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How Rolling Stones Suzy Exposito Made History with Her Bad Bunny Cover Story

Latina to Latina

5:51 listening | 1 d ago

How Rolling Stones Suzy Exposito Made History with Her Bad Bunny Cover Story

"Makes a good celebrity profile? Great when I don't like about some celebrity profiles is like the ones that that come off like being a little too. There's a word for it. Like ingratiating or like defying people in a way. That's is so smarmy to me for me. I broke my own rule in this story. Actually because I usually don't talk about myself at all and profiles. I think that that can kill the buzz a lot of time. I don't like when people start reflecting on their own lives in the middle of somebody else's profile I usually find it distracting. I think the point where I broke. That rule was when I talked about disclosing to him like my sexuality and I could you identify as bi. I do identify as bisexual. Yeah and I have for the last ten years at least openly and so I chose to have this part of the conversation. You know closet because I'm still at my grandmother's house and that's still something. It's like a sore subject for my family. It just is and like but at this point. I'm like thirty years old. I'm like what are y'all GonNa to do ground me like spear also hiding in a closet. Yeah I had to really reckon with the fact that I'm still worried about making my family uncomfortable and I think a lot of US still a lot of us can be like what like forty five sixty instill never be able to really discuss that side of ourselves with families like I have so many people in my family who are also queer. It's just they don't talk about it. You know every once in a while somebody has a roommate. That's like a common thing or somebody like brings their friend to Christmas. You know it's coded and that's just how things are in my family and in so many other families. I waited until I was in a serious relationship with a woman to come out because at that point I was like. I don't know I knew how I felt for many years by. I didn't even take it seriously until I was in a relationship. That's when I came out to my mom. She was super supportive. And like really sweet about it. This would have been ten years ago. An also like anyone who is queer also knows that like coming out is not. It's not like a one and done kind of thing you'll spend like the rest of your life coming out over and over again like I did my article. That's just like one of the many times and I also was so struck by an exchange that you had on twitter because in addition to interviewing buddy you interviewed a home Mulu of celebrities including Ricky Martin and it evoked someone to respond that like there was always a lot of homophobia around Ricky Martin. It wasn't yes just when he came out that he experienced that homophobia that those of us who sort of knew about Ricky Martin were exposed to that like it was always there and it was always a subject of conversation and that that predates the coming out very often. Yes it dies. Link oftentimes like you'll get bullied for being like any kind of queer. You'll kept bullied for many years before you even own up to it. Why did you choose to weave that into this story? It was something that I discussed with my editor because it was like after. I did that you know like when I when I brought my computer in the closet. I was like a like a met my in house lake. I don't want her like listening to this conversation. It's so funny. I love her so much but she like she liked to listen to some of my interviews for one because I was speaking in Spanish. That's kind of rare for my family. They don't they. Don't really speak Spanish with me so I think that she was kind of entertained by hearing me analyst like God. I can't do this but then when I thought about it a little bit more on like it is because I still can't talk about this around my family I just can't and what bad bunny did with his drag video. It was so powerful. Because I really don't think I I mean Ricky Martin is gay. I don't think Ricky Martin would have gotten away with that I really don't he presents as very masculine and if he tried doing that even even this year like if he tried to do that with people really accept it. It's like I think to this day. Like people prefer gay men to be masculine in like street passing or whatever. That's a very real thing so for someone like bad bunny who's in a very secure relationship with a woman. And WHO's the most popular rapper slash singer in Latin America right now and end in the US for someone like him to go out on a limb and dress in drag as like a show of solidarity with Queer People? I was like he's doing this so I don't have to feel this way anymore. And so that's when I decided to set the scene. We stayed in the closet for like an hour and just talked about. We talked about gender and sexuality in like why he started caring about all this because he really doesn't have to care and the fact that he goes out there and says like I'm not okay with this is

Ricky Martin United States Twitter Latin America House Lake Analyst Editor
Think no one can defeat Lindsey Graham?  'Watch me!' his Democratic opponent says.

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

8:41 listening | Last week

Think no one can defeat Lindsey Graham? 'Watch me!' his Democratic opponent says.

"I'm Jonathan Kaye. Part and this is Cape Up. When I was in South Carolina in February for the Democratic primary I sat down with Jamie Harrison. He's the former chairman of the State's Democratic Party. The first African American to hold the post and now he's vying to become the Palmetto sleet second black sitting. Us senator by running against incumbent. Republican Senator Lindsey. Graham Harrison has an incredible bio one. That took him from being so poor. He ate cereal with water to being a graduate of Yale and Georgetown Law school his race to defeat. Graham has gone from improbable to possible since we talked. Harrison's first quarter fundraising broke state records and he's within striking distance of overtaking. The man folks once revered. Here's what he said happened at Focus Group in Charleston and one woman. Said said to the moderator. She said it and I'm bothered. By the fact that Lindsey Graham did not stand up for his friend John McCain and she said if he won't stand up for his best friend. What would do for me here? Harrison explain how that sentiment could be his route to victory over Lindsey Graham right now Jamie Harrison. Thank you very much for being on the PODCAST. Thank you Jonathan. I appreciate it so I to get into to who you are and when you look at your biography it's gripping in its gripping in its deprivation and in its success and start with the dipper the tough early years and there one line in your bio that just grabbed me and I read it several times a simple line and it was Were you said you remember eating cereal with water? Because you couldn't afford milk. Listen when I tell folks that we it was difficult and hard it was The that particular situation there are a number of occasions. Where you we go to fridge. Go get some milk. I love fruity pebbles. I also and and and my grandma would You know sometimes. She wouldn't be at home because she's working and it wouldn't be milk and so you have to put water in it I there were times Jonathan when you know my grandfather who were construction would get up in the morning needed to go to work. And the Goethe's car truck in the gas on empty in In so you know. I'm helping him trying to looking through couch cushions Looking for quarter nickel dime so he just get enough. You know at that time Gal. Gas was less than a dollar Just enough to Get to work and back and and because he needed to go to work we we had to have him go to work. It wasn't like he was going. He was on salary. Who's GONNA I mean We were we were Every Nickel County In our household himself you lived with your grandparents. Because your your mom had you when she was sixteen yes she. She had me when she was sixteen years old. And we. My mom and I both live with my grandparents for awhile and then my mom decided She got a job and got a house and moved out until then I stayed with her for a while and then she got laid off at her job and couldn't find anything here in South Carolina so she decided to go to Atlanta and When she decided to go to Atlanta the the agreement was that she would go find a job. Kind of get situated. I would see here with my grandparents until that happened but You know time pass. My mom did eventually situated. But I didn't WanNa leave my grandparents and it's because my grandparents and I had sort of a symbiotic relationship It got to the point where I feel obligated like I took care of them and they took care of me They didn't have a whole lot of education. My grandmother had an eighth grade education because she dropped out of school to pick cotton and then worked in textile insurance she did. Domestic were and my grandfather had a fourth grade education. He Stop School. He worked at a dairy and then he did construction. Most of his life up until he got diabetes but because they didn't have a lot of education and you know I was a kid. Who's the I did well in school even early on I was reading above my reading. Level you know early on and so Bills would come into the house and it was my job to read them to tell my grandparents what it was now the context for what? I was reading. It had no idea what clue was but That's what I read. And so but at the same time they took care of me they made sure I had my clothes my food and and took me to all the little things that I wanted to do. And so we had a very very close bond and in some ways my grandparents And I were is sort of a second set of parents in essence and But due to remarkable people one really horrible thing that happened was that their house was sold out from under actually taken away from them. Talk about what happened in that. So you know when I was this is when I was in Middle School Mike Grimm so the House that I was born in my grandparents decided to sell. 'em Uh my grandma was just had her heart set on a mobile home in this. When you know mobile homes are eight. They were coming out in their fancy and they had like the Jacuzzi Tub and all this other stuff even though we now know it as an investment is not something that you really want to invest. Because it didn't build any equity in thing so but nonetheless they went and they decide to get a mobile home so they took the money that a guy from the house they went to this mobile home manufacturing place and they bought one But they had to meet mortgage payments. Just like you know you would do on a house and so my The Guy who was there at the at the place he basically told my grandparents. Okay every month you bring your your payment to me and I will send it in to the And so they decide to do that. And so what you say is bring your money order because my grandfather always would go to post office and You get his paycheck. Get a cash. Go to the post office. Get a money order. My grandma would take the money order to the The Guy and he said well I'll feel it out for you so I can put all the information on it right and they did it for months and then they started getting letters that said you know Harrison. We haven't receive your payments allied and he took the my grandma and I would take a ladder to the guy and said I'll call them right now and find out what's going on. There's something wrong with their computer systems. Or whatever when on for a few more months then finally. It was a knock on the door. It was a sheriff in an. He's said Mr Miss Hairs. I'm to tell you but The bank is foreclosed on your home. And you're going to have you have until this time to move out. And they were devastated. Grandfather never really cried much had never saw. He's one of those you lose. All southern men just tough Grizzle Digest. It never cried and but that was one of the first times I saw my grandfather cry Because he would. He always believed in being diligent with his bills because his his father always told me to do that. We will. You always pay your bills and So we were. We were stuck on sleeping on couches and spare beds of friends and You know aunts cousins for a few months until my My grandma and you know as luck would have it. My grandfather also lost his job that the guy who ran the construction company rain for got ill and so they had to lay off all the folks on the companies and my grandfather also lost his job right around the same time and so finally we found this little place. Six forty four Green Street in Orangeburg. it was an a not a duplex triplex. Or something like that. And we had this one. Little two bedroom on the in and In my launch video. There's a picture of me walking in front of it. I mean it was didn't having the air conditioning Those little small cramp thing and But that's where we live for an all number of

Graham Harrison Jamie Harrison Jonathan Kaye Lindsey Graham South Carolina Senator Lindsey United States Democratic Party Cape Up Chairman Senator Georgetown Law School John Mccain Yale State Records Charleston Bills Atlanta Focus Group
Andrea Hailey, CEO of Vote.org Discusses Protecting Our Vote During a Pandemic, and Vote-by-Mail

The Electorette Podcast

6:04 listening | Last week

Andrea Hailey, CEO of Vote.org Discusses Protecting Our Vote During a Pandemic, and Vote-by-Mail

"Haley welcome to the fight CAST Inc. You could be here Jennifer. I just WanNa talk a bit about Oregon. What you've accomplished over the past several years because it's really impressive. You know when I look at the numbers. You've registered more than three point. Three million new voters and you've verified registration for eight million voters and you do that primarily through technology. How does that work? Yes absolutely anyone can come to our site. Vote Dot Org and they can verify registration status and if you're registered to let you know and if you're not registered the site will lead you through a workflow that specific to your state and allow you to go ahead and in states where you have online voter registration and go ahead registered to vote and right now. You can request absentee vote by mail through the site. So that's pretty exciting. We've have a ton of organic traffic and we also have a lot of partners. Who User tools and embed them on their websites through that we end up with a lot of traffic in distractions working hand in hand with our partnership groups awhile. I didn't know about that. Change about being able to register for absentee ballots in vote by mail. I think that's really really important especially given the times we're in but I know you and I were talking about this off. Line that one of the most important things that people can do right now is to go to Dr Oregon. Check to see if you are registered as something that you say that people should do early right. Yes we like to say. Do it early often. So you can verify your registration. Make sure you're still on the rolls in. If you're not then you can go ahead and register through the site. But the verification of registration takes you know less than two minutes so that's the easiest way to go online. You can check on your phone on more on your computer. And we're really encouraging people to go ahead and do that and to continuously check that it's up to date and then I think the other thing. We're really encouraging people to do is. If you're going to vote absentee and if you can in your state which will take you through all your state rules on the site to do that as early as possible. So that you're getting your request in early. Just in case states get overwhelmed with requests especially in places where they're not used to having the administer by mail so go on the site. Ask for your absentee in verifier status. Right that's really important especially this year. I mean we saw during the primaries numbers up in lots of states right and people who think that they're on top of everything and think they might be registered. This is just check anyway because like you said states could get overwhelmed and if you need to register you don't want to be caught in November and find out that you're not registered and you've missed the deadline because I don't even know what my voter registration deadline is for my state. I don't know that's right. I mean and unfortunately we have so many different dens country depending on what state you're in because we have this kind of I think we've discussed before Wonky. Ping where unlike other countries where all fifty states in the US administered their own elections because of. You may have different registration deadlines you know somebody who's living in a different state than neo. So I don't think that people are aware of those deadlines off the top of their heads. So it's better to go on go online early. Go Dead Work. We tell you the deadlines Too so you can find those out there and get access to that information but really the earlier you get into the systems and in the process the better and into it often so yeah so you bring up a really good point about in this country because in other countries I know the things are different and then brings up a really fundamental question for me. Why is this a thing in this country? Why do we even have the separate? It seemingly convoluted registration process. And you know you have organizations and activists in all this money being dedicated to get people to do something that we say that we want all Americans to do and all Americans have the right to do. They have the right to exercise their right to vote. You have to go through these hoops to get registered. And I'm thinking about countries like Australia. Encana and I think Australia has birds of ninety five percent voter participation right in their elections so why in America is it so complicated? And why is it a separate process? That's a great question. I mean I think that we need to go back and redesign our systems with voters in mind and design them. This is a great time to imagine as everybody's having to change in just in time of Kobe. Why don't we imagine a system where everybody is participating in where we can get to eighty percent voter participation in the country and then work backwards from there? What would it take to get to eighty percent voter participation because we think about dot org that voters want to participate we believe that many of the systems in place created in ways that are not conducive? Brunson's many states do not have twenty days of early voting. That would be immensely helpful for people who need time off from work or who are concerned right now about social distancing. Don't WanNA stand in lines. I think that there's a lot of conversation that could be had about. How design a system with the actual voting population in mind? Because that's what Ms Service I also think we're in a moment whereas a lot of voting systems need to modernize any state that doesn't have online voter registration right now. There's no reason to not go ahead and make the change to all my voter registration. I mean we saw New Jersey Change. We saw North Carolina Change. And I think that the handful of remaining states that don't have online voter registration should go ahead and do that. The other thing is we know it's easier for a lot of people when they can vote by mail so people should have an option about whether they want to go into a polling location or whether they want to vote by mail and states should automatically in a time of co bed. Just make that so that you don't need an excuse to vote by mail in any state should be kind of a given you kinda think long term here. What are the things that would make voting easier on people and participation easier on people and and these are the things that are just a couple of things that would make it easier on everybody? But I don't think our system designed for the modern world that we're in right now and I don't think it was designed with the anticipation of full participation of our population but to have a healthy and thriving democracy. That's how we're going to have to start thinking about this

Oregon Haley Jennifer Australia Dr Oregon North Carolina Cast Inc United States Encana Brunson America
Why Billy Porter says he cant be a politician

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

6:51 listening | Last week

Why Billy Porter says he cant be a politician

"I'm Jonathan Kaye. Part and this is Cape Up. Billy Porter has a Tony for Kinky a grammy for kinky booths an emmy for his role as prey tail in the television. Show pose even. If you didn't know any of that you probably heard about that. Black Velvet Tuxedo Gown quarter war to the Oscars in twenty nine thousand nine hundred. It was an instant station and made the popular actor and singer in instant cultural icon. We talked all about that moment and how once he was true to himself. His career really took off and we talk politics. Quarter loves to talk about politics and explained during a conversation about the groner virus why he could never be a politician. Talk in October here at all right now. Billy Porter thank you so much for coming on the PODCAST. Thanks for having me. Okay so we gotta get the big news out of the way I and that is the Matt Galle. You and vogue teamed up to do a called. Hashtag met Gal Challenge. It was people going on instagram. To recreate the fashions that have come through the red carpet. Where did this idea come from? Was it. Yours was Anna winters? Well we started at me and my team started it with my own personal social media platform and audience. And you know with all the fabulous that I am and the stuff that people know me for. I don't think people realize how political I am and how serious I am. And so in this time I wanted to give my people something to distract them. A little bit While simultaneously not having to engage myself. Because I don't really feel very fashion oriented right now. I don't feel very silly right now. Like I'm having a hard time sort of mustering energy to just be goofy and filthy. I WanNa push you on that. Because at the met gala last year was when you were brought in as I guess a Sun Goddess or Cleopatra and and it was at the Oscars in twenty nineteen when you showed up in a in a black Christian Serio Tuxedo gown and I saw the instagram post or the Social Media. It just blew up and it was such an iconic moment. Do you understand. Just how big that Oscar gown you was. Yeah I understand on paper. I understand in theory. It's a really heady experience you know because I just found a space over the fifty years of my life to kind of just stand in my truth and get zero fs to anybody or anything and really just be authentic and so much to do. That wasn't about going by world much leads to do that was. That's just what to do. And you know there are conversations that need to be had in this world and when one has a platform as I have been able to build and create especially over the last couple of years I do understand the power and the impact that something like that could have. I didn't realize how big it could be I mean it literally speak of it as like B. O. A. O. In terms of my life before Oscar after Oscar like my life is completely different. And that's why I was pushing you on this idea you. You're saying you didn't feel like being silly. And yet before Oscar after Oscar is a great way to put it because when you strode across the red carpet in that Black Velvet Tuxedo gown. It was a thunder clap for a whole lot of communities. You told our friend or mutual. Good friend Tamarin on her show you said you spend a lot of your life quote unquote in the masculinity game. Talk about that what are you what did you mean by that when you said well you know from the moment. I could comprehend thoughts. My masculinity was in question and in our culture and our society masculinity as at the top of the food chain and if you're not masculine enough you're dismissed. I was sent to a psychologist when I was five years old in kindergarten after every Wednesday at school to talk to somebody because my family thought I was too much of it so from the minute I could literally comprehend thought the messaging I received was. There's something wrong with you. And it's based on how you behave and that needs to be fixed so I live my whole life in that. And then you know. Get into business and it's amplified one hundred times more You know and I spent the first half of my life and my career in that masculinity game trying to be masculine enough so that I can eat so that I could get a job so I could get paid so I can eat. There came a time in my late thirties. Early Forties late thirties. I would say mid to late thirty where I just got sick And I- extracted myself from that part of the toxicity of what it can mean and leaned in to all the things that I was told would be my liability all of the things that I lived as a liability. They weren't wrong. They the people were not wrong. You know I took every hit that I could take not being masculine enough. I took them all it then. I decided that I didn't

Oscar Billy Porter Oscars Anna Winters Jonathan Kaye Cape Up Matt Galle Gal Challenge Instagram Cleopatra B. O. A. O.
Deadly Discussions

Deadly Discussions

7:36 listening | Last week

Deadly Discussions

"John Weapon Daily discussions before I get started like to acknowledge the truce land on his on. Whose land where recode. Which is the bone people because my name is not on or injury like it usually recorded the year. It's unbundling. So he in Victoria and by Tribes Apart of the cooling nations. So John Welcome to daily discussions the live version of it. Hey going today. Yeah great thanks. Yeah thanks thanks. Have a pleasure to be Walsum. Awesome and before we started doing a share away from and What you position at the moment yes. Sure so I'm almost from bitter a country which is sort of at central west Queensland Basically at in there in the middle in Iway significant sought for people so add sort of special spring show. Why at that? Why yet really? I still don't know where that is a bit here. It's about eight hours north west of Brisbane. Yeah Wow so wrought out and you said the cultural significance. How high are we talking? These ranges in a huge this this tearing Ryan said there that sort of some a couple of hundred meters above sea level in yes. I ended up work at their that. Dates back to more than ten days and Yeah this is a lot of historic History of the divers for us yet I still like finding I know some Victorian so digressing before we get into it but so interesting Some ABS Dan. Hey Lodge mountains. I won't even say which ones but there's a lot of artwork that is still being discovered across the ranges Nfl Aboriginal is only that sort of a case there as well. Yeah there's a lot of second thoughts Cousins Arranger at the National Park Yet she goes on sighing loss. Wake that I found another another cultural sought yet just pitcher. Esca the mold New Way to go in and had explosive in a new way to go in terms of that. It's risky. I'm yet that that last last week. Still sought still being developed in an explode today. Yes incredible now. I've got three strains on hassle. I can always look at what other stuff. You've been doing a lot easier on. Usually just tolkien. I'd take notes but having the technology makes it a so much more convenient Your previous work with Avi A. I meant you went at Futures Forum which I think was a program that e sort of took laid on him put together Juwan explain what a futures form is and then. How does that work with Indigenous people because a lot of these terms and days a very foreign because we practiced these elements in different aspects of different ways but now with aligning so it makes sense in a in a Western context share. What a futures forum that works yes. Other futures will become that was born out of a of an agenda really engage with the future generation In terms of business economic sense and side what we've done is we raised Former colleague in MSL developed this concept. That really looked at. What does the future look like for indigenous people in this country in the next fifty years? What does that look like in relation to business? And let's get together deadly bunch of of a feature entrepreneurs and business people too early unpack. What that what that looks locking site that just got together. There are more country that we got and Yet we we tries back into into a pasta history and work towards a future vision statement as to what business. Lock in fifty. Is Tom here? There's some powerful stuff and was great to meet you there and have the caliber of yourself in the other people in the room. I think it was a fairly painful experience that we will go by. Yeah I think for me. It was a low the Tom I am. I'm coming onto thirty now. And so being a young entrepreneur and saying other young entrepreneurs full of indigenous latest. Probably like pretty intimidated. I was like Oh man these all these ideas a deadly like I should have thought of that But then I like you guys. Sharing and the facilitated tristen was sharing that A lot of people like early in the states have these expos in forums where I would pretty much plan how cities and how things would be divided in built and then from there that people have got the knowledge in the nine how where to position themselves to to get work where to position themselves to united. Start a business or bill equity and ask first nations people. We never really sold the reason to build up and build high things. We were living off the land sustainably living with each other trading with each other trading with Malays in Indonesia that went through China and dumb CEOS a concept that we sort of bring best both worlds really. I applaud you for that. And now you'll see you. Yes we'll get back to that. Let's rock back to dot. Cue the sound. That does time. What but let's take it back to growing up which you grow up you grow up. In country or country or countries all grew up in up McCulloch Soda Knowles In central Queensland depending on what body look at in jail grow up there in all of my family are in Rockhampton I basically Doesn't as denies dies was that my grandfather was a stockman escape. The mission law in skype in many ways living under the in that sort of thing and went from station to station appropriate. Property doing yeah. The stockman taught work fencing wholesale Some incredible stories of driving in Horses AND SHAPE AND WHATNOT INSIDE. Visually move from station station. He was born on country At at a major country and then ended up in a place called home Which is just enough canton and yum. Yeah as it was day of the policy was United Australia. Policy came in failure can equal pay came in and style of the. The property was working on Couldn't afford to pay the white that the business side I got booted at in the closest town was canton and yeah. The mobile is still there so I grew up. Just north of the. What's gone back and forth Rockhampton big family as as we are on my grandfather possibly one hundred six years old on on bitter country and had three hundred more than three hundred grandchildren gripe drain grandchildren and great grandchildren. And yet my grandfather's up to up to two hundred PSI The McCain down on having token I so yeah

Futures Forum John Weapon Hey Lodge Victoria Brisbane Cousins Arranger Walsum Iway Rockhampton Ryan Mccain TOM United Australia National Park Queensland Avi A. Indonesia Juwan Skype DOT
The eerie similarities between the killings of Ahmaud Arbery and Trayvon Martin

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

7:24 listening | 2 weeks ago

The eerie similarities between the killings of Ahmaud Arbery and Trayvon Martin

"I'm Jonathan Cape Part and this is Cape Up Benjamin crump. In attorney for the family of Ahmad arbitrary is perfectly clear on his view of what happened to the twenty five year old Black Man jogging near his Georgia home. On February twenty third chased him let community until they caught up with and then they executed him like a modern day. Mitch if crump's name sounds familiar. It's because he was the lawyer for the family of Trayvon Martin. The seventeen year old shot and killed by a neighborhood watch volunteer in Florida on February. Twenty Sixth Twenty twelve listen to crump talk about the eerie similarities between the February. Twenty twenty killing of the MoD arbitrary and the February twenty twelve killings of Trayvon Martin. Right Down Attorney Benjamin crump thank you very much for coming on the PODCAST. Thank you fabric down at their decades covering. They're for the story. So you and I got to know each other eight years ago because of the the killing of trayvon Martin and the similarities between the killing of Trayvon Martin and the killing of a Marbury are really. It's kind of Irie. Could you bring us up to up to speed on on the facts of the case as as we talk right? Now I'll tell you have ever similar those fat X. Between tricky behind and Ahmad Aubrey navigate tragically Ahmad. Aubrey was changed by a murderous duo of FOB. Said to a Gregory and Travis met Michaels and another man then William Brian who has yet to be arrested ads on this day. He is alleged to beat the individuals driving other a ambushed Ahmad and was taken the video recording of this execution ago. By saying a I have a teacher Johnson and Jive was on and he was a person who with are routinely. He liked to stay in shape as many people. A heat with said show as for whatever reasons we believe. We know why they did it but they suspected him of a burglary and a jumped into their pickup truck shotgun. Jonathan and a three fifty seven magnum and they chased him that community into they caught up with him and then they execute it him like a modern day mentioned. And we see on that. Video is so tragic Washing see that video. You can't see and that's what happens. We watched the execution of his young on all black man killed. We believe because he was racially profile. And the police show up and they take the words of the killer's apparently because the killers are allowed to go home and sleep in their bed. Bites while on. Albury is taken to the more you know There are so many things here In the The facts of the case that you just spelled out and I just want it there. Is the police report as it was filed in the moments after after the shooting after the killing where it says the witnesses said that arbitrary looked like a suspect who had been Breaking into that particular house and that They saw him quote unquote hauling ass down the street and when you look at the video I WanNa talk about how we got this video to begin with but when you look at the video. He's not hauling. Ass Johnson. He's doing what most people in America he is. Simply interest is and you know you put in contact. They come up with some a believable reasons. The killers down. It's you'd think about a walking while driving while black Both in general it is apartment literal while blatch Trae Bob more walking home while blatch may is submitted things Attia Jefferson sitting in her house living while black and now we come to Amman Albury and he's just Jonathan Wa black. They suspected him for that. All right let's talk about the McMichael's Chavis Michael Is the person who had the shotgun And fired the shots. That killed Ahmed Arbitrary and George. Mcmichael is the father who is standing in the back of the pickup truck with a three fifty seven magnum. A talk about why Gregory McMichael in particular is problematic in this case. Certainly we believe that the police did not arrest these murderous fob and said do also the cost Gregory met. Michael was a former police officer and had a thirty year. Employment will as a detected as a DA with the local district attorney. Glenn cowards so we believe they did not want to arrest their friends their colleagues and so that is what reason. We suspect Jonathan that they didn't arrest him. The other reason is even more heinous. We believe because Aubrey was a young for American that the police simply took the word of his white careless that he was up to no good that he was committing a burglary without doing any of appropriate investigation. Apparently because you know if he was A. Where's the burglar's mask? Where's the Burgers toes whereas the burger bags you know whereas the incident allegations of burglaries in this neighborhood? In the past says they suspended he had committed burglaries before. Or is it simply? They know that he wasn't a burger but it didn't matter because they had made a decision that they were not going to rest their France. Who happened to me? The killing this young black man

Ahmad Aubrey Benjamin Crump Jonathan Cape Trayvon Martin Ass Johnson Gregory Mcmichael Attorney Burglary Chavis Michael Attia Jefferson FOB Florida Mitch Ahmed Arbitrary Mcmichael Albury Georgia William Brian Amman Albury
Dying of whiteness during the coronavirus pandemic

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

9:41 listening | 3 weeks ago

Dying of whiteness during the coronavirus pandemic

"I'm Jonathan Kaye part. Welcome to Cape Up. Jonathan Metzler back sooner than I expected because of the Corona virus pandemic in his book dying of Whiteness. How the politics of racial resentment is killing. America's heartland Nestle the director of Vanderbilt University Center for medicine. Health and society put a human face on the opposition to many policies that would save lives and livelihood a warning of the lengths to which the white working class voters could either have underlying racism or be manipulated to vote in support of wealthy donors corporations but against their own life stance. And it's just been on steroids since this pandemic started. Listen to mental. Explain why those anti stay at home protests in state capitals Egged on by the president that historical pattern and why the politics racial resentment is a deflection. That works right now. Jonathan Metzel. Thank you very much for coming back to the PODCAST. It's great to be back. I you were just on the podcast a couple of months ago and I try not to go back to Previous guests sooner than say six months but the situation that we're in right now with the with covert nineteen sort of demanded that you come back. We had on Reverend William Barber talking about the racial disparities that we've now been forced to reckon with with the corona virus. And you sent me a message. Reminding me that everything that you wrote about in Europe antastic book dying of Whiteness is playing out in this corona virus and the covert nineteen pandemic. Talk about that well. The book I wrote Diana Whiteness was was really. I mean I who knew at the time but what I was talking about in. That book was about the ways in which there were kind of undercurrents of white racial resentment that shaped Attitudes among politicians and certain white voters particularly in mid in America. That am caused them to what you would think. Vote against their own biological self interests and so the story. I told him that book was a story. About how for example and working class and lower income white voters rejected the affordable. Care Act. Which would have helped them a lot because they thought that immigrants and minorities were gaming the system and I looked at The rise of guns as symbols of kind of white self protection. And you know that was. That was a a book that I thought was kind of how to beginning a middle and an end it was kind of a warning of the lengths to which when white working class voters could either have underlying racism or be manipulated to vote in support of wealthy donors in corporations but against their own life stance. And it's just been on steroids since this pandemic started. I mean everything from in you know. It seems like the best possible for many red states would be to expand Medicaid if people health and transferred this moment of dire need and you would think people would be rallying to get Medicaid. It would help them. Not just medically would help them. Financially not incur bankruptcies pay less for medications but instead trump has been actively actively not expanding Medicaid and and people have been supporting him and the same thing with guns are the the gun story as is eight hundred percent rise in gun sales in some states in in in conjunction with this idea And and so kind of across the board this idea and and of course brought to bear most recently by these protests are across across many red states where people are literally out there saying and we we want to support trump even if it costs us in our family members and our communities days and months and years of our lives and and the racial currents are just. I mean just absolutely unavoidable. Okay so let's let's start with the with those protests because as I watched the video coming from Lansing Michigan and other places and people is openly. Define what we all knew when they were protesting to be true that the corona virus is spread. If you are not socially distancing if you're not wearing a mask if you're shaking hands if you have any kind of physical contact and these votes were acting in total defiance of everything of everything we know up the is it. Are they being irrational in what they're doing or are they being rational in that support for Donald Trump and resentment of and racial resentment are enough for them to ignore science? Well I think there are a couple of things that are important to keep in mind about this process. I just always make clear when I talk about them. That those protests are not all all white Americans. They're not all trump supporters. That's a kind of vote very vocal very threatening fringe group. That has gotten a lot of validation from from trump and a lot of funding from the Devos family and other places and so in a way. Because we're all stuck at home. It's hard to see that there are a lot of people in red states who are terrified of what those protests represent Democrats and Republicans and so first of all. I think it's unfortunate just given the way we're all many of us at at home right now and it looks like that's every Republican out there and that's not the case that being said I try to avoid saying that anything is irrational You know I think would my research. I came to realize that there are there are deep and ideology said that makes sense to people and I think this idea of government. Overreach this idea that Social PROGRAMS ARE GONNA benefit immigrants and minorities and and at the expense of of white people. do these ideas are very very ingrained and I think that also when you when you combine that with a moment of real despair this I this moment of you know not just a more the risk of mortality but also this fear of you know real real economic trauma that people back on their deepest their deepest fears. We've seen that you know the rise of Nazi Germany on down that people when they're who've been there the most desperate it's not like they become the most centrist They they become the most terrified. And so it. At a moment like this people fall back on extreme ideologies. It's not like everybody's GonNa come to the middle and I think trump has been very artful at manipulating those anxieties and shifting blame race. That I think are very dangerous but it's not I. It's not irrational. If it's based in a particular reading of reality and and also Lib reality for a lot of people you know one of the big stories to come out of out of the corona virus coverage is the the health disparities disparities in impact that overwhelmingly the victims of Corona virus have been Americans and other people of color particularly African Americans. What role do you think that plays in the mindset of people who might be looking in saying you know that's affecting them and so therefore I don't need to be concerned about this? Well I think certainly that's been framing an edge of course true right in other words. Many of the people who died in this early phase are emigrants of members of minority groups. People who have to either have to go to work In in conditions are live in areas. Where there's a lot of density I certainly think that that led to a feeling of kind of white and bits ability especially in the people. I've been interviewing people in this idea that oh no. This won't be because this is kind of black and Brown problem. I certainly think fueled part of the feeling of invincibility surrounding mess But it'll be interesting to see. I mean I think there are two caveats that narrative of I is that I guarantee you. A lot of these deaths in rural white America are being under reported. Just because there's not great data gathering and so I do think there's a lot of despair in in rural areas that we're not hearing about and and I think the other point is because of these protests and particularly when these red states start opening up if if they do which seems insane. We're GONNA see a lot of of working class white very sick and dying and so it'll be interesting to see what happens to that narrative when it really starts to hit home for people

Donald Trump America Jonathan Kaye Jonathan Metzler Diana Whiteness Cape Up Jonathan Metzel Vanderbilt University Center F Europe Heartland Nestle William Barber President Trump Director Lansing Michigan Brown Germany Devos
Learning How to Forgive

Criminal

8:59 listening | 3 weeks ago

Learning How to Forgive

"I don't subscribe to the idea people a- bad and I I don't subscribe to that because I believe that these inherent good in everyone. I think that crime It's all to be honest with you. Very relative What might be criminal in. Some communities are excused in other communities. Delia Muna was born in London and raised in Nigeria. Her mother is Nigerian and her father is from Sierra Leone. She went to college and Law School in the United States and then she became a public defender in Washington. Dc main motivation for me is that throughout my time as a public defender. I and as a Christian I operate from the presume that if Jesus swear on earth today he'd be a public defender. He was always defending people who were accused of various Nefarious activities Tax Collectors and you know Prostitutes and and and people that we will consider unsavory but as a public defender. I got to learn and appreciate that. Each person has a story and that my role as an advocate was to tell that story in a way that will shoot to the lead experiences to give voice to them I learned to appreciate the fact that but for the grace of God Right. and fat Human beings have the capacity for change today. We're talking about forgiveness. I'm phoebe judge. This is criminal I'd like to ask you about where you grew up in Nigeria and and how growing up. You saw forgiveness injustice Criminality in differently than than we do here right. So we're very very communal society and so compared to to the US where It seems that we exist in silos and a very much individual pull yourself up by your bootstraps sort of mentality in Nigeria we. It's sort of those mentality that if one person is going astray we all collectively are going astray. And so the idea is You know we rally people will rally around you to make sure that That you don't go astray and that if you do that there are resources particularly human resources to help you Sorta recalibrate Your life trajectory And that's really critically important. I guess it's kind of a flip the whole idea in on the head which is in other communities when someone does something bad it it looks bad upon the community. Exactly as opposed to here. Where if someone does something bad when this person must be intrinsically bad or evil and let's remove them from the society? Oh yes absolutely. You absolutely correct here. It's you did something you something that you did and in other communities. It's like well what? How did we fail? How could we have prevented this? And now that you have indeed some done something. What can we do to restore your humanity? What can we do to make sure that you become one of us The question becomes. When is enough enough? When is punishment enough? When can we say you have paid your dues? It's time to welcome you back into society because we still think you've got value. We still think there's much more that you can add to being a productive member of our community in two thousand eleven a twenty five year old woman Nimble Shonda Armstrong drove her car. Into New York's Hudson River with her three children inside later. Leshan to Armstrong's neighbors came forward and said they knew she was in trouble. The often heard yelling. Her landlord leader said that she asked him twice in six months to change the locks on her doors. Delia Luna wrote about Louis Armstrong and other women who'd committed similar crimes she asks how is it that American society bears no social responsibility to support. Its most vulnerable members. In raising their children she proposes that we watch out for each other not just watch each other but really look out and offer help as she says communities in Nigeria. Often do she writes. It's imperative that the legal system take steps to foster a sense of communal obligation towards the most vulnerable members of our society single mothers and their children in two thousand fifteen delia. Muna was made clinical professor of law at Harvard. The law school's first Nigerian professor. She's also the deputy director of Harvard's Criminal Justice Institute where Third Year Law Students under supervision. Essentially work is public defenders. We asked her to tell us about the cases that stay with her the most and she says it's the ones where children are charged with crimes. She told us about representing a nine year old girl and she was charged with assault with a dangerous weapon and she was charged because while Throwing ten from classroom. She picked up a book a textbook and threw it at a teacher. Miss the teacher. The book hit the wall The child was promptly taken to a The principal's office and when she got there she was then arrested put in handcuffs. She was transported at the back of a police car and brought to the courthouse. She had to be placed in isolation so in solitary because she was nine years old and I went into speak with her so she is tiny little person and I was trying to explain to her. What my role was as her attorney and advocate and she had no idea Just even process in what that meant and she looked at me and she said where's my grandmother. And when can she take me back to school and then she said to me? Do you have any food? I'm hungry and so there. I was trying to figure out how to advocate for this child. In light of the very serious thing that she'd been charged with I mean assault with a dangerous weapon. book But clearly this child at other issues that we're contributing to Her behavior in class that day and he really will have been a very cruel and capricious thing for the legal system to continue. Its prosecution of her. It's easy to forgive a child and to consider all the social factors in play in their behavior. It's not always so easy to forgive adult. Well that's correct I it's easy when you paint a picture of a very vulnerable child but what about those evil adults and evil men and women who do such terrible things well. The truth is A An an an evil adult or terrible adult just didn't You know pop from just didn't become that way. They've had most likely a terrible childhood A childhood where they will likely abused likely neglected. And so you have children who wants. That's happened to them will indeed grow up to be adults who then Commit crimes I don't ever believe that an adult just takes actions without something being the catalyst for whatever it is. They that they've done and so it might be easier to forgive a child but if you delve deeper into the experiences the lived experience of an adult I think it makes it easier to forgive them once. You understand what it is that they've been through The prism through which they view life and sort of. What's happened to them?

Nigeria Delia Muna United States Assault Sierra Leone Shonda Armstrong Harvard Delia Luna Hudson River London Washington New York Louis Armstrong Leshan Deputy Director Principal Attorney Professor
How Tight and Loose Cultures Wire Our World

The Psychology Podcast

6:53 listening | 3 weeks ago

How Tight and Loose Cultures Wire Our World

"What are social norms? So this is a great question and as a cross cultural psychologists. I tried to understand this really puzzling. Phenomena of culture culture is one of these puzzles because it's omnipresent. It's all around us but it's invisible like we tend to ignore it all the time and it's like the story of two fish. Were there swimming along? And they pass another fish. Who says how's the water boys and they swim on and wants US the other? What the Hell is water and for fish? This invisible thing is waterboy for humans. It's culture and a big part of culture is social norms or these unwritten standards for behavior that sometimes become more formalized in laws and rules but nevertheless we follow social norms all the time endlessly without even realizing it and we have to really understand their impact on social behavior. And that's why I wrote the book. That's so cool. Well thank you for writing it and for shyness late on this. But certainly there's individual differences in them like dark triad people. You know people who score high on the dark triad Scales and Machiavelli's and narcissism psychopathy. They they don't like social norms. They are versed. Do it. Well you know I've right in the book about sort of individual differences in people who like or dislike social norms rulemakers rube acres. You can think about the analogy of the chaos quarter. Muppets exactly like think about sesame. Street like the chaos. Muppets are like you know. Cookie Monster and you know and animal who loved to just create chaos. And don't follow rules by Ernie and Bert actually and Kermit the frog who love rules and I actually have tight-loose mindset quiz on my website where you can find out. Where do you veer in terms of mindsets people who like tightness really notice rules? They have a lot of impulse control. And they like structure. People who beer lose tend to ignore rules more often. They're more impulsive. But they're more creative and more open minded book. I talk about the advantages and disadvantages of this construct across levels from nations to neurons from states to organization. So it's something that I think about as a fractional pattern which is repeated pattern of phenomenon across different levels and I tried illuminate why titans differences evolve in the first place at Cross levels and what what consequence love the link that to creativity. Some people have. I wonder how that relates to some people. Argue that Asian cultures are less creative? You know then. Do you think that some of that can be explained by sort of the laser looseness titan of the culture itself? Yes so in our first analysis tight. Lucy was across thirty something nations where we were able to classify nations as veering Erg loose. Even knowing that all nations have tightened elements and some countries like Japan and Singapore China. Beer tighter than places like Brazil and New Zealand and the Netherlands Brazil anything goes indicators of Titus was the accuracy of clocks and how coordinated crops are city streets tight cultures the quad city streets. Pretty much say the same thing but in loose cultures like Brazil or Greece entirely. Sure what time it is because the clocks around you say a lot of different things and that speaks to something. That really is about the tight lose. Tradeoff tight cultures have a lot of order and loose cultures a lot of openness and that means that both have strengths and liabilities. Depending on your vantage point so your question about creativity. We have found that across nations across states. 'cause organizations that are tight. They tend to have less novelty idea generation than loose cultures by. What's interesting and we're finding this recently. Is that each. Has its own strengths. In terms of innovation. So who's cultures can create a lot of ideas but tight cultures can implement that much better so in fact both again have strengths that can be brought to bear on a common issue like innovation. Oh great have you read Richard Florida's work at all and the credit? Yeah the creativity class and yeah and at the city level. Also I think he's really staying. That's right because this also differs state by state within America rate. Do you think like is there a south difference versus? I don't know I don't WanNa grossly stereotype things without you. Actually telling me what the data says so in one of the chapter in the book. I talk about how we can move beyond red vs blue right right. In fact we have a paper in the Journal. Precedes National Academy that rank orders the fifty states into the tight and loose and often? You're saying that the South tends to actually of your tight. They have more strict rules. They have more order to some extent they have less creativity. They're also more polite so the route estates are the loosest states which tend to be on the coasts but those states had to have more creativity like like you surmised and so what got me does that we can kind of look at different different states now through a new Lens. One of the more important things that I talk about in the book is why these differences evolve in the first place and what we find across nation states etc is that groups. That have a lot of threat. Whether it's from Mother Nature like chronic disasters are famine or other human types of threats pathogens or population density or invasions tend to veer tighter. And the logic's pretty simple when groups have a lot of threat. They need rules to coordinate to survive and norm provide that they help people to actually control themselves in difficult situations and the titus states in the US tend to have more threat. They have more pathogens have more disasters and so forth and so there's some kind of logic to why groups evolved to be tighter loose. I mean with that sad and we could talk about it later. Threats now are whether perceived or real tend to produce the same psychology and. That's something nowadays that we're dealing with more. And more in terms of how tight who's manifesting itself in politics and in other contexts where threat is less objective and more

United States Brazil Machiavelli Richard Florida Lucy Singapore China Ernie America National Academy The Journal Japan Netherlands Brazil Bert New Zealand Greece
Design and Comedy with Meg Lewis

The Futur

6:25 listening | Last month

Design and Comedy with Meg Lewis

"Mentioned something about infusing comedy. What does that mean? How's that applied? Or how does it manifest itself in your work? Did you study Like performance art and things. I got when I was a kid. I wanted to be a comedian. I grew up so I think as I did a lot of comedy and acting camps when I was a kid. I did a lot of Improv. I learned very early on how to think improvisation really and I learned how to act on my toes and become very witty and I think the most important thing that I learned when I was a kid was to observe adults and realize how many things adults took so seriously and I thought as a kid that adults were just so boring and I just didn't to be a boring adult when I grew up so I think as I got older. I learned that I had additional skills outside of comedy that I really wanted to utilize and I just became really interested in design. So it's been a challenge for me throughout my career to kind of take all those things about myself that I love. That seemed so separate in not related to one another light comedy and design and try to blend them together into one career. Because it's definitely been a little bit easier for me to have a job as a treat skill as being a designer than breaking into the comedy industry of never really even tried hard to break into the comedy. Industry has just been so easier for me to work as a designer and get paid and have a little bit of income supporting the comedy. Work that I'm doing and you know there is a low level Low Bar when it comes to comedy in the design industry so my goal now is to just take traditionally not necessarily boring but dry topics and make them funny and finally you know. Bring some lightness into the things that we have to deal with as adults. That could be a little bit more. Lighthearted I'm here for that Now just out of curiosity I don't WanNA spend too much time on this. But have you gone to like open mic things where he just go onto the stage and do your thing not yet? Oh skirt that scares me alive. I generally have a common fear that everybody hates me rejection. And I'm so scared of that and I think having to see that I love hiding behind a computer so much like to hide behind a phone or a camera or computer so bad and that way I can kind of judge everything myself see it from all sides. Think what are the critics going to say before I do anything and before I release anything? I'm just so used to that. From working with clients and as designer I think of it from all sides and make sure that I have all my bases covered and I think it's just so it's I'm a super vulnerable person but the idea of being on stage in being judged in real time for something I'm not one hundred percent comfortable with really scares me. Wow what I'm hearing from us. There's this kind of opposing energy economy if you if you will like this performer. Somebody who likes to make people laugh and have fun and you said like Improv. Acting and all that kind of stuff. And there's this other person who. I would describe as more teacher digital graphic or visual artists. Where we just? WanNa be by computers on talk to me To look at me because I'm weird and awkward and so how do you resolve this in your mind? I think that's where the magic is. Truly because I think for a long time I wouldn't let myself both. I was wondering the other. And that's you know that's what labels due to us when we're labeled as a designer. We know what we're supposed to fall into when it comes to that label. We know the kind of person we're supposed to be and I was pushing to be that person for a long time and you know I let the comedy thing go. I let those aspects of my personality just kind of go because I didn't identify didn't feel comfortable identifying myself as a comedian. I didn't feel comfortable or like I belonged in that industry and so it was a hard thing for me to slowly realize that if I take these things about myself that seems so unrelated and I push them together into one career then I can actually do something. That's unlike anybody else's doing I can be. I can redefine what a designer comedian or a performance artist is and I can just truly offer the world something that no one else can and that has that has been very very exciting for me. The seems like almost like a perfect segue to talk about fulltime. You but before we do that. I talk a lot about the narrative the narrative the story that we tell ourselves the voice inside your head so when you said like He. That felt uncomfortable weird. I'm not supposed to be doing this or that. And the labels that you apply. Do you know what that voice sounds like in your head and do you know where it comes from you know. I think it comes from years of my whole life. Growing UP OF BEING TOLD THAT. I'm supposed to look and act and be a certain way and I think labels can be very empowering for a lot of people or they can hold a lot of people back. I think it depends on the label. And what you want to be identified as and for me my whole life you know thinking about what a woman is supposed to be in what comedy looks like for women and girls and and what. I wanted to be doing and telling jokes about and how that didn't match up and so I spent a lot of time feeling a lot of shame about who I was and what I really wanted to be doing. Based on what people expected of me and the examples I was presented in the world of a woman or a graphic designer comedian looks and sounds like and so that voice in my head is just like always constantly barking over me. If nobody else is doing that people are GonNa think you're weird. You're going to be doing something that people have never seen before this very scary. What ARE PEOPLE GONNA say? People are definitely not going to like this. And that's generally what replays in my head and it's taken so much practice of pushing through voice because I've realized in pushing through the voice getting over that and pushing further past what the voices telling me I can do and actually following through doing the thing. That really scares me. The perceived outcome. I have in my head of what's going to happen that horrible incident. That will happen if I do this thing. It never happens. It's always a fraction as bad as I anticipated to be in once I started to realize that the perceived outcome I had in my head of what would happen never happens it made it so much more exciting for me to keep doing it over and over again and keep pushing in realize areas that I had been holding myself back. It pushed through them.

How Local Governments Can Reduce the Spread of COVID-19 in Prisons & Jails

The Electorette Podcast

10:03 listening | Last month

How Local Governments Can Reduce the Spread of COVID-19 in Prisons & Jails

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner. And this is the electorate on this episode. Have A conversation with Rachel. Barco Barco is the Vice Dean and a professor at New York University School of law and she joins me to discuss. How state governors can use their authority to help slow the spread of Kobe. Nineteen in prison and jail populations around the country. Many local governments have responded to the corona virus outbreak with stay at home orders or by enforcing social distancing practices but very few had a comparable response to reducing the spread of Corona virus in the incarcerated population as well as to the jail and prison staff and to their families. Rachel Barco and I discussed a recent report that was published by data for progress which provides a detailed outline for exactly how local governments can act. Now slow the spread of covert nineteen in prisons and jails so without further ado. Here's my conversation with Rachel. Barco Barco welcome to the PODCAST. Thanks for having me so I think it's become increasingly obvious that you know while the current virus outbreak is dire generally for the rest of the population that it's even more dire in the incarcerated population people who are in prisons and jails and one of the obvious reasons as to why that is is that you can't socially descends properly in prison or in jail. But what are some other factors? You're certainly right at environment in. These facilities is such that people can't distance themselves but they also don't have access to some of the key things that health officials have told us. We need to try to stop the spread so people who were incarcerated often. Don't have access to soap. They charge in many facilities for soap. And people don't have it. They don't have hand sanitizer They don't have access to easily easy access to water to even wash their hands. So you know the kind of basic hygiene practices that we think of as necessary for prevention aren't things that are accessible there And then you you add that to the fact that the population of people who are inside these facilities leans toward people with preexisting health conditions and very older people. Who are there as well so you have a particularly vulnerable population should this spread within the facility? they're more likely to get serious cases in death as a result right. That's another factor that I hadn't actually considered that. The percentage of older people in the prison population is. It's actually grown quite a bit in the past decade or decade and a half. I think there's something like a tough percent of people who are over aged fifty five exactly and many even much older than fifty five past sixty past seventy. The populations that were were most concerned about. Yeah and and also they aged faster. I think just generally medical professionals tell us that people who are in car serrated kind of a person who is chronologically aged forty five is really more like a fifty five year old based on just the harsh conditions of living inside prisons. One of the things we aren't really talking about are the peripheral people who are involved with the population right like the prison guards or even the doctors and therapists that come in and out of prison then of course the families who are also kind of a risk. Yeah and if you look at New York which is where I'm located right now. There are almost nine hundred employees of the corrections department who are infected with Kovic. Nineteen so staff. The people who work in these facilities are the. It's not as if the virus is going to distinguish between the people who are there because they were convicted of a crime and the people who work there. It's going to spread to everybody and when we're talking about people who work there getting it they in turn we're gonNA take it outside. The prison walls back to their homes back into their communities. And so it's GonNa be a source of spread to the community at large when we're talking about it's spreading within these facilities and in addition to that thinking about the people within prison facilities who work specifically on medical issues the medical staff. You know these are not large numbers of people who do that and so if you get high rates of infection among the staff who are designated to treat people with inside these facilities. You're really looking at a looming crisis. Because if they get sick you know there aren't people to replace them. And now we don't have people to take care of the people inside who get this and you can just see how it very critically conspire onto a crisis. President NGO population. I don't think that they're being counted in the current projections for infections and deaths right And those projections are kind of scary already. Yes I've seen a couple projections. I believe it's the. Aclu has tried to do one to figure out if we did bring into the projections. What is happening now in prisons in jails in what it looks like going forward you know we we see exponential growth in terms of the number of people dying in infected when we factor that in. Because I don't think the existing models are properly accounting for how much more rapidly the spread of this virus would be inside prison facilities. You know it would be as if we had an unaccounted for. Really large proportion of people on cruise ships and because it spreads so much more rapidly in an environment like that. If your model wasn't accounting for that you would be under counting and I think that is the problem with most of the existing models that are out there is. They're not accounting for the much more rapid spread inside prison in jail right. So so what? We've seen generally in relation to the responses response. That kind of been working and I live in one of the states that that's had a really good response. I live in Washington. State where governor Jay Inslee is in charge. We've seen responses on the local level to the outbreak specifically on gubernatorial level. Like I said Jay Inslee. You know governor Cuomo Gretchen. Whitmer you know all democratic governors. I should run out but have any of them responded in a significant way to prevent the spread in prison and jail populations no and it's really disappointing. You know. I think that this isn't one of these left right. Republican Democratic Issues Savelly. It's it's basically both failing to address what's going on. You know there are. There are at most playing. You know at at at at best what we've seen them do is maybe some small numbers of releases but nothing that is commensurate with the problem in the risk. You know so here in New York. Governor Cuomo has done nothing to address the fact that we now have more than a thousand people who have covert nineteen inside our correctional facilities staff and people incarcerated both and he hasn't released anybody you know it's just I. I'm not sure what accounts for it. But it's an enormous blind spot and and it's true You know across the states you know. I should say there are some governors who have done some things and you know some of it may may surprise people that you know for example Oklahoma. The governor there has has granted a fair number of commutations letting people out earlier from their sentence in light of what's happening and you know that's a Republican Governor. And you know we've seen a few others who are trying to make an effort to have at least said that they would have releases places like. Vania a New Jersey but unfortunately the announcements that they made haven't yet been followed by actual releases that match what they promised. So what we see when we look around. The country is essentially really small numbers of people being released from these facilities and so in what ends up happening is they're crowded and the fire starts to spread and it starts to spread to the staff and it goes into the communities and so it's really the situation that we would hope that we'd have governors getting ahead of it but there are efforts thus far have been really disappointing is the nicest way. I could put it sure and you said that you know. This isn't partisan or shouldn't be partisan but of course in this climate everything. Everything's partisan just about right so we can talk about that later. So one of the solution that's being proposed as just what you hinted at is clemency or early releases. So how would that work exactly? Well there's a couple options for governors so a commutation would be a sentence reduction that's permanent basically saying look we know we gave you ten years but the is the Governor Im- going to say The eight years you've currently served as enough and released. You're done the other option that a governor has and sometimes with commutations. Governor could just do that with the stroke of a pen and other times. They need to go through a board or some kind of process so so. That's actually a mixed set of options for governors in

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How Michigan's governor is battling coronavirus

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

9:34 listening | Last month

How Michigan's governor is battling coronavirus

"Jonathan Cape Heart. Welcome to this special edition of Cape. Up Two separate interviews with two elected officials in two different jurisdictions dealing with the corona virus. Pandemic Governor Gretchen of Michigan and Chicago. Mayor Lori. Lightfoot the start with Governor Whitmer who after instituting one of the strictest. Stay at home. Orders in the nation is getting set to review them and ask her why after all the attacks and president trump. She's polling better than him in a brand new Fox News. Poll Governor Whitman. Thank you very much for coming on the PODCAST. Client to be with him. So you have one of the strictest. Stay at home orders and now word comes that you're now reevaluating that stay at home order. What's changed to make that possible so I think you know? I want to assure kind of the rational. Why we have one of the strictest. Stay home orders. Michigan is the tenth most populous state in the nation. And yet we had the third highest death in the nation and that's something that It has just absolutely devastated. Communities across my state created an incredible amount of fear and concern and we know that Cova nineteen was spreading far and wide long before it was ever detected via test so it took actions to keep people safe and there are more restrictive than other states but I thought that it was absolutely essential after a few weeks of the stay home pasture. We have seen our trajectory. Really Start to flatten. We've saved lives on one of the things about Public Health when you're successful. You've never able to really quantify precisely. How many lives he saved. But we know that. This strategy is working here in Michigan. Every day. We're learning more about Kobe. Bank teen we are crunching the data. We are learning more through increased testing. We're not where we want to be your where we need to be as a nation and sterling. That's that's true in Michigan as well but we are seeing This data that gives us Optimism and so as we evaluate extending the stay home order. We're also an a moment where we can evaluate if there are some things that we might Lighten up on not dramatic changes but changes. That may bring us more in line with some of our our other states and so this is a moment where alphabet evaluation is happening. I'm GonNa make a very Thoughtful data driven determination that centered around promoting public health but also ensuring that people are still eager to abide by the stay home. Stay safe order. I think that's always the balance fat that we have to do here to make sure that we keep compliance than and we keep giving people confidence that we've got a strategy to re-engage in a very thoughtful safe manner so this is not a just so that no one thinks that you're gonNA completely junk your stay at home order. This is. This is going to be something. That is gradual. Sure yes absolutely. This is we're going to look at it. I think the trump administration says as a some people say we're GONNA open stages I like the visual of waves were We're surrounded by the great late. So I'm always thinking in those terms but I do think that we are going to be very thoughtful. We're GONNA have to measure every step of the way There will be you know it'll be necessary that we're nimble if we see a spike Dr. Start to happen that we pull back when necessary that if we are continuing to see success as we open things up where numbers stay down in our ability to meet the needs in our hospitals that are PPA. Needs are much than we can. Take the next step forward. But I think that the the leader's epidemiology and and health sciences across our country are advocating. That is the best practice to avoid a second wave and I hope even if you're a dissenter of the current stay home order we can all agree that avoided. A second wave is the most critical thing that we need to do. It will save lives but it would be absolutely devastated under economies Leeann. A second wave two so you are a part of a compact of states and correct me if I'm wrong. Great Lakes Region Governors who have joined together in sort of dealing with the with the pandemic at can that compact that you're in hold if each of you opens up your respective economies separately or are you given the evaluate reevaluation that you're undertaking and the one that Governor Dewine Ohio is undertaking are those being coordinated so that way these the waves of reevaluation as you put it are all being done in. Concert saved us. You know one of the things that I have found incredibly helpful in these unprecedented times is that I've got group of governors with whom I can share information and data and our thoughts and learn from and I think it's made all of our determinations better the fact that we've got an open dialogue and it's open with Democrats and Republicans. I think that's really important when I pulled kids out of schools here in Michigan as one of the first states to do that and immediately got a call for my friend. Jay Pritzker governor of Illinois. Same tell me. Your thought process did you. What are your experts telling you because they were contemplating it but I had made the decision and they wanted to understand you know weeks later. Maybe a week later when he decided to close bars in Illinois and Mike Dewine closed bars in Ohio and they made the restaurants dine out. Only I got on the phone with both of eminent said. Tell me your thought process. Tell me what you're seeing so I think that the sharing of information has been incredibly helpful. There are many people who can understand all the pressures that we are under but we certainly can understand it from one another and in the global pandemic were all in the in the same situation and we've got similar economies and so I think that's important. That's what really drove Reaching out and trying to get everyone to join this kind of Compact that doesn't mean that when I make a decision in Michigan Kentucky Ohio Indiana Minnesota Wisconsin Illinois. We're going to make the same exact decision at the same cadence but what it does mean is that we are having those robust conversations. I am organizing it. So we're getting on the phone regularly and our teams are as well so that our sharing at we are learning from one another and it makes all of our decisions that are informed and I think better decisions you you created the Michigan Corona virus taskforce on racial disparities and it's dedicated to the memory of Schuyler. Herbert who had five years old is the youngest person to dive the corona virus in in Michigan. It's the Task Force is headed up by your Lieutenant Governor. Why is this task force important sort of a leading question? But I'll have you hold forth. Well you know So you know governor Garland Gilchrist as the chair of this task force and one of the things that I'm really proud that we did in Michigan. We were one of the first states to do it. And frankly not Everyone has followed suit and I'm hopeful that eventually we'll have every state following suit but we've been releasing racial data on our current virus cases now even when it's not completely full because we do have a lot of Tests that were conducted on. The race was not noted early on in the process by gathering. This data has really put a spotlight. On the fact that we've got a disparate health outcomes and anyone who studied it anyone who's been paying attention isn't surprised by that but I think I think the surprise is that is so desperate that fourteen percent of the Michigan population is African American and yet forty percent of the deaths from Kobe. Nineteen are African American. And I think that that's something that we absolutely have to in this crisis. Learn the lesson and make them. Societal changes to improve outcomes and to have real equity meister. I gave a few months ago. It feels like a lifetime ago. Now highlighted. Is that a good part of my save. The state addressing the dispirit outcomes for women of Color and babies of color is three times more dangerous Three times more deadly for a woman of color to have a baby in Michigan than it is for women. And there's implicit bias. There there are a lot of contributing factors. I think it's incumbent on every leader. Everyone who has a position of authority to understand that? That's an issue that there's a problem and we've got to fix it and I think this is held a mirror up to our country and really magnified The the historic racial discrepancies. That we have in our society and fix them

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Overcoming Isolation: Recovering From Religion

The Thinking Atheist

5:53 listening | Last month

Overcoming Isolation: Recovering From Religion

"We're talking about today something that we've spoken about in the past. I think it has a new urgency now. Though with the isolation people feel many people are where I was a dozen or so years ago. Challenging cherished beliefs once assumed beliefs or they were indoctrinated. Or maybe they were just wrong about what they believed whether it's philosophically religiously or otherwise and so they have this moment of crisis and yet it's harder so much harder at seems to reach out. They have a compounded feeling of being alone and without help. And that's why we're talking today. Do either one of you or both. WanNa speak to that feeling of isolation and what's recovering from religion is doing to perhaps help these people I'd love for Darryl to answer that we are. We are have our hands full but he is certainly leading the way because of his background. Not only as a former minister but as a psychologist and helping us understand the physiology of what's going on on our brains but also the emotional part and all of that layered into the process of of questioning and doubting and perhaps even separating so I'm GonNa let Darryl field that one well we. We saw this well when we saw it coming and the board of recovery legitimate and leaders and all we saw this coming and thought we better do something because there's GonNa be a lot of trauma coming out of this and a lot of upset and isolation all the things you've already named so what we're seeing that we have already seen it quite a bit just like on our chat line and our phone call in line is people are saying. I'm feeling very lonely and isolated. I used to have a religion. I used to have a congregation of people I could talk to and and even now even if I did have the congregation. I can't go back to that. I can't go get hugged by somebody. So we're seeing a lot of isolation feelings of despair even depression and we're getting people calling in and talking to us about that but we decided to get ahead of the game if we possibly could and we've been starting to offer some online programming that Kinda combines the issues of leaving religion with the issues of isolation and psychological problems that come with with all that the fact that you're all communities not available and maybe you don't have a new community yet either so we're trying to hit this on several different fronts. And he'll should not undersell ourselves. He's doing a massive amount of work to make this happen. Doing some online courses webinars will. They're only available to our people not that we don't care for everybody else but we just don't have enough bandwidth to do the whole planet right now. So we're we're getting some pretty. Well attended webinars every Monday night within our system. And we're talking about what's the psychological problems that people need to anticipate. And here's one thing I've been telling Steph I've been telling people is. Let's be aware that this could last four months maybe longer. Let's get her head around that so we're not surprised because I think the biggest problem with a lot of people faces the uncertainty and there is uncertainty. But if you think this is going to be over a month you're going to be sorely disappointed and then we gotta start over again with some mental health issues and I just WanNa get ahead of that so to speak some of the conversations. You've been having out there. Well there there what you would predict. Because they have this added component of this isolation. There's a phenomenon that I noticed. Well before. The whole Corona virus issue when people begin to doubt and they remove themselves stop attending church and they remove themselves from the environment. It's almost like there and you know this phenomenon. It's almost like they're coming out of a super when they're out of the culture and they're out of the saturation of the language and the praising and the Sundays and the Sunday school and the community that reinforces over and over again when they when they finally take the step to remove themselves from it. It's almost like they can see clearly. You know it's it's an indoctrination thing and so what's happening now is that people are forced to do that. And we're having people that were not on the doubting path before and and now that they've created some separation and they're trying to make sense of this global pandemic with the whole all of the questions that people doubt about a benevolent. God what's going on with all that so those two things are leading people. I think they're accelerating their questioning and they're doubting and so recovering from religion. Were trying to be prepared for that. We're kind of in a in a ready stance as they come to us with those questions. Remember that our help line is all peer. Support is not therapy. It's not professional therapy. We do have that with the secular therapy project but the helpline and the chat and the telephone hotline in the online community where clients come in and can talk to each other. All of those things exist to help someone ask their own questions. We don't try to deconverting. We don't encourage them take the next step. You're almost there. It's simply providing resources. It's giving them a safe place to be able to express their doubts and vent their frustrations and ask their questions. And and maybe provide. Here's a book. Here's a website. Here's a podcast that you might listen to help. Answer Your Questions. But we have that now on steroids so to speak because the entire country net in the entire globe is is faced with these doubts and fears and questions and so we we find ourselves Adapting by the moment our trained agents who are committed. Volunteers to recovering from religion. Have Risen to the need. I I am so proud and so impressed by these folks who are giving of their time to be able to help an an and now questions are coming from out of the blue that we're not. We weren't expecting an OH. I haven't ever heard that question before in our volunteers are adapting and answering and helping and encouraging all along the

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A Conversation with Civil Rights Attorney Rabia Chaudry

Asian Enough

5:42 listening | Last month

A Conversation with Civil Rights Attorney Rabia Chaudry

"The story that works. You know I've had thousands of people over the years reach out. It's not just me not saying we read this book or we listen to this. We Watch this. And we didn't even realize some of the assumptions we held or the prejudices. We had about Muslims until we heard your story and was like Oh my God. You're just you're just like any of us and and you know it made it much more self aware I think storytelling is one of the most powerful aspects. Storytelling is what changes people's hearts and minds really. Nothing else works. What were some of the stories that I made you feel that like even growing up. You're always like a writer at heart. What were the stories that I took hold in you? Where did you get them? You know the stories growing up as an American Muslim when before nine eleven honestly a lot of people had no or maybe before the Iran hostage crisis. I'm trying to think of what international event made me realize that I'm a Muslim probably the first the first Gulf War. I remember the Gulf War. I was in middle school and the war began in the middle of the day and teacher came over to me and said hey tell your uncle Saddam Hussein to back off or something and I said who is it. Almost saying I'm not era. I don't even know what's happening and I was a kid. But you know a lot of the stories really just came from like my parents handing down stories like stories out of our religious traditions cultural tradition as an adult. I realize what's problematic with a lot of the stories? They're wonderful stories of very heroic stories but they also set up this false like idealism. That didn't allow us to feel like if you're a Muslim you can also have false. You can make mistakes. You can screw up because all the stories were told. Were about people who are just incredibly honorable. Did the most amazing things. And that's what you aspire to And that's what you're supposed to be What's an example? Gosh I mean one example is like my name so I'm named after medieval century like Muslim female saint one of the only Muslim female saints I best known I think she lived in the twelfth century. I don't even know Rubio other. We and you know the story I was told about her growing up. Was that you know she was incredibly right. Just and pious and she spent her days worshiping God in the evening she would go out and teach people and she had so much faith in God that she she just kind of stayed cloistered in this little space that she told people. Don't bring me any food. Because will deliver me. Sustenance and food would appear out of nowhere so for a little kid to be like okay I got like visas does incredible role model and And she says she was an amazing saint from what we know. But of course over the years you don't know what's been added to the tradition and it was just kind of this this really high expectation of piety and religious righteousness. That is really almost impossible to meet. Because you tell us a little bit about where you grew up your born in Pakistan and ended up in Maryland right. Yeah so I thought this was only like six or seven I was. I was under one when my parents came over here. Fundraising United States and my dad worked for the US Department of Agriculture. He was a veterinarian. And a lot of people don't know there's like this huge Boccassini veterinary like a whole gang of them in the US Department of Agriculture. They all came over in the seventies what we grew up in very small agricultural towns because of that. Because my dad had to work where you know where there was agricultural business oh Kansas Delaware Lancaster County Pennsylvania just very remote places where we were often the only people of color not just the only Muslim but really there were there. Were places where there were no other black people know. They're black families so very small town America. Then when I got about high school is when we kind of moved to a slightly bigger town with with diversity in it so but most of my formative years in adult life. I've grown up around the beltway. Northern Virginia or Maryland. And that's where I am. Now you've written on your blog that your parents know how to be quote critical of where we've been and where we are without throwing the baby out with the bathwater. Yeah I guess I just wanted to know how your parents raised you and how that shaped you my parents you know. They left boxes on one thousand nine hundred seventy nine hundred seventy s block. Assad never left them so as time moved on their idea of what's culturally appropriate for us was forever one thousand nine hundred seventy something bucks on. Meaning you know my dad would be like. Why don't you have your hair? Your hair should be in two braids and it should be well oiled and dress a certain way and you should at home. We always wore a boxing enclosing home. You know we only eight bucks any food at home but the funny thing is we would visit Baucus on like in the eighty s and ninety s people over there would be like all the women have their care cut and permed and look really cute and they'd be like what is wrong with you people. Why do you look like like? You're from a blast from the past. But you know my my parents are. My Dad is a very spiritual person. He's not like a a religious person. Like ritualistic my mom is much more religious. My mom raised us with some really strong values. And look the one thing that we heard and over and over again is the whole purpose of your life is how you're going to serve other people like what are you. GonNa do with all the education. The time the health the wealth the youth everything you have is basically like a test like we're being tested for. What are you GonNa do with it? That's the whole point of being here and so you know I. I always appreciate that because I think that's the one thing that's driven me to always feel like there's more there's more to do. There's a lot more to do.

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Aboriginal People of Australia

The Outside In

9:48 listening | Last month

Aboriginal People of Australia

"I'm just I'm shot and we are the outside. We're podcasts at syndicated to bursting your bubbles and opening up to new perspectives. And this time we're GONNA be talking about something been learning about the past few months. Which is the rights of Indigenous People in Australia? If you've been listening to our PODCAST You know that just Ni- are from South Africa in the United States separately. I'm from the United States justice from South Africa and we are not aboriginal people or in any way But we were very passionate about doing an episode on this topic because we've seen a lot of injustices in the world and in our travels yet to expand that all. Yeah well yeah like Charlet said neither of us are from indigenous groups and you were both like the colonizers in much. Yeah but I think that's one of the reasons why it's so important for us to be talking about this And finding a way to like raise awareness for the indigenous groups because a lot of the time people don't think about that and even back home in South Africa were like we've had a really good peace movement. People still don't like acknowledge the true ramifications of colonialism that has been that has had on our country and it's the same thing that we've noticed in Australia is people are very unaware in a lot of places and very very ignorant and I think it's important that we educate ourselves and talk about it. Yeah one of the reasons. I'm very interested in. This topic is during two thousand sixteen. When the d'appel North Dakota access pipeline was happening and the injustices that I saw towards native Americans really inspired me to try and make a change and currently have been researching a bunch on that topic and have connected to connected it a lot towards environmental racism and so that is why I wanted to focus on this topic today in our podcast super important to talk about. We're going to be going through some of the main terms that we're going to be using because this is different to our usual content. You might not know what's actually going on First term to talk about is colonialism. Now there's a whole lot of different types of colonialism but essentially one will be talking about most is settler colonialism and this is when one group of people move to another place moves to someone else's land and basically tries to take over that land so that can be in the case of places like Stralia and the states where people showed up and then said this is our land and that means everyone who was living here before copy here anymore or it could be in the case of like my country and South Africa were a small minority moved there but then took complete control even though the majority of the population were the people that were living there before So that's kind of what colonialism is. It's this inclination of like trying to take over the world in a way. Colonizers are the people who call our Joan people for the first nation people of Australia. The oldest people who've lived on the land and fun fact average Australians are actually the oldest surviving culture in the world with like traditions that date back sixty thousand years which is insane pretty amazing. Yeah Yeah and the colonizers that actually came over were the British. They were so they needed a place to put their prisoners in their convicts. They found Australia and they were like sick. Let's put these people here and one of the reasons because of that. Australia is very difficult back then to live on for people who don't know the land because of the amount of things that can literally kill you hear. The prisoner is like a really good experiment. Sent here I because it was like well then we can live. Yeah no yeah. It's a it's an intense story so the first colonisation of Australia happened in seventeen eighty eight. That was the first time that people actually settled on this land and before this there were more than five hundred indigenous groups that inhabited Australia and the way it worked back then was like it wasn't just one country. It was five hundred countries essentially or maybe less or more depending on the groups but it was divided up in the similar way to Europe and there are about seven hundred fifty thousand people living on this land cultured. Like I said that's developed for sixty thousand years and there were over three hundred languages spoken in total whereas today only about one hundred and forty five languages spoken with only eighteen being strongly spoken by lots of people so you can see immediately like the decline of the culture in the effect that that's had on original people because of this one. The colonizers were coming over. It's hard it was very hard for them to unite as like an aboriginal front. Because there's so many different tribes and Like currently like when it was being called as they're probably like still wars going on between tribes then as well so it wasn't like everyone is a one aboriginal nation it's all divided separately into different groups And then when we get further into so we're GONNA talk a bit about like how it is now and why that's difficult even unite. Today one of the things that was actually released pricing to us. Because we've spent seven weeks or six weeks now in Australia. Learning about indigenous cultures learning about that kind of stuff and we spent a week in Alice. Springs the rest of the time we've been in Melbourne. And what I found really interesting is when we first arrived in Melbourne we were welcomed by one of the aboriginal groups were under people with a smoking ceremony which is a typical welcome into the land. That when we went to central Australia near Alice Springs. We were told by the indigents people. They're like they don't have the thing and it was kind of a weird moment for me because I automatically assumed like. Oh this is what they blame. Everyone does it. Yes accents but you eventually realize that like those three hundred five hundred nations like were completely different groups and spanning across the country completely different cultures which makes it really difficult to unite even today so aboriginal. Australians are still facing a ton of issues today a ton of oppression from the White Australians and this is largely in part due to just the history of this country and the history of the racism that so institutionalized into the country's law so when the British first arrived in Australia they said Yeah. This land is free to take. Because they didn't recognize the aboriginal people as Human Beings. They were classified as flora and fauna so basically plants animals not human beings and that sentiment existed for years and it let it has led to a lot of the attitudes that sill exists today even if people are no longer classified that way they're classified as human beings like a It's still rings true. In the way the government treats these people one really good example of this In central Australia. There's this thing called the green credit card. Basically if you're aboriginal half of your income comes in whatever form you want and the other half needs to go on this card that basically you can only spend on assesses which they classify as clothes and food alcohol or tobacco products or anything like that. So if you're thinking of buying a house nope And this is a very big issue because they're basically controlling like where where you go in life if half of your income is stuck on that card then like that's that's it you know and this is just one way that the government really keeps control of Aboriginal people whereas they justify it as A. We're helping them because like many of them have addiction problems and things like that one in reality like no colonizers introduced alcohol to them and introduce tobacco products. And it's really actually your fault that that may be a problem in some communities but the people should still have a right to choose because they're people and this is where the whole flora and fauna thing connects back. I think it's a real real problem like this idea. And it was something that we encountered a fair amount in the northern territory yet. Definitely yeah we got to spend time not only with aboriginal communities but also like the settlers there and it was quite harsh because it was an attitude of we know best yes coming from the white people which was pretty horrific and you can see that through like that green card. We know best what you should be doing with your money rather than dealing with addiction problems at the source. Would you most frequently accident in? My research comes from like loss of culture. Loss of tradition like the oppression that's been placed on these people definite instead of focusing on that. It's it's just putting a band aid over the problem.

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Interview With Vivian Nava-Schellinger

Cafe con Pam Podcast

8:59 listening | Last month

Interview With Vivian Nava-Schellinger

"You grew up in Texas yet. Groping Al Paso Borden Rave and educated. Most of my life in El Paso. And you're an attorney right. Yeah I'm a non practicing. What do they call it? Here's the a recovering attorney guests Sosa? Oh turning bed definitely were trained attorney but then decided to do something else live took them in another direction or they changed the direction. But yeah interesting but you have an interesting story because you're Atlanta so you had the trajectory F- like where you wanted to be. When did you decide that you wanted to become a lawyer? Oh my God you know. It's funny because I when I hear people say oh I you know I was in college and I didn't know what I wanted to do or a dotted and I totally can kind of picture what that feels like but for me my earliest memory of thinking what I wanted to do with my life was to be an attorney. My mom went to law school. I Inner Family College. Grad first-generation scholarships all of the beautiful academic story. I do think that a lot of Latinos do have that we may be you know. We highlight but just not enough sometime. She really lead that example for me and showed me that law school was going to be a place that wouldn't necessarily teach me how to be a lawyer but would teach me how to think like one and I think for me even at a really really early age I wanted to know what it would like to think critically about things and not just accepting that they were and kind of go along with your day. Maybe that came a lot from my parents. My Dad was in federal law enforcement. You know there was always like the other layer of why people did what they did and there was also that layer of I get there was all around me always to not only immerse yourself in your community but to protect it so I think at a at a really young age again like I said I don't I can't put it like a like an age on it because I don't remember not wanting to do that for you an only child. I have a sister. She's about five years over five years younger than me. But I will say that I think Mike variances as an only child for the first five years of my life I think they were enrich in a way because my parents did wait a very long time actually to have meet my parents. Mary fifteen years before they had the right. And then that's unheard of now in a sense. Maybe maybe a little bit more right but even then right nineteen eighty six. When I was born my parents had already been married for fifteen years. They had traveled the world. I guide was in the FBI. He was one of the first Chicanos you know Mexican American to get into the academy among the first and actually got into the FBI Academy with J. Edgar Hoover was retiring. So I mean that how far back back goes then you know I think that whole experience in and of itself was really again be too like parents. That were pillared for me. Guide me in this direction and so also say that I think as an only child for the first five years of my life. I had a real great sense of duty to what I needed to be doing with my life so I almost feel like. I grew up kind of quick in terms of knowing that there had to be something bigger than yourself and so having a little sister and I don't WanNa get choked up because you know we can kind of go into a little bit about. She's just kind of warrior to me but having a little sister for me became a sense of duty so yeah I think those are things that the kind of circle around my story if you're sharing and I think your story is awesome because a lot of times what is Brown people that had different generations. What generation third third. I'm second generation Alpaca win on my mom by Third Generation. On my dad that we've been Pessoa longtime were crosstalk rate do Mexico This lake right there. Yeah what it is right there so we haven't been in a while but we used to go every Sunday. You know we Goethe's Mikhaylo. I guess my parents will now know that I went on a much earlier. Age or other reasons like yeah I mean you know. If they're sisters idiot are truly just a pair and it's a beautiful beautiful beautiful experience. I think to grow up in such a place and yeah I mean I grew up going. We go eat on Sunday. We go get groceries. We'd go you know we needed to get something framed. We need cowboy boots. I mean that's just what you did and for me as a child again being third generation it was never a fear or or an oddity right like some people who are really far removed. It's like Oh you know. I went to Mexico holder world and I feel like for me. My parents made a conscious effort. And one thing I've been mentioned. Is that my mom? My mom the first before my sister was born. I can remember her speaking to me. Entirely exclusively in Spanish and then my father spoke meaningless so we would be in the car or sitting at the dinner table and my parents were talking to me and both languages and I was responding in in bold thirty sometimes singlish finish though the code switching with like lit was happening And then I would go to school and you know in English and coming home and seeking Balto. It was always again living in a border community. You learn really quickly that or you know. At least that the border is a lot more fluid than what people want to make it Because that's how we you know growing up in a border town how you live your life. You're always weaving in and out language Culture Food Flavors. Balkan totally and one thing that I see that is it's beautiful I love it. Is that even though? You're third generation. You're still letting you're still proud of your culture in. I think we begin. Give that back to your parents and grandparents. They kept that in you because I've met a lot of people especially in Texas. Actually that they just went opposite direction because of all the hardship that their parents and grandparents went through soup could us your parents grandparents for instilling that culture and to keep you close to it. Yeah yeah all added that you know my two grandparents so one was a citizen in one with not and both of them though are were World War. Two veteran and the one who was yeah and one was in Japan and one was in Europe. So my mother's father my GRANDPA Korol. He actually obtained his citizenship because of his service in World War. Two you know. He was seventeen years old he was living in in quoted and he saw that they were signing young men up to go to war and he had a job in El Paso but lived in wanted like many people and he signed up and he wanted to protect the country that he felt gave him a lot. He met my grandmother who was a US citizen in with born and raised in El Paso met her at a party and wrote her throughout his entire time away. Furthermore and when he came back he married her in. He obtained citizenship. And I will say this. Is The true story. Anybody who's part of the family really knows this story but I think it's really it resonated with me especially now and and just in the time that we're in what he. She laminated his paper so that he could carry them with him at all Because even after his service than even after he became at that ascend I mean he probably couldn't count the years and the Times in which he was stopped and asked for his papers. My Mom clearly remembers the time she was probably in college where he asked where he could. Laminate something and when my mom Helped him do that to realize quickly? It was his papers so bad to me just really when you need a reason to believe in. Why the American dream as as much a part of our dream as let the nose first generation pregnant bird one hundred may be. I always think about that among other story. 'cause for me that was that that's a really powerful thing to be both proud and beautiful right and I think that that you know that hasn't changed for a lot of people. Oh my gosh so powerful quote you there because we live in this were proud of gooey are and because many people here have not explore their country they were brought young and so they especially we still have a lot of people living in the. Us times we live in living that fear and at the same time. Loving the place that you your end. It's it's a hard copy to exist

Third Generation Attorney El Paso The Times Texas Al Paso Borden Atlanta FBI Sosa I Inner Family College J. Edgar Hoover Fbi Academy Mike Pessoa Mary Grandpa Korol
Coronavirus is a totally different disaster for philanthropies to handle

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

9:16 listening | Last month

Coronavirus is a totally different disaster for philanthropies to handle

"Darren Walker. Thank you very much for coming back to the PODCAST. I'm happy to back on them. So you're every year you send out a New Year's letter in this in this year's letter was entitled how we move forward during the year ahead and in it you decry how we're losing ground on a whole host of issues that democratic values and institutions remain in retreat as a quote from the letter. You also say in the letter quote. This is a time to step up not check out a time to reenlist. Re-engage and reconnect. And you ask a question that is pretty remarkable given where we are right now you wrote quote what new crisis needs to befall us before we together are spur to collective action is covert nineteen that new crisis that will spur collective action. I hope it is. I hope that out of this horrific calamity. We can emerge a stronger nation. A more empathetic people a society where we realize that we have a shared destiny that we realized that our future is one future a future that is dependent on our willingness to act as one our willingness to engage as one and our belief in the idea of equal status them. You know you have been either in your role at Ford or your previous role when you're at The Rockefeller Foundation. You've been a part of many calamities. Both Mother Nature created and manmade I seem to remember there was Detroit bankruptcy there was a new orleans rebuilding after Katrina up. Have you seen anything like this? That we're going through right now. There has never been anything like this virus to hit the world. There's never been a a calamity of this scale and scope and intensity and every crisis I've been involved in where there's been some terrible act of God or whatever you WanNa call it In in it usually place based in some part of the world there is some terrible thing ebola or so Nami in Southeast Asia and the rest of the world can rush to help because the rest of the world is stable prosperous and doing very well generally speaking and this case the entire planet is on edge the entire globe is impacted by this Kobe. Nineteen hours there is no place on earth where one can seek refuge from this and believe that you won't be impacted and so the question for us is. How do we respond in a circumstance that truly does require that we build a consensus that Necessitates a global response not just a response at the country level and particularly response that recognizes that the inequality that we see in the world and in our society will be exacerbated by this corona virus crisis. If we don't as we design how we get out of this and we work through this we are paying attention to the inequality that existed before this virus hit us. We're going to actually make things worse for the very people who are most vulnerable and most at risk. I WANNA get into a little bit deeper into that in a moment but as president of the Ford Foundation. Correct me if I'm if my memory is failing me here but you have a major presence in India and just recently. A India went on a national lockdown. We're talking about one point. Something Billion People on what? How does that impact the work? That Ford does while in a country like India. Our work is focused on civil society and strengthening civil society supporting the rights of women and Dulles Indigenous People until those communities are absolutely impacted because these lockdowns basically impact their ability to earn a living. And most of these folks earn a living As garbage pickers as day laborers people living off of cash and so they are absolutely impacted but on the other hand it's important that India as a nation have a uniform standard way of approaching. This and I think the prime minister has done that. Interestingly we also have an office in Beijing so our China office closed in January as a result of the virus hitting Beijing where we have an office and Within days our office closed. What's very interesting? Is that this week. Our office in Beijing opened. And so we've got a reopening of an office and the a ten offices of Ford in other parts of the world are all closed now so we have this almost this this reversal and so in some ways. What we've seen in our office in Beijing May Portend Our future in that. That office was closed for ten weeks before was able to be reopened and we'll see if We follow a similar pattern here in the US. So let's dive into what you said Just a moment ago about you know how we design the response to Covet. Nineteen will determine whether the societal issues that countries were dealing with before. Kovac's nineteen whether they're exacerbated and I don't mean this as as a partisan question but it is it is a question that has been lurking in my mind. I sort of troubled. By the fact that the United States is not in the forefront of leading in terms of responding to cope with nineteen can can the United States can nations get past this without concerted driven fact based Response from leadership leadership is essential here and the importance of leadership has never been more elevated And felt at at at at anytime in my lifetime than this moment. We're in most certainly the work of global organizations like the WHO is essential and working with them on global strategies and global approaches. Is the only way we're going to actually Get on the other side. If you will I I I don't think it's a secret to say that the US has not sought leadership in many global fora the traditional Seats at the head of the table that we assumed and that we championed global ideas The this is not a part of who we are today in terms of and I think something we have to really consider Do we want the United States to be a a global leader a global organizer a global. Convener I believe we do. I believe it is in our national interest for the US to be engaged in the world and to set a standard and an example of excellence of Democratic Participation Of OF COLLEAGUE SHIP.

Ford Beijing United States India Darren Walker Ford Foundation Rockefeller Foundation Southeast Asia Reenlist Ebola Detroit Dulles Prime Minister Katrina President Trump Kovac China
Trapped In Wuhan During COVID-19 | Jen Knight

Migratory Patterns

8:55 listening | Last month

Trapped In Wuhan During COVID-19 | Jen Knight

"Gen nine says that she won the in laws lottery when it comes to Chinese husband's parents but luck wasn't on our side this past January when a day after she arrived in her husband's hometown just outside of Wuhan for a Spring Festival celebration. The Chinese Government started shutting down all transit lakes into and out of the area effectively trapping her at ground. Zero of what would soon come to be known as the covert Nineteen Corona virus outbreak. She was as she easily admits terrified and filled isolated but what helped her feel less alone was participating in a study. That has china-based ex. Pats how they were feeling during the crisis and through two months of lockdown and plus two weeks of self isolation in an apartment in Shenzhen. Her notions of home have shifted. Or maybe she was just being made aware of a ship. That had already taken place. This is a really great conversation. And I'm thankful we were able to get this glimpse of what life was like for Ex pats in China as the global pandemic first emerged. I hope that you learn as much from her story is ided. Please sit back relax. Enjoy my conversation with JEN night. Gen night welcome to migratory patterns. Thank you so much for having me. Where is home so and I thought about how to answer this question. I came up with three answers. Three different places. One would be the place where I you know grew up and was raised which would be suburbia midwestern suburbia so a suburb of Milwaukee Wisconsin and a second place. That is home. Would Be San Francisco Bay area where I lived for eight years before I moved abroad and where my family is now. Located is in the North Bay and then the third place that I came up with it feels like home would be where I am right now. Which is my apartment in Shenzhen China? Where my husband is and my apartment is and jobs and life. I think in the first person with three answers. Oh really pretty sure. It's always interesting. Everyone's unique and I love how people will somehow work in where they're from originally some people you know there are few who like where I am now and all that stuff but I think the first TRIFECTA. I think if you'd asked me a few years ago it would have been just too but as I've gotten a little bit older I felt more strongly connected to my roots in a way and so I really wanted to add that third one in about where I came from because I think it's so important It's something that I wanted to leave behind when I left there at the age of eighteen nineteen. I was like goodbye. I Never WanNa see you again suburban Midwest. So let's talk about that so so suburban Midwest. Where exactly was that so it was in? It's a suburb of Milwaukee Wisconsin Like on the north side of town and it was it was a nice place to grow up and I've gone back a few times over the years. My family doesn't live there anymore. So the only real pull. I have our friends and people. I know who still live there but I found the last time that I returned which would have been seven years ago I think about. I felt I really felt the sense of home. It was so interesting so when you ask that question. That immediately came to my mind. That's interesting so you said you were looking to get out of there at eighteen. What was that all about? Was that Just sick of suburbia type thing? It's kind of an archetype in in the US. Yeah I was. I was always ready to get out from a pretty young age and my friend and I we just pointed at a map and there was Seattle and we had one friend who lived there who said we could sleep on his floor and we sold all of our stuff and bought backpacks and took the train for three days to Seattle the train. That's awesome. I love the train still was school. You were going to college or you just get out and I was just getting out. Although I ended up studying my undergraduate was in Washington state so I did live there for a number of years but interestingly it never felt like home so that is interesting so After so how did you get from? Let's say Seattle because that's kind of where you can set off on your journey. How did you get from Seattle to where you are now? What was that like? Well I my family had relocated to the San Francisco Bay area and I visited there one time before and felt really like a strong Paul to San Francisco and I went through some personal problems in While I was living in Seattle and I ended up packing up and moving and decided to relocate there and I just loved it I mean I had an amazing eight years living in San Francisco and I remember driving my used Acura over the Golden Gate Bridge like crammed with all of my stuff and I really felt that sense like this is going to be my home for awhile. Kinda cool this kind of cool so then you went to San Francisco. So what motivated jumped from San Francisco to overseas? That'd be fair. I Guess San Francisco can kind of feel like overseas from suburban Milwaukee. Well yeah so I made the first jump to Seattle and then from Seattle to San Francisco and I think San Francisco for me. I feel like I just had done it. I don't know how else to explain it. I just felt like I was John. Like I had done everything that I needed to do. There I had an amazing time. I met amazing people. I had incredible experiences. It's a beautiful place to live. There's so much to do. There was such a buzz. You know the entrepreneurial seen everything there when I was living there but I did feel like my time there was complete and I felt really unsure about what to do next and I ended up going to New York for a while and I went back to the Midwest for a while and I was really torn about my next move and sort of out of nowhere. The opportunity to teach in Shanghai came up and they said we have this job for you. You have two weeks to get here and I just went for it. What was the job? It was teaching in a school there but it was kind of a startup situation where I would be helping them. Start an American program within a Chinese school so it was a lot of curriculum development and teaching As well as some other like Adleman kind of stuff. It's a great way and so did you study to be a teacher when you're teaching in the US before you left. Yeah I had a California teaching credential and I got my master's from San Francisco State University so when I moved to San Francisco that was. That was the reason why was for a job that I got in Oakland Public Schools. So my background is very heavily in education is a teacher and I know what you guys do. So good on you for that work. Is You know you? Kinda got out at San Francisco. Probably right at the right time. It's just San Francisco to me. I've been there several times over the last few years last several years and San Francisco from to me feels like that really cool band. That sounded awesome but then sold out immediately and not quite as cool anymore. I love that analogy. Yes I could not agree more so so you hit China and did you say was shot high. Yeah Shanghai is where I lived I so for four years. Wow you've been bouncing all over the place where you did you. Did you go to Thailand for Awhile? Yes so after we were in Shanghai Shanghai four years we lived poop hat Thailand for two years and then we just moved back to China. Shenzhen last August. Well what great timing I actually right now. I'm pretty happy to be in Shenzhen overall right now I mean you know. Obviously we're this is the time of the time of Corona virus right now and it China. Ironically when the outbreak I happened so many people were streaming out of the country. And now there's tons of people who would love to be able to go back because they got a handle on it I it's Conan and argue at the methods but They've worked yes. Yes and I was at the epicenter of all of that so I I rode the roller coaster.

San Francisco San Francisco Bay Seattle China San Francisco State University Shenzhen Shanghai Milwaukee United States Wisconsin Shenzhen China Chinese Government Shanghai Shanghai Wuhan Midwest North Bay
Lets Talk Some Census Into You

What a Relief! The IRUSA Podcast

6:29 listening | Last month

Lets Talk Some Census Into You

"Terms of of the desire to really engage with the local communities we're turning gauge with community that date sign up for thousands of since his jobs available all throughout the country. You can find out more information about that. On twenty twenty cents is dot dot dot jobs in. It's a fantastic place to look for. What are the needs for this often? We're looking for folks who are speaking a specific language as because they can connect with those communities in particular. I imagine. That's what's happening in the city of Alexandria Sarah. I'm sure she can speak to that. So and so So I thank you for the Segue so I actually did want to mention one thing about the census enumerators that we've talked about a couple of times So the folks who are working on hiring in from the Census Bureau of actually been in conversations with me and so we kind of try to benefit each other and try to Support each other when we can One of the things that I like to tell people about census enumerators is that they're actually hired from the communities where they're going to be working so When you have someone knocking on your door asking you about the and might be someone you sought the grocery store money sally. You're getting coffee. It's not going to be someone from two states over who doesn't talk exactly so And they're trying to hire people who speak languages that are commonly spoken in those areas And you know when I do talk about the jobs I do mention that. They're they're really beneficial especially for people who might have a day job and just want to pick up a couple of hours doing sense. Numerous in the evening And so I think it is a really great opportunity in a way to involved That is not a on a volunteer basis by his still very critical to making sure that every single person gets on it. I mean it begs the question for me like for both of you guys like your own. I mean especially you as a demographer. Do you like really excited like every ten years. You're just like Oh my God. We're going to go do it again. Guys WE'RE GONNA find out. Who's out there and we are is it is. It is excitement of this. Like for you guys. Or what other the exciting parts of or of your participation. You're trying to encourage people to sign up to be some of these. What are the things that get you excited about participating in this to me personally and I think it goes back to what you're saying And the Child of immigrants in their agreement in a household where there is a little bit of hesitation about engaging but I remember when this insists occurred in the pig. Fat Inflow came in the mail. my dad had my sister's is it around the dinner table and say this is very get hurt. This is where we count eneg Rubin at five Sunny American will only in hearing that. I have to tell you that kind of inspired me to you to join us and to really talk about the importance of not only participating but spreading that message among all communities Also Denard and other lifestyle on economic economics and policies that are provide evidence and data driven decisions in census. Data is the gold standard for making so as a fellow data nerd. I agree So I mean everything that I do is supported by census data If I didn't have data from the census then I would either have to conduct surveys on my own which is very costly. Um and imprecise but So I really value since data for that reason. I'm particularly excited to see what comes out of the twenty twenty census Just because the city of Alexandria such dynamic place and it has been evolving and changing over time In just the past Thirty years of doing math correctly We have seen our Hispanic population for instance Rise from five percents to seventeen percent and that's That kind of demographic change is one of the things that makes me very excited to both live and work in the city of Alexandria that We're in an area that is becoming increasingly diverse and census. Data's really what tells me how diverse re becoming where people living? How are we interacting with each other? And where can we do a better job of interacting with each other and people who aren't necessarily like us or some excellent all right? I think we're con a low close to the end of our time together. But I wanted to know. Were there any other plugs or any other comments and our hope that listeners really did get a chance to understand the senses. Take a little bit of fear factor if there is any fear factor and then and and. I think like you were just saying like that. That feeling of being recognized you know. And that's part of the people want to be recognized. They want to you know know that we are here in. That's what this is kind of saying to The world that we have. We're here as a family as this culture as you know. What have you so Where are there any other Point said YOU WANNA bring up. We come to a close. Can't cover ever scenario podcast. Right WanNa make sure that folks knew about a great resource. It's twenty twenty cents. Dot Gov questions about how to count your college kids that are living in dorms versus living off campus or what happens to the relative that stays six months a year versus eight months year versus for months. Imagine it happens a lot with immigrant communities those resources addresses questions in so populous. Podcast isn't the only source of reference. I hope you've really visit those that website in address any of those answers here and for our neighbors here in Alexandria where I are based in the NFL LOSS. Pieces for them share So one thing that I really like to say is that Responding to the twenty twenty cents. This is important for everyone as we've addressed here but I like to say that it doesn't matter whether you're born here whether you've got here ten years ago or whether you got here ten days ago You count and you deserve to be hounded on the twenty. Two Thousand Census Another thing I like to share is that participating in the census is your way to participate in the civic process. Even if you're not a citizen of the United States And then the last thing I will close with is that I am Staffing the city of Alexandria is complete count committee but they're complete count. Committee is all over the United States. So if you are living in a different place than You might want to join your cities complete count committee and even if they're not accepting new members at the time. I am positive they are accepting volunteers There are complete committees that are both at the state and local level and also I know that community based organizations especially in some larger places are managing their own

Alexandria Census Bureau United States Alexandria Sarah Dot Gov Eneg Rubin NFL Denard
Interview with Butterfly Moon and Jay at PCon 2020

Ravens at the Crossroads

8:44 listening | Last month

Interview with Butterfly Moon and Jay at PCon 2020

"We are joined now by butterfly and Jay Wright thanks proper billing to me okay. Wasn't sure just want to make sure everybody's got their own terms. I know it's really late. You guys thank you so much for staying up with us. It's almost one in the morning. We're GONNA miss. We miss the shuttle obviously. Didn't have to root back. That's all I have to do is get the scooter to make it back up the elevator. You've been charging for a couple of hours now. Yeah you'd think you'd think it makes it across the hotel once and then it's out of POW. Wow that gaff rental disclose. This was my pantheon this year. It's all about look. Butterfly Moon is disabled. Sell your post on the official pagan projects. Who the hell's being Earth pigging grouping anthea on facebook community very go. I've had more than one incident. This time that I've become a piece of furniture. People have climbed on me. People have adult people adult people. I mean it's one thing if the kids climb on me that's okay. I looked like a jungle gym sometimes sitting on that thing. But I'm on scooter and I was trying to back up to park the scooter. In a workshop woman came through the door decided the gap between my back end and the chair was where she was going to walk. Even though my scooter was in motion and when the space got to narrow she put her foot on the scooter and her hand on my shoulder went up and over. The back scoops climbed over. You just climbed over like you were an actually. They're not like you're a real person or anything. No I was a piece of furniture. That's ridiculous Shit A and and it's one of those things that it's one of those things that you get used to win. You are disabled. Not being seen not being heard not being looked at or talked to but one of the things I love about. Pantheon is it's one of its one of. I think to pagan events that are held indoors so disabled people can attend. I cannot do outdoor events or camp outs the Ground Jason. Even my mobility devices. Don't work there. I've just not possible. Losing Pantheon means I have to fly across the country to go to another hotel show unless we create another one And I'm hoping that the next version of this will be great and accessible but I also think that we have to create a better space agree. I've heard some of your comments seen them on facebook and as somebody who is not differently abled. I don't face those issues. So it doesn't come to my forefront tell somebody brings it up and I feel bad about that because I don't have to think about it and most people don't and it's good they don't have to think about it but I would like it if they would see that we're here no you don't have to think about it. All the time to my thing is always don't put another obstacle in my way. I think it's just a simple fact that a lot of people don't think it we actually. I went to meet up recently two weeks ago and I know that the group had good intentions ago. We want wanted to paint the connex out in camping. And I'm like for the promises that excludes a large portion of the yes says they even if a mistress prime-1 camping she could easily because she has stuff that she needs it not to mention that traditional camping for those of us who have a knee and back issues. It's it's painful. It's very painful. And if you have allergies or asthma or yeah yeah I have trouble getting off a regular bed let alone off the ground uneven ground wheels volunteer person. I've gone to Ren Fairs where we've left early toes wheels of my walker sink into the silt or the mulch that they put down and I get stuck the wheels on the bus no longer go round and round exactly and it's so much fun to watch him trying to pull me out considering my relative size now getting video of that no sir. No by absolute favorite was I got stuck his. The parade was headed. My Way and my friends are in the Scottish clans. And they realized what was going on and they gave the orders. And the guys big guys marched out and kicked me in the Walker up and moved off to the side. It was hysterical. I mean I knew they were coming in so they sort of had my permission to pick me up and move me but it was along the lines of of watching my friends faces. He realized I was stuck and that the parade was about to walk right over me Yanks and they did it. More or less in cadence. Yeah that was fun But there are times when you know I WANNA be a regular part of the rituals. I WANNA be a regular part of the events and I can't always do it. That's that's a good point for those of us who planned rituals do public events. Yeah think about those who are differently abled than what you are listening pigging specifically but I didn't escape room and one of the things that the ass was are any colorblind. His they had a change was Trials that is in this Abram for that is it would never occurred to me would creating something like that. Actually that was brought up at one of the one of the conferences that I had been at with regards to It was workshop regarding A website and being mindful of color blindness win putting in certain Colored Fonts and highlights for your links so that people could recognize that there is an actual link there sometimes to continue to the next page. Press the Green. Button up your. There's No red green or purple here that I can help myself to rights exactly so it was kind of it was something I hadn't thought of before and so. Oh this is something we need to be aware of. Yeah I've had to learn to have an a conversation differently. I yes su-mei Jay is almost completely colorblind. I have had to learn to describe things differently. I can't say could you hand me my Blue Cane? He just turns and Glares at the because I have a stand with twenty different gains in it. Yes he has no idea what color they run on. Each one will actually. Once upon a time I had ones that had like animal heads in different so we named them all so I could say hand me quite chain. Cain hand me you know. We gave them puns of course Because he couldn't see the colors but yeah there's there's different things could be done. What my one of my big things is. Ada is great except most people in acting it. Stick to the letter of the law and not the spirit of the law

Jay Wright Facebook Ren Fairs Official ADA Cain Allergies Abram Asthma
Ireland Won't Accept an Atheist's New Religion Since He Was Once a Pastafarian

Thank God I'm Atheist

4:58 listening | 2 months ago

Ireland Won't Accept an Atheist's New Religion Since He Was Once a Pastafarian

"Gotta take us meanwhile to Ireland the Great Republic of Ireland. Because I don't know if you know this but Ireland has a history with their religions in general the in Catholics Protestants. There's been some. There's been some dustups overtime. Okay They they they haven't necessarily all agreed on what what the right religion was. Well now the you know they. They like many places have to approve people who want to do things like you know minister and And and officiate weddings. That sort of thing and one person there A Guy who actually runs a podcast called the free thought profit podcast company. Name was John Hamill and he was talking about He. How public policy was favoring Christians? No shock there Specifically Catholics. He said so he. He said he was as a Pasta Faren. As a follower of the flying spaghetti monster he wanted to to have the same rights as a Catholic did and was denied summarily denied because the apparently the government of Ireland sees that as a parody religion not a real religion which I kind of. I'm okay like that's probably true. It's probably kind of counts as a parody religion anyway. Then he changed it up. He cited join a different. Religion stopped believing in his in the newly appendages of the FSM and went to a a a religion called the syncretic. Jesus Christ Church which apparently is a church that believes likes the teachings of Jesus just doesn't believe that he's real or divine or anything it's basically just. There's no supernatural stuff. It's just his moral teachings are pretty okay. And that's where they're at so he he reapplied for Status under that religion was dismissed was was told was rejected. The registrar general apparently deemed his His conversion vexatious really yes say basically yeah decided that it was with the word. Yeah very interesting. I guess they thought he was just taking the Piss when he decided that he got to change religions which is so funny because basically what they're saying is we get to decide if you are allowed if you're being honest about changing your religion. That is so bizarre. Yeah Melissa Matter Great Question. Why can't you just say look he? He says he believes the thing so done no problem. Let's just move along sound like you know you're worried that his his religion is going to somehow change everybody else's religion or whatever they just the the logic is missing. I think I think what's important here. Dan Is that it's it's it's really important to make sure that people They're sincere in in in what they're saying and I think that that is a very good role For for the government for government to take. No no this is this is this is i. I'm glad I'm glad she looked out for for this on this issue because you can also mess otherwise faster already. We know already that they test thoroughly and vet each and every priest and rabbi that comes through To to make sure that they are not also being vexatious about their their ordinations or whatever. I'm sure area. I'm sure that they have some sort of rigorous thing that they put people they can see into people's hearts goods true. Isn't that Nice?

Ireland Great Republic Of Ireland John Hamill Jesus Christ Church FSM Melissa Matter DAN
What else? Corona!

IGeNIGHT Podcast

7:56 listening | 2 months ago

What else? Corona!

"Hey guys hey. This is quarantined. Special saw Corentin special party. He knows how many parts there will be a while they too will watch this. Show this to exactly just to see. This is just this season but the but no is coming off as much as I would say. Let's talk about. The rebels is reality and we have still colliding with this bad ass disease right now but it will pass. I just got a couple of calls just working from home and it's interesting because I talked to different people role globally so I get to talk to people from all different countries and so sometimes. I'm I'm just surprised sometimes about where people are at and this affects people differently like we all know but I just got off talking to a friend a colleague in Germany and man. Oh I was like we were meant to talk about something. We literally spent forty minutes just like having a session on just we can do it. You're okay how are you near Lezo? Stay strong friend you know. And it's like what if it is adjustment thing you say funny like sometimes you can from hiring more you think. Oh yeah cool. Welcome him APPEA- days but at least we know going back to work the next day or the next week that this feels a bit uncertain. Because it's like we would hold I four weeks and now it's more let me going to be twelve last. I think it's about adjustment of what I have to pick up my workplace. Actually because they are competing fixable. They know that people have children or other responsibilities. They know that this is a huge adjustment and people on some people aren't suited to working from home so they are retry it as much as possible to be flexible and because we are all the organization they have reverted funds to support people who live in college. Who are freelancers? Pay Their rent. Who you know what I mean so this to me. It feels like even this is really crap was going on. We tried to pull together to make people's experiences of this at least a bit better. Yeah that that makes me feel good. I think for me. It's just. It's kind of the ways that people things that people are afraid of that. I'm being very aware of and so for some people you know. They're afraid for their families. And so if you've got relatives in countries and so he's he's really touch me because you know he has a mom in Brazil and he's like you know the most the most hard done by people in those cultures in those countries. What what is it what? What about them when they can't get access to health care they can't give up a festive ones on the on the list when it comes to resources because they don't have the money and to book you talked about this last time the private health insurance and when it comes to work. I feel like the him. He's real kind of pain was coming from the uncertainty around work where the company's losing projects. I just talked to Marissa This afternoon as well and should she works for a Hedge Hedge Fund but I can investment bank That sponsors and she was talking to your best year mercer and she was just sharing how this company that specialize in Holidays High Holidays and they and they're like you know borrowed forty million to start their company or something crazy like that and they're projected earnings and revenue for this next month zero and so it's just alert these ways that people are just feeling fearful so job security is really a big one and he was just sharing their with great with you live in a country where yoga get unemployment. Belfair all you can kind of do this and that the government willing to do this but there are places where it's like often we ain't got nothing for you usual job. Good luck to you. So I was really found his pain so he's worried about his wishes USA heaviness to him about worried about so. I'm just trying to encourage him. And just you know just got my little car. Djing words of wisdom up there on a mile my back the back of me so when people see video just like you know just trying to put a few words out there and just keep encouraging. Yeah you know people that you've seen as really strong and you interact with them on a daily basis and they're like to see them so bun rable at this. Time is really humbling. I think it's humbling for them. People that I just was always like. Oh this is about us. But it's like they are afraid fearful and depressed and not necessary. Made the mostly weak enough. But you just see inside of you. I think this is the fact that this is also unprecedented. Like nobody knows how what when? And so you're right and then you start to realize the things that you rely on and I think that's what's really showing me when I'm not traffic on. Having compensate the panic the the most panic that the kind of conversations I'm having with people is all centered around yet security jobs e micro a lot of people who have very much safer kind of freelance space and very much kind of kind of doing what. I want to do creatively. All of a sudden they're like oh my gosh like really scary and I don't have security. How pay my rent and and and you know and people and I feel really privileged. Actually that I have a job that that is going to stand the test of time. Coding and it will still be there the end of this but even still like I ain't concerned because it gets the point where all of a sudden as well people are thinking. Okay what's the party's what are the core things that needs to focus on? What are the core moments core principles? There's a lot of the kind of added value rose in a business that was all of a sudden seem to feel like not like not important anymore. And so you can really get into like my my job boy. Am I gonNa Again? Same same shots. What was in? I'm big on my company like they've actually been so resilient and how they responded. I think they've been very good at kind of just know that you know we get. This is the day by day thing. This is not a this is what's happening. This week is literally day by day. They're kind of really opened the communication it has to be. I think you know. If I'm honest view might be disappointment. Has Been actually from the government. Not so much from workplaces. I think our work's been great. I think the government being so unsure and so I said the government Boris Johnson. Just not being clear in what he says like a delivery guys. I think you have. The trump does every day like a certain time he has his compasses which again are a shambles. I'm not even GONNA get too much into trying to bring too much negatively into this moment because I think everyone is in that space of worries what will stay there. But I do think that they they could do better with just reassuring people because I think that where there is so much uncertainty. You really do need leadership to lead. And they're just no. I'm just under sweeney disappointed so actually I found solace in looking at my community to lead an. I'm seeing great leaders papa elsewhere in terms of inspectors that. I wouldn't necessarily be looking for them. I E actually checking them of friends who are like how mental health care in this time. What are you doing to kind of? Stay Sane in these moments so small things that check in. Jovan everybody even APP site house. He couldn't if you guys have seen the housefly which is really cool. The instagram live moments. All suffer usually. I would not be my back like it's not my thing but it's actually been somewhere. I found a lot of kind of support salacious when people come and mega positively and like this fun through this also sharing some facts which is held. 'cause I'm really checking on friends and people. I know that else regardless of age that just because it can be quite isolating of course so thankful that MOMS in America view one and your family but yeah so a lot of my friends single or they or they could be partners but then if by themselves and yeah just checking it on them because people are. Social Butterfly is will they? You know they better if you're an extrovert shiver and you get your energy from people. That's really

Germany Lezo Corentin Hedge Hedge Fund Instagram Boris Johnson Jovan USA Djing Brazil America Sweeney Mercer
The Coronavirus Conspiracy? Truth and Myths with Dr. Ala Stanford, MD

On One with Angela Rye

9:00 listening | 2 months ago

The Coronavirus Conspiracy? Truth and Myths with Dr. Ala Stanford, MD

"Love them. This is a very special edition of on wide with Angela. Rye I have the great privilege of introducing to some of you in reintroducing U. Two others and dismiss that out but what I'm saying Dr Alasdair burglarizing Haxhi physician and surgeon or more than twenty years. She is board certified by the American would have surgery in most pediatric and adult. General Surgery is women's history. Months are would be remiss if I did also notes that she was the first black woman to complete general surgery training at the University of Pittsburgh for her research in both basic science. Clinical Research in also public health has been published in peer reviewed medical journals. She serves as a medical consultant and correspondent. They start healthcare advocate for so many. And why end mother? Thank you so much for joining us today. Dr Ella you in her hands are so sorry. All right so I wanted to do that. I know you know very well and that is before you get started with the patient you wash your hands and since clearly so many of us don't know how to do that. Show his house. So we'RE GONNA turn one water though on with some so the actor who in Armenian ladder the ladder is. You're getting all your finger. You're getting under the your nail and monkeys will say eighty eight songs In your land rain bad for them usually not wearing a rain either. B-actor bars can be bought in your jewelry at rent. Ricky and I bribed mine in thoroughly it there. You can also transmit actor in Mars. Inside legally or ends is sometimes apper Or NOT NEAR. So war can use apple You're clean burs. It's Issue in greater than sixty percent alcohol Eddie. She gave her front in your in in weight or early bride when it diverts most protection Admires her fate. Were thank you very much. Thank now we're ready to go. Dr Ready to start first feature false. I know this is a very serious subject matter so I'm not making light of it but I think the way that we process information. These days is in quick bites. I rather Quick by done to. We're talking to people in ways that they can understand. I want to start your tour. All Cove in nineteen is the same thing as the Kerala virus ninety is the same bay acid lumbar or see is for Arouna. I'm from the buys. Brown and finds all run is or fires in the the is disease. So Ground Myers in nineteen thirty year. It will be nice is okay and then in eighth grade and so the next at shoe or cost Sherpas Cova nineteen was started by consuming bat or frog suit in Wuhan China so a boss or you know get numbers that Arnie is originally from. Okay a thought now I actually others in ager man is at Brown back to hang around which is a mammal ent- year and for Matt was transferred to Houston where it resume at Napa slacks natural place on the later dean at it out. Ninety five percent of course is this mail and then in a hose if so injury binds our sappers as in. As Roma's after that that's how it's mutating ended so susceptible affirmative close or a grown man. He true romance but lightly bands. Wow okay the next one is our falls. Warmer weather can kill the virus so the Kerala virus will go away once Spring and summer come. Awesome writing and explaining our okay. Here's what you're one is driving me. Nuts black folks can get back Rona about back that off off off. But you know we're at our as Arab Americans in our relationships with our healthcare system had not always been off in there. Were chairman there were three of the HP b-cell there were so many days in times. You're tested the tested as lack of trust historic president. The accents that he received offers end is not sub and it doesn't matter At nonsenses Iger these one affluent on or only a is added. Eric Liver is it not is Madison as not guess world a bill is not learning. Its not strangely year. Widens because of the lack of trust fund from sort in present-day Practices Chandler. We can yet. I'm telling you add NAPN narrative. I practicing all listening in other than by Hindu to prevent myself in my family. Am I doing this lead in Dr a more to come on his arm hypochondriac any tissue? I'm running against tissue. Okay tissue sitting here. Wake up a belief in their way. No this that there. Beautiful Up Yours you okay. Here's the next. I'm not biased or anything. But sure off the governor of New York Andrew. Cuomo is he handling this crisis better than Y'all President Donald. J trump age Governor Cuomo is leading by symbol. Yeah and when there are nine lead as accurate Eagle in New Year. He has do you know what I mean. Look you like I have never experienced. Remember the actor about a law. Say That so the fourth largest in the United States is inner twenty million people. Nine know that is buyers Gates Fred. It's clinically in dense conway's New York City. You can't walk down the street without someone and so forth so I think that they're acting east so will lead also protect spread neighboring state. Jerry Nadler is your lab.

Governor Cuomo Kerala Dr Alasdair Burglarizing Haxhi University Of Pittsburgh Jerry Nadler Dr Ella Dr Ready Angela Brown U. Two Consultant Clinical Research New York City Sherpas Cova United States Ricky New York Ground Myers
Kathryn Sophia Belle

Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

8:30 listening | 2 months ago

Kathryn Sophia Belle

"I'm India Lorrie Wilmot. And you're listening to the PODCAST TALKING. Journeys out belonging to blackness. Joining us today is Dr Catherine Sophia Bell. Catherine is associate professor of philosophy at Penn State with research and teaching interests in African American Afrikaner Philosophy African American Studies African Diaspora studies lack feminist philosophy and critical philosophy of race. She's an author. Co Founding Editor of the Journal Critical Philosophy of race a certified Yoga instructor in founding director in owner of La Belle. Be Coaching which Offers Executive Academic coaching workshops and retreats for administrators faculty and Graduate Students. Catherine also offers services specifically under happily unmarried and erotic empowerment that provide individual and Week Group. Coaching workshops and retreats designed to support the social emotional and physical wellbeing of her clients. Thank you for having me Katherine. Let me tell you. I just love the way. You're able to demonstrate for so many folks out there. How one in academic can be multifaceted in dynamic right. Don't sit at a desk. Let's read in on this thing right and then also to how as an African descended person and woman how he can truly embrace and live in your truth when it comes to your personal relationships and partnerships and even with yourself as it is the case with happily unmarried and then I love this and open to the sixty nine ways to embrace ecstasy. Yeah I mean there's more but sixty nine such a fun number and then I'm also my son. Signed his cancer and sign kind of looks like a sixty nine so I like playing with things like Bat. I love that. And so all of this falls under your business tagline philosophical purposeful and practical approaches to La Shelby. The good life. All of that fantastic. I'm so excited to have you here. Because you are such a brilliant scholar and you also have this really great. Entrepreneurial Mindset as well. I think our audience here will just enjoy listening to your journey as to how you've been able to combine these two passions. It seems to me I love it will fall right into our first segment. If you don't mind because I have so many different kinds of questions and thoughts act one call to adventure so for our listening audience. Who may not know you changed your last name from Gyns. Yes to bell and bell spelled with an extra e honor your maternal grandmother and and as I understand your maternal grandmother named herself. And Yeah and you see this active. Changing your name as a way to honor that power and legacies. Yes well first let me say I absolutely love my name. I mean every time I see it written down Catherine Sophia Bell like I get excited at the sight of my own name. So in terms of motivations oftentimes our names are patrilineal right. So many not necessarily all women are given the name of your father in. May Take on the name of their husband and that was my experience. So my initial given name was Catherine Theresa Johnson. My mother wanted the name Catherine after her mother my father wanted to name you theresa and then Johnson was his name. So that was my maiden name I got married in. Nineteen Ninety nine at the age of twenty one between my first and second semesters in Grad School and at that point I changed my last name to guidelines which was the name of the former husband I got legally divorced in twenty seventeen and I'm now berry happily unmarried. And rather than returning somebody that patrilineal name I mate name. I decided to go with a match. Lineal named honor my maternal grandmother so her initial given name was Katherine Smallwood. Which was my great grandmother's last name. Smallwood. But by the time she got the high school she changed her name's Katherine L. B. E. L. L. Now I have no idea how she went about changing it or even if she went through some legal process to do that but my mother got me a copy of her high school yearbook class of Nineteen Fifty two where in that yearbook so by the time. She got her senior in high school. Her name is listed as Catherine Bell. And so there's something really powerful to me about this black woman in the nineteen young black woman in the nineteen fifties by her senior in high school Made her name Kathryn Bell. And that's the name that she's recognized as you know later in life she. She went on to model. She showed up in jet magazine a few times and her name is Catherine Bell knows faces as well. You know that was just a powerful legacy to me and it was important Tap into in connect to that legacy empower naming oneself Have a match lineal name as hopes to patrilineal name. I'm so I changed my name Catherine. I actually dropped the middle name. Interestingly my mother when I was changing my last name she was like. Oh well I never really liked Teresa anyway. That was your father's toys. That would choice so she got a chance to rename me. My Middle Name Sophia. She recommended because she said you're Lhasa. In philosophy us so you can be Sophia. My Mother's middle initial is S. My two daughters have the middle initial s so we were able to share that s middle initial further sophia in the bell It's still sounds the same as the way. My maternal grandmother founded by added the extra e. Just a little bit of self friendship over the meaning of beauty. I think evidence that there was so much thoughtfulness and care. Yeah even your process to say okay. How do I go about changing my name because even when we go through relationships such as marriage? And you're going through the divorce there is a lot of conscious thought around. Do People keep their names Ryan or even when you're getting married forget about even when you're getting divorced but like when you're getting married some people choose to keep their name drop the name in my case I hyphenated. I've even attended a wedding where the husband and the wife decided to both hyphenate their names just so that it would on paper as well as the presentation of this new joined. Family Union Unit. That it wasn't that someone was giving up but they were just more so adding naming oneself is so powerful. I mean I can't help but to even reflect on scene in routes where yes lavar. Burton is as as Coon to Kim. Tae Is being whipped. He ends. It's you know this holder of active submission. That's trying to happen with him being beaten because he refused the naming Tober right and he's like Kota Day trying to be broken. Think about that example. I also think about the example with Muhammed Ali. Right where he's like. You know. Say My name. Say My name right before the destiny's child came out with it up. You know what I mean and so yeah. I'm not GonNa say that that you know the cultural model my mind that I figured I'd put that out there. Once I said it I was like okay. This is GonNa be the connection that comes up celebrities name that too. But that's not quite what I have in mind right. There is something and I think we have more examples of men doing that than or the example of men don't eat more celebrated than examples of women during that but definitely for me like I look forward to dropping the maiden name when I took on the Mary name but I also very much look forward to dropping the Mary name and renaming my for me. It was another beginning for me. Like who am I in this new chapter this new iteration of our life? And how can this naming process a reflection of that kind of a launching point for me for that? So that's been beautiful. Young kids is all about identity. And the all these different phases and stages just you know what does our about us and then our names judge. We're judged by our names whether we're applying for different jobs or positions. I mean their scores and You know them very well. Also but their scores of research studies and the employment field that talked about racial bias and discrimination based on candidates nate. I think that's a fantastic way to pay homage to her legacy. Thank you

Dr Catherine Sophia Bell African American Afrikaner Phi Catherine Theresa Johnson Lorrie Wilmot Katherine Smallwood Katherine Bell Kathryn Bell Associate Professor Of Philoso India Journal Critical Philosophy Co Founding Editor Executive Week Group La Belle La Shelby Lhasa Katherine L. B. E. L. L. Muhammed Ali