Road Trips

Deep dives for long drives, waiting rooms and passing time without wasting precious minutes. Chock-full of intriguing short stories from a far-flung range of topics - hear the latest in Artificial Intelligence, True Crime thrillers, lessons in Leadership and much more, to keep your inquisitive mind satisfied as the miles fly by.

A highlight from Its Time To Focus Group (with Sarah Longwell and Julie Womack)

The Suburban Women Problem

05:31 min | 2 hrs ago

A highlight from Its Time To Focus Group (with Sarah Longwell and Julie Womack)

"We are the one doing the grocery shopping and we realized that force birth is not gonna make this better. What if I had three more people to serve? That would make this so much cheaper. That would not fix inflation. I would just like to officially say we gotta address the suburban women problem because it's real. Welcome to the suburban women problem. A podcast for red wine and blue. Hi everyone, thanks for listening. I'm Rachel vindman. I'm Jasmine Clark. I'm Amanda Weinstein, and you're listening to the suburban women problem. Continuing our weekly countdown, the midterm elections are now only 5 weeks away. The women I've been talking to on my travel maker tour are fired up, but the stakes are so high that there is still so much work to be done. You can sign up for the great troublemaker turnout by going to red wine dot blue. Every time we do this countdown, I'm like hyperventilating lighting a little bit. But while the actual election day is 5 weeks away, here in Georgia, early voting actually starts on October 17th. So like literally two weeks away. This morning on NPR at herd a guy who's from the heritage foundation and my heart kind of sank and I was like, I gotta keep it together. I have the kids in carpool in here. But he said something good. He was like, look, if you're gonna have early voting or drop off ballot, just have, you know, we need to have secure drop boxes. And that's it. And I was like, is there anything else? Did they cut it off? I don't think they did. That's fine. I can agree with that. He was like, Virginia's done a good job of that. And I was like, well, yeah. Do y'all have drop boxes that are outside though? Or do you have to drop, go inside of the precinct? I vote inside and it's the DMV and there's like a room. So I don't know the answer to that because I don't get an absentee ballot. But he made it seem like there are because he described them like you have to be 24 hour surveillance. And they can't be something that can be blown away or carried away. We had outside ones, but in the last election, they took hours away and basically said it was insecure and people were dropping off 50,000 ballots at once and all that crazy craft that they were saying. Yeah, 'cause it's easy. Here's the other thing, it's easy for moms. So there's research shows that moms with little kids vote less often, and it's not because I have some politicians like, oh, you just got to vote and get off your butt and vote. Now that ain't it, like we got little kids, they have fevers, they're puking, like, or you just don't want to deal with taking them out of the car. Or long lines. Like if you have little kids and that's an hour away please, that is like torture. And so outside Dropbox makes it so easy. And so that women with kids, they can be sitting in the back seat while you drop it off. I'm glad you brought that up because I was canvassing this weekend and I went to a door and the lady answered the door and her little daughter also came to the door with her. She was probably about one. And as I was talking to her, I was like, well, do you plan on voting? And she looks down at her daughter and she's like, I don't even think I have time. And I kid you not. I was like, oh, oh my gosh. That is such a heartbreaking thing to hear at the door number one, 'cause I need her vote. But number two, when we talk about creating barriers to voting, these are the types of things that we mean. When people have little kids giving them options that make it easier for them to not feel like voting is going to be a huge burden, that is the opposite of voter suppression. That's what we should be doing, but we don't do that instead we do things like say the drop box has to be secure, therefore, it's only available inside of the precinct during early voting and only in this number of precincts, which is what they did in Georgia where we went from having about 20 drop boxes in gwinnett county, which is a county of a million people to 5. And so I think when the guy from heritage foundation says that it might sound innocuous, but what he's really talking about is how they made changes to voting laws that actually made it harder for people to turn in their ballot in that manner. And that's a lot of Republicans right now. I feel like a lot of Republicans are like, I am going to position myself as a moderate, whatever. And now what Glenn youngkin did? Yes. And they're not. Glenn youngkin, who is going to go and campaign for Carrie Lake that normal Glenn youngkin with the vast he looks just like this guy. Where's how to go in your vest? Yeah. How bad can he be? So it's a sweater. That's like a Republican campaign uniform because Kemp's been wearing them a lot lately too. He can pass, they can that they have like, I saw them together and they had their matching best. I mean, you know, the thing that I think we are having always getting back to you is this idea of authenticity. And I've been thinking about a lot. I wrote something about that that should be coming out soon. I mean, that's the way out of this. And I think I talked with Sarah longwell. My interview with her is going to be on later. And I mean, the great thing about her and her focus groups is it's straight from the people, right? I mean, she is talking to them and hearing from them. You have to listen to people. You have to listen to their news sources if you're going to try to change their mind. Before that, we're going to talk to Julie womack, Julie is the head organizer for red wine and blue. She is very busy these days, so we're lucky to get her. And we'll get to ask her what the team has been hearing from suburban women on the ground. But before we get to that, let's go back, you know, what we normally say is Webster and blowing up our group chat, but I think we've all been really busy.

Rachel Vindman Jasmine Clark Amanda Weinstein Glenn Youngkin Heritage Foundation Georgia NPR DMV Dropbox Virginia Carrie Lake Gwinnett County Sarah Longwell Kemp Julie Womack Julie Webster
A highlight from David A. Arnold: A Joke about Being Raised by a Founder of The O'Jays

Netflix is A Daily Joke

04:06 min | 2 hrs ago

A highlight from David A. Arnold: A Joke about Being Raised by a Founder of The O'Jays

"My stepfather didn't have no job when getting no job and fuck anybody who told him he better get a job. Stepfather was a completely different guy to do. My stepmother had a claim to fame though. My stepfather started a group in the 50s that became popular in the 70s called the OJ's. Yes. Yes. But he quit the day before they made a $1 million. So I spent my whole childhood watching a man try to prove that what was probably the biggest mistake of his life was not really a mistake at all. And this is the thing. Wait, I don't know if you know anybody from the same. My stepfather from the 70s. You know all them date from the 70s. They always got some slick shit happening. You know, they got everything he wore with silk for no goddamn reason. And he was always doing some 70s shit with his fingers. And he had a Jared curl, but not really. You know, my stepfather, you know, he was cool. And you know, he would talk down to you, you know? 'cause they got started the OJ, nigga you didn't. That's all of his sentences started the same way. No, no, no. I remember saying to my mother, why you got me in here. And we grew up with a lot of rules with my stepfather. One of the biggest rules that we grew up me and my three younger sisters was one glass of juice, per kid per day. Everything after that drink water. That was the rule. And you couldn't get around this rule because he had drink tickets that he would pass out in the morning. You wake up, come downstairs, he's standing right there, good morning. There's the Drake ticket, fuck that off. I have you like. I was a smart kid. I was saving all my drink dickers to the end of the week. Coming here on Friday, put them on the table, bam got 5 drink tickets, need 5 glasses of juice. No, nigga now. Today's drink ticket gallaudet is blue. None of this is that. Drink water. And I was like, I hated here. And for the life of me, I could not understand why this man was so cheap. And then one day it hit me. He was not cheap. He was broke. And that is a difference. When you broke, you move at a different cadence. You understand there is always a pressure on the back of your neck. And every single decision that is made in your life applies a little bit more. You're saying, this wasn't even about the juice, because this shit wasn't even real juice. It was like 99 cent chili Willy. Diabetes in the jug. Colored water. But when nim juice levels got low, that pressure got on the back of his neck, that shit was real for him. But for me, a ten year old kid, all I know is I wanted some juice. I could never see his life through the eyes of a 33 year old man. Which is, this is a man who's married to a woman. Who has three children, two of them are not his. Right? There is no money. She's in his ear and never lets him fucking forget it. Right? There's juice levels is getting low. There's pressure on the back of his neck and every single day. In our House, on the radio, the only thing you heard was people all over the world. Saw the love train love train. I'm surprised this nigga didn't kill all of us. You hear me? Watch David a Arnold. It ain't for the week. Only on Netflix.

Diabetes Arnold David Netflix
A highlight from How the West Can Compete with China in the Global AI Race - with Sean Gourley of Primer

AI in Business

02:32 min | 3 hrs ago

A highlight from How the West Can Compete with China in the Global AI Race - with Sean Gourley of Primer

"This episode, we are not focused on a particular use case or the impact of AI in one particular sector. We are focused on the international game of power that is technological predominance. Whether you are on the political right or the political left, it really doesn't matter at all to me. Probably all of us can agree that some basic freedoms such as freedom of speech, freedom of the press are things that we enjoy regardless of which political sway we happen to have. There are certainly authoritarian regimes who do not necessarily respect those rights per se. And whose ascendance to political predominance would be pretty challenging, no matter where you sit on the political spectrum. The west versus China when it comes to the AI race is a critical and important topic, one that I think is drastically underrepresented in conversations about AI ethics and AI risk. This week we focus squarely on that topic and we're lucky to be joined by Sean Gurley who is currently the CEO of primer AI they've raised some $170 million to focus on the analysis of large volumes of data. Sean earned his PhD in physics and complex systems at the University of Oxford, where he was also a research fellow for 5 years on quantitative analysis of war and conflict prior to that. He was a research scientist for NASA. Sean tackles two big topics in this episode. Number one, what are some of China's great advantages in the future of AI power when it comes to our entry into the metaverse when it comes to the ascendancy of cyber warfare versus just tanks and helicopters? Where does China have an edge over the western world broadly? Secondly, Sean talks about what the western world should be thinking about in terms of keeping up with and keeping in check, the authoritarian regime of China, whether this is dealing with TikTok, whether this is the adoption of artificial intelligence or new modes of collaboration internationally, Sean has some perspectives on what he hopes the western world will do to maintain enough strength to remain relevant and be able to keep those values alive in the coming half century ahead. I should note as we head into this article. I just published a substantial piece in our series called AI power on China's advantages in the metaverse, Sean is quoted in this article, as our leaders from the Department of Defense here in the United States, the chief minister of digital from the country of France and other policy experts and thinkers on artificial intelligence. You can find that article like in China's advantages in the metaverse at EME RJ dot com slash China and then the number one.

Sean China Sean Gurley University Of Oxford Nasa Department Of Defense United States France
A highlight from HHS: Sylvia Mathews Burwell

Wisdom From The Top

01:51 min | 5 hrs ago

A highlight from HHS: Sylvia Mathews Burwell

"This interview of wisdom from the top was recorded in 2019. From luminary built in productions and NPR gets wisdom from the top. Stories of crisis, failure, turnaround, and triumph from some of the greatest leaders in the world. I'm guy rose, and on the show today, former secretary of health and human services, Sylvia Matthews burwell. There were a number of things came through the door in the first three weeks. I turned to Bill core, who was my deputy at that time, and I said, Bill, what's can you help me understand? Because he had been there. And he said, well, Sylvia sometimes people say that problems come in threes. I'm afraid with you, they come in 33s. How Sylvia Matthews burwell learned to navigate crisis after crisis at the highest levels of the nonprofit world and then as a member of president Obama's administration. The biggest government agency is not the Department of Defense or the treasury or even the agriculture department. If you consider budgets, it is the Department of Health and Human Services about a $1 trillion a year, because Medicare and Medicaid account for a huge chunk of government spending. But there's also the Food and Drug Administration, Centers for Disease Control, the national Institutes of health and so on. Keeping Americans healthy is expensive. And running an agency this big is probably the second most difficult job in Washington right after the presidency. And it's the kind of job where crisis tends to be the norm rather than the exception. Over the three years, Sylvia Matthews burwell ran HHS,

Sylvia Matthews Burwell Guy Rose Bill Core Health And Human Services NPR Sylvia Department Of Defense Bill Treasury Barack Obama Medicare Food And Drug Administration Centers For Disease Control National Institutes Of Health Washington
A highlight from  Eve Rodsky on Rebalancing Invisible Labor

Skimm'd from The Couch

05:00 min | 6 hrs ago

A highlight from Eve Rodsky on Rebalancing Invisible Labor

"Hi everyone, it's Carly. Before we get into the show today, I want to give a very warm welcome to someone we haven't had on the show in a while, but who is back to 9 to 5 ish full time after being on paid family leave? Drum roll please. It's Danielle. I was gonna be really confused if it was someone else. Hi guys, I'm so happy to be back. I have a special guest sitting on my lap for this intro. Do you want to say hi? Okay. Yes. He said, oh doggy, he dropped his doggy. Uh oh. I am thrilled to be back and to have some really great interesting conversations. Let's get into it. So I never once thought this was a systemic issue. I never once said to myself, oh, Danielle, maybe suffering from the same thing. Like, I wasn't thinking that way. I was just thinking, I'm a complete and resolute failure because I worked so hard for my degree, and now I want to quit. I want to give up. I'm Carly zakin, and I'm Danielle weisberg. Welcome to 9 to 5 ish with the skin. We've run into so many questions over the years and had so many moments where we needed advice and we got it from women who'd been there. And that's what we're bringing you with this show. Each week we're helping you get what you want out of your career by talking to the smartest leaders we know. Because we know your work life is a lot more than 9 to 5. All right, let's get into it. Hi everyone. Today our guest is New York Times bestselling author eve rods. After attending Harvard Law School, eve spent the first few years of her career as a corporate lawyer, but eventually she found that her true passion was in philanthropy. And she spent more than a decade advising families and foundations on their philanthropic efforts at JPMorgan and at her own company, philanthropy, advisory group. Aside from her philanthropy work, eve is best known as the author of fair play, which teaches couples how to rebalance the unequal and often invisible labor done at home. Eve publish another book in 2021 called find your unicorn space, which goes a step further than fair play. It teaches women how to regain satisfaction in their lives by exploring their creative self expression. Eve, welcome to 9 to 5 ish. Thank you so much for having me, Danielle and Carly. We're going to warm you up with a lightning round and then we're going to dive into it. I want to sort of preface, we met you at a conference this past summer. And you are the last speaker of the day. I've never seen so many people be captivated. So I want to just preface all of this by saying you guys are in for a treat today and to listen. We're going to try to do the least amount of talking. But first, we have to do my favorite part, which is the lightning round. Are you ready? I'm ready. Okay. What is like your having a bad day? What's the movie you put on that makes you laugh? When Harry met Sally. Who would play you in a movie? Naomi Watts? Is Naomi Watts going to play you in a movie scene? I'm not yet, not yet, but we'll manifest that out there in the world. But maybe. Maybe. We'll see the 5th, okay. What is your go to ice cream flavor? 1000 percent has to be soft serve. It has to be full of a million toppings, typically I do lucky charms just the marshmallows on the bottom if possible. I picked them out. And then it's this swirl and then on top would be rainbow and chocolate sprinkles with fruity pebbles on top. I really appreciate the specificity here. Thank you. Yes. I eat a lot of ice cream, almost every day, so. What time do you get up? Well, it depends. I'm a night person, so under my normal circadian rhythms, I would be getting up till noon. So that's one of the reasons that parenting is extremely hard for me. So I try not to get up, but kids usually wake me up around 7 30. What's your unicorn space? My unicorn space is really, I'd say writing and reading and lifelong learning. But lately, I've been learning to play the guitar, which has been so fun. So I'm trying to do a little home recital by the end of November. Oh my God, I love that. What a cool thing. Is that like a pandemic, like Tommy? Yes, I like to dance in the summer. I was with my kids where we stay in the summer. And I fell at night, so everybody thought I was drunk, but I'm just really clumsy. And I broke my knee, I did two microfractures in my knee, so then I couldn't really dance anymore, and I decided that guitar was like dancing with your fingers. So that's a little bit like porn. But yeah, so I sounded beautiful. So is dancing with your fingers and I thought I liked the percussive nature of it. And combining chords is similar to choreography.

Danielle Carly Zakin Danielle Weisberg Carly Naomi Watts Harvard Law School Jpmorgan New York Times Sally Harry Tommy
A highlight from Lenin Part 2: Underground, On the Run

Real Dictators

04:02 min | 10 hrs ago

A highlight from Lenin Part 2: Underground, On the Run

"When Hurricane Katrina ravished my hometown of New Orleans. I saw the food being served in disaster sounds. And I knew I could help improve meals for those in need. That's how mercy chefs began. We used Facebook and Instagram to raise over a $160,000 in 2021. That helped serve over 45,000 hot meals in a disaster, which is huge. Something amazing happens over a shared meal. Food is love, and that's New Orleans. See how Facebook and Instagram are helping nonprofits grow it's Christmas Day 1905. We're in temporary in the Grand Duchy of Finland. The city is playing host to a conference. The Bolsheviks, a faction of the Russian social democratic Labor Party, have gathered here in this corner of the Russian Empire. Though no one knows it now, in their midst, a two dictators in the making. Men who will go down in history as originators of left wing tyranny. The star of the show is the Bolsheviks de facto leader. Dictator number one he is currently using one of his many aliases to stay ahead of the authorities. According to the papers he's carrying, he is Vladimir karpov. But with his distinctive beard and mustache, and is heavily receding red hair. No one at this conference is in any doubt as to karpov's true identity. There's just something about Lenin. Not conventionally charismatic perhaps. But a man with undeniable presence. He exudes intellectualism, yet is able to communicate complex ideas as hard hitting slogans. Anticipation is high amongst the delegates as they wait to make his acquaintance. Among them is a 27 year old man. Dictator number two. His skin bears the scars of smallpox. He still handsome though. Rugged and unshaven, with a dramatic sweep of thick, dark hair. If you look closely, you notice his left arm is shorter than his right. The result of a childhood accident. Like Lenin, he goes under any number of monikers. Is he Ivanovich today or Koba or so so? Or perhaps the name that will stick? The Man of Steel. Joseph Stalin. His background could hardly be more different to Lenin's own. He hails from Georgia on the southwestern frontier of the empire. Far from idyllic. Stalin's childhood was peppered with violent outbursts, even kidnappings by his drunken father. Lenin emerged from the comfort of the middle classes. Stalin has pulled himself up by his bootstraps. He expects to be wowed by the Bolshevik leader. But on this occasion, Stalin is left disappointed. There is no dramatic entrance, no great speech from Lenin. Just handshakes and small talk. Thoroughly unremarkable. In 18 months time, they will be introduced again. And Lenin will have forgotten Stalin's name. But however, inauspicious it may be, this Christmas Day meeting will go down as a crucial point in history. The moment the two pivotal figures of the 20th century enter each other's orbits for the very first time, upon this foundation, the fate of nations will be decided. From neuser, this is part two of the Lenin's story. And this is real dictators.

Lenin Instagram Russian Social Democratic Labo New Orleans Bolsheviks De Facto Vladimir Karpov Facebook Grand Duchy Hurricane Katrina Bolsheviks Stalin Ivanovich Koba Karpov Finland Smallpox Joseph Stalin Georgia
A highlight from Lasting conservation, led by Indigenous heritage | Adjany Costa

TED Talks Daily

07:34 min | 19 hrs ago

A highlight from Lasting conservation, led by Indigenous heritage | Adjany Costa

"Hey y'all, you're listening to ted-talks daily. I mean these Hugh. We're going to learn about an incredible part of the world today wetlands in a conservation area vital to many ecosystems, which still somehow go unprotected. In her talk from Ted 2022, indigenous conservation champion odd Johnny Costa describes her work to restore pride and ownership in stewarding the land. And how it connects communities to conservation. That's after a quick break. Hi, I'm selim rusham Waller, post the far flung, a podcast from the Ted audio collective. Every episode we visit a new place across the globe to explore the ideas that flow from the people there. Next up, Puerto Rico, where a deadly natural disaster was also a chance for people to come together and build self reliance. Let's tap into what the world is thinking. Check out far flung with slim Russian Walla on Apple podcasts. Ted-talks daily is brought to you by progressive. Have you tried the name your price tool yet that works just the way it sounds. You tell progressive how much you want to pay for car insurance. And they'll show you coverage options that fit your budget. It's easy to start a quote, and you'll be able to find a rate that works for you. It's just one of the many ways you can save with progressive. Get your quote today at progressive dot com and see why four out of 5 new auto customers recommend progressive. Progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates, price and coverage match limited by state law. Imagine if you live at the center of a global conservation spotlight. But you have no voice. Your aspirations are not valid and your knowledge does not count. Sadly, this happens very often in local communities of key ecosystems around the world. In conservation, my field of work, I call it community based conservation, washing, which is basically when conservation organizations claim to work for communities, only to inform and impose pre designed conservation plans instead of including them. Misguiding media and funding sources. Think of greenwashing and then apply it to conservation. Hopefully we can all agree that approach is not right and it needs to be tackled. And how about we start by twisting classic community based conservation questions upside down. Say, instead of wondering how to bring science and policy to communities, how about we find a way to bring the voice and centenary knowledge of communities to research and policymaking. But see, the answer to such questions is never a one size fits all solution because it needs to be tailored to the unique environmental social and economic realities of each community. Let me give you some context. I get to work in one of the most incredible wetland systems on earth. The sources of the kavango zambezi transferred here conservation area, Casa, for short. But now Casa spreads through 5 countries and is home to iconic African wildlife, incredible landscapes like the okavango Delta, and up to 2.5 million people. Its sources in eastern Angola are the heart, the lungs and the backbone of the entire Casa, yet they're unprotected. In one of the many research trips I've done to the area, I met mama roggio. The oldest lady of a luchazi village and she was genuinely surprised to still see me alive. She told me the story of the Mookie see this mythical giant snake like creature that protects the rivers and thus life. And she told me that if the mocchi spared me, my life after spending four months in dugout canoes from the sources to the okavango Delta in Botswana, it meant it trusted me. And if you did, so good day to lucasi people. But see, most not chassis children do not know of the Mookie see or any other local tale. And that is because the 40 plus yearlong war they have endured as created a gap in storytelling and has stripped away ownership of their heritage. So now the ancient wisdom which is he to stewardship is locked in the older disappearing generations. And so we started this journey to bring back these stories as an effort to restore pride and ownership. Oral storytelling has always played a fundamental role. Not only in African culture, but in conservation efforts too. We also do mapping exercises to help villagers visualize the influence and impact not only of their land, but also of their daily actions beyond their geographic reach to give them a sense of importance to counteract how they felt abandoned all these years. And we also help give them back the power of decision by instigating curiosity on alternative livelihoods that they can trial on. All of this in an effort to bring back ownership of their heritage and make them stewards of their own land and also of their own future. But see, through the years that trust that I've mentioned before, grew stronger. So now they scold me, they teach, they feed, they protect me, they tell me secrets of their traditions, children tease me and call me names, but I will never be one of them. And thus they will never fully truly trust me. But that is the point of this whole talk, they're not supposed to trust me, you were anyone else coming in with a grand plan to save the world. They're supposed to trust themselves. Real community based conservation goes much beyond ensuring an elder has a ceremonial seat at the table and is interviewed. It fosters fierce independence, doesn't further dependency, lasting conservation comes from within from believing from belonging from dreaming. So whether you are a conservationist yourself for a donor or a media outlet or maybe just plain curious, let's be vessels for that for stewardship for ownership for pride. Don't just take the boxes, ask the difficult questions, and always wonder, are we working for communities? Or with communities? Thank you. Ted-talks daily is hosted by me, Elise Hugh, and produced by Ted. Theme music is from Alison Leighton Brown in our mixer is Christopher faze bogan. We record the talks at Ted events we host or from TEDx events, which are organized independently by volunteers all over the world. And we'd love to hear from you. Leave us a review on Apple podcasts or email us at podcasts at Ted dot com. PRX.

Johnny Costa Selim Rusham Waller Okavango Delta Kavango Zambezi Mama Roggio Hugh TED Puerto Rico Apple Angola Mookie Casa Botswana Elise Hugh Alison Leighton Brown Christopher Faze Bogan
A highlight from Garmin Aviation - Autoland

Pilot to Pilot - Aviation Podcast

08:18 min | 20 hrs ago

A highlight from Garmin Aviation - Autoland

"Bailey shield and I am the autoland project manager. Aviation, welcome back to today's episode. Today's episode is a rerelease and it's a good one. It is Garmin autoland. It's a Collier award winning technology that is just so incredible to see auto land come into the general aviation world. And I really like to see what the future of this does hold. It does it lead into a fully automated aircraft. Or does it lead into better technology that just makes flying safer, which I think we can all get on board with. Every nation I hope you enjoyed today's episode. So without any further ado, here's Garmin autoland. Bailey, what is going on? Welcome to the pilot the pilot podcast. Thank you for having me. No problem. I'm excited to have you on. I mean, things don't have to be pretty exciting over there with you guys. Yeah, it's been a pretty crazy couple of years, really. I bet. And I don't know if people really understand how long this has taken to come to fruition. How long has it take? Again, I should say. Everyone started our software development in 2011, but it was on our product road map for a while before that as well. We had our first flight in 2014 and our first fully autonomous landing February 17th, 2016. So that's one of my favorite aviation history dates and now I can actually talk about it. I want to recognize that it happened years ago. Absolutely. Well, before we get kind of into auto land and garment, I want to kind of get to know you a little bit more as well. When did you realize that you wanted to have a career in aviation? I grew up flying with my grandfather quite a bit and I really enjoyed the culture, the lifestyle of having a lot of piloting friends and that sort of thing. But I realized I didn't sit still very well. And my grandfather was an airline pilot. And I don't think I could sit still that long. And my other grandfather actually was an engineer. And so between the two, I wanted to get into engineering of aircraft. I went to school for mechanical engineering and then ended up here at Garmin working on Avi aviation equipment. Cool. What school did you go to? I went to Utah state. I don't know, I didn't know this current, except from the east coast, but you tell states a fairly big aviation school, isn't it? It is. So we have an aviation program there. There's also a really big aerospace engineering program, which is what I was focused on. What made you choose Utah state just was it the kind of the only school in the area that offered what you wanted, or was it always like, I want to go to Utah state, Utah state where it's at. I actually kind of scholarships based. I wanted to go to the good aerospace engineering school and Utah state offered a really great out of state program for students to come from surrounding states. So that's a deciding factor. Money really talks, doesn't it? A little bit. What is obviously we kind of talk about or the media and everyone talks about how there aren't very many women in aviation. I think pilot wise at 7% and I'm guessing engineer wise, it's either around that, maybe even less, what would you say your experiences have been as being a women in aviation or a woman in engineering? And would you say that it's getting better? Are there more women getting in or would you say it's saying about the same? I didn't really speak to broadly since I only have my own personal experience, but I see there are very few women around. That's kind of a fair statement. We are obviously trying to build that and garments honestly really dedicated to help get more women into aviation and engineering. So that's really cool to see. I must say my team has doubled recently from one to two, so very excited. Congratulations. Thank you. But it's definitely a challenge. There are times where you just have to go find someone that is an ally and chat about things. And that really helps. Yeah, for sure. And it's definitely something that I think we need to solve and get more women in aviation, whether it's flying or whether it's being an engineer or whether just anything in aviation. So I think that's awesome. Yeah. We talked a little bit before and you are a pilot too, right? Did you get your rating at Utah state or did you do it separate? I actually did that in high school. So I got my single engine land in high school. I'm actually before I learned how to drive a car. But I lived, I grew up in Oregon. And I lived quite close to the evergreen aviation museum, which is now that ever being air and space museum, I believe. And they actually paid for half of my flight costs. So that was really awesome that helped get me into aviation just from an educational perspective. Absolutely. And when you started the flying where you kind of, and then you said that you couldn't sit still. Like I said, still it was a pretty evident when you started flying, or did you think for a little bit? Maybe I should be a professional pilot. I considered it. I really did. After a long cross country, I look forward to sprinting around the ramp instead of sitting in the airplane. So I figured a desk job where I don't have to pretend to be stationary all day better. Yeah, if you have a feeling of being claustrophobic so claustrophobic, but if you don't, if you can't talk, if you don't want to be stuck on a plane for that long, then flying and being a pilot is definitely not for you. We have some 6 hours, 7 hour legs, or it's just like, oh my gosh, get me out of this thing. The grandfather routinely did a flight from Chicago to room. Oh my gosh. It was his day job, which is flying to room every day. I mean, that'd be kind of cool. I want to mind flying a room every day, but being stuck on a plane would be kind of a hot mess for that long. Perfect. Well, a little bit more about auto land. We kind of want to focus on kind of the history when the road map happened. Why it was even thought about and I guess one question is when we can get to it is did you expect it that they expect it to take this long? Is this part of the plan or to do you have a bunch of hurdles coming up when you guys were creating this? I think just like any other aviation technology, it takes time to develop correctly to think through all the different corner cases and ensure that we're thinking through the safety aspects. I think everyone would have wanted it earlier than this. Just because we always want to have things efficient and quick. But there have been some really unique challenges just ATC has to be aware and involved and making sure that we coordinate well with them and that they're comfortable with what they are crafts going to be doing. Just things like that where we have to really think through how do you how do you feel the technology until it's done to have this conversations? Yeah, well I guess it leads to a question. How does ATC notice that automatically squawk an emergency? It does. So autoland when it's activated, it'll immediately change the transponder to 7700. It begins transmitting on various frequencies, including one 21 5, so the emergency frequency, so it has an automatic text to speech message that it will play that's the aircraft where it is that there's a possible pilot incapacitation and where it's heading and the amount of time it will take to get there. That's wild. I mean, that's just like crazy. It's 2019 and we got that stuff going on into wild. That's pretty cool. I mean, I didn't know about that aspect of it too, because yeah, you think about it, emergency, say it's a single pilot, it can't make any radio calls, and someone needs a squawk, someone needs to communicate. Those are two huge things to do in an emergency. And you guys kind of thought of everything. What you have to think of everything, because you know it's aviation, things. You could plan this whole autoland system for one perfect scenario and that one scenario would never happen. So you have to think of everything. And it has to be pretty hard to think of everything. I'm sure that's one of the reasons why it took so long. Yeah, and one of the things that we had to think about that we've never necessarily had to think about is the passenger. It's not about the pilot, the pilot doesn't see anything. The pilot doesn't need to do anything. How to make sure the passengers calm. How do they know that the system is doing what it's supposed to be doing that is going somewhere that they're going to get help. And if they want to, how do they communicate? How do we teach them to communicate with emergency use so that they can get whatever help that they need? What were some of the hiccups that you guys ran into? Specifically, was it just the technology wasn't good enough for was it kind of airplane component? Was it you needed to get up from a G 1000 to a G 3000 or just talk a little bit about the problems and struggles that you had when you

Utah Bailey Garmin Evergreen Aviation Museum Utah State East Coast Oregon ATC Chicago
A highlight from 10 Trivia Questions on B-Movies, Star Wars, and The Seattle Seahawks for Vernon Heagy's Birthday!

Trivia With Budds

04:39 min | 21 hrs ago

A highlight from 10 Trivia Questions on B-Movies, Star Wars, and The Seattle Seahawks for Vernon Heagy's Birthday!

"What it be and welcome to another episode of the trivia with buds, podcast. I'm your host Ryan buds, thanks for checking out the show and leave an iTunes reviews and celebrating the birthday of listener, collaborator. Sender of questions and all around good guy Vernon, he Vernon your wife Ashley reached out to me, she said, hey, Ryan, I'm Vernon Higgins wife, nice to meet you. I know he sends you stuff and we listen to you all the time. Thanks for what you do. I'd love to do a sponsored trivia episode for Verne's birthday, October 4th. So happy birthday Vernon. We've got that episode for you today. It's going to be very fun. And we're going to dive into questions on Star Wars and Game of Thrones and other things that you love. But right now let's do a quick little warmup with four very random thought provoking questions from a game I have called things they don't teach you in school. All right, here's your first question. What is the average life expectancy in the country with the world's highest overall life expectancy? The answer is 89 years old and that would be in Monaco. Monaco 89 years old. Next question, what does wiki mean in the Internet based encyclopedia Wikipedia? That is fast. It is Hawaiian for fast, the word wiki. Third question here, how many people are murdered every day in the U.S.? That's a fun little birthday fact for ya Vernon. I guess I should have read this card. Approximately 45 people are murdered. Hopefully no one you know today Vernon. And is there only one sign language for deaf people that is used globally and the answer just says no. Okay, there's not one sign language for deaf people that is used globally. Now we know that if you didn't know that. Thanks for warming up with me on a fun little episode here to celebrate Vernon's birthday. It is October 4th and it's 2000 22 and it's time to jump into this quiz on things Vernon loves here we go. All right, Vernon loves all these things. Let's see if you love them as much as he does. Here's question number one. In 2013, what Seattle Seahawks player became the shortest quarterback to win a Super Bowl. Number one in 2013 what Seahawks player became the shortest quarterback to win a Super Bowl. Question number two, what is the name of the man eating plant in little shop of horrors? What is the name of the man eating plant in little shop of horrors? Number three, what is the main religion of the 7 kingdoms in Game of Thrones? What is the main religion of the 7 kingdoms in Game of Thrones? Number four in Star Wars episode two attack of the clones, who is the first to say I have a bad feeling about this. I have a bad feeling about this. Number 5, which Seahawks player has a marijuana strain called beast mode two, which Seahawks player has a marijuana strain called beast mode two. Number 6 how much was the budget for plan 9 from outer space was a $10,000, $60,000 or a $150,000. What was the budget for plan 9 from outer space ten 60 or a 150,000? Number 7, aside from being master of coin and a member of the king's small council, the character of petal Littlefinger baelish from King's Landing in Game of Thrones also runs what kind of business. Besides being master of coin and a member of the king's small council, Littlefinger runs what kind of business. Question number 8, what color is mace, windu's lightsaber, what color is mace windu's lightsaber?

Vernon Ryan Buds Vernon Higgins Ya Vernon Seahawks Verne Ashley Ryan Monaco Super Bowl U.S. King's Small Council Littlefinger Baelish King Windu Mace Windu
A highlight from The Cuban Missile Crisis | The Discovery | 3

American Scandal

05:41 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from The Cuban Missile Crisis | The Discovery | 3

"It's late September 1962 in Langley, Virginia. John mccone, the director of the CIA steps into a meeting with a group of agency analysts. McConnell's men are dressed conservatively and black suits and ties. As he takes a seat, Macron can tell everyone seems to be in a calm and easy mood. But from a calm, that's a problem. A situation in Cuba appears to be spiraling into chaos. A Cullen was just on his honeymoon, but he spent the entire time reading top secret cables, painting a picture of a rapid military buildup on Cuban soil. The news wasn't entirely a surprise. Ever since president Kennedy took office, the relationship between the U.S. and Cuba has gone downhill. Kennedy authorized a mission to remove Fidel Castro from power, but after the invasion at the bay of pigs fell apart, Castro pivoted and sought an alliance with the Soviet Union. Ever since then, Cuba has become a proxy battle between the U.S. and the Soviets. The hostilities have steadily ratcheted up. And just recently, the CIA discovered the Soviets were sneaking anti aircraft missiles onto the island. Kennedy then upped the ante, calling up 150,000 reserve troops, but apparently the show of force hasn't had the intended effect. The cables Macon red on his honeymoon describe a swarm of new activity in Cuba, soldiers blocking off roads and highways, convoys of military trucks moving equipment deep into the jungle. It's all added up to something troubling, a looming, confrontation between the U.S. and the Soviets, and with a sense of crisis mounting, Macon ditched any pretense that he could have a nice time away with his wife. The CIA chief flew back to Washington and was determined to get to the bottom of the issue. Sitting alongside his top analysts, maccone looked at his men with a scow. All right. Well, this is a precarious situation. Who can give me facts about Cuba? A young analyst chimes in. Well, sir from everything we've seen. I don't think there's anything to worry about. Our navy has been monitoring the Soviet ships docking in Cuba, we don't have any evidence of manner, military equipment on board. Well, what about the reports of men in the military equipment hidden below deck? How do you square those with your assessment? Well, I'd say the reports are unreliable. I mean, you can't hide that many people, or that much military equipment. It doesn't fit below the deck of a ship. And the stories of convoys in the jungle, trucks hauling heavy equipment? Well, sir, with respect, and the anti aircraft missile spread across the island, I'm not dismissing any of that. I just think we need to consider the source of these cables you've been reading. What does that mean? The analyst shoots a sideways look at one of his colleagues. Well, director McConnell, those cables start with Cubans in the country. I mean, farmers, they're not well educated. They talk to people in the city, and those people call the relatives of Miami, and finally it gets to us, it's a big game of telephone, except every report is saying the same thing. Well, sir, I think we have to put some trust in our intelligence apparatus, not some chain of Cuban dissidents. Your intelligence apparatus didn't help us with the bay of pigs, though, didn't. So that was different. How so? We had experts. We had intelligence, and we managed to screw it up. Well, sir, in that instance, there were a lot of variables we were not able to put into consideration. No, no, no. I don't want any more false promises of certainty and no more excuses of variables. We are not invincible, but we may be suffering from hubris. There's a reason Alan dulles is sitting in this room, the same reason I now have his job. This is America's top intelligence agency and I expect top trade work. If all you want to do is applaud yourselves for a job well done, even though we're sitting here in the door. I'm going to ask you the tenure to resignation. The analyst goes silent looking rattled. And for a moment, mccown gave us across the room waiting for someone else to push back. But despite the heated exchange, consensus forms in the room and the CIA analyst signaled their support. Raccoon is right. Something troubling is happening in Cuba, and they're going to have to get to the bottom of it. It could only be a matter of time for the Soviets make a bigger move, and the U.S. could be under threat. American scandal is sponsored by the new Hulu original, reasonable doubt. In the high stakes world of criminal law, nobody does it like jacks. From executive producers Kerry Washington and Larry wilmore, reasonable doubt is a brand new, sexy Hulu original that centers on Jack Stewart, played by emi otzi cornelli, Jax is a high powered criminal defense attorney who boxed the system every chance she gets. She's also juggling a rocky marriage, a high profile murder case, and the sudden return of an old flame, played by Michael ewy, so yes, it will be messy, and you will not want to miss it. Reasonable doubt is now streaming only on Hulu. American scandal is sponsored by the new audiobook killing the legends, the 12th audiobook in the multi-million selling killing series from Bill O'Reilly and Martin dugard, Elvis Presley, John Lennon, and Muhammad Ali, three icons known everywhere in every nation across every culture. They had everything, fame, money, the admiration of millions, but their lives spun out of control at the hands of those they most trusted, killing the legends explores the lives, legacies, and tragic deaths of these three legends, each experienced immense success, then failures, that forced them to change. Each faced the challenge of growing old and fields that privileged youth, and finally, each became isolated. Cocooned by wealth, but vulnerable to the demands of those in their innermost circles, killing the legends is available now wherever audiobooks are sold. Start listening.

Cuba CIA John Mccone America Mcconnell Maccone Kennedy President Kennedy Langley Fidel Castro Cullen Macon Castro Alan Dulles Soviet Union Virginia Hulu Navy Larry Wilmore
A highlight from S7E3: Welcome to Polyamory City

Love Letters

01:30 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from S7E3: Welcome to Polyamory City

"Remember the summer of 2020, it feels both forever and not that long ago. It was a turbulent time. There was a lot of breaking news to say the least. That July, Naomi, a 30 something living in the Boston area, see something on Facebook that no one else is really talking about. This news, reposted by a friend, applies to her in a very personal way. The post says that Somerville Massachusetts, a small city right outside of Boston, has become the first municipality in the United States to pass an ordinance, recognizing polyamorous, domestic partnerships. Polyamory, meaning having more than one romantic partner with a consent of everyone involved. Naomi is polyamorous, and in a serious long-term relationship with her two partners. The prospect of their union being legally recognized that they might enjoy the rights of more traditional two person relationships, it feels like a huge thing. I was completely flabbergasted. I did not expect this to ever happen in my lifetime. I had pretty much resigned myself to living a closeted life with my boys. Immediately, Naomi has a bunch of questions. She's not sure what this new ordinance in Somerville would do exactly. What it could mean for her life and the lives of her partners, but she's eager to find out.

Naomi Boston Somerville The Post Massachusetts Facebook United States
A highlight from 70 - Part 1: Kevin Holland and the Operation to get Saddam Hussein

Game of Crimes

03:16 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from 70 - Part 1: Kevin Holland and the Operation to get Saddam Hussein

"Everybody in between. We are back now for a episode that ends in an even number. 70, Murph didn't like the previous episode because it was after 68 and before 70, but hey, this one's 70. So welcome. Hey everybody, Smurf. Welcome back to the show. And I am the world's most recognizable unpaid Tommy Bahama brand ambassador. Former detective and state trooper, which Murph likes to make fun of Morgan Wright. Hey, but we're glad that you guys are back with us. Don't laugh. It's true. You know, you know, you know you wanted to be one. I don't make fun of troopers. I'll just give you a hard time. Just make fun of me, yes. Well, hey guys, well, thanks for joining us. We're just gonna do a little bit of housekeeping before we get into the fun. This one is gonna be a fun episode. You'll find out here in a minute. So hey, head on over to Apple and Spotify those 5 stars. Those reviews really help us out a lot. We appreciate all the help you guys do for us. So just head on over there, leave your comments. Tell us what you think. We really appreciate it. We look forward to it and guys that helps us make the show better so really head on over there. Apple Spotify, 5 stars. We appreciate it. Also head on over to our website, game of crimes podcast dot com. Everything's there. We've got books, you know, we've got things that are mailing list is there. Our merch is there. So head on over, get some stuff to rip the brand as Marlon Carlson did called he's got a Facebook account or Twitter account called making a podcaster. He still hasn't made a podcast yet. So get off your ass, make a podcast. Yeah, but did you see the picture? I saw it down at Disney, yeah. That was fantastic. He's in the Magic Kingdom and he's got a shirt on the front that says evil is coming. It's the daddy, it's a bad man. I loved it. Hey, follow us on social media. And you'll find pictures like that. He just posted at game of crimes on Twitter at game of crimes podcast on Facebook and the Instagram, but where you gotta be, I guarantee you I say it three times and answer, where do you got to be where you got to be? Where you gotta be. Gotta be over on our Patreon page. It's like magic. I say it three times. The Murph answers. I think next thing, you know, I might turn into beetlejuice. So be careful. But come over and check us out on Patreon. It's content that you're not going to hear on the regular podcast. Yeah, there's a little bit of a fee, but we hope that once you listen to some of the stuff on there, you'll think it's worth it. Give us a shot here. There's a lot of different, we've got as much content on Patreon as we do in the podcast, probably more. More. Unbelievable. No, it's not unbelievable. It's believable when you see, you know, how much time we spend looking at each other over a video camera and recording stuff. It's believable. Well, not to mention the research it goes into this stuff. I don't think I did this much study when I was in college. We scowl the bowels of the Internet so you don't have to. That is our new motto. So we find the stuff nobody else wants to find. But yeah, it's on Patreon. We just dropped episode 6 of the real DEA narcos talking about the real DA narcos Cali edition. We've got 9-1-1, what's your emergency coming up in other case? If you are at the right levels, then you get access to our narco meters where we review a movie every month that's law enforcement related. This month it was Al Pacino. It depends on where you're listening to this in time, but if you're listening to it in September or October of the year 2022 in the year 25, 25, that's Zagreb Evans. That's a different song. Anyway, I digress. First drinking thing. But anyway, guys, we got a lot of good stuff there on the Patreon. So go over there, Patreon dot com slash game of crimes, but also what you're going to say something? No, I just said, yep, I'm a

Murph Morgan Wright Marlon Carlson Tommy Bahama Apple Twitter Facebook Magic Kingdom Disney DEA Zagreb Evans Al Pacino
A highlight from AT#819 - Travel to Asturias, Spain

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

05:47 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from AT#819 - Travel to Asturias, Spain

"And I got my bags back on the road. I'm heading out there and I'm ready to go look at real good in my passport oh no amateur traveler episode 819. Today the amateur traveler talks about beaches and cider old churches and a Roman bridge. Jagged peaks and mountain lakes as we go to Asturias in Spain. But maybe not maybe not to the day welcome to the amateur traveler I'm your host, Chris Christensen, let's talk about Asturias. I'd like to welcome the show Leanne and Lyle from beach travel wine dot com who've come to talk to us about Asturias in Spain. Leonardo, welcome to the show. Oh, hi, Chris. Nice to be here. Thank you. And I say you're from beach travel wine. I should say that you have both a blog and a podcast at that site. So welcome fellow travel podcasters. I don't think I had heard of Astoria before you pitched me this. So where are we talking about? Located on the northwest of Spain. It's on one side, you've got the picos de Europa, which are the peaks of Europe. Yes, the table. The cataract mountain range, and also the other side is the bay of Biscay. And the one side you've got Galicia and on the other side is cantabria. And why should someone go to asturia? We found, we've been from one end of Spain to the other and we just found Asturias is the most fascinating place that doesn't even feel like you're in Spain. There's history mountains, rivers, churches, food, it's just so many different things about what happened in Asturias that you don't find anywhere else in Spain. And especially value for money. Yes. Unbelievable value for money. We also went to Paris and London. And we completed the price comparison in relation to Madrid, which will give us a bit of an idea. And yeah, it was, I think, Madrid was $299. Every hotel. For the day. Okay. And London was 5 27. Interesting. And that and we talked about converting units what unit of currencies. Which is your American dollars. I almost asked when you said 200,000 people, what was that in metric? But excellent. And what kind of itinerary are you going to recommend? We stayed in oviedo, which is the capital of Asturias, and you can spend quite a bit of time exploring there. When we travel, we don't have a car because in Australia, we drive on the other side of the road and that would just be way too stressful for us. You could do some exploring with a car. So day one, we always recommend you go straight to the juris information center. And the one in oviedo is particularly good. It has an up to date information sheet about all the churches and monuments and things and when they're open and which is really important because sometimes you can go to these places and they're closed. And so the truth information center in our theater is actually in the old town. I've yet as a finest for its old town and there's lots of different plazas in the obviously the old buildings and one of the main ones is the aviator cathedral and it's definitely worth a visit. It's got an 80 meter spire on it. It's an important place because it's on the north Canada. So pilgrims go there as a pilgrimage site and one is a bit more about the cathedral because it's very historic, isn't it? The old towns obviously got the city wall and where we were saying we could basically see the cathedral. It was started in 7 81, or I edits. Over the years, it's just been added to an attitude like most cathedrals in Europe. And so the type of architecture is basically gothic reminisced baroque renaissance. So yeah, it's beautiful. It's on a Plaza itself. It's a big place where the cathedral is so there's the town hall there as well. So you got the Plaza day Alfonso el casto. And yeah, look, it's got the university there. It's gone. The monastery of day San paella, which is a Benedictine order monastery. And they bake cookies. Yeah, you don't see them at this island. How do they in secret? And then the thing turns around and then you've got your biscuits. There's also a way to explain that a little bit. I know exactly what you're talking about because I've done this before, but you're saying you put your money on a lazy Susan. They've got a one way mirror so they can see you, but you can't see them. Your money disappears and biscuits or cookies show up. And this particular monastery, their business really picked up in COVID and said that they've continued doing it and they've added to their line apparently. Another one of the probably more proud of buildings is the palace. And that was built in the 15th century and that belonged to the accountants of the Catholic monarchs. Surprise, nothing changes. So as I said, Taiwan would certainly just explore the old town and get the information from juicy information center. And probably for dinner, we would definitely recommend heading to the most famous street in oviedo, which is called Calais or Kelly, which is street in Spanish. Guest corner, which is a straight full of Sid rays, and they are where you drink cider. So sidra insider in Spanish.

Spain Asturias Chris Christensen Cataract Mountain Range Oviedo Mountain Lakes Madrid Juris Information Center Cantabria Biscay Leanne Lyle Galicia Astoria Leonardo North Canada London Europe
A highlight from Rewilding Earth Podcast Episode 78: Iowa Rewilding and Big River Connectivity With Mark Edwards

Rewilding Earth

03:23 min | 1 year ago

A highlight from Rewilding Earth Podcast Episode 78: Iowa Rewilding and Big River Connectivity With Mark Edwards

"I'm still Just in the throes realizing how wild it is where i live and yet where i live is the most biologically altered state north america. We've converted roughly ninety eight percent of the state for ume needs farming mostly roads highways and cultural kind of things like that. And so. I feel like i've been really lucky. I have a numerous france that i still maintain visiting one. Those main couvert island and so for example. And so i get to go to these places still. But i really like teasing him in particular like wait. You left i with this front on it. We don't figure out here where we're gonna figure it out. I mean he wanted to go over. There was something left a lot of friends in that but it became clear to me. I go visit those places like going to wilderness areas. But really the wildness is about more my relationship to my place wherever i am and so i've really come to love. I will bear very deeply and lake. I love it a lot. Because of what's been done to in a very short amount of time and yet i see potential there that i don see other places and i think that's really how i got into the reviled and so here. I am with the re wilding nut connecting with the people. I know and so i met roger. Ross give for this process and we kind of formed a partnership and Ross is extremely important in my life at that time because he's very challenged to me. We both agreed on. We were following rewinding We at read most all the same odd. We read most all the same books in southern deep understanding the language of each other but we came from past history a whole different way as was a local agricultural a business And here's mine trying to work with all the different environmental organizations trying to learn every plant species all that kind of level and between the two of us. I challenge each other tremendously and that's I think would really Catchers be wild Wild ethic that we're trying to do. We're both trying to learn how to be wilder and what rewinding me. And it's changed me tremendously. I just keep reading and reading a read most of this stuff before. How do i apply that to my own thing about. I don't have to wilderness anymore. I used to go a lot and well supposed to grow up. I still love places. I still find that interesting. But i have never been a wilder place in one sense of the word than i am where i live now on. I and i'm surrounded by corn beans. Two thirds of the statements covered into animal species. It's absolutely frightening how that green curtain and what's frightening is how people look at it and see that as a agreeing healthy thing on the national level what was being addressed was wilderness series or what we have stuff that's left. Where can we

Science Biology Wilderness Wildlife Environment Nature Rewilding Conservation Ross North America France Roger Wilder