. After how did college get this expensive. There are so many more things pulling on our household incomes than there used to be. We are entirely responsible in most instances for our own retirement. We're paying more and more out of our own pockets for healthcare. Many people are paying off their own student. Loan debt well into their forties or fifties right so people don't have the same kind of disposable income as they might have earlier states have reduced their subsidies towards higher education which means the price of the state schools has gone up and the private institutions. They've gotten more and more expensive so the middle class. There is being squeezed. This whole idea of i want to go to a liberal arts college and better myself and in the world is will be. My voice. teacher is kind of an antiquated thought. Sure i'd like to enrich myself but not if it's going to put me in hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of debt. I remember when i was a senior in college. I went to lehigh and lee. Could absolutely help you on the career services front. If you wanted to go work in an accounting firm or be an engineer i wanted to work in investment banking so i drove to new york city with my mother and i stuck into the career services office at columbia university and i borrowed these giant binders. That had every piece of information that you needed for every bank every financial institution so you could apply for the summer internships. Now i went to the photocopy machine to start and you needed to have a school. I d to use the photocopier. I got caught. And i got kicked out the reason i bring this up. We send these kids to college but the best jobs are directly linked to only a few schools. So do we need to start looking at. Here's a college. What is the job. My child is going to get on the other side because otherwise they will be sitting here in hundreds of thousands of dollars with a debt. Yes to all of that first of all. That is the most bad ass career services story that i have ever heard your description of this as quote unquote best jobs right. I mean it is true that the best jobs in investment banking very narrow feel from certain institutions. Right unless you beat down the door but are those. The best jobs in america are the best jobs for anyone. Goldman sachs's is hiring. All these people in salt lake city now do not come from columbia and harvard and stanford mit. So then we have to ask ourselves well. These are iconic jobs in in certain social classes but are they really the best jobs out there for any given twenty two year old. I don't think so. Before the pandemic we knew there was a skills gap in the united states. We were at full employment yet. We had millions of americans who are not making enough money to support themselves. We had people who had jobs but good enough jobs. But you hear people making that argument saying you cannot afford to support yourself and your family working in a fast food restaurant but that job was never intended for someone who has a family to support. Is there an opportunity to actually create a real jobs program. A skills retraining program so it's not just about raising minimum wage. It's about retraining. People to qualify themselves for better higher paying jobs yes and that infrastructure already exists we can use the community college infrastructure to provide that skills training but we also have a shortage of qualified instructors to teach some of these skills. Why because the skills are so in demand that the people who would be doing the instructing are making five times as much money being actual practitioners. If you're a master plumber. You're not going to spend twenty hours a week teaching at a community college even though it would be a service to the community if you are a welder with twenty five years of experience right same thing is true. So how are we going to create the budget that allows for more people to be pushed through rigorous training programs. And so we need to do more I think from a state perspective and from a federal perspective not just provides the money but also to ensure equity and access to these programs

Ron Lieber New York Times RON Stanford Mit Lehigh Columbia University New York City LEE America Goldman Sachs Salt Lake City Harvard Columbia
Charles Blow wants Black Americans to move back to the South to gain real political power

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

02:31 min | 12 hrs ago

Charles Blow wants Black Americans to move back to the South to gain real political power

"I'm jonathan kaye. Part and this is k pop in his new book. The devil you know. A black manifesto new york times columnist charles blow urges black americans to reverse the great migration of the twentieth century. He wants them to move back to the south one express purpose to gain political power. There is a window and it's closing fast. Like bobby was just have to decide whether they more power not blow isn't just proposing the idea. He's followed his own advice. Last year he moved from new york city to atlanta here. Blow explain his manifesto. The rationale behind it and why begging white people to change in the absence of political power is not a position. African americans want to be in right now. Charles blow of the new york times to the podcast exempt. And thanks for having me. I've been so looking forward to having this conversation. And the having you on the podcast. Since we first talked about what was then the book you were working on the book you were writing and now it is out the devil. You know of black power manifesto. There's so much in here. And i want to start right at the manifesto and go right to the final words of your book and you say the successes of the great migration now stand shoulder to shoulder with the suffering that grew out of it but there is a way to alter this reality. The only thing black people have to do is come home. The south now beckons as the north winds. Did the promise of real power is made manifest sees. It migrate move. So why charles. Do you want black people to leave the what you called the destination cities which are the ones in the north move back south to claim state power At the end of the civil war three southern states were majority black louisiana mississippi south carolina. Another three were within four percentage points of being majority black every southern state had large percentages of black people in it because up into the great migration ninety percent of all black people lived in the american south. If black people had not moved and every migration. That's a big. If of course

Jonathan Kaye Manifesto New York Times Charles Blow Bobby New York City Atlanta The New York Times Charles Louisiana Mississippi South Carolina American South
Lee Daniels and Andra Day on the hidden activist life of Billie Holiday

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

08:01 min | Last week

Lee Daniels and Andra Day on the hidden activist life of Billie Holiday

"Much for being here to see you again. I know it's been a very long time. Greats isn't a you again both of you. Congratulations on this film. The moment i saw it. I immediately sent a letter to y'all saying okay here. All your options. I need to talk to you about this film. Le- let me start. Start with you. Thanks so as we saw in the in the opening clip. The film tackles pretty much everything. Racism sexism addiction art abuse. And i'm wondering. How did you come to this project. And what influenced your approach to billie. Holiday's life susan lori parks the pulitzer winning a prize winning playwright Sent me this beautiful script that really depicts the government breaking her down coming for her coming for billie holiday and and really trying to cripple her. As an artist or singing strange fruit which was about lynching black people and that wasn't the understanding of billie holiday that i had. I thought that she was a troubled jazz singer. Got in trouble with the law. And you know the drugs and was fashionable. I did know that she was a political activist. And so and i you know i pride myself in being smart about our history and i thought to myself that i i don't do this. I don't know i had. I had to do it. And i thought also like how many other stories about our people have have. They have been hidden so yeah that was more threes in selena. And so right and i am going to latch onto what you just said before. Which was you thought of billie holiday as a jazz singer But you didn't really know that she was an activist. What what more did she do. Other than being defiant about trying to seeing strange fruit despite government opposition and government targeting. What other things that she do that made you realize that she's she's more than just lady day. What other than she did. Besides stand up to the government. I guess a lot to say i couldn't. I don't know that i could today. I don't think that i could. They told me lead. You can never make a movie again or coming for your mother. I'm going to come for your kids and you will. I'm like take it. But the thing about her strength and her being born in the into the world that she was being born in tipton board she didn't she didn't get to fly in you know what because she. She had nothing to lose by living in her constantly. And let me bring you in here. I saw your interview go ahead. Go ahead now. I just wanted to back off that too. I mean. I think what shows so brilliantly in the movies that apart what she did in standing up to the government was being human. She's black queer woman in the nineteen thirties. Forties and fifties and that living in an owning their in itself is is is defiance than accident that she's integrating audiences music one of the first artists a black woman to integrate carnegie hall. She wasn't the first but she is one of the first shoes audiences in athlete. People understand. This is sort of pre. They're real reinvigorated civil rights mellon so we wouldn't have our heroes would not have been as bold in as they were no thurgood. Marshall end the light on downs. You know rosa parks on down if it were not for her singing. Strange fruit in defiance of the government for not for setting off this alarm in the nation. In letting people know that it's that this was a really really understand. How much for june that emboldened the civil rights news we know today you know as as arrested in the so and him showing her in all her. Human element is is access. Defiance all in itself nelson young. I'm proud from did work. Yeah that's deadly for andrew. What's what's so great about About the comment you just made is that it is so it was so laden with facts in history and deep knowledge of billie holiday and i watched your interview on. Cbs sunday morning. Where you you said you read everything. You could possibly read about billie holiday. Everything watched everything. Listen to everything and whatever you could see carried all a lot of that information in this beat up shopping bag part of it. There's other pieces in other parts of my room and my father. That's the person so in all the in all of that studying when it came to learning about billie holiday did you come to a different Even clearer understanding in the way. That lee did of this woman who the country's simply just knows billie holiday that extraordinary jazz singer. Yeah absolutely i mean for me. It wasn't different. It was deeper humanitarian. Steeper it was more solidify came more crystallized. I knew just from being a fan of her where she is my foremost inspiration. That's where daytime spot in my artisan And so i knew a lot about the government going after her. Did not know about the jimmy. Fletcher fees styles revelatory from each. But it's just deepened. Everything because i knew they went after iraq did not know the extent to which they went after her. I'd like i said. I didn't know that jimmy fletcher piece it. It's infiltrating everything infiltrating for weaknesses. Strengths infiltrating her heart hurts her. Chosen family you know an end and And with the goal of destroying her and then when you sink it all came together. When i remember all. Yeah you know once we did all of this. And i see what leads put together. It's like yes she was doing. All of this pre-civil rights there was not a movement to support her. I cannot stress that enough. It was not that she had this whole great community this movement in this this this sort of army behind her it was just her and her broad women shoulders and i think that You know when you think about that. You see that like you know. Her community people loved her but she would also be penalized under the nwa. Soupy sort of wrote these violation cards behavior in you know leaflets. So beautifully in the movie about this reporter asked wanted to just behave. Be more like ella fitzgerald or more like this person. So i think what it really made me realize first of all it made me just love her so grateful to god for her and for her to her maybe realize my own strength as a black woman and it just it just made me realize what we are capable of his people and the fact that she was doing all of this With all of this trauma with all of his pain with all of his boss that she was still you know Dettori so you know that's So made me realize that her addiction is it's illness you know this is. How could this woman have done all this without some type of battery and put back right. If he can manifest different alive she was trying to be as you've said the orient Well it just deepending my love

Billie Holiday Billie Susan Lori Parks Nelson Young Pulitzer Selena Tipton Carnegie Hall Rosa Parks Jimmy Fletcher Marshall CBS Andrew Fletcher LEE Jimmy Iraq NWA Ella Fitzgerald Army
Episode 191: P.C. White-inos

Latinos Who Lunch

04:54 min | Last week

Episode 191: P.C. White-inos

"Hi this is five. Eighty five and this little and we are latinos. Who lunch the podcast. We talk about important things like he. This louis almost obsessive pinch. Hello hello hello show show show. Good morning bob alito. Be like we've ever recorded in our whole fucking light bro. Are we professionals. Or what he might see someone allowed or procrastinators to the max and we're like oh fuck. We have an episode tomorrow dental commune. I'm halfway through banana. Oh my god everybody get that visual in your head. And so how many cups of cappuccino have you had. You had I'm halfway one. I'm trying to master the art of latte art. Okay okay. it'll. I've been watching youtube videos and stuff you know when in rome fuck it so i suck at it. The results are either litter bleach or more or less. What like my two weeks for can point but little harles all. Like the visual art and willis. I don't like to just let's think a to maybe should partner up with a dentist started cafe. That'd be night after cleaning. Done a couple. Chino bye-bye bellido so yes. Yes state anthem brennan girl not. Are you kidding me. My body can digest who this early in the morning. I got a warm it up. Honey what the hell. i don't. yeah. I'm the same way you know how people sometimes wake up. And they're like okay. Let's go for like a big ass breakfast. I can't i have to have a banana piece of cake or something. Like the sugar flow in led the fat from the half-and-half in my coffee like to my brain. And then i can start thinking about you. Know bubbas shed that normally do yeah. It's because i think it's because i eat too late like 'cause i am now that i'm on this project Now that i'm back on my same bullshit. I basically work like twelve hours a day from ten ten pm and so i eat dinner when i get home at like ten thirty eleven you know and so does not hungry when i wake up because hello i just ate which is great for you because it takes me longer to fall asleep. But i'm hungry when i get home. You know nacho. Oh last night. I just had a bunch of leftovers. Oh let me tell you. It's pretty white. You're going to enjoy this I had some leftover rice. That i made and i also made a have been rob brussels sprouts salad. I tried it. Maybe once but i don't remember the flavor so i'm gonna say no so you. You basically like shave. The brussels sprouts really really thin chop them really really thin. And then on my god. I'm sorry they're doing landscaping my Neighborhood and you might hear a leaf blower but the show must go on people you you wanted us here. We are leaf floors. All okay So where was i. Oh it's basically just like really thinned out. Brussels sprouts and And then you put up a bunch of lemon juice on it because the acid of the lemon juice cooks it a little softens it up you know and then you just out a bunch of shit and you know you can go. Like full tilt caucasian. And add. Like cranberries and you know like shaved almonds slices or whatever the fuck ya thai flavored almonds and added how tie flavor almond. Yeah you. Are they different than regular almonds. Yeah they're like flavored with thai chili and lime. And and then. I added I added some shredded cheese and i added I do live two caucasians.

Bob Alito Willis Rob Brussels Brennan Rome Youtube Nacho Brussels
Who are we vaccinating now? Who should be next?

The Big Story

02:44 min | 14 hrs ago

Who are we vaccinating now? Who should be next?

"Island crime investigates true crimes on vancouver island in the latest season. Gone boys host. Laura palmer digs into the mystery of vulnerable men that have gone missing from the island in recent years. Are these men just walking away or could a serial killer. Be out there right now. Stalking and killing vulnerable men on vancouver island. What about the mean. What is going on in the valley all cars. You're walking everywhere. Europe all normal. He went missing on as you can find island crime gone boys on the frequency podcast network or wherever. You get your podcasts. We've been fighting this pandemic for a year now and there haven't been very many times when we could say that we had a good problem but now we do and it is a great problem. Really canada's vaccine rollout supply no longer appears to be the main problem at least for the foreseeable future the federal government is saying that millions of doses will be coming into the country provinces are scrambling to get infrastructure and systems in place to start inoculating the general public. This is a wonderful thing to contemplate. We initially thought it would take at least twelve to eighteen months just to develop and test a vaccine and twelve months later. We have hundreds of thousands of shots arriving every week. Ready to go into arms. But who's are when the ontario government rolled out. Its vaccine timetable last week. The criticism that it faced was mostly around how long it was planning to take. Not if it was the right call to assign priority based mostly on h. This virus predominantly kills older people. So yeah it seems sensible to do it that way. But what if there was a better way a way that prioritized not just by age but also assigned vaccines in a manner that would curb the spread of the disease and target the people at risk of the worst outcomes and if that way exists how can governments adopted and roll it out without risking a whole lot of backlash from people who feel they've now been bumped back even further. It is a good problem to have but

Vancouver Island Laura Palmer Ontario Government Europe Federal Government Canada
Mythbusting Poverty and Education

PM Mood

02:29 min | 3 d ago

Mythbusting Poverty and Education

"This week i wanted to share with everyone. The beginning of my interview with dr mark rank co author of poorly understood what america gets wrong about poverty. I asked mark to bust. Open some common myths about poverty. And what he told me is important to share with everyone. What are some of the haman misconceptions and myths that we share as a country around poverty. There are obviously a lot of different mess out there. But i think one to start with. Is this idea that well poverty is going to affect somebody else but not me that. It's an issue of them rather than an issue of us in one of the ways we start out in. The book is to say actually if you look across people's lifetimes Majority of americans had some point will experience a year below the official poverty line. So between the ages of twenty and seventy five sixty percent folks will find themselves in poverty. Three quarters of americans. We'll find themselves either in poverty or near poverty for at least a year end. This really puts a different perspective on it. Because it says you know actually poverty is an issue that affects most of us in one way or another. So that's that's one sort of Variation on this idea that The myth of poverty being an issue of them rather than an issue of us there are many others as well. For example we often are image of poverty is often now the folks of color in inner city areas that have been in poverty for long periods of time that are using social safety net programs. Turns out it turns out that that's that images is is not correct Actually most people in poverty do not lead live in high poverty. Inner city neighborhoods. They live in a variety of places. They live in suburbs. They live in rural america. So i i guess the point of this is to say that the reach of poverty is very wide and it. It affects a lot of folks at some point in their lives. What do you think that we mean from your research in the work that you've done throughout your

Dr Mark Rank America Mark Inner City
Flyin Ted & Mr. Potato Head

Matt D’Elia Is Confused

01:36 min | 4 d ago

Flyin Ted & Mr. Potato Head

"Get to some of the ship. I wanted to get to last week last week better now. They mentioned it. I think at the beginning of the episode but there was that crazy storm across the country in many pockets a but particularly in texas. The snowstorms fucked up everything. It totally fucked a grid of texas and power was out running. Water off fucking. The craziest imagery was coming out of their icicles hanging from ceiling. Fans people burning close to stay warm Some people have died from like trying to keep warm but doing it in the fucking dumb way like running their car to get heat to generate heat and dying of carbon monoxide. You don't do that but understandably when someone is fucking freezing to death they become desperate probably aren't thinking that straight anyway. The thaw has begun and while it was happening. A lot of leaders in texas. Were under fire for mismanaging. The and and the one that caught the most heat even though governor. Greg abbott was trying to say it was. It happened because the green new deal or something there were a lot of missteps and dumb things that were said

Texas Greg Abbott
A note of optimism on the climate crisis

The Big Story

07:35 min | 4 d ago

A note of optimism on the climate crisis

"That is not as economically painless. Well of course this is. I mean this is a challenge of a world historical scale To decarbonise the world At a pace that would allow us to safely avoid what is called a catastrophic level of warming two degrees celsius which is the stated goal of the paris accords would require a unprecedented almost unimaginable disruption of the way that every aspect of world is conducted. Today so you to give us up to bring us in range of of one point five degrees of celsius which is sort of the preferred goal of climate activists and would give us a much better chance of avoiding some of these really truly truly scary out outcomes that would require us to entirely eliminate carbon from everything we do in the world by about twenty thirty five and that is assuming a pretty rapid We start today and and we start declining keep our emissions stable at today's levels will entirely exhaust the budget for that one point five degree target in just seven years. That means that you know well. Before twenty thirty we may have entirely lost the opportunity to avoid some truly truly scary climate outcomes and in fact a number of scientists. Think that you know. There's some debate about exactly how what the scale of what that's called the carbon budget exactly what that is and there's certainly some scientists who who we've already exhausted the carbon budget for one point five for one point five degree target so in order to take action that will secure a kind of comfortable stable. Livable future for ourselves. will require already. Today does require Really quite dramatic action well beyond anything that any governments of the world or any corporations of the world are promising. But you know there's a way to be quite distressed and discouraged about that and that's perfectly reasonable you know the world is Careening towards an almost inevitable future. That will look quite bleak on the other hand the fact that we have taken some of the truly worst case scenario off the table in a four or five degrees warmer than that where we'd be talking about you know more than twice as much water as we have today and maybe permanent thirty percent drop in in global gdp parts of the planet being by six climate driven natural disasters at once. Those scenarios now seem vanishingly unlikely. And i think you know in the climate business. You kinda gotta take progress where you find it and to me the fact that we have we have already made investments and refocused our energy future sufficiently to avoid those Outcomes it is quite good news but as you say it still leaves us very far short of any target that anyone looking rationally at the science would tell you was was a safe landing and as a result. I think we need much much more still to be done much much more to be done on that point though. I do think it's important. It's important to keep in mind that one of the great contributions of rapid movement is that it makes future rapid movement. Easier to imagine as well you know a few years ago would have said yeah today. What what we're seeing today. Two or three years ago seem to me to be impossible to imagine a believe. Now it's it's still insufficient but it's it was well beyond what i thought was likely to happen just a few years ago that means among other things that it's quite possible that what we'll see two or three years from now or certainly five or ten twenty years from now we'll go beyond what we see what what seems possible today and that kind of momentum is exactly what we need. I still think even with it. We're unlikely to to get close to one point five degrees of warming. I think something. Like two degrees best case scenario. But i think that we're likely to see of quite rapid acceleration of of all of these Processes of decarbonisation and Ultimately that's that's good news even if it's it's not quite as good news i would hope for. Here's my last question for you. We talked to A lot of climate scientists and a lot of folks who cover and right on this topic and often it can feel hopeless. And i think one of the things that resonated About your piece was the opposite. How do you feel now Compared to how you might have felt A couple of years ago as you mentioned when when it looked like you know the worst case scenarios were right there. Well i would ask personally. I'm i'm feeling more optimistic But i think it's also important for us all to understand that this is not a binary system. We've already lost the opportunity to avoid dramatic warming. We are going to be living with it and going to be adapting to it and so when we talk about being or about progress being made. We're not talking about seeing path out of the problem. It's just that. I'm now seeing real changes in how seriously climate is being taken by the people with the power to do something about it and as a result. I think we're giving ourselves a chance to be forced to only adapt to a smaller level of disruptive warming rather than a truly apocalyptic level. And i think we fall into a trap in our political thinking on many issues by when we think of them in terms of in binary terms in terms of winning or losing terms of climate weather. We're gonna totally beat climate change whether it's going to totally destroy us. We're already in that ugly muddle in the middle. It's going to get uglier to some degree. It seemed as though were on a path now to ensure that the future can still be relatively comfortable and relatively prosperous relatively just by the standards that we hold today even if that requires responding and protecting ourselves against some of these impacts It doesn't look at the moment like that future will be the overwhelming one that seemed likely a few years ago and so coming from where i'm coming from a climate alarmist. I've written a book that sketches out. Some some really scary scenarios. I'm very happy and reassured to think that the world is going to be slightly less hot than i thought it. Would you know you're or two ago. But i also think at a sort fundamental moral level. We have to be serious and recognized understand that already. we've made inevitable levels of warming and disruption that previous generations would have found horrifying and we would find horrifying to if we hadn't along the way normalized ourselves to that amount of suffering impact. And i think as a result going forward we need to be justice worried about how to aid those hit most punishingly by the impacts of climate change many of them in the global south and around the equatorial band of the planet as concerned about that as we do about how to decarbonise our energy and electricity systems as rapidly as we can. These are sort of two twin moral imperatives that we have to be serious about at the same time rather than thinking that we can avoid the need for one with the other. which has i think. Been a problem for too long. I hope we can keep our eyes on that ball. Thank you so much david for

Paris David
Environmental Racism in St. Louis Report

We Live Here

06:39 min | 4 d ago

Environmental Racism in St. Louis Report

"Louis. The environmental racism in saint louis report was released in twenty nineteen with the help of multiple grassroots organizations across the region and tara roque assistant professor are practice in assistant director for the interdisciplinary. Environmental clinic says that blake strode. The executive director of our city defenders a saint louis based holistic legal advocacy organization. Initially brought the idea to them and asked about our research into environmental justice nassif. There had been a report on environmental justice issues in the saint. Louis emmy lopes end. There hasn't been any. There was no comprehensive report on the issues so he asked us to do it and they brought together. A group of four local nonprofits came together. Dutch down south community corporation or defenders action saint louis in the missouri. Chapter of the sierra club all came together and the students did allow the research and together. We put together the report force. We were also able to speak to kathryn finishing in for action. Saint louis in madison roscoe community collaborations associate for art city defenders about the importance of working on their environmental racism. Report and catherine says the mission of action saint louis is the reason why it makes sense for them to be involved in compiling a report that directly affects the communities. They serve actress. Save louis we exist to build a future where every life can thrive in. We're communities are free of oppressive institutions. That have caused us harm again. It was founded by politicized. After the killing of mike brown in ferguson arising so we are constantly fighting to build power for by people in st louis the report outlines virus injustice but the justices actually disproportionately endanger of health for people of color and low income individuals in saint louis. And this is the work that we do. We are all about empowering and assisting the most marginalized people in saint louis which are black people and this coincides. Exactly with the type of work that we do and Roberts racism right into that even though our city defenders is a legal advocacy organization. Madison says their holistic approach. Is the reason why they wanted to get involved with the report. That means we're working with direct representation. Yes and civil rights litigation. Yes but then also media policy advocacy work in the community collaborations which department that. I'm a part of and that is really about building partnerships that are working to change saint louis building partners that are working to really address the issues mma things that the people that we are representing facing people like those who representing are facing answer. You know the environmental justice work. It's really part of this community collaborations in building partnerships. And we just recognize that all of this is so connected extra. Saint louis in city defenders. Were just two of the four local non working on the report with their main focus being community outreach and engagement catherine says coalition building and collaboration is important in change making work when we worked together these organizations. There's always you know plan but we've never forget about the people that were fighting four and you know so we get community engagement. We it's gonna take all of us to engage. The community is gonna take all these organizations to let people know. There are people on their team. So i think that's one of the reasons why you can't handle something as big as this. something stomach. is this by ourselves. So we're always about building collaborating and the dedicated students at washington university's interdisciplinary environmental law. Clinic are pushing everyone to work together to make saint louis in environmentally friendly place to live. We come back together semester after semester to work with students from the clinic in there's always a kind of renewed sense of understanding. This is why we're all here together and this is what we want to accomplish together and we need each other because we all bring different strengths. We all bring different. Skill says different knowledge to france and so being together on that team that makes us all stronger. The report was released. The end of twenty nine thousand nine hundred and in the following year the covid nineteen pandemic debated environmental issues and put a sense of urgency behind tackling them. Tara points to the differences in how white and black people live in saint louis an example of why it is important to pay attention to the information they released just months before the pandemic eight will if you looked into there have been a lot of studies done as of late about the between environmental racism and covert facts of the matter is is that black people all over the country but at and frankly a lot in saint louis have been being infected at rates higher than like people. The severity has been higher with black people and white people and they've been dying significantly higher rates that might people and that is because long term exposure to air pollution tumult to lead to all of this stuff has left people in a weakened state their bodies are less able to handle respiratory disease. People who are are aren't healthy are less able to handle getting sick there've Less able to recover from getting sick and they're less able to hand out the new or new diseases like covert so be set system where certain subset of people in this city are less healthy And less able to things like covert and it's not it's not fair frankly But it's not only just the disease itself even if you take into account the different ways than wiping people and black people live in the city of saint louis and the different ways whites and blacks live in saint louis are clearly shown through. The sacrifices people have had to make in order to stay employed. During this time. i've been working from home. I have a nice home to it. I'm able to do my job through a computer. And i've been able to keep myself safe. I'm not a frontline worker. I'm not essential worker. I'm able to keep myself safe. So many people aren't and when you even considering Ferry there there's also another spare those people that are staying home if you're staying home in a house where your neighborhood is surrounded by illegal dumping bacon properties where your home has led or mold or what have you in. That's where you're staying

Saint Louis Tara Roque Blake Strode Nassif Louis Emmy Lopes Madison Roscoe Art City Mission Of Action Saint Louis Sierra Club Mike Brown Kathryn St Louis Louis Ferguson Catherine Missouri Roberts Madison Washington University
Would you let your face be your passport?

The Big Story

07:24 min | 5 d ago

Would you let your face be your passport?

"The frequency podcast network or wherever you get your podcasts. The last time that. I crossed the canada. United states border. Eilat a machine. Take my picture if you crossed at a busy airport. You probably did too. It was easy. It probably saved me ten minutes or so or more and i mean. I assume that i'm on camera the entire time. I'm in an airport anyway. So what do i have to lose. Well my face for one. I have no idea where that picture goes. Once it's been taken what other agencies see it who do they pass it along to or if it will ever come back to haunt me and it turns out that those kiosks are one of the least creepy kinds of technology being used at border crossings. And in other places with a high level of surveillance everything from the irises of our eyes to the unique ways that we walk can be recorded and used to identify us and pick us out of a crowd and once these tools debut usually in a pilot program. They can roll out to wider use with alarming speed. And once they're in us if you want to cross the border there's not a lot you can do about it. So what rates do you have. What regulations govern the use of this kind of technology. What can agencies like the border patrol. Do with your information. Can you opt out. would you opt out. I will just ask this last question because honestly some of you might say yes if you could leave your passport and your identification behind and never worry about losing or forgetting them. Would you let your biometric data become your. Id would you let your face be your passport. I'm jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story hillary. Beaumont is a freelance investigative reporter based in toronto. Hello hillary hey are you doing. I'm doing well. I'm a little creeped out. About the next time i traveled. Thanks to this piece. No problem just happy to make you aware will listen. Let's start with the actual process. You had your irises scanned as part of reporting this. What is that like. tell me about it. yeah i thought it was. It would be really interesting to go into a jail in texas as part of this story because there was a sheriff there. this guy named omar lucio who had been lake pretty open about the fact that he was using this iris scanner in his jail. His jail is very close to the texas mexico border and this iris scanner was helping basically deport people at the us border And i wanted to go inside the jail and see what this was like. I went in saw how they were using it in jail. They were scanning inmates in an not telling them what this technology was. I volunteer to use it as well as essentially like a little camera. You get your is scanned. It checks your is against database and tells you who the person is and if they have a criminal history and i'm assuming years came up negative. They came up negative. Yes do you know what happened to the scan after you were done well for my is deleted it but for inmates in the jail they keep them indefinitely they basically ended up in government database that is shared with law enforcement agencies across the us like the fbi and also immigration and customs enforcement and essentially they they allow agencies to deport people more quickly or identify people who are not using their real names. And that's really how it works. Is there anything in. we're going to get beyond This one texas jail this one technology In just a second but is there anything preventing that jail or any other place That does this from giving those to anyone else like i. I understand it being used in a law enforcement context though we can certainly debate that. But i mean how private is it wants. Your eyes are out there. Yeah i mean for a lot of these technologies whether it's in a jail context or when you're crossing an international border. What i think people should know is that you're you're in a space of reduced privacy expectation. So it's really hard to say no to these technologies than once your irises or your face or any. Biometric identification is scanned. It can be indefinitely stored in a database an shared with all of these different agencies. Know whether or not you're a criminal. Can you explain a little bit about What a place with a reduced expectation of privacy is an and what does that let the government do yeah So spaces of reduced privacy expectation include borders prisons detention facilities and essentially these areas. Where legally you cannot retain your rights to privacy as well as you wouldn't other context so One example is a back in twenty sixteen. I believe i was flying from toronto pearson. To north dakota and to to report on the standing rock protest and i was flagged for secondary screening and The actually confiscated my phone only about ten minutes But it made me nervous hell You know. I had a pass password on my phone of course but it just made me lake feel so violated that they could take my phone like that even just for a few minutes. I was wondering like things were rushing through my head of like. What are they gonna do with my phone. How long are i going to be kept here. What's going on. And this is just an example of what you can and can't do at borders like you. You have a really hard time retaining your privacy your data your phone in these spaces because what are you supposed to do under those circumstances so that brings us to why this matters to canadians. I guess because there's all sorts of this technology being used at border crossings. Apparently yeah you know. The irs is just one example of how quickly tech companies can offer new tack to local state and federal law enforcement agencies. How quickly those technologies can expand along borders. For example omar lucia the sheriff in brownsville texas. He was the first quarter share of to use this and then the company had offered the tech to him for free because they saw a

Jordan Heath Rawlings Hello Hillary Omar Lucio Eilat Texas Beaumont Toronto Hillary Canada United States Mexico FBI North Dakota Omar Lucia IRS Brownsville
An Anthology of Puerto Rico

In The Thick

07:03 min | Last week

An Anthology of Puerto Rico

"This is one of the strangest things about the moment about la area that we're in right now is that people are leaving the island because they can't make life work. Hey what's up. Welcome to the podcast about politics. Rates and culture from a poc perspective. I'm madonna horsa. And i'm julia lorena. Joining us from new york. City is alana casanova burgess. She's a reporter and producer for wnyc's program it's called on the media. Hail ana hi. How are you good and joining us. My god i wish i was there. Montreal canada is steam keillor's report for the center for investigative journalism centre the value these investigative. Oh welcome greece deny montreal. Thank you so today. We're talking about puerto rico and we're talking about berea which okay once i found out. Has you know. I'm mexican. So like once i was like kissel and then when you figure out you're like okay cool so you're going to figure that out we're gonna talk about because you guys are like what is lebanon. Well it's a new podcast series co produced by wnyc studios and yes our very own studios. That's right we're dropping yet. Another podcast gonna drop this wednesday in both english and spanish seriously so be sure to subscribe labra. This is really fabulous to be in this company because alana not only did you host the podcast but can you and my dear friend. Yes and my co host. Julio ricardo eddie you both reported and produced your own episode for this series but i really just want to talk a little bit about the inspiration for the podcast. You call it a collection of narrative an investigative stories that a different piece of puerto rican history and experience in each of these different stories and in the opener. Alana you call libra gun. An analogy of puerto rico. Because they're really so many things that make up this little island. I mean elway is the recos. Complete gallo knows super. Super complete. Are as i say that as an outsider. Right facebook relationship. Yes it's complicated. You know the history of colonialism economic issues and inequality like an extraordinary art scene the diaspora that has changed. You know the united states mainland for ever and it goes on and on so. Just listen to how you describe it. There's an imbalance of power when you're but again the whether it's against your boss or some larger injustice it's an underdogs word abut implies a challenge. We can't really solve so you have to hustle to get around it. An import rico. There are a lot of challenges that seem unsolvable. Puerto ricans are constantly but again though with the jobs that don't pay enough the electricity that comes and goes their kids schools. That are closed the broken traffic lights. That never get fixed the hospital. That doesn't get built the government's debts that aren't paid the frustration over status austerity. Colonialism and lebanon is a word that came to the states with the diaspora who have had to find a way to deal with a new language to navigate somehow being immigrants and citizens at the same time to struggle with displacement and discrimination so the series looks at this notion of labrada. You also talk about resilience. This concept that came to define puerto ricans especially after hurricane. Maria devastated the island in two thousand seventeen so alana when thinking about lebedeva what is the main takeaway the have in terms of understanding this really complicated. Puerto rican experience. What we really wanted to do was to bring the same kind of thoughtful storytelling and reporting that comes from produced audio journalism but also recognize that. There's so much talent. There's so many different people who can really add to an understanding of puerto rico. So i didn't want to just host this myself. So right away. merlin bishop from doodo and i started thinking about you know how we could assemble some kind of avengers squad of the best adventures of journalists down. You know coming together right. So we know that could eastern keillor's who's with us right now. She's been reporting on reconstruction for an. I put that in komi yesterday. Like in quotation marks after media. And you know. We have loose valentine on our team as well. I think nobody knows the debt crisis better than he does. And you know yeti matt bonier. Who's a political anthropologist. And a writer. She joined us. Chris gregory riveta. Who's a photo journalist. Who's been working on a project about lescott betas for like six years. He doesn't episode about that so we just we wanted to really open up a space. Where a lot of the stories that inform the current context but haven't really been told where we could serve make space for for those stories to be told him both languages and then thinking about you know this is an anthology. So what pulls all these stories together. There's a sense of the you know the individual bodega and also the collective data right like when we're inevitable data and so hard to translate but it's like you're dealing with something but you don't really like you can't solve a problem it also depends on how you say it right. If someone says like gone with us you can say like hockey onoda. You know like here just dealing with it. I'm coping you know making it work and there's a hopefulness in that sometimes right like like you. Just lie down in front of traffic. If you weren't going to get more like lebanon is kind of like a hopeful. Like i'm still here. Yeah i'm trying to make it. Work is like and i think especially in this last year you know. When like non spanish speakers like non puerto ricans have asked me like you know how are you doing. I want to say. I got you know like i haven't given up. I'm holding it together but also sometimes you don't even want to say like how you really doing because it's just It's a lot. But you know like being puerto rican is really great so it's not like a one no kind of series and his julio's piece particularly is really like a celebration and thank you for bringing that sense of joy to it i try. He tries our charter. Bring joyce she's know what about you. we know. we're asking the big question in very little time. But you know camo to the phoenix look as la brea experience

Puerto Rico Madonna Horsa Julia Lorena Alana Casanova Burgess Center For Investigative Journ Wnyc Studios Julio Ricardo Eddie Keillor Alana Lebanon Wnyc Kissel Labrada Berea Lebedeva Elway Merlin Bishop Montreal
One woman's journey to hold New Yorks former attorney general accountable for abuse

Modern Ruhles with Stephanie Ruhle

04:46 min | Last week

One woman's journey to hold New Yorks former attorney general accountable for abuse

"But the story. It's an important one to here. He was a progressive liberal hero. He was also seen publicly as a champion of women. So what was especially hypocritical and shocking and gas lighting. The behavior that he sought to legislate against was the type of behavior that he inflicted on his partners in private and because he was a very powerful politician he was the top law enforcement officer in state of new york and he was in the national spotlight at the time that i was with him. Who knew what he would do. If i told others about what i was experiencing. But this is why. I feel like somehow the universe intended for me to have my path intersect with eric schneiderman and then end a pattern of violence with his intimate partners. That had been going on for a very long time with many people knowing about it may twenty eighteen. The new yorker published a story. That would take down one of the most powerful men in new york. The man was eric schneiderman. At the time he was the state attorney. General someone who stood up to trump and four women's rights for so we've talked what many didn't know was the behind closed doors. He allegedly did the opposite verbally. Emotionally and physically. He allegedly abused multiple women. Women that on the surface it would appear he loved. One of those women was tanya silverado. She mentioned item and the democratic national convention in two thousand sixteen and was instantly charmed but very quickly. She says the relationship began to shift. I'm stephanie rule. Msnbc anchor nbc news senior correspondent and this is modern rules. A podcast from nbc. An iheartradio tanya says that she got caught in a situation that too many women find themselves in strong smart successful women drawn to successful men and then suddenly trapped unable to escape so what pushed her to get out of this relationship and share her story with the world. She writes about that in her new book. Assume nothing tiny is here today to share her story and for that. I'm grateful tanya thank you. Thank you stephanie. If you could sort of back tell us about your experience how this relationship even again. It started beautifully when he first came up to me and started asking questions. It turned out that we both gone to harvard. We both had studied chinese. We both had spent time in china. We also both interested in spirituality and meditation. I mean it was a nerdy flirtation but also the fact that he was a politician. Who meditated was intriguing to me and then it started just as a normal dating relationship. We met in two thousand sixteen at the democratic national convention when he first approached me it felt too good to be true he was so adoring and complementary and supportive and it started like a fairytale but then the darkness started to seep in as time went by the controlling behavior isolating may the abusive language the criticism and then the physical violence started to emerge in the sexual context. And so when the abuse started emerging. Yes i was living with him. And because of the turbulent times after the election after the former president took office. Eric schneiderman became the leader of the democratic attorneys generals around the country who were standing up to trump. The national spotlight was on eric schneiderman. More than ever before and at the time that it was happening i thought the abuse was specific to me as so many victims do but then i realized through word of mouth and through friends that i was not the first and i realized that i wouldn't be the last. I am so grateful that he wrote this book that you're telling this story you said that at first domestic violence didn't look like what you expected it to explain that when it first happened. It happened in the blink of an eye.

Eric Schneiderman Tanya Silverado Tanya New York Stephanie The New Yorker Nbc News Msnbc NBC Harvard China
Have we found proof of alien civilization?

The Big Story

03:29 min | Last week

Have we found proof of alien civilization?

"You get your podcasts. A couple of times a year. Something weird shows up in the sky. Sometimes we can see it ourselves. When small pieces of meteors or space junk streak through the atmosphere. It happened around. Eleven o'clock last night a fireball flying across the western sky people from vancouver island to brooks alberta reported seeing something in the sky sometimes we detect bigger. Things headed our way and we all wonder for a minute. What would happen if they hit us. In cosmic terms this is a very close encounter the closest one that nasa has ever seen for something this big and sometimes we see things and we just wonder what the heck the universe has sent our way. Three years ago we encountered an object. That looked like well. It looked like a cigar but it also looked like nothing we'd ever seen in space before and now one of the world's leading astrophysicists has a new book. The tries to answer the question of what it was. It was aliens no really aliens. It was proof that somewhere out. There is intelligent life. It was proof that we're not alone. Don't believe me okay fine. Let's see if you believe him. I'm jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story. Avi low is the astrophysicist. That i mentioned he is from harvard university and he is the author of extraterrestrial the first sign of intelligent life beyond earth. Hello avi thanks for having me. It is my pleasure This is not the first interview you've done about this book. You've done many and i've seen you basically everywhere as i guess the quote unquote scientist who says we have proof of aliens. Is that an accurate way to refer to you Suddenly as the scientists that is everywhere because ahead about a hundred and fifty interviews over the past few weeks but You know we have clues that perhaps the first object that we found Near earth that came from outside the solar system may have been It technology color artifact and that may indicate that not only we are not alone but the may there may very well be a smarter kid on the block so 2017. was a long time ago by the standards. We judge time by now. Maybe you could take us back there and just describe what we saw and what we thought of it at the time so this object was discovered by telescope in hawaii and there was given the name imamura Which means the hawaiian language scout or a messenger. From our way it was the first object we identified near the earth that the originated far from the sun outside the solar system. And we know that because it moved at the very high speed relative to

Brooks Alberta Jordan Heath Rawlings Avi Low Vancouver Island Nasa Harvard University Hawaii
Living the racism dream: Where comedy ends and activism begins

The Big Story

08:10 min | Last week

Living the racism dream: Where comedy ends and activism begins

"And i don't know much about being funny on stage. I know even less about trying to do that as a black woman and alberto but i do know that someone who can win over a cowboy crowd in one of canada's whitest places by telling jokes about systemic. Racism has a kind of power. The can be used for many things racism races. You ll with this star today. We will meet that woman. One of the only black women comics in alberta. Maybe the only one in calgary and we'll take a look at where her power comes from and how she wields it to make her province a better more inclusive place. oh and also she will crack you up. I promise and hopefully she'll make you think a little bit differently about where comedy and performance ends and activism begins. Because it's a really blurry line and that's a fascinating thing. I'm jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story. I am so happy to be back with you after a couple of weeks off. Thanks to fatima. Siad for holding down this chair while i was gone today. We're going to talk to adora for a calgary based stand up comedian. The president of black lives matter y y c and one of the subjects in a documentary. That airs tonight. February twenty-second at ten pm eastern on c. d. tv or on demand later at city. News dot ca. Hello adora hulo jordan. Nice to be here. It's great to have you Why don't you begin by telling me about your approach to doing. Stand up comedy about systemic. Racism of my approach is really just to talk about the absurdity of both my experiences being born raised and still living racism dream here in calgary alberta canada. You know. I'm also a pretty big person i like to say i'm giant because i'm six one before shoes and depending on the day you know though she's could be nine inches and then i can have like another three inches of hair you know if i have like the double bang from the eighties. That's i mean at least three inches for that bang so you know i take up as much space as possible by those. Are the things that i lake so it seems like it's a punch in the face for people but for me normal. That's every day that's regular. That's the girl next door so who i just. I'm really direct and pretty sarcastic. Some people will say that. I mean but it's all in good fine and with a message like i truly hope that people are hearing that you know there's a different point of view there's room for growth and if you're open you can practice anti-racism and get that glow that you need. Give me an example of the kinds of topics that that you will address head on Sort of in a way. That might not even be intended to be funny but maybe because of the setting right. Well i mean. I talk about racism. I talk about gender tra. I talk about transphobia and sexism. How sizes them affects my life You know let's talk about dating. So sometimes i feel like my audience doesn't deserve that because that's really the funniest stuff Dating and sex in a truly i save vagina onstage. That some people have been very upset about that way he may set Is said it. One time i said the word vagina one time. I've already said it more times today than i did on set and the person came back to another show and says all you talk about is your pussy and i was like okay I have one so why. Not some lame. How many guys talks about their phallic. Why can't i talk about that. And really his problem was with me. Saying ledge aina and i was like but i only said it once and he said well. We never hear that. So i was like ok that to say that more. That sounds really tame for a standup comedy. Complaint i mean it's calgary their little conservative and I'm the only black woman who's been doing. Comedy in calgary consistently the the scene is not necessarily the most friendly to us and yas so i talk about that that kind of stuff as far as i'm concerned that's what you you came to hear like. You heard all the way people talking about that. You heard on the men talking about that. So why wouldn't you wanna hear it. People think i'm a groupie. And then i get on stage in their shots. I'm the talent. Apparently look how a stand up comedian should look so. I'm just out here breaking all the rules wearing clothes and talking to myself. What are the audiences like because what you just said made me picture. A very white western conservative audience is that is that what you're seeing and the club's dang dang. That's what's in the clubs. But that's not necessarily where i go to perform. So i performed for all kinds of audiences because calgary has all types of people living here and The world needs to know that more in calgary needs to identify us as valuable in their city. More I can go to a room full of black women so yes. In months i can interact with all kinds of people like folk fast. I've done carry west Reggae fast lake it could be a roomful of conservative white man You know blue collar white collar women Trans folks i host at burlesque like so like if people are willing to hear my message. I'm i'm willing to share with them. How different is the core of your stand up message from the work that you do with black lives matter other exactly the same. How does that work. Tell me about that. It seems kind of weird. Hey people are often like. i don't get it. I come from the foundation of anthropology. I know that doesn't really sounds right but That's my education. I i love to see how different people live around the world and different cultures societies. Lifeways and i used comedy to save myself as a child. But i have always been focused on know community and then i really liked fashion and so all three of those things i use everywhere all the time because they are organic to me So when i'm doing comedy like i'm putting on an outfit. That for me has a message. Sometimes people get it sometimes people. Don't i do my best to be anti to practice anti-racism every day every moment. Sometimes i don't because i have been socialized in white supremacy in

Calgary Jordan Heath Rawlings Adora Hulo Jordan Alberta Siad Adora Canada Alberto Fatima Foundation Of Anthropology
Beyond Back to Normal

PM Mood

05:37 min | Last week

Beyond Back to Normal

"A f- with me danielle moody this week on my patriot. I shared conversations that examined how we can reverse the damage that the last four years have done on our country and what can be done to create a better future for everybody today. I'm bringing you thoughtful tastes from two of those interviews looking at the structural inequities in the public school system and the continued fight for lgbtq equality as always to hear these full discussions and get full. One hour shows. Every single week had over to patriotdepot dot com slash woke af and subscribe for. Now take a listen to my talk with educational scholar repay our author of reading writing and racism about how teaching race evasiveness to educators only deepens. The racial divide in our schools. What kind of pushback do you gat when you're telling people like oh we're doing this work but we have to undo this work in our classrooms like it isn't just a you know an exercise in like growth in our democracy. But it's like how do we do that I'm glad you're thousand experienced as it certainly isn't the norm. I'm in teacher education programs. I think most educators consider themselves specialists in the subject area that they're preparing people to teach so i'm elementary education. My specialty is social studies. So that's what. I'm supposed to prepare people to do instead of thinking about that. We are preparing a whole person that is going to be sitting in run of a whole room full of people and that what teachers teach is not just their subject matter. We teach our beliefs. And so if we're not giving our future teachers and opportunity to unpack what it is a believe particularly around race than they're going to go in and teach mainstream dominant racial ideology to their students. And that's what the first part of my book is about is the kind of racist curriculum. That is going viral right now. That is sort of seen as one off bad teachers or bad apples but that really point to the permanence of racism in education because like most of society teachers have not necessarily done that. The work understand their the way that they think about race the way that they think about Difference you know. I often believed you know we did such a grave disservice to everyone not not just teachers when we said oh you know. Be blind to race right like. Let's let's let's ignore it. Let's tolerate it right. I grew up in a schooling system. That was ninety six percent white. I was the only black kid. Most of the time in my classes and that wasn't acknowledged and by by the not acknowledging it it was like it was a way to basically say you need to assimilate right like you are supposed to assimilate to be like everybody else and that the uniqueness and the experiences that you're bringing into this place we don't care now. Yeah you know for teachers. That sort of with pride have that. I don't see color. i see little purple yellow. It's really based in a deficit notion of people of color when you're white teachers. Say that because what they're saying is if i acknowledge your race than there something negative that on doing some reason why i'm not supposed to notice it in a phenomenal to notice it. It must be because there's something wrong with it and so there's this fear that i think is underneath. That is a fear of being called gray says Fear underneath a lot of white teachers. And so they spouse this race of vases kind of mentality. I've been moving away from colorblind. So i'm trying to. I know and i actually when you know when you just said race evasive. I'm like oh that's a better term right. Yeah we've been working on that one in the field for a while. But i think that it's it's really what's under underneath that is deficit understandings about race. I had a student once who was like. Well it's not that. I don't want to acknowledge their race but i also you know. I don't wanna be making assumptions. What is the assumption. You're afraid that you're making. What was the assumption that they were afraid that they were making well. It was actually very confusing when she actually started to talk about when she started to get into it she had a lot of confusion around race period. I mean there's so much right beneath the surface you know. talking about how well as she gets tan than. She's darker than some of her students. And so i think she was wondering if that she still white. I mean it was look. This stuff is odd examined and it well and so if we're not giving them a place to talk about this than the classroom is the place where they're experimenting and we see the results of what that looks like. When we see these cases of curriculum that are floating around it you know. As recent as three days ago there was a curriculum on out of wisconsin around. I think the words were something like something about an escaped slave. Yup and how would you

Danielle Moody Confusion Wisconsin
How Americas biggest flour company survived 2020

The Big Story

04:25 min | Last week

How Americas biggest flour company survived 2020

"Hi megan thanks so much for being here. Thanks for having me. You've written this incredible story about the flour shortage of twenty twenty the infamous flour shortage of twenty twenty Should say i want to start by asking you. You describe the shortage as eerie and you describe it as something from wartime that. We've never actually experienced in america or around the world because this happened in. Britain happened in candidate happening australia. When did you personally witness the national flour shortage and of become aware of it. So i got paranoid about covid and food like a week earlier than a lot of other people my social circle so i remember going to supermarkets in very early march here in los angeles and buying a ton of canned goods and the people checking me out looked at me like what are you doing like. Why are you buying all this non perishable food for like weeks. You know a couple of weeks worth of it and i i think like wasn't even i was afraid to even say late because i'm worried about covid. Nineteen even though now at this point we know it was spreading widely in los angeles. At that point. I did pick up some flour. But that didn't it never occur to me to grab a ton of flour while it was still there so it must have been late march. We started doing curbside pickup with our local coop and the hardest thing to get was flour. And i remember also because i really liked to bake In this hour dow before it became a giant thing. Though i got into it not through for it was a little trendy i will admit and i remember. We went to king arthur's website and there was something saying like to bag limit per order. And that made me think whoa and at the same point we were seeing in our slack. Newsroom on eater. That like search terms for bread. We're going bonkers on google so actually called king arthur that day so it was sort of late march and spoke to their Pr team hordes of super bowl and actually want to work with you to get a great story which is rare and wonderful and you know i said hey like i just you guys are limiting orders. What's up with that and the representative bill. Time told me they had put that in that day. So i happened to go to their website and see it just as instituted it and he did say yeah. We're having this kind of run on flour and we're seeing really insane traffic on our website because king arthur develops a lot of their recipes. That are really great. They use Veteran recipe developers and those recipes. Very reliable books to right so they've been doing this for for a long time. they have cookbooks. They have like baking academies. it's a really interesting company. Also their employee owned on. There's really nothing quite like them. In the food space. So at the time i think i did a story more on an this rising haha interest in bread and sour go and at the time they really thought sourdot was happening purposes a yeast shortage so people are buying flour. They all wanted to make bread because remember also the bread was running out. I remember i can get bread for a couple of weeks from my co op. And now we know that this appliance held you know. Maybe i mean i was definitely too. Many people were put in danger to hold supply lines but the bread did come back. You know. I do wonder how much it was seeing. Bread sell out and thinking like okay. I'll admit big my own bread and then east sells out. You know it will. Now what am i going to do. Because i'm going to get soured from someone. And then the flour runs out. And i think in april early april. I remember gossiping with my neighbors. Because now we're all like. I'm on our lawns gossiping. All the time and one of them told me that they were going to a local italian market that was selling flower in small bags and then my landlords also my neighbors actually scored twenty five pound bag of bread flour from costco and then and i had given them some bread and then a few days sort of almost sheepishly were like We're never going to use this this twenty times founding of bread flour so yeah i do remember in april. I don't remember the first moment. I couldn't get flour by members in king arthur's limit. Come down and at that point. I think it was already hard to order any kind of of their traditional flowers from them.

King Arthur Los Angeles Megan Britain Australia America Super Bowl Google Costco