Photography

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A highlight from Panasonics BS1H Box Camera!

This Week in Photo

05:48 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Panasonics BS1H Box Camera!

"We're gonna be talking about Panasonic's new BS camera. This is Twitter. Hey, welcome back to another episode of this week in photo. Today I got some special for you. My longtime friend, who just celebrated a birthday, by the way. Photo Joseph total Joseph is online here. He is one of the few people that got their hands on a new camera from Panasonic. It is the BS one H box camera. We're going to be talking about why that camera is important, who it's for, who it is in for, and what Joseph is looking forward to doing with that camera, photo Joseph, man, how you doing? Welcome to the show. I'm doing well, my friend is good to see you again. It's been far too long. In fact, I think the last time I came on here was for the BGH one. Some of us only got you know who knows anything about the podcast? You and me, right? I got me the other one. And I know more after these conversations that we have about the box camera. Yeah, so speaking of that, the camera that I'm using right now is the original BG camera, which I love. It's amazing. I've got this thing on top of my above my monitor. I've got the XLR adapter attached to it. I've got this mic running into it. And it's all is right with the world. It's bulletproof. Sounds like my setup. Did you break into my studio? I know a guy. Just say it. It sounds like. I could go on here. Hey, it's the occam's razor of professional setups, right? It just works. I'll take it. It's bulletproof. It works every single time. So and I'm happy with it. And you know, over the years, it's been for me. It's been an editor to iterative process of webcams and GH fours and GH 5s and all matter of G 7 was in there. Yeah. Yeah, going in, going into an atom going into here, all this stuff. And now it's just this. So first of all, for the folks that may not know what a Panasonic box camera is or just what a box camera is. Can you start there and do some fundamentals? Yeah, sure. So think of any normal mirrorless or mirrored camera. It's got if it's a mirrored camera it's got a pen to prison monitor if it's a mirrorless camera. It's got a viewfinder that kind of looks like the Penta prism. There's probably an LCD on the back, maybe an LCD on top. There's a grip for you to hold on to the camera. There's a battery that gets inserted into the camera. Now, take all of that away and what's left is the box camera. A box camera is essentially the shape of a box as the name would infer, but the idea is that it has the sensor memory cards to record into a bunch of buttons to control it. And that's about it. You don't have a built in battery slot, a battery gets attached externally, which means that you can put any size better you want on it. You're not limited to just the whatever fits into the handle type of battery. There's no viewfinder on it. So you have to add a display to it. There's no handle grip on it. So if you want to have a handle grip on it, you add that onto it. And at this point, if you're not familiar with the idea, you're probably thinking, who in the world would want to use a camera like this exactly? Why? You know, hey, by the way, you can have this amazing thing that you're used to, but we're gonna take off all the things that you're used to and just give it to you. Everything you love about your camera. Except for the image quality. So the idea is that a camera like this is much smaller, much lighter weight and can therefore be rigged up. First of all, can be rig things like a gimbal. It can be rigged onto a drone. So if you've got obviously not your little mini Mavic kind of drones, but big proper drones that are designed for carrying big cameras, this type of a camera is much lighter weight and can be attached to that drone. If you're using a gimbal, it's a much lighter weight camera to have onto the gimbal and you can then have your monitor separately, your battery. You could actually even have the battery separately because you could just run power up to it over cable. So you have this completely modular camera. And this really what it comes down to is it's modular. Instead of having everything already built in, everything that you might need is separate so you can add only what you do need. And if you look at any movie set, look at any Hollywood set. You see the cameras that people are using on set and they're huge. They've got these big lenses and all this rigging and all this stuff. Well, the heart of that is a relatively small camera. Whether you're shooting on a red or shooting at pretty much anything, the camera that's in the meat of that is a box type camera that is relatively small. And so that's what this the B cameras are. The BGH one and now the B S one H, the BGH one being a micro four thirds box camera and the BS one H being a full frame marks camera. So you get this capability of the much larger camera in a smaller space and you just add whatever you need to it. So that's a good segue into the sensor size argument. So the one that I'm on is the previous one, right? So the micro four thirds sensor, which is great. I don't call it previous. It's the current micro four thirds one. Correct. It's not a previous generation. It is still current, but it's the Michael for four thirds and the recently released version is the full frame in the S line. So it kind of plays in the S series. Okay, so that said, looking at this again, you know, I am my audience, right? So my audience is looking at this and they're like, okay, so micro four thirds, I know that box camera, the one I have here is Netflix certified. It does all kinds of things that you would use probably that, but I as kind of a consumer level content creator am not going to use, though it's nice to know that I could shoot a Netflix feature film with this with my webcam if I should get the wild here to do so.

Panasonic Joseph Total Joseph Joseph Twitter Hollywood Michael Netflix
A highlight from 2021 - My Most Challenging Year of Photography - TDS Photo Podcast

The Digital Story

00:45 sec | Last week

A highlight from 2021 - My Most Challenging Year of Photography - TDS Photo Podcast

"November 30th. Today's theme is 2021. My most challenging year of photography, I am Derek's story. In large part 2021 seemed like a year of talking about photography. Rather than actually taking pictures. But just like with any important relationship, anything that you can do to keep the embers glowing is worthwhile. Today I'll take a look back at the past 11 months and look forward to what could be different in 2022. I hope you enjoy this show. I just spent some time looking back over my calendar for 2021.

Derek
A highlight from A New Nikon arrives, the Z9!

This Week in Photo

07:07 min | Last week

A highlight from A New Nikon arrives, the Z9!

"Back to another episode of this week in photo. I'm your host Frederick van Johns, and today Mark cruise is on the line from Nikon USA, yes, that Nikon. And we're gonna be talking about a brand new camera, actually the flagship camera of their line, the Z 9. I want to dive into it not from a brochure features specs, fanboy perspective, but more of a real guy looking at this camera, considering it, and wondering if the hype is actually reality because, you know, I want to see where the line is in there and Mark is the perfect person to bring that to. As a mark, welcome to the show. How's it going? Great, happy to be here. It was good to have you. It is good to have you. So you are the singer manager for product for digital cameras and interchangeable lenses at night. What does that mean? Are you are you the guy that says, you know what? We need to move that button over there. Or you know what, let's make this focal length lens. What's your purview? I have a few roles here, but part of them is adding to that hype that you were talking about there. I work with the marketing department. So as in the dci L division that's digital camera interchangeable lens, I touch DSLR as well as our mirrorless portfolio. As a senior manager with the marketing department, I am kind of responsible for bringing the products from our Nikon corporation in Japan to our local market here in the USA. Really understanding the needs of the market developing the content for our website and our and the way we target the audiences. So in terms of the product itself, I work with the technical liaison with future development and we talk about how certain technologies would be adaptable to certain markets. So it's a little bit of everything. It's a little bit of technical. It's a little bit of marketing, but a lot of fun because the technology and the fact that I'm a shooter myself. So I can talk your language, my friend. I want to get a good deal too on a camera. And I want to make sure that it's getting into the right people's hands. So let's do it. Yeah, you know what? These cameras these days. Back in the day, I mean, we spoke about this a little bit in the green room before we started recording. My history is photojournalism. I started in the United States Air Force as a combat photojournalist and it was all Nikon. Probably still, it was all kind of, you know? And I remember starting one of my first cameras was a Nikon F three with the big motor drive on the bottom and, you know, I had the whole 9 yards, my kit with my low pro bag, full of lenses and another bag full of film and it was just pure happiness. And I remember back then, it was a huge deal. It still is today, but it was a huge deal when Nikon released a new camera body. You know, kind of like Adobe releasing a new version of Photoshop. It was like, oh, wow, we have a new superpowers. Same with these cameras. Back then, it was all around shutter speed, I think. Shutter speed. Frames per second and focusing speed on the cameras when they got auto focus. So where are we now? So making that leap from an F three manual ISO F stop shutter speed, all that stuff, focus, everything is manual to today when basically we have R two D two taking photos for us in our pocket. Is it all true? I mean, is the focusing speed that we see on these cameras on your marketing page. I'm sitting on the marketing page now and those videos, it just looks like, you know, Arthur C. Clarke borderline magic the tracking and the focus. How is it, how is this Z 9 able to do that? Yeah, you know what? We announced the camera a little over two weeks ago and it's starting to make the rounds and stores now and people are starting to get their hands on it and really appreciate it firsthand. You know, from what I can tell you, the hype is real. The technology is there now. And what we've been able to do is match and even surpass the performance of our flagship prior to this was our D 6 DSLR. And for many years that has been our flagship, even when we started coming up with mirrorless cameras, our Z system back in 2018, it's not even been three years. But our flagship performance of autofocus was always relegated to the DSLR format. It's only now with the xenon that we've been able to surpass that. And the way we've been doing that is through, well, a couple of things. There's physical components in the camera, namely the sensor and the processor that can adapt very quickly to rapid change. And there's also development processes when they build the cameras and the program at something called deep learning. And that's kind of like the programming methodology that they're using now. And when you talk about all these fancy things, it's not only just about the autofocusing speed and precision, it's also about subject detection. So, you know, in days past, you would pick a focus point kind of relegated it to a certain point in the frame, you know, focus, recompose what have you. Now, the autofocus squares can conform to the shape of the subject that it detects. And now this camera with a deep learning design can detect 9 different subjects. Everything from humans to animals to vehicles and not only that, but the precision of the focusing can adapt as quickly and if not faster than a DSLR, and that has to do with something called a stacked sensor and as well as a new processor in here that is probably ten to 12 times more powerful than our previous highest end mirrorless camera, the Z 7 two. So we've really gone leaps and bounds ahead and so much so that we're anointing the Z 9. Now, the true flagship of the entire Nikon brand. So we thought it was a CSR 9. Yeah. Which is a lot. I want to talk about that leap, too, because it was on the website a couple of weeks ago about a month ago on Nikon USA dot com looking at the Z 7s. You know, and I'm thinking, wow, these look pretty amazing, you know? And then now you guys dropped some drop the ace of the Z 9 out there. So I want to talk about the delta between those two. Before we do that, let's talk about who this camera is for. Again, looking at the site, you know, I'm seeing all different influencers from all different genres, a lot of landscape, sports and action, you know, some wedding up there. Is there a particular avatar that you and product management and product development had in mind when you were kind of sitting in whiteboarding this camera? Was there like, okay, we're gonna make this. We're gonna make the ultimate birders camera. We're gonna make the ultimate sports photography camera. Is there an avatar? Is it just this is the camera and just aim it at anything that light is bouncing off of and it'll capture it. That's a great question. Typically historically are flagship quote unquote Cramer, whether it be our D two, three, four, 5, 6, anything with a single digit number was primarily pointed or catered towards the photojournalist and

Nikon Corporation Nikon Usa Frederick Van Johns Mark Cruise United States Arthur C. Clarke Mark Air Force Japan Adobe Cramer
It's Not: What's the Best Software? It's: What's Best for You

The Digital Story

01:45 min | 4 months ago

It's Not: What's the Best Software? It's: What's Best for You

"Most of you the same to this podcast. The have your software right but there's always a little something a little voice in the back of your head especially after you see an article like what was on dp review with the capture one pro versus like rumi going well. Maybe i don't have the best. Maybe i should take a look at capture when pro or maybe i should take a look at affinity photo or maybe i should just stay with what i have and just know that is probably not the best but i'm too lazy to make a change. It could be any number of those things. So let's let's focus on five questions to start out with. And then i'll show you how those five answers may work for you or may work against you the see the see what. I'm talking about here all right first question. How important is overall speed for you. And we're talking about image processing software. If that's the case if overall processing speed is important to us high on your list will then you should be looking at capturing pro or photos for mac os because they are tops in that category and we know this for the moment. Especially if you're using one of the new m one max that captured one pro as really y- fine tuned for that particular hardware in certain areas. It really screams. Photos has always been fast. People never talk about. How fast photos is. But it's actually quite fast. Guess what the people that make the hardware also make that software. Do the math there.

Sarah Louise Jackson: How to Charge for Your Phoography Services

PhotoBiz Xposed

02:26 min | 4 months ago

Sarah Louise Jackson: How to Charge for Your Phoography Services

"When you started photographing for your boyfriend's boss will doing that. Construction work in a very early paid pretty well too. How did you even know what to charge back then. Was it an early right. Did you give a quote headed. You do your pricing back. Then yes i. I've never sooner charged by the ala of allies charge by the amount of images that the client end up choosing. And it's just. I guess something that i just really discovered by flick Asked the clients payment imaging wide. And there's i organization called the master builders association of the tara or skyline as well and they have like a little bit likely have they. I pay woods die have That had requirement that you had had four new regions on sorry despic- with a figure Images of charging the scenes. While i can so back then. Would it be like an architect or a bill that would employees who wants to enter this competition. Yes sorry. i'm mainly fight off. The building was built as at the time but of course areas architectural awards. That run all right. But i've always erred on the side of the business guy back then another going back a long time. But let's say you on the bill. And i'll call you walk. Senior portfolio like it. I'm going into these awards amount of fourteen images yet. I'm guessing you would shoot a lot more. And then i pick the best fourteen. That's exactly right. Yeah i would normally go to a project can fight off anywhere from soda. Steady two hundred five to be honest. kick the month Reflect the project the best. Yeah and then you remember you judge back. Then yes i. It'll be a clever about it. I think i sort of had. I guess a staggered approach. Want to five ks six to an editing to teddy. And i think back then i was charging at bat. Fifteen hundred something back. The came to teddy image inside that. Was they charge. And alois chosen because we had to have a minimum of four tate.

Master Builders Association Of Flick Alois Tate
Telling Your Story in Pictures, With Andy Biggs

This Week in Photo

02:40 min | 4 months ago

Telling Your Story in Pictures, With Andy Biggs

"Wanna talk a little bit about storytelling. And and the the you sort of the missing x-factor in from my my stand plan you know you're sitting in the middle of this stuff you know running nose and we're running trips and you know we'll talk a little bit about your your bank company as well but you're in this world so you know this as well as i do that. A lot of photographers advanced amateurs you know amateurs and maybe even some pros are lacking the storytelling elements in their work in other words. It's here's a shot of a pretty picture. There's a pretty picture with a b pollinating on it you know and that's it. How do we go beyond that. Be to you telling the story you know of that. Be or of that flower. So i don't know how to answer that. Other than i'll just tell you my approach and what i teach people and it might help them. But you know i think one of the biggest challenges that people take photographs literally for the most part they say you know. Let's say you're a sports photographer. There's a picture on the mound and on baseball and he's throwing throw the pitch and people photograph that and it's very literal. it's it's it's It's what's obvious and that's a challenge because it doesn't it just doesn't transcend. It doesn't really tell you what's going on so often what people will do is. They'll take that one photograph that hangs on the wall above the fireplace. And that's really what they're after but sometimes they should consider taking a body of work to illustrate a story. It might be by photographs. That might be fifteen. It might be two hundred. The average coffee table photo book has bad one hundred twenty-five photographs in okay. So just just you have to get that out of you and my idea is that i take photographs of adjectives. Not things so. Photography by definition is the to graphics writing with light but the problem with that is is. It's just that's really all it is. And so i try to use adjectives and what that's done for me is. It keeps my my photography consistent over time. And as i am out in the field taking photographs whether it's two thousand and five two thousand fifteen two thousand twenty. Hopefully those photographs have leads together. So what i do. I have a list of adjectives that are in my mind all of the time. I'm trying to look for photographs. That are positive. Uplifting hopeful regal her roic timeless remote and those are all connected

Baseball
The Spectacular Sigma 150-600mm Sports Lens Comes to Mirrorless Mounts

PetaPixel Photography Podcast

02:25 min | 4 months ago

The Spectacular Sigma 150-600mm Sports Lens Comes to Mirrorless Mounts

"I still have a couple of sigma lenses. I need to sell. And i've been saying that for a long time now as their for nikon f mount and i don't shoot night count anymore but that's neither here nor there and one of those lenses is the one hundred twenty two three hundred millimeter aft- to point eight sports series. Such a great lands just useless to me now because it's for nikon not fuji. I wish it was for food. You that'd be awesome anyhow sigma just announced lands. That well isn't as fast as that have to point. Eight still has a really great range. I'm talking about the one hundred fifty. Two six hundred millimeter f. Five point six six point three d. d. n. o. s. sports series a land. That's available in both sony. E like l. Mount remember l. Mount is being utilized by not just like a but panasonic as well. I think wasn't the other one. Sigma they make it. So darn confusing. This new lands is the company's first ultra telephoto lands at the company says been designed from scratch for full frame. Murless cameras using those mounts sigma describes this lens as uncompromising that's their word in performance. Not only when it comes to its optics but in its autofocus speed and accuracy it features a dust and splash resistant. Build the front element is both water and oil resistant and it features dual action zoom. A feature allows her both straight zoom as well as rings zoom and with that photographers able to change the angle of you in what sigma says is a quote quick and intuitive way and quote the company has also included a zoom torque switch which allows shooters to change the resistance of the zoom ring as well the ability to lock it all the way out at the white in a sweet feature that not only provides some customization but eliminates zoom creep. Zoom creep is annoying. You want your lens to stay where you had it and not move locking. It takes care of that this beast of it lands ways in it two point one kilograms also known as four point six pounds so if this lands is on your wishlist you might want also put a sturdy monoplane on there as well this thing is heavy. You're not gonna be able to hand hold this lens for very long. Even if you're in great shape trust me on this.

Fuji Nikon Panasonic Sony Sigma
Jeff Brown: Why Photographers Should Be on LinkedIn

PhotoBiz Xposed

02:59 min | 4 months ago

Jeff Brown: Why Photographers Should Be on LinkedIn

"Today's guest is the linked in expert. Jeff brand from the uk. Now if the name sounds familiar up jeff has appeared on the podcast episodes. Two hundred sixty one and three hundred thirteen. He is the author of the book. The photographers missing linked in your step by step guide on how to make a ton of money unlinked in now in a recent chat. Jeff told me that lincoln has changed more in three months than the past two years and there are still less than eight percent of photographers with profiles on the platform. He says for many of the hundreds of photographers. He works with lincoln's producing more jobs than ever before. I'm looking forward to learning more. And i'm rat to have jeff back with us now. Jeff welcome to the podcast again. Fantasy under it's great to be back on again by. Why do you think photographers either. Reluctant or staying a wife from linked in. I think it's still lee old belief that link is for people who were recruited and it's like recruitment applauded. Uc visa at form. And it's not you know. Say coming close to seven hundred and seventy five million uses on the platform now. It's the biggest professional social network in the world and with an average wage-earner of eighteen thousand dollars a year so these are people who actually have money. So do you think people are staying away from. Because i don't feel to attract clients or they just think it's another social network. Have you heard from people that are are reluctant to actually join photography's specifically well you know you came with a bath. So i did some searches at the beginning of the year and found out that the a law photographers unlinked in bull moose photographers. Huge percentage of jobs don't have equal fully optimize profiles and i would look at the entire limited network itself. Seven hundred and seventy five million uses only thirty million of those have fully optimized profiles by fully optimized these the showing up in the searches people. They get same now from that less than one percent of the entire uses on linked to create content. That goes into the news feed and from photographers point-of-view between south eight to ten percents photographers use lincoln actively post to the platform. Once a month. So if you put that into context to the likes of facebook and instagram where the traffic is high. If you want to start getting seen online tain and get in front of the people that you want to do business with than the compensation is pretty much non existent for you. All you've gotta do is get your profile fully optimized and get consistency. So you know you do one poor stumbling. You're not gonna get a load of people in boxing say can oblique. You need to be shown up in people's news feeds. You need to build that relationship and that takes about two or three months but Apply to we optimize the profile three implant on jeff the magic stone the happen because it stopped me get seen by

Jeff Brand Jeff Lincoln UC UK LEE Instagram Facebook Boxing
Annemie Tonken: How to Build a Recurring Photography Income With Portrait Memberships

PhotoBiz Xposed

02:21 min | 4 months ago

Annemie Tonken: How to Build a Recurring Photography Income With Portrait Memberships

"Back in two thousand seventeen my business. I had been in business for about seven and a half years. Things were chugging along very well. I started in twenty ten when it seemed like. I'm a family photographer. And at that. Point the general message out there was if you're interested in making real sustainable money as a portrait photographer. You need to be doing in person sales so i learned how to do in person sales. And that's what. I did for seven and a half years and that worked really well but in two thousand seventeen my marriage was falling apart and my ex husband and i separated and all of a sudden what had felt like a pretty lucrative business all of a sudden i realized that wasn't going to be enough and it wasn't because my average per client income wasn't good with in-person sales and i know i hate throwing numbers out there because i feel like everybody's business different everybody's needs or different all that sort of stuff but i had over a two thousand dollar per client average which in my area is on the high end of good so it felt like. Oh i've got this really successful business. But when i sat down and ran the numbers that i needed for you know paying the full mortgage on my own. I have two boys who are now. Fifteen and eleven. Who eat as much as everybody tells you. They're going to eat and trying to save for being able to retire at some point and all of those different things. now that that was all on my plate squarely. I didn't have enough hours in the week to be doing my work the way that i was doing it. So you know these in-person sale sessions. It's not just the session. It's so much like ahead of time and afterward an so much extra like one on one time with the client and you can't skill added all so if i had had enough time in my calendar to add thirty more clients year it would have been fine but i didn't and so i was trying to figure out what i was going to do. And that was how i developed this system which is basically taking the sales psychology and some of the tenants that make in-person sales so lucrative and so effective and kind of reverse engineering them to make them work in an automated online fashion.

Which camera should you buy?

This Week in Photo

02:14 min | 4 months ago

Which camera should you buy?

"Okay spoiler alert the answer to the question. What cameras should i is. There is no answer to that question. It depends right. That's the answer to the question. It depends on a lot of things. And we're gonna talk about some of the some of those things in this video. It depends on. How much money do you have freight. It depends on. What are you shooting. where are you shooting. What what is your commitment to this art form. Are you just playing around or do you plan on making a go of this as a career. All these things factor in early on in the decision making process around. What camera should you buy. So let's start with the first thing the first thing that you want to consider when selecting a camera or considering a camera is the genre. What genre photography are you interested in landscape portraiture street photography wedding photography astro photography underwater photography. It goes on and on. There is no one camera. that's well maybe there is. I haven't found it yet. But i don't believe there is one camera that is amazing at all genres. It's it's a genre based sport that you're getting into so that's the first question you have to ask yourself. What genre are you shooting because that will then dictate a lot of things like sensor size. And should you care about lynn size and the weight of the lenses. If you're going to be hiking up mountains you care about wait. It's going to be on a tripod. you don't care so much about weight bright so you gotta answer those questions or that. Part of the question i is. What am i shooting. what do i care about. And it doesn't have to be one genre mind you. It doesn't have to be well okay. I'm gonna shoot portrait portrait. You have to kind of wait it right so i know that right. Now i feel like i'm gonna shoot portraits the most but i made the occasional street. Photography may a wedding here and there. I may go on a trip and do some travel stuff. I may try my hand astro photography but my real joy is in portrait photography. So that is what you're going to solve for for the most part and that's gonna affect your lind selection your sensor size selection and all those things all of the

Quick Tip: Remember to Reset Your ISO Sensitivity After Every Shoot

The Digital Story

01:53 min | 4 months ago

Quick Tip: Remember to Reset Your ISO Sensitivity After Every Shoot

"Remember to reset the iso two auto after jacking. It up to six thousand four hundred the night before right. This is so common in this happened to one of our participants in the recent workshop and he actually had to go back out and shoot the assignment again because he had been doing some stuff the night before had the iso set way high goes out. The next day does a day shoot and doesn't notice that the iso was at six thousand four hundred you know and the funny thing is that when you have the white balance set incorrectly say that you correct it for tungsten The night before you're working inside with incandescent lying well when you go out the next day and you look through the viewfinder you see that the white balance is off if you have an electronic viewfinder right you see you go. Wow whoo and there are a lot of other things where we get visual cues that we have screwed up but the iso thing will get you because you don't get a visual cue. You don't suddenly when you're shooting this beautiful landscape in front of you see all sorts of grain. Show up in the shot in the electronic viewfinder. No you don't get to see that until you open it up in light room in you go even fifty percent and you go. Whoa what happened there. And why are the colors not saturated and you go. Oh man sixty four hundred right sixty four so remember whenever you wonder away from auto iso especially going up the scale. The minute you're done with that shoot return into auto. Iso returned to auto iso and there will be a day. Where you thanked me for

Is Your Photography Business Saleable or Worth Selling?

PhotoBiz Xposed

02:33 min | 4 months ago

Is Your Photography Business Saleable or Worth Selling?

"Photographers around the i. Guess who you're talking to right now would have a business that would be turning over. We'll have a revenue of something between one hundred and five hundred thousand. I think that we can capture light. Everyone that's listening. Like one hundred thousand dollar turn of business or revenue business. Is that something that is cycle. it could be. It's less about the revenue and more about how the revenues generated so look for the business to be sellable. If you put yourself in the shoes of the acquirer you think about like where and how this business be worth me. Buying it and the answer comes down to. Will it run without the photographer. The owner you know if you're turning over one hundred thousand dollars in revenue and one hundred saw revenue comes from you selling doing the jobs the no it's not really sellable as it structured but if you've structured so that you're behind the scenes you've hired someone to shoot for example weddings and you're turning over one hundred thousand dollars revenue in. You're not doing the work or the selling. It's very much sellable asset. Even though it's just turning over one hundred thousand dollars in revenue it's really comes down to is the business dependent on you personally to either operate or grow. And that's really the essence of a cell will come if the answer to that is no then. It's definitely helped. I said if i. I have a photography business on not the photographer on not doing this aisles. But on behind the scenes you know maybe doing the marketing. But i have a system in place to do that. Marketing to bring the clients in. Is that still a syllable business. Absolutely all i absolutely. Yeah yeah again. There's three types of buyers and for the most part i think your listeners will be best served by what's called an individual investor so the three types of buyers in rare individual investors private equity groups strategic acquires private equity groups of strategic choirs generally acquire much larger businesses individual investors are effectively buying job. So what they're looking for is a business that consistently generates profits without the owner having to do the work. And if that's the scenario and they're looking to for example move into a certain country. A certain city perhaps moving to a certain industry that there are sort of enamored by again. That's the first step. The second step is can this business. Will the business continue once. I write a check to the owner. 'cause once somebody writes you a check for your business your attention get strong away

How to Juggle Your Photography Business and Your Day Job With Kevin Gilligan

Photofocus Podcast

02:38 min | 4 months ago

How to Juggle Your Photography Business and Your Day Job With Kevin Gilligan

"Not unusual in fact my guess is that fifty percent of the industry are made up of part time photographers and i don't think that has changed in the last thirty or forty years. It's always been that way going back to the very early film days. There were so many part photographers out there. That were primarily came out of the educational world. And we're teachers because teachers were often the summer it was logical connection to photograph during wedding season and there were so many photographers out there that we're taking advantage of that time to create some additional income so the challenge today is just the same as it was. Then it's finding balance kevin. What are some of the things you've found work for you to maintain your sanity and and balance when you're when you've got two different challenges like that and two very different careers You've identified a really really important question point There's the obvious in many parts to it for my perspective number one is. I think it's really important to get input and have a discussion with the people that you're close to around you if your you have a partner. You're married if kids. Whoever it is that is really important. Issue time wise to have a discussion with them about you know what are their needs. What is reasonable amount of time for you to be working on this. And i think you have to really do an assessment about you know what your ability to meet all your needs is if you want to keep those relationships happy and i do. It's very important to me that my wife is happy and my kids are happy. So i think about that. And i think that's really important And in terms of balance the funny thing is is that for me for targeted. Not like a second job. It's still some that i love and i'm passionate about. So it's i want to do. And i think when you have a full-time job and other responsibilities what i find is that you know some weeks. I'm doing a lot of work in photography and some weeks. Maybe i'm not doing any little kind of go with the flow with that and you know someone. Someone said to me kevin. How do you get all this one friend assistance all time. You know your your fulltime lawyer photography you know you do martial arts you other things. How do you get all of. And i say i plan things out weeks ahead of time and i give myself extra time to get stuff done and people don't respect my time and cancel on me. You know late or whatever then you might have to cut those people out you know. I have to be particular with my time. And i have to be you know not rigid but i have to stick to that and plan out so that i can do things and i think that kind of planning is really important

Kevin
Tim Wallace on How His Grandad Introduced Him to Photograpy

Photography Daily

01:35 min | 5 months ago

Tim Wallace on How His Grandad Introduced Him to Photograpy

"Let's talk about voters i know. What was grandad the introduces deep fascination. Kambas yeah when. I was younger younger than charlie is not. I used to spend a lotta time. Like i'm pants Godfather was quite On i guess he was the one that saw a But my initial passion actually came from when i was a secondary school in djibril because of false thing in the family i run into a camera trip that adjoined jibril said i run into a guy that what's the athol hayes. Joe basically was when night. Put the surveillance planes of needs to fly around the strikes that you both. He used to load allowed. The bulk film. That used to shave the russian subs when they surface compensated strikes but he was. He couldn't actually print very well. It wasn't very good at princeton and it was one of the things that he wanted to learn today mall in the air force. Were ready doing anything like that with those guys in the photography section. Here's a tiny section. And i think princeton fifty years that Today fest which to develop prints and he said to me if you teach me out to print if you spend hours with me every way can help make this a sergeant nfl. And i'm not some kid I'll give you a device. Faith on which was the bulk. Tends that used to get that and thinking you can't add so. He used to give me a bolt setbacks. Faith five next to sit in his wardrobe with adult closed and everything that have been bugging me parasitism. It solid side unwillingness allowed. Fem stock could shape. He's probably one of the unique things with made. My journey was development. Princeton

Kambas Djibril Jibril Athol Hayes Godfather Princeton Charlie JOE Air Force NFL
Shoot at Any Time of the Day With Infrared Photography

The Digital Story

02:33 min | 5 months ago

Shoot at Any Time of the Day With Infrared Photography

"Get into infrared photography itself because this is really fun stuff now way back in january before i started going with the i. r. workshops i talked about you know now is the time. Four infrared photography and in that was mainly because of the pandemic because we were trapped in infrared allowed us to walk the same path that we had walked a million times during shelter in place but it looked completely different. Like going to a whole new planet. And what i felt at the time was absolutely right. This is the kind of thing that can just keep us going. Even when we can't go anywhere you know. He can't go anywhere now. We've done a few workshops. And i've been shooting of quite a bit of irr. Since then. and i've really learned a lot. I've learned a lot in the thing that i've discovered is that i are photography was fantastic for shelter in place but his justice fantastic when shelter in place is over. Right is just as good. And why do i say that because it has so many advantages that visible light photography doesn't gift to us and the first one is being able to shoot during the lousy time of day right that right at the top of the list so for example. Then say that you're planning a family vacation in august all right. We actually get to do that this year. So you go in the family vacation. We know as photographers how this goes. You know family comes first as it should. Photography will come second so a lot of times during the really sweet light during the best parts of the day to take pictures. Were like having a family meal together or doing some sort of activity and you and i are not taking pictures. The cool thing about. I are if you have. I are y- tools with you and talk about those tools. Is that then during the middle part of the day when the kids are taking a nap or you know the partner has gone shopping. Or whatever normally you go. We'll great now. I have time. But with i r photography that is the best time to shoot so that time of day thing just gets totally turned upside down

More Megapixels or Sharper Lenses, What's the Difference?

LensWork

01:58 min | 5 months ago

More Megapixels or Sharper Lenses, What's the Difference?

"I don't spend much time talking about cameras and equipment and gear so. I hope you'll forgive me if i break that rule with an exception this week because there is something sort of knew then i want to talk about and in order to lay the background for this. I really should recommend that you watch video from lens work online i'll make it available With a link here even to those of you who are not lends work online members so everybody can have a chance to see this when it's from our series called photography not cameras. It's from several years ago and it's a comparison of two cameras in a real world test. That is to say imagine photographer. A who had at that. Point a Sony state of the art camera and a seven hour mark to with Superb carl zeiss. Prime lenses comparing print results with the camera that i was using at the time which was the panasonic g five and the two f two point eight zoom lenses that were considered the top of the line at that point and the conclusion of which is if you Want the shortcut and want to go. Watch the video. The conclusion was that there was no visible difference whatsoever between those two cameras photographing in reasonable light. Photographing using rock-solid tripods with the exact same composition photographed the exact same time at comparable apertures. There was no visible difference between prince from the sony. A seven our mark to forty two megapixel camera and my panasonic jd. Five which was a sixteen megapixel came no visible difference

Carl Zeiss Sony Panasonic
Aaron Van Discusses Food Photography and Telling "Craveable" Stories

Photofocus Podcast

01:59 min | 5 months ago

Aaron Van Discusses Food Photography and Telling "Craveable" Stories

"Of the things that i noticed when i looked at all your images and shamir made a comment about your portfolio one online and and i mean that's just the tip of the iceberg in terms of everything. You've photographed. What are some of the ingredients that you work with when you've got when you've got some students or just other photographers whose work you're looking at. What are some of the ingredients that photographers tend to miss that. That make that image crave -able well. My background in advertising has definitely helped to form in shape. My my i and my take on food photography Also my background in advertising has helped me to work with my clients and work with ad agencies and understanding what they need what they want. What their deliverables. Far as far as the look and feel of an image and what. I'm you know there are one of the things that i think makes a big difference. Is that You can take a photograph of food with some decent light and be done like you. Can you can put a camera over good-looking dish Some decent light on it and have a good photograph. But i think what makes a great photograph is the details and it's in those details it's in those millimeters of movement sits in making sure that there's no tangents visible in a shot. It's the psychology of how an eye moves through a photograph and the composition that photographers in general really need to know and understand and learn over time. There's a such a psychological element to how the mind moves through an image. And i think that one of the things that makes is the thing that pushes an image to the next level is knowing those things and getting it right in the image to a point where somebody would look at that and not know that it was wrong in the first place it just all works it. Just all comes together And it were an your eye flows through it so effortlessly that that the crave ability of the food that you're photographing comes through effortlessly

Shamir
How NFTs Will Affect Limited Edition Prints

This Week in Photo

02:24 min | 5 months ago

How NFTs Will Affect Limited Edition Prints

"I'm a photographer. And i decided you know what i want to create a limited edition of nine cinema graphs that i want to release says in if i to be i want them to have value. And i'm not going to create them anymore so i want that level of exclusivity associated with them in today's world. Paint the picture of how that would happen in today's world and then how it will happen. Let's go out on a limb and say in thi is a foregone conclusion and say this is how will happen in the next couple of years being able to limit those editions. How would that work rent will be before before. Answer this remember the internet about twenty years ago a most people would use sudanese. They will use fake names to run things around the internet and data fell normal and using real names felt a look normal itself. Like why would you use your real name on the internet where everybody's a stranger but eventually became in these shows trusts so you trust people who have verified checkmark you trust people who have their real name their reputation of the density attached to their online persona and so thinking of the same thing. If you're making print a limited edition print and selling in your local market you're attaching reputation. People know that you know you will not print another same limited edition of prints a week later to sell it suspected audience because your trust is eroded in you are. We'll be shamed for doing so. What the blockchain label is that they bring all trust in the trust the society so basically you can trust mechanism because it's immutable It's impossible to change. And so once you touch a reputation your wallet or your identity to the blockchain of meeting. Everybody anywhere in the world can see at any point in time. What exactly have you done with those contracts Whether you sold them to yourself for example in like old history and where it's going and whether you printed or like minted another part of lives in peace so that is something that is unique because before if you made prince and decided to sell them in the different town. It's likely that nobody will be able to catch

Is the Nikon ZFC Retro for the Sake of Retro?

PetaPixel Photography Podcast

01:48 min | 5 months ago

Is the Nikon ZFC Retro for the Sake of Retro?

"Old is new again. And in nikon's case perhaps taking a page from fujifilm from january twenty four teens. Xt one and itself from november. Twenty thirteen's diaw. Company has introduced a new crop sensor retro inspired body called the z. Afc so if the diaw was a full frame. F body does afc is a maryland as version with the c. Perhaps standing for compact or crop. If you're like me also known as old or you just appreciate retro. Styling like fuji's x. Series which is all crop as you know you might want to have a serious look at nikon's new z. Afc a body reminiscent from old school. Nikon's like my old. Fm to in fact looks a lot like the fm too but with modern merely z. Technology inside if you own an ancient nikon finding your way around this new dx crop body should definitely be essentially as with my food you bodies you've got dials for iso. In this case one hundred up to twenty one thousand two hundred expandable two hundred and four thousand eight hundred shutter speed. dial and exposure compensation. Dial as well in fact there in all the same positions as my body's bodies now of this new body the company's executive vice president jan vannatter says quote the. Afc is kind of camera many have been waiting for and that only nikon could create its exceptionally slim yet offers superb image quality and features with iconic styling and precise tactile controls. It's a joy to carry and use for casual street photography streaming or just living in the here and

AFC Diaw Nikon Fuji Maryland Jan Vannatter
How Olga Karlovac Developed Her Dark and Mysterious Style

Photography Radio

02:42 min | 5 months ago

How Olga Karlovac Developed Her Dark and Mysterious Style

"You have a really really distinctive and wonderful style. And i should tell everybody who's listening. Of course there's there's a website and it's oh l. g. a. hyphen k. a. r. l. o. v. a. c. hyphen photography dot com. And when you get there if you look at the work and you think it looks vaguely familiar if you are a subscriber to frames magazine than you know that. There's been a review of her most recent book escape. That's on the website there. The work is i want to say it's dark but i don't mean to think to say that it's depressing. It is really evocative is really moody. As a matter of fact. When when i got the chance to review this book i fell in love with it. There's as i said in the review. I said these images are dark blurry out of focus. And that's the point. These are impressionistic images and every single one of them is that invitation to linger in dream. All this is not a concept this is not a style just occurs to somebody out of the blue. How did you come by this way of imagining your work. To be honest he just came to me. I didn't practice it. I didn't try to make my shorts. Look like that simply came to me. Naturally when i was shooting and know going out as mostly. I should wear intuitive and emotion using slower shutter. It's the way it comes and the images simply out to be that way. I mean i should also be kind of windows et cetera so it use another dimension to the images but that was how happens. It's not something that i tried or planned to happen. It's the way i see the world in a way. Okay when you were first beginning. Were you doing more traditional street. Photography more photo realistic stuff for a very short period of time. I was shooting. Maybe more regular some shorts that they're not bloody not the way they look now but very very quickly. I developed decide and now without really thinking about it. One day i simply started shooting the more and more in this way since i started. I felt this is something to where that really came naturally and that e e really something. That is the picture that i really

Humanitarian Photography with Henrik Saxgren

Photography Daily

02:22 min | 5 months ago

Humanitarian Photography with Henrik Saxgren

"Henrik you trained originally as an advertising photographer so the direction could be set one way but you changed course really didn't didn't you want. I wonder why why you changed course. Yeah it was a dramatic change. Because i was. I'm born in fifty three and i'm a little bit late to be a sixty eight but i became quite radical left wing critical to capitalistic society. At that time he was very modern to follow. Your ideas. one could say that today. People don't care much about that. But i couldn't see myself in the advertising world trying to make people more commercial stuff because i was against this kind of society so so i took the consequences of that and stopped the day after i got my education and then i started to be a political activists with my camera to document. Humanistic commentary photography. I i would say these ideals you adopted as a photographer. Moving straight out of advertising and entities. These more humanitarian fields. Did did that present you with a different kind of life challenge. Because i look at your stories from around the world to you'll now well known and respected for but you can't exactly hitchhike to places like nicaragua and i'm i'm always fascinated by how photography managed to find a financial passport on top of their physical ones to to fund these extraordinary journeys and stories. I had never had a problem with that. When i was young. It was very easy of me to live in sleeping back. Just going to cameras and pundits trikes film. And then i could sleeve everywhere so it the only cost i actually had was the plane ticket and a little bit for food and transportation but the yes laid. My work grow allowed in ambition. A i learned that. I could not do thing on short time. I had to spend maybe two three years on every project in that speech to asia. More funding was necessary for me.

Henrik Nicaragua Asia
The Least Amount of Barrier

LensWork

01:54 min | 5 months ago

The Least Amount of Barrier

"One of my favorite. Youtube guys is hugh brownstone. He has a channel called three blind men and an elephant. Yes he of the spiky hair fast talking specification spouting pragmatist point of view in photography. I think he's got a lot of interesting things to say. And so i. I do regularly watch his youtube channel. He said something. I dunno might have been six months ago that i still in thinking about so that must indicate that there's something there there and that is that he proposed that the best photographic equipment was the equipment that imposed the least bit easier between you creative vision and your finished product. And i'm not sure he would have put it this way but i will paraphrase his idea by saying that the best photographic tool is the one that requires you to think the least about photographic mechanics. Obviously the less. You have to concentrate on how to make the camera. Do something the more you can concentrate on what it is and why it is. You wanted to do whatever you want it to do. Rather than fussing with buttons and dials and all of that sort of thing. I guess the part of his idea that really appealed to me. Is this idea of barrier somehow in our minds. I we have something. We want to do photographic and there's all these barriers that crop up things that have to be dealt with problems that have to be solved and overcome in order for us to achieve our creative vision and his ideas simply that we should choose the equipment that imposes the least amount of distraction from our truly creative task

Hugh Brownstone Youtube
How I Discovered Photography with Jo Brunenberg

Photography Radio

02:02 min | 5 months ago

How I Discovered Photography with Jo Brunenberg

"Tell me about discovering photography while it all started as you said in in that here and when i was young i i was very much interested in all kinds of technical inventions. I consider photography as kind of a miracle. And i really wanted to know how it works and the of time i was i was lucky to win. An act act. Black camera is very simple box camera but it was a puzzle from the local drugstore show. I was very glad with that with that first camera because i was. I was fourteen years old at that time and with that box camera actually. My first conto photography began at that time. You had to bring your your film roles to photography to have to process and to go tech. Britain's made or a notch argument made a rather soon started to to make contact prints at home from the six nine centimeter negatives. So that was that was by first gabbara and my first experiences bench photography taking images. What is it about practicing photography. That was appealing the most important thing. I think most that you could really capture a moment in time and that you could treat it. That was kind of match magic trick. But i was also interested in the technical side of it on the game right because at that time by any you didn't have internet. You didn't have google. You could go to a library to read a book about photography. But that was only later that i did that kind of savings so it was kind of a secret device and also when i bought my first film roles they had such a especial smell at a kind of chemical smell which was very strange.

Britain Google
Don't Call Leah Judson a Photographer

This Week in Photo

02:21 min | 5 months ago

Don't Call Leah Judson a Photographer

"What's the elevator pitch for. Lia when you're blading to people who you are and what you do well i think i think the biggest thing is and something that i've kind of over the past couple of years when defining myself ask for photography is not my superpower and i think that was something that took me a while to actually break. I think might be scary. Maybe for some people to sit like to claim that for themselves because my photography. I always wanted to go beyond just taking a picture of someone and moving on. I want there to be that intimacy that connection that just this continuation in this feeling of infinity for bat relationship with that person and i noticed that yeah. I can continue and get stronger as a photographer or in this new in this new upcoming year. Be a filmmaker for this project. That i'm putting together but in the end i think something that makes me feel really unique and can kind of stand out in the creators. World is my ability to really build relationships with people beyond just having them set for me and take a photo. So i think when i think about the work that i'm doing it really i don't know just i feel like i wanna be more than just a photographer and i find that photography sometimes can trap me in the spots. Make me feel like oh my work can never been more important than the image right and that it's so refreshing that you say that because i believe exactly the same thing and i the it's it's trapping yourself and limiting yourself in a lot of ways to say that i'm a photographer of russia's that may sound to say that i am a photographer because in the end you're not just a photographer that's like saying i'm a person that uses a hammer right when in reality you're you build houses or you do other things but the hammer is the tool to to tell or the in this case. The camera is the tool to tell stories. So you're you're essentially a storyteller or you know that kind of thing but then like you're saying you're also a psychologist

LIA Russia
Photographing the Great Outdoors

This Week in Photo

01:50 min | 5 months ago

Photographing the Great Outdoors

"Most popular genre photography is outdoor. But in my experience. I've seen i've seen the range from. Okay can a mediocre outdoor to outstanding stunning. Just just how did how did that person get. That shot kind of right up. How other than just shooting and shooting inputting mileage on your shutter finger for the photographers that went to get to the level of having a number of covers like you like you have or at your level of work. Give us some tips like how. How do you get good. Well gosh that's a tough on right. You know like any other aspect of photography. A lot of it comes from dedication just shooting a lot. The other part of it and this goes for a lot of these kind of vertical. Sports will call him so rock climbing kayaking surfing back country skiing the photographers that are shooting sports like that are very much involved. In the sport itself they are an active participant in board. You can't be a country unless you're back country skier you. Anyone can go to a surf competition and sit at the end of the beach and shoo in Jaws that's the big. I think that's yeah. That's in hawaii and anyone can sit there and shoot it with a long lens but if you're not a part of that community if you're not ingrained in the surf world there's really not much you can do at that photo if that makes sense so yeah so for all these sports big part of it is actually living and breathing the sport itself so a lot of people are kind of disheartened when they hear. They're like oh so. I have to move if i want to be a ski photographer after move to whistler a mike well yeah basically you do

Skiing Hawaii
Ryan Vizzions: Van Lifing with a camera

Photography Daily

02:57 min | 6 months ago

Ryan Vizzions: Van Lifing with a camera

"Ron last year about how your journey into photo. Journalism started in twenty tenure father taking his life the year prior. And you and you take yourself on a journey across the world where you ended up in bangkok in the center of a protest and that and that's where it all started really further graphically for you today with talking about being the road once more. Is that as a as a photographer where you'll frankly happiest on the road. It's it seems to me like you. Yes i believe that it may be being on the road. But i think it's a little bit deeper that i think i have a passion as most photographers for exploring and finding new environments. And that's really what i'm searching for. I think with this project. I wanna find something. Nobody's ever seen before that's kind of what many people strive for. And that's what i'm in search of is is the never seen shots. So what would what is the project then. Is it landscape. Is it fun. Aunts is it photojournalism because the romans threw that are are. That's a great question When i first had the concept of living in a van with my dog and traveling the united states documenting all fifty states. I had this grander idea of photographing. What the country is in who we are as a nation and the communities that make up this nation and so the original concept for this book making was people in like who. We are well when i got on the road. I realized i was on the road during a pandemic in a very polarized country. The politics and i kept finding myself being pushed or gravitating towards rather nature. And so over the course. It's been some humanist photography some photojournalism for instance i the inauguration in dc and photographed a few different pieces but a lot of it has been focused on the landscaping in nature and wildlife. And for me. I tried to tie that altogether because the climate environment is really important to me. And so so it's ever evolving project. I guess well when we first told you you adjust building the venue just converting whatever whatever you needed to do. I think there's been to vance. Isn't there there. There has been to vans. i am now in my second man monk to mark to completely different van. It's newer. I learned the hard way about buying an old van. Romanticizing driving around in old van. I was rear ended outside los angeles last year. And since my van was thirty years old they totaled it out and so i was stuck in a hotel in the suburbs of angeles. All my belongings in trash van and a joke yard. And i had to make the decision of whether or not i wanted to go home with my tail between my legs or if i wanted to take out a lease on a new vehicle and continued going and i decided that i knew if i went home. I would probably never do this

Bangkok RON United States DC Vance Los Angeles Angeles
Digital Teleconverters Are Better than You Might Think

The Digital Story

03:34 min | 6 months ago

Digital Teleconverters Are Better than You Might Think

"Today. I'm going to talk about the joy of digital tele converters honest. I'm serious. This is not a joke. I'm really going to talk about how cool these things are now. I'm going to start with a story from fathers day which just happened I'm recording this on monday. So this was yesterday and my two boys live down in the santa clara area. And i'm in santa rosa. So san francisco is sort of like halfway in between so they set up the sing where we would meet Down in san francisco Around the presidio area which is just this lovely beautiful area part of san francisco and so we'd meet down there and they arranged for some takeout and we're going to eat out on this great green expanse at the presidio. Were just beautiful. People go there and they just hang out and picnic and families come and then after we had our picnic and so forth They had a walk planned and we kind of walk along crissy field in some nice views of the golden gate bridge and the city itself. So i knew that You know where we're gonna be someone to make sure. I had a camera with me. But i also knew that i wanted to travel light. This wasn't a day for me to you. Know have a bunch of photos care. And be. Like one of those dads. This was a day for me to enjoy and spend time with my boy. So i wanted to travel light well. I'm sure that's a huge shock to you right. Of course. I wanted to travel i. I almost always wanted to travel light. Regardless so i packed in my pocket. I had the iphone twelve pro. Max and i thought that would be particularly useful for the ultrawide if i needed it in a does have that. You know that to axe telephoto there. But i was more in the mood to shoot with fuji film. The x one hundred v is this that kind of day. I don't know i just. It just felt good to hold it in the hand and everything so my iphone stayed in my pocket all day. I never. I never used it once but i did pull out the x one hundred eighty. So we're taking our walk. And i i see some shots when we when we get near the water Played around with some shots with the golden gate bridge in the background in some really cool things in the foreground. That was fun in the thirty five millimeter. Equivalent lands of the excellent hundred v Was fantastic for that. It really was. It was great so that was all going really well. But then we kind of reversed direction. We went back the other way and the view that right away caught. My eye was the san francisco skyline with a kind of a semi low hanging clouds bank. So he had a little bit of blue right behind the buildings. Some fog above it a love that kind of sandwich. Look it's it's really gorgeous and in the foreground right in front of the city was the dome from the palace of fine arts. Going man has really nice. And then i had some good stuff to work within the foreground in front of that even so i'm going. That is a shot. i wanna do. I know a little bit of a postcard. Shaba does kind of an unusual angle and the lighting was really good. And i just wanted. The shooter is wanted to shoot him.

San Francisco Santa Rosa Santa Clara Presidio Fuji MAX Palace Of Fine Arts Shaba
The Importance of Photography Workshops

LensWork

02:51 min | 6 months ago

The Importance of Photography Workshops

"I've been an advocate of attending a photographic workshop. For as long as i can remember. Maybe because i had such terrific experiences in workshops but i also think that they offer quite a bit that simply cannot be replicated with youtube videos and online instruction and etc part of that is of course the ability to just hang out with your peers with people who were as dedicated about photography's you are with instructors but i think when it gets right down to it one of the most valuable things that happens in a workshop are the unexpected questions that you develop once you're there and here's an example in one of the very first workshops that i ever did. I went to yosemite for a workshop. That was being taught by bruce. Birnbaum john sexton and ray mix savvy as part of the owens valley photography workshops. I went because i wanted some honest feedback in my work. I'd spent months preparing stack of prince toned. Spotted matted to the very best of my abilities and i was kind of looking for some sort of assessment where i was in the photographic process. That was my reason for going and ended up being the least important thing that i gathered from that workshop. The most important thing came in the form of a field session now feel sessions are not often the most productive thing that happens in a photographic workshop. Because you don't go to a workshop to make photograph you go to a workshop to learn something but nonetheless. It seems like every photographic workshop includes field sessions and in this field session. We were at a particular location that had a small creek and we were all supposed to find a photograph compose it set up our cameras etc and then the instructors were gonna come around and look through our camera an offer some comments about what we had seen in composed. I found my subjects set up. My view camera made my composition and not long afterwards. Bruce birnbaum came up as the first of the instructors. Who's going to take a look at my field composition. He didn't even look through the camera. He didn't look at viewfinder. he didn't do anything he walked up and he said why. Have you composed this image. Certainly an innocent enough question but one that really got me thinking. He didn't wanna know how i was going to expose it or what. My thinking was relative to you. Know rule of thirds or anything like that. He didn't question my bangel in position. He asked

Birnbaum John Sexton Ray Mix Owens Valley Youtube Bruce Bruce Birnbaum
Angela Percival: A Different Path to Becoming a Successful Photographer

PhotoBiz Xposed

01:50 min | 6 months ago

Angela Percival: A Different Path to Becoming a Successful Photographer

"You're a graphic designer at our terex and did you say you created a film. Yeah created so. We weren't doing video back fan in the product videos. Were a saying like film as part of a marketing brand strategy. It just wasn't part of what we did in so i actually pitched my boss who was a creative director said. Hey how about. We try this film thing so i told myself video and i actually pitched one of our athletes to help me because he knew how to edit and so like i kinda think i can figure it out and so i did that i then we need to do photo shoots at actually do on that. Discuss two matches anyone that's ever done. That knows so. I just went purely stay purely with a photography still photography. So you've got this job. Your design navy credited the film. You wanna moving to photography. Surely that i just say angela. His company budget gumbo by itself a cameras shooting for. She must have learnt photography. Along the way i did. I had a partner. He was a graphic designer as long he showed he started the photographic terrasson. We go on shoots together. And so i would shoot photo in. He would shoot film or we would switch and a kind of self taught partially on the job but also wanting to have thoughts about we do this kind of shoot and then we would go out and experiment and it was a small company at that point so there was lot of opportunity to experiment. But i would say the transition for me was when i decided you know what i think. We should shoot women's skiing. And then i had some friends that were going to europe and they invited me to go with them in the self. This is where it kind of. Put my courage behind me. And i paid for the trip myself and i said to my boss if it works out you can just pay me back

Angela Navy Skiing Europe
Experimental  Photography with Jim Zuckerman

Photography Radio

02:40 min | 6 months ago

Experimental Photography with Jim Zuckerman

"Jim how you doing today. I'm great scott. Thanks for inviting me. It is my pleasure jim. I am impressed. I you look at everybody. You got to go to the website. That's just one of the rules here. These days i gotta go to the website and look at jim. Zuckerman dot com. It's j i. M z u c k e r dot com. If it's possible to have a broad scope to somebody's work. You've got every single kind of photography that i think is possible is showing up in your work and it is dynamic. It's colorful it's got a lot of real energy behind it. So i got ask you some reading your website and one of the first things i learned. Is that photography was not always your passion. You were actually studying to be a doctor. And how do you get from wanting to be a doctor to photography well. My sister's boyfriend introduced me to the dark room. And i just found that so exciting. He loaned me his camera. Before i had one showed me how to use it. And i started taking pictures with it and it was just blew. My mind was so exciting. And i thought to myself i have got to do this. And so i made the switch much to the dismay of my family but as you can imagine but i never regretted it net. Not not for a minute and i love photography from the beginning and i still do still have the passion. Oh very cool. Did you remember what it was that turns john with those early experiences. What is it about photography that said this has got a connection to something deep for you. It's a good question. i'm not sure if it was any one particular moment. But i can't remember something that made me want to do special effects and and i did i special effects for ten years. I kind of disdained normal photography in the summer of sixty nine. I was working in pearl harbor. It was a summer job between semesters working on old world war two dry docks maintaining them and in one of the dry docks. I found a piece of broken red glass. It was from an old darkroom from the forties. And i was just experimenting with color infrared film and i realized that if you shoot through the glass like a filter you get one set of colors and if you reflect in the glass you get another set of color so you could. In essence create a double exposure

JIM Scott Pearl Harbor John
Photography and Travel with Tom Stoddart

Photography Daily

03:03 min | 6 months ago

Photography and Travel with Tom Stoddart

"I've started with all my conversations rather inevitably asking how the time has been for for you as the photographer how this has affected you pass with your photography not being able to travel so freely to make your work and you definitely be somebody else that question because you'll used to having a possible to your hand. Yeah i think. I'm i think you forget as a working photographer. Just how many miles you do. And how important traveling is Just becomes part of your life so you know sunny with me it. You have to make a decision or gone to engage with them. Covert and trying should stories and the like or going to take on an enforced break Try and do something else. phila- to fill in the time. So for me. It was enough to fifty years. It was a chance to stay at home. Spend some family time and then try and put a book together because these things are very time consuming the best of times During the pandemic it's a book together. An exhibition Was especially difficult. Avi made any personal projects about the pandemic solo or was this time to take stock and work on projects like this instead. I haven't done anything on the pandemic. I mean In the early days for documentary photographers. There was very little access now. The government the usual fear of For sphere of access Kick deyan and everyone was terrified of leading film crews and photographers in two areas. Send the end you kind of just think. Well there's no point in doing this Especially as there were some very good work being done in america where they Whether photographers have much more on this but looking ahead. I know it seems a little bit early to be entirely confident but there are some green shoots there are some noise is being made about you know from galleries reopening worldwide and shows and new opportunities. How do you feel personally about this time. Going forward and i say this you know with the sense of trepidation and touching would every single time. I'd an idea moderate. I think for the first time in my career i One of the things. I've been doing as has been mentoring. One person in particular earned an a couple of others and normally. When i've been you know when asked this question on a regular basis and it's always it's fine you've got to be optimistic. Photojournalism is alive and well and it's wonderful etcetera etcetera. But trying to help. These youngsters has really brought home to me about how difficult it is and how the industry such as it is has changed out of all recognition. we're definitely living in the instagram generation. Where these young kids are out there and they're putting the living their life online and putting the pictures out that all the time and some of the images of really really good but it always comes down to the bottom line. Well how do you make a living

Kick Deyan America
Tanha Basile: How to Systematize Your Portrait Photography Business for Success

PhotoBiz Xposed

02:08 min | 6 months ago

Tanha Basile: How to Systematize Your Portrait Photography Business for Success

"Sounds like your calendar is set up to photograph one session. Every day of the weekday for the target is it yes absolutely yeah pretty straightforward and i can actually do a morning session with the baby and then go out sunset with a family which is quite common thing as well. Sorry yeah i'll hard-working sounds like there's two parts of the business. It's newborn maternity newborn and also the family side treat them as separate businesses at all rolled into one and if it is all one which is the most successful pot. It's all rolled into one end. I would say newborn is my popularized. Honor that idea so my sister my mornings at least three to four days a week. It's all new sessions. Monday to friday. And then yeah probably a couple of shoots a week. One zero three shoots a week going family outdoor. Say there's just probably that one day. Maybe two days hero the way of workdays i mean that i can actually see the computer and at it and do that kind of thing but i still am. One of these. People will be editing into the not. Just because that's when. I kind of come alive so family so looking at your books in your numbers is the family saw more profitable than nibble inside. Always the other way round. It's all the same. Yes does nothing and out more if anything might just why process with families is slightly changed and the amount of images that i would give them the editing behind my family. Furthers is a little less than my new orleans because obviously new ones have bumps and bruises and battle winds from on. Sometimes you know from bruising or just people skiing these kind of flaky marmots and the history touch with his family outdoorsy kind of really just -cumentaries marmottan you can batch that a little bit more and be a little bit. Sort of cut sorry perfection. It's not fine. I it's documentation of the

New Orleans Skiing
The Non-Fungible Photographer

This Week in Photo

03:01 min | 6 months ago

The Non-Fungible Photographer

"This discussion is about this weird thing. That's been in the news and all over the place called enough tea or non fungible tokens. So we're going to figure out we're gonna do a kind of a who. Why win thing around that and talk about and and let's with the grain of salt in the room right now just a year on a journey as well. You're learning more and more about this stuff and you don't purport to be an expert you purport to be someone who has made them and have more your further on the journey than probably the most the rest of us so we're going to pick your brain and figure out how it is where you are. You're essentially are canary in the coal mine. Right now acidly federick. Yeah happy to be happy here. Happy be happy to be your canary. Good good welcome. Welcome to the to the show. Man this is a lot to squeeze into about an hour here so let let's kick it off with just a little bit of background on on who you are as of taga for for folks that may not have seen any of the other interviews that we've done who is jesse dittmar and then we'll jump into. Nf tease after that for sure. I'm portrait photographer primarily celebrity portrait photographer working for the new york. Times washington post l. a. times i've been published in every major magazine publication. That's out there. And i'm working for other brands like hulu and apple for advertising as well and i photographed some of the. You know most influential and interesting and you know. Difference makers of our of our current culture from politicians to actors to authors and artists sends kind of anybody. You could imagine You know some of the big hitters like denzel washington and tom brady and serena williams injury yang last last week and You know all all kinds of people. Yeah so anybody can speak to this. You know you've got a lot of stuff floating around out there. A lot of a lot of images that are famous images that are inherently non fungible. Let's start there. Just the term non fungible token right. So you know my my. And i'm i'm playing the layman in this show right. I've done word or amount of research. So i i kind of understand a mask questions. From a layman's perspective. So non fungible is kind of the way. I see it correct me. If i'm wrong is something that is unique right so i am inherently non fungible because i am one of one frederik van johnson. I think on the universe right. If you believe in if you believe in multiversity there's infinite numbers of me but you know this in this reality. There's only one frederik van johnson. So i'm non fun learning as you're alluding to federick spacey real quick get get out there real quick even in the even in the first sentence of trying to explain yourself as non fungible.

Jesse Dittmar Times Washington Post Every Major Magazine Hulu Denzel Washington Frederik Van Johnson Serena Williams Tom Brady Yang Apple New York
Paula Brennan  Conversion and Nurturing Trumps Photography Lead Generation Numbers

PhotoBiz Xposed

02:51 min | 6 months ago

Paula Brennan Conversion and Nurturing Trumps Photography Lead Generation Numbers

"When you hear the term and when i say digital marketing online mocking what does that mean to you. Well this is back going to go back because it was around two thousand nine hundred ten when i started leukemia said if like facebook marketing and things like that you know back in dies you could pretty much like p- pasta shape and you'd have sixty me follow as the next day. Do you know that. Respect when i had the wedding studio Look into how could hotness that a little bit better figured out some systems that worked but then very quickly recognized that the algorithms were introduced in you know. The organic reach wasn't as easy. So i had to start learning about high traffic. Sorry it was probably around two thousand twelve. I would say that. I really started kind of educating myself around and doing looks online courses and things to figure out how to you know many people like these so i was doing things creating landing pages and silence pages. I looked at Creates very crude rudimentary funnel spec in the early days and then obviously learning to drive traffic to that using facebook ads so there was quite a good period of education for myself. Maybe about threes. Where i was you know. I was already a good shooter so i didn't have to learn about photography angle of things what i really worked on with Marketing side. and how do i drive traffic. And how do i take the numbers to increase the the the results of h campaign. I guess i love. I'm so excited to keep going with this conversation because you are talking my language so when you have all this experience you you're a successful she'll like you say you grown up a photographer like us success. When they know how to run a business talk me through that change or that transition. Interpersonal brandy photography. Why you did it and you did sorry. I guess when. I was running the portrait business. What i found was a lot of my clients are coming to the guy all. Can i just get a headshot doing the headshots so lack all not to say to fight of me doing excited as well. Maybe a little bit of behind the scenes and of course any say not really messy Why pay kind you know the instagram laugh. That instagram version. If you're working in sorry. I started then looking following a lot of the big online entrepreneurs who coincidentally the people who will leaning Signed time so. You're looking at like the lex. Murray fully as the antiporda fields. They sort of big huge entrepreneurs out day. You've got a. I mean you down a liberal going down to the lexi. The tiny robbins fit most of the people. That were of out spatting personal branding. At the time. I was watching what they were doing. In their fade and let's face paper were employing photography's but a lot of the young upstart so we're talking like the twenty and thirty. Somethings in the demographic in the same area of entrepreneurship with doing it themselves. And they'll find really creative ways of utilizing day i

Facebook Leukemia Murray Robbins
Mindful Photography with Paul Sanders

Photography Radio

02:03 min | 6 months ago

Mindful Photography with Paul Sanders

"We are talking with paul sanders paul's over in the south of the uk south of england beautiful area and has one of the most remarkable photo careers that any of us could hope for. He was the photo editor at times and now he is into something of mindful photography landscape photography black and white minimalist approach but with a really really intriguing and to my mind to use a technical term here to engaging with photography and engaging with the landscape paul how doing today how's over in england hayes. Gone i'm good. Thank you really nice. Spring spring afternoon is thank you very much for having me as it's it it is. My pleasure is really really remarkable. Work your work paul. It i mean it is landscape market. It is a very quiet market. It's a very template of work but that's not what a great deal of your career was about. You know you as i said a minute ago. You were the photo editor for the times. Tell me how you get from being the seven year old with the instamatic to the photo editor of the times and then completely turning in a different direction. Say you go from being the kids who likes taking pictures because you think is cool with a lot of hard work Very lucky the key to it. I think is understanding why i was fired. Crossing things might vary in photography last night trump printing in dot greens in helping photography Do that kind of thing was actually as a glamour photographer. in spain. One always eighteen hours shooting glamour calendars in the trunk of now. That's what the sort of the young kid photographer won t today. A wanted the cool the photography job with the girls and the life on the fast call.

Paul Sanders Paul England Paul The Times Hayes UK Spain