Nutrition

Hear the inside skinny with the latest audio on nutrition, how to eat well and maintain a healthy diet and weight, from audio aired on premium podcasts.

Welcome to Audioburst's Nutrition Playlist

Audioburst Playlists

00:13 sec | 1 year ago

Welcome to Audioburst's Nutrition Playlist

"Welcome to Audioburst’s Nutrition playlist. You’ll hear bite-sized audio highlights from the latest podcasts and talk radio shows on eating well and maintaining a healthy diet. Bon appetit!

A highlight from Why Sugar And Fructose Are So Deadly with Dr. Richard Johnson

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

06:49 min | 4 hrs ago

A highlight from Why Sugar And Fructose Are So Deadly with Dr. Richard Johnson

"A place for conversations that matter. And if you've ever struggled with weight or wondering about what you should be eating to lose weight and why you can't lose weight and what something called the fat switch is, you might pay attention to this conversation because it's with a key research in this field. Someone who has a lot to say about why we are an obese nation and an increasingly obese world, doctor Richard Johnson. He's a professor at the medicine at the university of Colorado in Denver and has been a pressing Doc in clinical scientists for over 25 years. He's recognized for seminal work on the role of sugar, which you know, I care a lot about. And it's component fructose. We're going to talk about fructose because we talk about sugar in a general way, but I think we need to get more specific in doctor Johnson's work about fructose is so important. And it's how it plays a role in obesity and diabetes, particularly. And these suggested that fructose has a really fundamental role, and particularly in how it affects something called uric acid, which we'll talk about and how it's generated during fructose metabolism in prediabetes is what we call metabolic syndrome, which by the way affects about 88% of Americans. And it's almost 9 out of ten of us. So you're listening to probably maybe you. Doctor Johnson has been a prolific scientist doing research that's been funded by the NIH since the 1980s. He's a member of the American society for clinical investigation over 700 papers, a lot of papers. Over 45 countries and he's a highly cited scientist. He previously authored a book called the sugar fricks with Timothy gower in 2008 and the fat switch in 2012 and his new book, nature wants us to be fat is out now. It's an important book and it's really quite a different spin on it and the full title is nature wants us to be fat, the surprising science behind why we gain weight and how we can prevent it and reverse it. And you might want to get that book. So welcome, doctor Johnson. Hi, Mark. It's just great to be on your show. Oh, I'm so glad to have you. Okay, let's get right into it. No, we know that sugar is bad. And certainly anybody paying attention to my work for the last 25 years has heard me talk about sugar, until it probably sick of it. But okay, how is sugar is such a threat? And why is it so deadly? I mean, tell us in your perspective as a scientist and the research on this, what makes sugar so bad? Well, sugar contains glucose and fructose, and these are two different sugars that are bound together to make table sugar or sucrose. And it turns out that fructose can activate a biological switch that tells a person or sets off a program to gain weight. So when you eat sugar, you're actually triggering, you know, this biologic process to gain weight. At the same time, sugar tastes really good. We have these sweet taste buds that really like sugar. And we're eating a ton of sugar. And high fructose corn syrup, you know, like 15% of the diet, and then it's being put in all these foods. So, you know, it can be a real menace. And what's really interesting about sugar, just as an aside, is that if you take an animal and you genetically alter it, so it can't taste sweet or can't taste it all. It's still like sugar. It loses its flavor, desire for artificial sugars. But it still will seek out foods that are. That's fascinating. And they'll still get fat from the sugar. Even though they can't taste. That's amazing. So this fat switch you're talking about is quite interesting. And what do you mean when you say fat switch? It literally is there some kind of metabolic switch that gets turned on that makes a store fat and gain weight. And how does that work? Yeah, so this was one of our kind of big discoveries. So everyone knows that, you know, obesity is linked with eating a lot of calories, bad foods, and one of the classic theories is that it's driven by the fact that we eat too much. And we exercise too little, and so there's excess energy that we end up eating that is not used, and that gets stored as fat. And so when this hypothesis came out in the 1920s, it was, you know, we were the ones to blame because it's over nutrition, you know, we're eating too much. We're exercising too little. But we blame the victim. It blames the victim essentially. You're a victim. Exactly. So Quinn eating, you know? Why are you getting such a big plate of food, you know? Don't go back for a second. You know, it's your fault. Exactly. You're taking the escalator when you should be taking the steps, you know? And so this has been the classic teaching, but it turns out that there are certain foods that trigger you to want to eat more. And triggering you to not satisfy your appetite so that when you eat, you don't feel you don't feel full. So you want more. And there's certain foods that actually will reduce your, how much energy you have. So it will actually make you drop your energy metabolism. So the formula is the same. You end up eating more and you exercise less, but the issue turns out not to be because it's your choice. It's because you've eaten specific foods that activate the switch. Yeah, so your work is sort of very similar to doctor David Ludwig's work. So the whole idea that it's our fault we're overweight is one that is promoted by the food industry by the government by most doctors and certainly most nutritionists, which is really about this whole idea of the energy balance hypothesis, which is all about calories and calories out. And what you're saying, I want to hear you saying what doctor David, who's been on the podcast and saying, is that it's actually the quality of the calories that matter and the information in the food that matters, and that not all calories are created equal. A 100% right. We know we know this kind of, you know, if you ask a 5th grader if a thousand calories of soda are a thousand calories of broccoli or the same, they'll go, no. But by the way, Richard, I have asked his question to the vice chairman of Pepsi. I said, okay, who by the way was a diabetic?

University Of Colorado Doctor Johnson American Society For Clinical Sugar Fricks Timothy Gower Richard Johnson Johnson Obesity Metabolic Syndrome NIH Denver Diabetes Mark David Ludwig Quinn David Richard
A highlight from The Link Between Menopause and Alzheimers with Dr. Lisa Mosconi

Ask The Health Expert

01:56 min | 9 hrs ago

A highlight from The Link Between Menopause and Alzheimers with Dr. Lisa Mosconi

"All right, I just wrapped this interview and I think I might have fallen in love with my guest, have a good big girl crush on her because she is just so fabulous, so brilliant, and it's such great information. So I'm super excited to share this interview with you today and it is about the women's brain. And what we're going to dive into today is really talking about women's brain, how it's different than a man's brain. Duh. But why this is so important, how menopause can impact it, what you can be doing right now to make some differences no matter what age you are and what's going on. What the risks are with Alzheimer's, et cetera. I mean, just amazing, amazing information. And I am interviewing doctor Liza mosconi and she is phenomenal. She is the director of the women's brain initiative at weill Cornell medical center. And let me tell you a little bit more about our associate Professor of neuroscience, neurology and radiology as well. And she is also the associate director of the Alzheimer's prevention clinic. She's the author of brain food and she has her new book coming out depending on when you're listening to this called the XX brain. And honestly, as soon as we were done with this recording, I was like, all right, and you're coming back. So she's so good. I'm really excited to share her with you. She came through my buddy doctor Anna cabeca. And who is just phenomenal too. She wrote the hormone fix the keto greenway. So, you know, great people hang together. Alrighty, I am excited to share this interview with

Alzheimer's Liza Mosconi Weill Cornell Medical Center Alzheimer's Prevention Clinic Anna Cabeca
A highlight from Answering Your Questions About Autoimmune Disease, Optimizing Sleep, And Inflammation

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

06:07 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Answering Your Questions About Autoimmune Disease, Optimizing Sleep, And Inflammation

"We're going to go to our community our YouTube comments are Facebook comments, Instagram, and podcast community that emailed in. We're going to take a few questions here and we're going to start off with the first one. My daughter law has scleroderma and keeps trying different diets, but she believes she is dying from it. Are there actual diets to help slow this down can people live longer with this condition? Yeah, so scleroderma and drew is a common autoimmune condition that's based on the hardening and stiffening of connective tissue. So basically you're skin gets tight, your esophagus gets tight and everything starts to stiffen and you're like the stiff man and it's inflamed and it's basically the same exact approach that we take to all autoimmune diseases is look for the root cause, get rid of the root cause and do a lot of things to help the immune system to reset and rebalance. And there's a lot of options out there for people. It's essentially starting with an autoimmune anti inflammatory diet, which could be the ten day detox diet or it could be more aggressive version, which is called autoimmune paleo autoimmune paleo is essentially getting rid of all the potential inflammatory foods that are not necessarily, but they can potentially trigger problems. Like lectins or essentially it's protein and vegetables, you get rid of nuts, which is you think is healthy, eggs, which I think is often healthy, but drinks a bit bigger. Obviously, dairy, gluten, grains, beans. So it's basically paleo plus. It's paleo but no nuts. And no eggs. And that can be and also no nightshades, which can be very inflammatory. So tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, and so forth. That's a good place to start. Then working on your gut is really important. Probiotics, anti inflammatory foods, getting omega three fats in, making sure your levels of nutrients are at the optimal level. Dealing with stress, exercise, all those things help. And I had a patient who was a Doctor Who had a really bad scleroderma. And she came to see me and a lot of my patients are doctors, by the way. And she really did the program. And got so much better and her scleroderma halted and even reversed. So, yes, the answer is yes. If you understand what's underneath all these diseases, you can really fix them. Yeah, and one thing I'll add to that, you've had doctor Terry Rawls on your show and she also talks about how she used the principles of functional medicine to take some of the autoimmune paleo stuff and go even a step deeper and two things that she shared and I really recommend everybody go watch that episode. We have a couple episodes with her. We'll link to it in the show notes. She recommended that she was doing pretty good. She saw a pretty strong reduction in her symptoms, but she really kind of hit a floor where she wasn't getting any better. And she started bringing in two things that was a game changer for her. Morgan meets? It was Oregon meets was number one, and then it was making sure that every day she ramped up slowly to having about 9 cups of vegetables. Yeah. It's not only what you don't eat. It's what you actually eat. Right. Because sometimes people go on a paleo diet and they end up restricting so many things and they're limited because they react to a lot of stuff. No. But slowly ramping up, which you take some time, you don't want to start off right away and she's got a whole process of going into it. So that's where, you know, these layers of how people combine things and share their experiences. It's very unique because they can be the missing ingredient. It's true. And so just as food can be the cause, it also can be the cure. And within plant foods are these phytochemicals, there's 25,000 of them, and many of them are anti inflammatory, medicinal reparative, fixed the gut, the microbiome, prebiotics, probiotics, is amazing what you can eat. So for her, she really breaks down the food into a number of categories, right? Brassica family, which is all the color kill cabbage. The garlic and onions family really important. Components with sulfur detoxifying compounds were tin and other anti inflammatory. Compounds. Mushrooms which are full of these immune modulating polysaccharides that are anti cancer, but also the immune system, and also pre and probiotic foods to help the microbiome like sauerkraut and various kinds of prebiotic foods like artichokes, they're just smarter chokes or asparagus or plantains and other foods. So there's a way to actually use food as pharmacology. It's not just, oh yeah, food is medicine and it's kind of cool. If you eat healthy food, you'll be healthy. No, no, no. There are specific components in different foods that regulate different biological pathways, and you can optimize those by choosing to eat those foods. And that's what I do when I go to a grocery store. I'm thinking in my head, okay, where am I going to get my drugs? I'm like, oh, artichokes. Okay, that has prebiotic fibers is going to microbiome, but it also has these special compounds that are detoxifying for my liver. Oh gee, I'm going to have these shiitake mushrooms because they have the polysaccharides that are helping my immune system and cancer. And maitake, that's really good for cancer too. I'm going to have that. So I kind of go through, oh my, I'm going to get this really good olay high oleic olive oil, which has got oleic acid and also these olive polyphenols, which are extremely anti inflammatory and help my heart. So I'm constantly looking at the grocery store like a drugstore. And that's I think that's why I called the podcast, the doctors pharmacy with an F all right, Mark, here's the next question from our audience member. They're asking that a history of Hashimoto's in their family and thyroid issues, but their doctor isn't running their thyroid antibodies. And they want to know what I'm assuming from this question is, what really should be the complete test and how much do you pay attention to things like thyroid antibodies? Yes. So typically as doctors portrayed all you do to track thyroid disease is check TSH, which is the thyroid stimulating hormone. If it's low, it means you're hyper, if it's high, it means you're hypo. And if those show up, then you go further to the next level testing, which

Scleroderma Autoimmune Anti Inflammatory Terry Rawls Instagram Drew Youtube Facebook Morgan Cancer Oregon Hashimoto Mark Thyroid Disease
A highlight from The Surprising Habit Helping People Live Long Healthy Lives

Ask The Health Expert

01:42 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from The Surprising Habit Helping People Live Long Healthy Lives

"Hey, this is JJ virgin. Thanks so much for joining me. This is ask the health expert. In each episode, I put the power of health in your hands and share ways to get healthy, lose weight, heal your gut detox and lots more so you can look and feel better fast. If you'd rather watch the video, hey, I did put on my makeup and do my hair, so check it out on my YouTube channel. What if it turns out that there was a really simple way to hack your metabolism and burn fat almost effortlessly and maybe even live longer? Well, it turns out there might be, and it's based on some pretty cool new science. Hey, it's JJ. Now, if you want to keep up with the latest research on things that will help you get healthy and then bonus, lose weight too, make sure you don't miss out. Hit like and subscribe to this channel and you'll be good to go. If you've heard of the blue zones, you know that people living in those 5 places are living a lot longer than just about everybody else. Sometimes passed a hundred. And more importantly, they're healthy too, because who wants to live to a hundred unhealthy, right? Now, even though they're spread out around the world, they have pretty much the same lifestyle habits. And there's some surprising things. In fact, one surprising thing that they do that you can easily do too, no matter where you live. If you want to get healthy, feel better and lose weight too, you probably already know that being overweight can put you at risk for disease, and it can also decrease your life expectancy and the quality of your life.

Jj Virgin Youtube
A highlight from Q&A with Dr. Greger 7

Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

07:57 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Q&A with Dr. Greger 7

"Live from my treadmill as I do every month. And let us go to the questions and see what you have for me today. All right, Fernanda says, what is the ideal LDL? Ideal LDL depends on whether or not you have been diagnosed with heart disease. If you have not, a lifetime LDL, well, actually a lifetime LDL under 100. Should protect you from heart disease. However, if you didn't figure this out into middle age and you're in your LDLs too high and you're trying to get it down to prevent heart disease, then 70 would be the target. If you already have heart disease, then the target in terms of secondary prevention prevent the second heart attack, drops down to like 30 to 50 or basically as low as possible. So wait a second, could there be a harm of having cholesterol too low? We didn't know until PCSK 9 inhibitors came out. We had these new biological injectable drugs, which can drop peoples, cholesterol, LDL cholesterol into the single digits. And still, not seeing any problems with hormone manufacturer like testosterone, estrogen, or any other issues that have piled on. So only benefit as you go lower and lower, but we don't most people should not need drugs to get their LDL down. They just need to cut out or cut down on the three things that increase one's cholesterol, and that is saturated fat found mostly in animal fats and junk trans fats found almost exclusively now in animal fat and how that's been removed from the food supply. From partially addressing it oils and third is dietary cluster of predominantly in eggs, but throughout the animal kingdom. Just do all that in your cholesterol to drop right down. Add in a whole bunch of high fiber plant foods, which is, say, whole plant foods. And you can push your cholesterol down even further. Yes, in addition to eating healthy, there are a few foods, particularly that may lower LP little a further. And I think those are black cumin seed and flax seeds. Okay, this is from Heidi nude, a plant based, mostly fruit diet, okay? 20 to take vitamin B 12 supplement absolutely or even B 12 fortified foods. One of those two critically important for anyone eating a plant centered diet, even if you're not even if it's not strictly plant based, critically important to do. Okay, next up, Jacqueline said, what is the oh, that's a good question. What is the difference between vegan and whole food plant based diet? So a vegan diet is defined as not eating animal products and oftentimes it also has other stipulations like not wearing animal products. But from a strictly dietary point of view, no animal products, but that means you could live off of French fries and beer and cotton candy. And have a strictly vegan diet and have a horrible diet, right? Well, whereas whole food plant based diet is doesn't just say what you don't eat, but actually says what you do eat, oh, you actually eat vegetables. That's nice. So hopefully plant based diet, one is trying to minimize the intake of meat eggs dairy and junk and maximize the intake of fruits. Vegetables, whole grains, legumes, or beans split peas, chickpeas and lentils, nuts, and seeds are spices. Mushrooms basically real food that grows out of the ground. These are our healthiest choices. Next up, we have Mike, what a good name. What do I think of Kate doctor Katie? Shanahan, fat burn fix specifically aggressive bee Pasteur. When you raise them germ free. Pasture raised meat and dairy. I have never heard of doctor Shanahan or the fat burn fix. What do I think of grass fed beef? Or pasture raised meat and dairy still has such a fat trans fat cholesterol, all the things I just talked about that actually increase your LDL cholesterol. Number one cause of the leading risk factor for the number one cause of death in men and women now is that better than eating bacon, it is better than processed meat, yes, indeed, unprocessed red meat is healthier than processed, red meat, so better than bacon ham baloney sausage. But certainly not as good as eating some hummus. Next up. Oz acts, how do I motivate myself to reduce my meat intake? Went to very small amounts to back to previous amounts. Oh, okay. Well, one can. Depending on your personality, things may work differently. One can educate yourself, continue to educate yourself. One can control one's environment and so if you just don't have meat in the house, it's easier to, you know, it's just like not having junk in the house. I mean, it's easier not to eat cookies when there aren't cookies in the cupboard kind of thing. And educating yourself is about the various. Whether you care about your health, educating about health, you care about the environment, you can educate yourself about the environmental impacts, care about pandemic risk, if you care about. Animal issues, you know, you can kind of constantly barrage yourself with information, so you can live a life that is aligned with your values of wanting to have a healthy family and all that kind of stuff. Hopefully that helps and figuring out like, what are you getting out of that? Out of the meat. Do you like the taste? Is it the texture? Are there other things you could explore that are healthier with the same text taste, texture, whatever is just like one recipe you really love. It end well. Maybe we can swap that out. There's all sorts of wonderful resources online for people to do that. Worst comes to worse, there are plant based meats on the market. Now, certainly better than animal based meats, not as good as eating beans or something. But certainly zero cholesterol. Usually less saturated fat, no trans fats. So, and actually, it's a little fiber. So certainly healthier and can give you those same kind of tastes and textures that you grew up with. On your transition towards eating a diet centered around whole plant foods, which would really be ideal. Next question, Maria. Says, I have, oh, constant post nasal drip. Oh, I had it for years. I've been hopeful plant based since May still have it. What am I doing wrong? Well, sometimes these drip can be an allergic, have an allergic component. It could be dust. Could be dander, it could be pollen, that kind of thing. And so you can, for example, try an air filter, like a hepa filter at night. In your in the room that you sleep and that can kind of take some allergens out of the air and that may help. Give that a try. Okay, next up. Jason says, what do we think about Dave asprey? Says a lot of stuff about MCT or recommends eating fats. Don't I've never heard of Dave asprey. Eating fat isn't like just drinking oil

Heart Disease Fernanda Shanahan Heart Attack Jacqueline Katie Kate Mike Maria Dave Asprey Jason
A highlight from How Climate Change Is Making Us Sick And What We Can Do About It with Amanda Ravenhill

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:22 min | Last week

A highlight from How Climate Change Is Making Us Sick And What We Can Do About It with Amanda Ravenhill

"The doctors pharmacy. I'm doctor Mark Hyman. That's pharmacy with place for conversations that matter. And today we're going to have one of the most consequential conversations we've ever had on the doctors pharmacy. And with the manager of ravenhill, one of the leading climate activists and thinkers, we are in literally the Drake passage on our way to Antarctica to witness what is really happening there. We've already lost 3 trillion tons of ice from the NRC staggering to think about and we're really on the precipice, but the good news is there is good news. And we have a moment where we can actually transform all this and not let it be the disaster that it could be. I want to tell you about a man that she's really extraordinary. She's one of my absolute favorite humans. She's the executive director of the bucket list for fuller institute who point the term birth. And that is dedicated to accelerating the development and deployment of strategies of radically regenerate ecosystems, which is about what we need to be doing, which is restoring and regenerating. She also held the role as cofounder and executive director of project drawdown, the most comprehensive plan ever proposed to reverse global warming because it was the only plan. Proposed to reverse global warming. She's a member of sea stars at a capella group lending harmonies with new narratives of future that works for 100% of life. She's an avid gardener student or a small backyard farm to build soil, host pollinators create medicines and grow food, she lectures and speaks publicly on climate, biochar regenerative design, carbon dried out strategies, mindfulness, and systems thinking she's my kind of gal. And she's also an active member of an international community focused on addressing imminent global challenges and welcome Amanda. Thank you so much for having me. It's such an honor to be here. With you here today and also on this boat with this incredible crew of folks. Facing the wildness of the nowness. Wow, it's now in terms of the climate emergency and stepping into our presence and our wholeness as human beings. Yeah, as background, this trip is boat. It's not a vacation trip. It's a tip of carefully selected humans who have the intelligence to creativity, the entrepreneurship, and the networks to actually make a real difference in climbing. And we're here to bring awareness to ourselves and to the world and it's going to be quite, I think, an experience for us. And we're just

Mark Hyman Fuller Institute Ravenhill NRC Antarctica Drake Amanda
A highlight from Reset Your Stress with Dr. Doni WIlson

Ask The Health Expert

06:59 min | Last week

A highlight from Reset Your Stress with Dr. Doni WIlson

"And I love how you were talking about fight or flight, which is in my new book I talk about that as stress mode, right? So when we go into stress mode, we land in our unique stress pattern, which is going to be higher low cortisol and higher low adrenaline at various times a day. And to know your stress, your stress pattern is going to make all the difference in your recovery because the treatment, even the way you meditate and the time you meditate is going to be different, depending on how stress shows up for you. So how would someone even know where to start what they're looking at? Like right off the bat, you talked about cortisol and people saying my cortisol isn't high. First of all, what is cortisol? And how would you know if you were having an issue? So cortisol is our main stress hormone, but it's also, I think, in the cortisol as our supervisor hormone of our whole bodies, because cortisol is not that it's either there or not. We actually need cortisol all day every day. It's what wakes up us up in the morning. It increases in the morning, gives us energy, and it gradually decreases through the day, and so it's lowest when we go to sleep. When a stress happens, it responds and sends signals throughout our body to help us respond to the stress, and then when this dress finishes, which is, you know, this is the thing is a lot of times our stress doesn't finish. We keep having stress. So cortisol also communicates with our digestion and communicates with all the other hormones in the body, like the thyroid and insulin, and so on. Cortisol also communicates with our immune system and our nervous system. So that's why I call it like a main supervisor. It affects everything. And so you really want your cortisol to be in this nice, healthy curve of high in the morning gradually decreasing through the day. But when we're exposed to a lot of stress and not enough stress recovery, that's when this cortisol loses loses that pattern, it's going too high or too low at different times a day. And then when it does that, it's going to affect everything else is going to affect your digestion, your insulin, your immune system, your nervous system, and when that happens, that's JJ how it leads to this tendency toward weight gain, right? Because if it's disrupting insulin, for example, now our blood sugar levels are thrown off and we're more likely to have weight gain or if it throws off thyroid, that's another potential cause of weight gain. So it's when the thyroid is not where it should be, then it throws everything else off and leads to the symptoms. So the symptoms could be, for some people, it's fatigue, sometimes it's depression or anxiety, sometimes it's sleep issues, sometimes it's weight gain, or joint pain, it can really show up in a lot of different areas of the body, depending on the levels and whether they're high or low. But then you go to a if you go to a traditional doctor and you send out for lab tests, first of all, it's not even included. And if it is included, it's a single blood spot. Exactly. I'm looking at what you just said where you looked at and it was interesting. One of the biggest things that I've seen with cortisol with stress is that people who are eating healthy and, you know, all of a sudden their blood sugar is higher than it should be, even though, you know, insulin's good, triglycerides are good. So you know it's not a dietary thing. You know, it's a stress thing. But if someone weren't knowing how to look at these things, you might see a blood sugar of 90, you know, they don't check a cortisol. They look at a TSH, and maybe it's 2.5 and they think everything is cool. How does someone know that this is an issue for them beyond their symptoms and those symptoms could be, you know, the challenge with those symptoms is those symptoms could be other things too. How would someone get a clear diagnosis that this is an issue? And it's true, it's not going to be checked at the standard doctor's office. Even if you go to an endocrinologist, they may not even look at this because what we're really talking about is a what we may call a functional imbalance of cortisol. So it's not an extreme. We're not talking like Cushing's disease or Addison's disease where the adrenal glands completely stop working. We're talking about an non optimal level. That's still leads to health issues and symptoms. And so the way to test it is usually with I test it with urine or saliva because I want to know what your cortisol is when you wake up in the morning and then a couple hours later and then later in the day like usually before dinner and then before bed so that we can see the pattern and we can see it at different times a day. Cortisol is not supposed to be the same all the time. It needs to follow this pattern. So we need to measure it at different times of day, which you could do with a blood test, but now you're having to have your blood drawn multiple times a day, so it's better to do, we can measure it in saliva. So you're spitting in a tube or you can do a urine like a dry urine sample. And now we could get so much more information, but these are generally considered specialty tests that are out of pocket, but to me, they're, to me, they're essential for everyone. Like this is essential information, this is a stress test that we should all have to know this information about ourselves and what then with that information you can know best how to help get your cortisol back in sync again. If it otherwise, people will guess, right, JJ, they might guess, oh, I'm gonna take this adrenal product, but some of the herbs in those adrenal products could either raise the cortisol more or lower the cortisol or both in the same product. It's not going to be efficient. Right. So you would handle this, there's a couple different situations you'd be looking at. You could have someone who's all high on their curve. And what I found when I used to see a lot of people one on one is the people who are all high, they didn't come in. 'cause they were like running and they were like, you know, until they started to notice that they were getting some belly fat and it wouldn't come off. And then all of a sudden they started to get tired. Yes. And tired wired. And I'd love you to talk about that. And then they really got tired and of course all started to get really low. And then you'd start to see them. But the initial part where it started to lift up, they were like, yeehaw, let's go. Let's roll with it. So if you could talk about because I know, you know, there's a very different treatment when someone's high versus when someone's low and so the first step is to get tested, but the other piece of that too is what's going on with adrenaline, how do you know what's going on there, like how do you know if you're getting into the tired and wired stage? And what's going on with DHEA? How do you, how do you look at those two things? And then what

Addison's Disease Anxiety Depression Cushing
A highlight from Answering Your Questions About Sugar Cravings, Migraines, Weight Loss, And More

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

05:26 min | Last week

A highlight from Answering Your Questions About Sugar Cravings, Migraines, Weight Loss, And More

"The questions? All right Mark, let's jump in. This is Cheryl who has the first question here. Good morning, doctor Hyman. I'm a longtime candida sufferer, and I also lived in mold filled building for 5 years. I'm wondering if there's any kind of products that I can take that would help with the sugar cravings that I struggle with on a daily basis. Or high Cheryl and thank you for that question about three things. Yeast growth in your system mold in your environment and sure cravings. They're all a little different, a little related, but I'll tackle them all. The first is the yeast stuff. And it's an unfortunate situation that many in the alternative medicine space say, oh, you have candida and that's the cause of all your problems. And that's just not true. That's not to say that many people do suffer from yeast overgrowth. And it's a big problem that I treat. And in the right patient, a targeted treatment will really help. So yes, if you have yeast overgrowth, it's usually because you're eating a lot of sugar and flour because you've taken antibiotic because you're on the pill because you're taking steroids. Something's gone on. It's caused you to have this problem. And so usually getting rid of the cause, whether it's the diet, starts with sugar, alcohol, processed food, whether it's all lots of antibiotics and making sure you don't stop taking those and reset. You can fix this. And it can be cured with both dietary approaches and also supplements, which can be herbal that kill yeast like oregano, for example. Or other combinations of herbs, probiotics will help a lot, saccharomyces Bologna, which is a very powerful yeast against east can be very effective as a supplement. I recommend one called biome bia OHM because it also has compounds that help break up the biofilm or the yeast live in the gut. So those all are really helpful. And sometimes you do need any fungal like prescription antifungal like diflucan and I statin or others. So that's the mold stuff, yes, that's a whole big problem where, you know, probably half of all the buildings have water damage and many of those have mold and people have a lot of them are exposed to mold, don't know it. And it can cause very low grade symptoms, brain fog, fatigue, muscle aches, sleep issues, mood issues, as well as other inflammatory symptoms congestion, coughing. I had mold in my house and developed a terrible cough. Really bad, bad illness for me. But you can address that by removing the source of the mold by helping your body detoxify from the mole with binders and various things. So that's a treatable thing. A sugar cravings are something else. And Cheryl, you know, they can be triggered by yeast overgrowth for sure. But mostly it's the diet causing the cravings. So it's a vicious cycle of cravings beginning more cravings. And I remember teaching a workshop God, 15 years ago, maybe a crepo on ultra metabolism, which was my book on Trish to the time. And this woman came in, and I was doing basically a detox. We got a haul sugar, processed foods, elimination diet. It was a 5 day workshop. And she's like, look, I've been addicted to sugar my whole life, I crave it all the time. I know there's not going to work. I want to try it, but look, I just give you a warning. I just might not do very well. I'm like, I'm like, okay, just see what happens, you know? That's fine. And day two, she's like, I don't know what happened. I don't know what you did, but all my cravings are gone. And so the cravings are not a moral failing. They're not a lack of willpower. They're a problem of biochemistry and hormones. And you have to use science to fix it. You can't use willpower. Willpower will not work. You can white knuckle it for a little while, but then you're going to fail. And you're going to eat more. So how do you address the cravings? Well, I wrote an entire book about this about sugar addiction, which is what you're suffering from Cheryl. And it's called the ten day detox diet. It's the blood sugar solution ten 80 detox diet, and essentially eliminates all the foods that spike insulin in blood sugar. And when you do that, you really shut off the system that's driving the craving. And it's essentially about 50% fat, lots of fiber, lots of phytochemicals, whole foods, no processed food, very little fruit, very little or no starchy vegetables. And what happens is very quickly all your biochemistry and hormones reset so you're not craving and hungry and want it all the time. So you might think it's challenging, but my joke is, you have to go cold turkey. You know, if you're addicted to heroin when you say, I'm just going to have one shot today, or you're addicted to cream. So I'll just have one line. And I'll be fine. You can't do that. You got to go cold turkey. And it seems crazy and hard, but if you follow the regimen in the book, which is designed to balance your hormones from right at the beginning of the day, so you start with fat and protein in the morning, lots of fiber and you start to reset your brain chemistry between hormones from the minute you wake up and you do all the practices in the ten day detox diet, literally you'll have no cravings within a day or two. And then you'll start to feel better. You've talked to lose weight, the inflammation goes down, and you get to reclaim your natural taste buds.

Cheryl Hyman Mark Trish
A highlight from [Repost] #222: Orthorexia Recovery, Joyful Movement, and Sports Nutrition with Heather Caplan, Non-Diet and Fat-Positive Dietitian

Food Psych

06:50 min | Last week

A highlight from [Repost] #222: Orthorexia Recovery, Joyful Movement, and Sports Nutrition with Heather Caplan, Non-Diet and Fat-Positive Dietitian

"A great conversation and I can not wait to share it with you in just a moment. But first I'll answer this week's listener question, which is from a listener named Chelsea who writes, I've dabbled a bit in intuitive eating, read the book back in 2014 when I was still recovering from anorexia, and then kind of walked the gray line over the last three to four years. I have had lots of food rules and also gone through a fair deal of digestive issues in the past. Once I no longer was dealing with digestive issues, I decided to really commit to intuitive eating and get rid of my food rules, buy ice cream and sugar cereal and all the typical things that diet culture influences us to restrict. The issue I'm facing is that I feel like I quote unquote should eat pizza because intuitive eating says it's acceptable and I have a really hard time figuring out if I am truly craving pizza versus what I feel like I quote unquote should have as a fuck you to diet culture. Do you have any advice for working through this? Is this just part of the process of making peace with food? Also, do you have advice on breaking habitual eating habits like having a sweet before bed? Again, this is just one of those things that I've told myself I should have and it's really hard to know if it's just a routine or if I'm really craving one at this point. So thanks Chelsea for that great question and before I answer just my standard disclaimer that these answers and this podcast in general are for informational and educational purposes only and are not a substitute for individual medical or mental health advice. So yeah, this is a very common phase to go through when you're starting to get back to intuitive eating. And I think it's totally understandable, given the culture that we live in, and also given what you personally went through in your own relationship with food. So diet culture trains us to want rules and to want to know that we're quote unquote doing it right. Because every diet has its rules, every diet has its ways that you know your quote unquote doing it right. And so it's really normal to ask yourself questions like, am I really craving this or am I just rebelling against diet culture? And is this something I genuinely want or is it just a habit? And especially when you've had an eating disorder, it can feel so important to know the answer to those questions. And to choose what feels like the quote unquote right answer. Right, of course, being the answer that diet culture would prefer, because in diet culture, we're conditioned to believe that it's quote unquote bad to eat something out of rebellion or out of habit or to eat sweets before bed, right, or to eat pizza. And so diet cultures quote unquote right thing is like, oh no, I don't actually feel like a sweet or oh no, I'm not actually craving pizza. So it's really, I think this is a sneaky form of diet mentality that's creeping in to your intuitive eating practice. And that's so common and so understandable for anyone in diet culture and for anyone coming out of an eating disorder. So my best advice to you would be try to stop overthinking it. If the idea of eating pizza pops into your head when you're thinking about what to have for lunch or whatever, just go with it and try not to second guess it. And then you can notice, is it satisfying? Do you enjoy it? How satisfied you feel after eating it? Did it taste good? Did it make you feel content and ready to push the plate away and move on to other things when you were done eating? Or were you left wanting more? Were you left wanting different flavors? There's no wrong answer here. It's all a process of learning and figuring out what works for you and what satisfying for you in the moment. And the beauty of intuitive eating is that if you don't feel very satisfied by a particular meal, it's not a problem, right? You have a million other meals in the future to find more satisfaction. And sometimes meals just aren't as satisfying as we thought they'd be. And that's okay. It's totally not quote unquote doing it wrong. If you thought something would be really satisfying, and it wasn't. You're still doing intuitive eating, even if the thing you thought would bring you satisfaction ended up being sort of meh, you know, not that good. And you're also allowed to eat the meh thing again if it sounds good the next time you're thinking about what to eat. There's really nothing wrong with you. If you circle back to that food, a bunch of times, even after realizing it's not that satisfying or having it be not that satisfying one time. Because sometimes we just need to do that circling back in order to come to our own conclusions in order to really discover what we feel and what we think. And something that's not satisfying one day can also be deeply satisfying another day, just because of what we're in the mood for that particular day. So I think it's important to give yourself room and time and space for a lot of experimentation with intuitive eating and just know that there's no quote unquote doing it wrong or doing it right. I also want to assure you that you're still doing intuitive eating if you thought you might be choosing something just out of rebellion, but you ended up finding that you really were satisfied by it. So remember, intuitive eating is all about having full, unconditional permission to eat for any reason. And that means even if the reason seems like it's a rebellion or habit or anything else, right? We're allowed to eat for whatever reason we feel like. And we practice non judgment. We practice not judging ourselves for our food choices. And it's true that early in your intuitive eating process, you might have some rebellion against diet culture. Some reflexive gravitation towards the foods that diet culture has deemed off limits because you need to show yourself that those foods really are allowed and that they're not going anywhere, that they're not going to be taken away again. And that's when I call the honeymoon phase of intuitive eating, a phase that many people, not everyone, but many people go through, where all you want is those foods that were previously off limits and you just can't get enough of them and you're eating them in part just to prove to yourself that you can. But over time, if you can allow yourself to go through that phase and give yourself permission to eat those foods and not second guess yourself, eventually you do reach a place where you'll want other foods too. And there won't be this feeling of compulsion around the previously off limits foods because you'll know you can have them any time you want. And that is when you truly become free with food because when you trust in your bones that nothing is off limits, then you get to make your own choices rather than reflexively following diet culture's rules or rebelling against them because you're still being controlled by diet culture in that sense. And remember, there's nothing wrong with rebellion against the rules. It's a natural part of coming out of that regime, but it's not the full expression of autonomy with food. And you're going to get to that full expression of autonomy if you can allow yourself to be in the rebellious place and go through it. For most of us, it's really important to go through that phase of rebelling and really pushing the envelope in order to

Chelsea Anorexia
A highlight from Dangers of Drinking

Dishing Up Nutrition

05:48 min | Last week

A highlight from Dangers of Drinking

"Nutrition. Brought to you by nutritional weight and wellness. You know last month I read an article called alcohol abuse women, do we need an intervention? I read the article and I reread the article and I thought, you know, I think this would be great to share some of the key points with our dishing up nutrition. Listeners. Nutritional weight wellness is all about providing life-changing education and this article certainly had some concerning statistics. So today on dishing up nutrition, we are addressing the dangers of drinking. More specifically, the dangers of drinking alcohol. So I want to share this alarming statistic from 2001 to 2013. Now during that 12 year time frame, there was a 58% increase in women's heavy drinking and an 84% increase in alcohol use disorder. Even more alarming, and because of the pandemic isolation and all those stressors, women's alcohol usage continued to rise. Women of all ages drank more. So the question laid out in this article, do women need an intervention? And I'd say, well, maybe we do. With all the research data, we thought it would be important for women to understand the health risks of drinking alcohol. The health risks are so much more than just having a hangover the next day. So before we continue, discussing these risks of drinking alcohol. Let's introduce ourselves. I'm Teresa Wagner. I'm a registered and licensed dietitian, and I have three children. And I am of the age that social drinking is very popular. I am also aware of the many health risks of drinking alcohol, which certainly causes me some mental tug of war, right? Where on the one hand, I can understand the pull of social drinking. And on the other hand, I also know how disruptive disruptive it can be to your life and to your health. Joining us today as our co host is jolene Carlson, who is a licensed nutritionist with a master's degree in human nutrition and functional medicine. In addition to being a part of the weight and wellness team, she counsels and educates for us, jolene also among her many hats that she wears is an officer in the National Guard. And Julian, I don't know if you know this or not, but after college, I lived in Hawaii for a while. And I lived near the naval base in one of my good friends. She was married to a navy guy. And I spent a lot of time around service people. At that time. And drinking alcohol was certainly a popular pastime. And perhaps it was because we were all in our 20s at the time or perhaps it was because, you know, hey, we're living in Hawaii. It's fun. But I do think that I've heard that alcohol usage is also very popular among service people and maybe you have some experience with that too. But of course, jolene is also very aware of the health risks that alcohol can bring on. And for us, we truly believe that when you know better, you can do better. And so today we want to help people be able to know better so they can do better. Well, thanks for that, Teresa. That was a great introduction. I mean, just the whole thing. Never really brought us into the topic today very, very well. Yeah, being in the military, drinking is very common, much for the reasons you mentioned. It's a social thing. Of course, there's a lot of stress. But you know, I could say that, then I think back and I'm like, oh, I was a teacher. And there was a lot of happy hours there too. Oh, and as a mom, there's a lot of happy that we're scheduled, so you don't have to be getting when you said that. The study was women of all ages. And I would say women, men, whoever. And they're all backgrounds, right? Great. And so it's just become very a very social thing. And with that, it becomes just maybe more acceptable or maybe we just don't aren't as aware because it's kind of a joint. Everybody's doing it. Exactly. And that's what I love about today's show because it's really about like you said the education and we're not here to say to judge or be like people are drinking more and no, no, we just want people to understand that one, we're in this together. We all know somebody or our self experiences. And then two, the more you know, the more you can make an informed decision of what's best for you. Right. And also, I think one thing that we could say too is just because somebody drinks does not make them an alcoholic. It doesn't mean you have a problem. Absolutely. But it still is not necessarily a health habit. Exactly. Yeah, and that's our goal to be healthy and that's what we try to do with these podcasts and articles. And you're just saying you had a post on social media of what is relevant to people right now. And this is something that's very relevant to people right now. And that's what we get to do with educate on that. So we're going to share some of the statistics, just to help you understand that we're not in this alone. And then hopefully give you some of that education and resources to help you on your health journey around alcohol. So in addition to what Teresa started with was stats, here's another statistic. This one is from jama, which is a journal of American medical association. And they found women drink four or more drinks, the times that women would sit down and have four more drinks at a sitting.

Teresa Wagner Jolene Carlson Jolene Hawaii National Guard Julian Teresa Navy Jama American Medical Association
A highlight from How Men's Health Is Affected By Stress & Blood Sugar Imbalance

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

01:23 min | Last week

A highlight from How Men's Health Is Affected By Stress & Blood Sugar Imbalance

"With doctor Lewis Agnes on the anti inflammatory benefits of the miracle molecule nitric oxide and with Jesse and chow speed about tips and tricks to minimize blood sugar spikes. Let's jump in. What are the drivers of dropping testosterone in guys from a lifestyle perspective? And what do you do to address those? Stress, nutrition, lack of exercise, poor sleep, too much alcohol, too much pot, bad relationships. The usual suspects. So it's stress lower testosterone? Yeah. My favorite study was this study where they looked at guys who went to football games. And they measured their testosterone before and after the game. I know this study. And the guys whose team won, their testosterone levels went up. The guys whose teams lost, their testosterone levels went down. The particularly the ones that had been gambling. That was in the fine print and the methods of this study. I didn't get that. That is striking. When you think about that. Yeah. So your mental state has a huge effect on your hormones. Yeah. So you mentioned also nutrition. Talk about that, 'cause I think that's something people don't understand. How does food affect your hormone levels, particularly testosterone? Well, you need food as fundamental to it's the building blocks for everything that we need.

Lewis Agnes Jesse Football
A highlight from 3 Common Keto Mistakes & How to Avoid Them

Ask The Health Expert

01:30 min | Last week

A highlight from 3 Common Keto Mistakes & How to Avoid Them

"Hey, this is JJ virgin. Thanks so much for joining me. This is ask the health expert. In each episode, I put the power of health in your hands and share ways to get healthy, lose weight, heal your gut detox and lots more so you can look and feel better fast. If you'd rather watch the video, hey, I did put on my makeup and do my hair, so check it out on my YouTube channel. All the rage these days, and you want to know why, because when it's done right, it can really work well. It can help you get healthier, feel better, and lose weight. But to get the most out of it, you have to make sure you're doing it right. And that means you have to avoid the three most common mistakes I see people make. My videos are all about the things you can do to get and stay healthy and heal your metabolism, which is the first step in losing weight. So if you want more like this, click like and subscribe. So keto is a popular diet approach, and it can do so much for your health and weight. But it's really easy to fall in the trap of the three common mistakes that will work against you. Be bad for your health and could even make you gain weight. Avoiding these landmines is easy if you know what to look out for. First, a quick history lesson. Everyone keeps talking about keto as if it just happened, but keto isn't exactly new.

Jj Virgin Youtube Keto
A highlight from Excuse Me, Your Gut Is Leaking

Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

08:39 min | Last week

A highlight from Excuse Me, Your Gut Is Leaking

"Intestinal barrier integrity in the development of numerous ailments, such as inflammatory bowel disease, researchers measured intestinal permeability using blue food coloring. It stays in your gut if you're healthy, but can be detected in the blood of extremely sick individuals, as their gut barrier breaks down. You don't have to end up in the ICU to develop a leaky gut though. Simply taking some aspirin or ibuprofen can do the trick. Indeed, taking two regular aspirin or two extra strength aspirin just once can increase the leakiness of your gut. These results suggest even healthy individuals should be cautious with aspirin use as it may result in gastrointestinal barrier dysfunction. What about buffered aspirin? It doesn't make any difference, both regular aspirin and buffering produced multiple erosions in the inner lining of the stomach and intestines put a scope down people's throats, and you can see extensive erosions and redness inside 90% of people taking aspirin or buffering in their recommended doses. How many hours does it take for the damage to occur? None. It happens within 5 minutes. Acetaminophen sold as Tylenol in the U.S. would be a better choice. Unless you have problems with your liver, and rather than making things better, vitamin C supplements appeared to make the aspirin induced increase in gut leakiness, even worse. Interestingly, this may be why NSAID drugs like aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen are involved in up to 25% of food induced anaphylaxis. In other words, increasing the odds of life threatening food allergy attacks by more than tenfold presumably because these drugs increase the leakiness of the intestinal barrier, causing tiny food particles to slip into the bloodstream. Okay, but why can exercise increase risk too? Strenuous exercise, like an hour, it's 70% of maximum capacity can divert so much blood to the muscles away from your internal organs that can cause transient injury to your intestines, causing mild gut leakiness. But this can be aggravated if athletes take ibuprofen or any of the other NSAID drugs, which is unfortunately all too common. Alcohol can also be at risk factor for food allergy attacks for the same reason increasing gut leakiness. But cut out the alcohol and your gut can heal up. What other dietary components can make a difference? Elevated consumption of saturated fat, which is found in meat, dairy and junk can cause the growth of bad bacteria, which make the rotten egg gas hydrogen sulfide, which can degrade the protective mucus layer. It is said to be clear that high fat diets in general negatively impact intestinal health by disrupting the intestinal barrier system through a variety of mechanisms, but most of the vast array of studies cited on the negative effects of high fat diet and gut leakiness were done on lab animals or in a Petri dish. You don't know for sure until you put it to the test. Rates of obesity and other cardiometabolic disorders have increased rapidly in parallel with a transition from traditional lower fat diets to higher fat diets. We know a disturbance in our good gut flora has been shown to be associated with a high risk of many of these same diseases as studies using rodents suggest that a high fat diet unbalances the microbiome and impairs the gut barrier resulting in disease. To connect all the dots though, we need a human interventional trial and here we go. A 6 month randomized controlled feeding trial on the effects of dietary fat on gut microbiota and indeed higher fat consumption appeared to be associated with unfavorable changes in the gut microbiome and pro inflammatory factors in the blood, and note this wasn't meat and dairy. The researchers just swapped in refined carbs in place of refined fats like a white rice and white flour for oil. These findings suggest countries westernizing their diet should advise against increasing intakes of dietary fat. While countries that have already adopted westernized diets should consider or cutting down. So far, we've discussed things to prevent a leaky gut. What about foods to heal a leaky gut? That's what we'll cover. Next. Our intestinal tract is the largest barrier between us and the environment. More than what we touch or breathe what we eat is our largest exposure to the outside world. Normally, our entire gastrointestinal tract is impervious to what is inside of it, allowing our body to pick and choose what comes in or out. But there are things that may make our gut leaky and chief among them is our diet. What happens is the standard American diet can cause gut dysbiosis, meaning a disruption in our gut microbiome, which can lead to intestinal inflammation in a leaky intestinal barrier. Then tiny bits of undigested food, microbes, and toxins can slip uninvited through our gut lining into our bloodstream and to your chronic systemic inflammation. To avoid this dysbiosis and intestinal inflammation, plants should be preferred. Vegetarian diet gut bacteria are associated with intestinal microbiome balance high bacterial biodiversity and integrity of the intestinal barrier. They tend to suffer from markedly fewer uremic toxins like indole and pea cresol, and because fiber is the primary food for our gut microbiome, the gut bacteria of those eating plant based diets produce more of the good stuff, the short chain fatty acids that fulfill a protective and nourishing role for the cells lining our gut, ensuring the preservation of the intestinal barrier. Plant fibers of prime importance to the preservation of intestinal barrier integrity, but you can't know for sure until you put it to the test. People were given whole grains. Beans and lentils. Fruits, vegetables, and nuts and seeds, and got a significant reduction in zonulin levels. Zoning is a protein responsible for the disassembling of the tight junctions between gut lining cells. And so it's a biomarker that reflects an impairment of the intestinal barrier. In other words, zoning is considered to be a useful marker of a leaky gut. But since adding all those plants seem to lower levels, that may imply that appropriate fiber intake helps to maintain the proper structure and function of the intestinal barrier. But whole healthy plant foods have a lot more than fiber. How do we know it's the fiber? And the study didn't even have a control group. That's why they say gut permeability might be improved by dietary fiber to prove cause and effect. It'd be nice to have a randomized double blind crossover study where you compare the effect of the same food with or without fiber and here we go. People were randomized to pasta with or without added fiber and there was a significant drop in zoning and levels in the added fiber group. So fiber does appear to improve gut leakiness. Any plant foods in particular that may help? Curcumin, the yellow pigment in the spice turmeric can help prevent the intestinal damage done by ibuprofen type drugs, but that's in rats. Similar protection was noted for the broccoli compound sulforaphane, but that was in mice, no human studies on broccoli, yet, but there was a study on three days of the equivalent of about two to three teaspoons a day of turmeric, which did reduce the gastrointestinal barrier damage caused by exercise, less may work too, but no smaller doses have been put to the test. If you ask alternative medicine practitioners, what treatments they use for a leaky gut number one on the list after reducing alcohol consumption is zinc. Zinc doesn't just protect against aspirin like drug induced damage in rats, when put to the test in a randomized trial of humans the same thing was found. The inset drug indomethacin caused a threefold rise in gut permeability as one would expect from that class of drugs, but when they were also taking zinc this prevented the rise in permeability, strongly suggesting a small intestinal protective effect. The dose they used was massive though, 75 milligrams a day. That's nearly twice the tolerable upper daily limit for zinc. What about getting zinc just a regular food doses? There was a significant improvement in gut leakiness, even with a dose of just three milligrams of zinc, suggesting that even relatively low zinc supplementation

Gastrointestinal Barrier Dysfu Allergy Attacks Inflammatory Bowel Disease Anaphylaxis Chronic Systemic Inflammation Allergy Intestinal Inflammation Obesity U.S.
A highlight from How To Find The Gifts In Unpleasant Feelings with Dr. Joan Rosenberg

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

01:03 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from How To Find The Gifts In Unpleasant Feelings with Dr. Joan Rosenberg

"Coming up on this episode of the doctors pharmacy. The idea here is that what doesn't get emotional often gets physical. It ends up in our body as a problem, or a disease, as opposed to something that is worked through on an emotional level. So we have bodily symptoms. We might have increased anxiety. We might feel more vulnerable. Hey everyone, it's doctor Hyman. I'm all about using food first when it comes to nutrition, but there's certain nutrients I recommend everyone supplement with because it's simply impossible to get adequate amounts from diet alone. One example is magnesium, which our soils are having less up and our plants today have about 50% less magnesium than they did 50 years ago. And exposure things like sugar, caffeine, and fluoride also depletes our magnesium source. In fact, 80% of Americans are actually deficient in magnesium, which is a huge problem for our health, and considering the epidemic of stress we're facing, we should really be conscious about our

Hyman
Fungus found in Yellowstone is key ingredient in new meat substitute

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 8 months ago

Fungus found in Yellowstone is key ingredient in new meat substitute

"Two thousand nine. A team of researchers discovered a previously unknown microbe in the hot springs of yellowstone national park now. The fungus is the star ingredient in a new line of food products. He was very very high in protein. And it's actually a very exciting protein because it's a complete protein. There's really not that many sources of complete putting out there. That's thomas jonas. Ceo of nature's find the chicago based startup developed a process to ferment. the fungus and create. What's now called five protein. They're using it to make a variety of foods so we've been able to make things that range from chicken nuggets hamburgers breakfast sausages to yogurts and cheese earlier this year. The company offered a limited line of cream cheese and breakfast sausage on its website. Jonas says the products will soon be sold at stores. He foresees growing demand for protein. Filled foods produce more sustainably than meat and dairy that whole supply chain is completely inefficient and using a tremendous amount of resources of land of water energy. So jonas says fi could provide a more climate-friendly alternative.

Thomas Jonas Yellowstone National Park Nuggets Chicago Jonas
The Gut-Brian Axis

Food for Thought

01:28 min | 8 months ago

The Gut-Brian Axis

"Now is a good time to go into the evidence surrounding something could the gut brain axes i guess kind of it is and why suddenly become not suddenly. I'm bane. i guess discovered why it's important. Yeah great ray. And it is so much in evidence around the gut brain access and what we do know from. The studies is that the gut brain axis is all these microbes have a two way communication between basically the entering nervous system of the gastrointestinal tract so alcott and the central nervous system. Which is the brain the vegas nerve and is referred to as the gut brain axis now. This communication occurs via the power sympathic nervous system which also is known as the rest and digest mode and this is the complete opposite response to our sympathetic nervous system. Which is that fight or flight mode which gets us ready. But the power sympathetic returns our body to the state of calm and rest whereas the sympathetic massive nervous system get the body ready for that fight or flee which can increase blood pressure breathing slowing down at digestion and take him blood and oxygen away to other parts of the body. So it's important that people know is this of two way. Communication almost like a highway caused going back and forth between the garden rain.

Vegas
The Nutritional Advantages of Oats

Diet Science

02:27 min | 8 months ago

The Nutritional Advantages of Oats

"Week. We're talking about oats. Oh so very good. I always feel that everyone needs to know oats. Yes absolutely so. What would you like to share about oats well other than than the the typical health benefits votes. There's actually two compounds in oats that i don't think very many people know about and so wanted to talk about those today but then also talk about the various types of oats. I think a lot of people have heard of these different types but they don't really know how they're prepared and what makes them different from each other. Good good good topic all right. Yeah so. I think most people probably know that oats Help lower cholesterol. He also helped to lower blood pressure and stabilize blood. Sugar levels have also been known to help people with diabetes. So that's a one of the important things and a lot of these benefits In the past were attributed to a particular type of fiber that's in the oats called beta glue can And that has really kind of gotten most of the attention in previous studies on oats and their health benefits. But we're coming to find out that Oats contain more than twenty unique polyphenol compounds which are like phytochemicals Called evanston reminds have strong antioxidant anti inflammatory and anti itching properties which is why people can use. Oats says a bath like if you get poison oak or poison ivy. Get that itchiness on your skin. The compounds and oats are known to reduce that. Oh so that's why that you know they're known for that And then there's a couple of other compounds called avino kocides that Together with the of the ninian through reminds and the venacuro sides. Which are i mean. Both of them are really hard to say. Yes but these are just polyphenol compounds They've also been shown to prevent colon cancer And also heart disease because they help to reduce the the production of nitric oxide in the artery and And also help with the smooth muscle in the artery. So they're they've been studied widely for this now.

Diabetes Evanston Oats Colon Cancer Heart Disease
Where Did Body Mass Index Originate?

Science Vs

02:02 min | 8 months ago

Where Did Body Mass Index Originate?

"Today. We're looking at whether it really is that bad for your health to be fat and a quick note about our words in this episode. A lot of people don't like the words overweight or obese. Some people prefer the term fat as a neutral way to describe a person's body like tall but not everyone is comfortable with using fat this way and meanwhile overweight and obese have specific definitions medicine. So we're going to end up using all these terms but we'll try to be careful about when and why we use them okay so in order to talk about this at all we've got to with the bmi the body mass index every stat. You've never heard about how many americans are overweight comes from this measure. Hundreds of thousands of studies rely on it. It's a staple of modern medicine. So where on earth did it come from to find out. We're going to go back to the nineteen fifties do the university of minnesota's football stadium. The golden gophers are battling it out in the big ten conference. Our story starts down in the depths of the stadium entered through gate twenty seven. Just as if you had a ticket gate twenty so and then there's a maze of of hallways and offices along under the sloping of the The bleachers above this is henry blackburn. He's taking us to the lab where the bmi was born. He's a professor emeritus and minnesota so When when we worked there on a saturday could hear a distant rumble. When the minnesota eighteen got a touchdown run out and run up the causeway and see if we could see the extra point kick sometimes invaded by berman. Because of all those who left the stands and the carter but it was our place. Were very much at home. There and one thing they were doing and as weird lab was trying to answer this big question. How much fat do we have in our bodies. This was important because scientists figured it was the first step and understanding whether fat is bad for us

Golden Gophers Henry Blackburn University Of Minnesota Minnesota Football Berman
Biochemist Shawn Wells on the Benefits of Berberine as a Health Supplement

Ask The Health Expert

01:38 min | 8 months ago

Biochemist Shawn Wells on the Benefits of Berberine as a Health Supplement

"Have been talking about burbank for years. Because i've been talking about kito for twenty years and i've been talking about burberry for probably about half as long. It's one of the most houghton's anti-aging anti-diabetic key tone insulin sensitivity improving if improves amp k. Protects you from advanced location and products and glorification which is blood sugar damage. This is such a powerful compound. As is it's kind of drug equivalent metformin in so anyone associated with having diabetes or insulin resistance definitely as interested in metformin or the herbal equivalent of covering but certainly people that are into anti aging and looking to lower information with crp. Lower hemoglobin a. One c the blood sugar and live longer are taking things like verb ring. Or now the new form that i was involved in patents of kodi hydro bordering. So what's cool about die. Hydra ring is it's about five to ten times more bioavailable so it increases much more in the plasma at a much lower dose you only have to take about one hundred milligrams versus five hundred milligrams of burberry and also what's really cool is it lasts about twice as long in the plasma versus standard burglary so standard burberry. And you're taking five hundred milligrams three times a day and with diana jabbering you're taking around one hundred milligrams two times a

Kito Burberry Burbank Houghton Insulin Resistance Diabetes Diana
Is There a Link Between Certain Diets and Depression? With Dr. Neal Barnard

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

01:43 min | 8 months ago

Is There a Link Between Certain Diets and Depression? With Dr. Neal Barnard

"Barr thank you very much for joining us to be with you. You ready for question number one. You bet all right this one comes to us from each four and a tour rights is a junk food diet more likely to cause depression. Well it's a great question. And and historically people have drawn a division whatever's below the neck. That's where i could have an effect but above above the neck no couldn't have any effect. Well the that foods might affect depression impressed in a favorable way through the right foods came to our attention as an accident. We were doing research study with geico insurance and the reason the reason we did this study and check you and i talked about this before the geiko national headquarters is about three or four blocks from her office and so they were really interested in the possibility that a plant based i might help them where they had employee wants to lose weight or get diabetes under better control so we instituted a program at geiko of a vegan diet both in the cafeteria and a weekly class for anybody who wanted to actually jump in and so although the purpose of it was to look at way changes and to see how he does. Diabetes might improve. We saw something else and that was depression. Started to lift. And you can do this subjectively where where you have. Individuals fill out a paper and soul questionnaire of specific symptoms. Are you sleeping. How's your mood. How's your appetite a whole bunch of indicators of depression and what we saw is that quite steadily. They were improving over the course of his site.

Depression Geico Insurance Geiko National Headquarters Barr Diabetes
Dr. Michael Greger: How to Naturally Boost Brain BDNF Levels to Fight Depression

Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

02:14 min | 8 months ago

Dr. Michael Greger: How to Naturally Boost Brain BDNF Levels to Fight Depression

"Welcome to nutrition facts. I'm your host. Dr michael gregor today. We look at ways to mitigate a serious mental health disorder. Depression there's accumulating evidence in brain derived neurotrophic fact may be playing a role in human depression beady. Nf controls the growth of new nerve cells so low levels may explain the atrophy of specific brain areas. You see among depressed patients that maybe one of the reasons exercises so good for our brains. Starting our day exercise regimen within three months you can get a quadrupling obedient. F- reliefs from your brain. This makes sense. I mean anytime. We were desperate to catch prey or desperate not to become prey ourselves. We needed to be cognitively sharp. And so when we're fasting or exercising or an negative calorie balance. Our brain starts churning out. Bvd nf to make sure we're firing on all cylinders. So of course. Big farm as eager to create drugs to mimic this effect. But is there any way to boost enough naturally. Yes i just said it. Fasting and exercise. Okay okay but is there anything we can add to our diet to boost obedient. Well hiring takes dietary flavonoids appear to be protectively associated with symptoms of depression. The harvard nurses study followed tens of thousands of women for years and found that those who are eating the most to appeared to reduce the risk of coming down with depression. Flavonoids occur naturally implants. So there's a statue mountain variety of healthy foods. But how do we know. The benefits are from the flavonoids and not just from eating healthier in general. You don't know until you put it to the test. See some fruits and vegetables have more than others. Apples have more than apricots plums. More than peaches red cabbage. More than white kale. More than cucumbers. So if you randomize people into one of three groups more high flavonoids fruits and vegetables. More low flavonoids fruits and vegetables or no extra fruits and vegetables at all after eighteen weeks. Only the high flavonoids group got a significant boost and obedient f- levels which corresponded to an improvement in cognitive

Dr Michael Gregor Depression Harvard
Author Sabrina Strings on the Racial Origins of Fat Phobia

Food Heaven Podcast

01:55 min | 8 months ago

Author Sabrina Strings on the Racial Origins of Fat Phobia

"To the podcast. Sabrina thank you on so excited to have you so tell us about how you started to explore issues of body image and wait specifically for women of color while this is actually almost like a family legacy for me. My grandmother was born in rural georgia during the late nineteen thirties and so she was growing up the jim crow era and lived in a racially segregated community as part of the great migration in nineteen sixty. She traveled west and at that time for the first time in her life she lived and worked around white women and she was amazed by the number of white women diets. Seems like what is this. You know sort of like a typical black grandmother fashioned. By the time. I came of age in the one thousand nine hundred ninety s. When i was in high school she was still troubling over. This question like what is going on here. She would even ask me like why women dying to be thin. And i was like sixteen years old but it wasn't until about ten years later when i was working in a predominantly black community in san francisco baby hunters points. I met women of color who were hiv positive. And we're attaining an hiv medication adherence clinic where i was a researcher who refuse to take their medications for fear of gaining weight. And i thought oh. Wow you know this. What was clearly a phenomenon that was mostly about middle class white women in the nineteen sixties arguably even through the ninety s. Clearly by the early dots was something. That was impacting women of color as well so i wanted to be able to dig further into this question of why is it so important for women of all racial ethnic backgrounds at this point to feel like they need to discipline themselves and maintain a particular. Wait

Sabrina Georgia San Francisco
Are You a Dieter or Disordered Eater?

Diet Culture Rebel Podcast

01:45 min | 8 months ago

Are You a Dieter or Disordered Eater?

"We're going to look at. How dieting and disordered eating are similar. We're gonna look at what disordered eating looks like. And then we're also going to talk about what you can do to heal from disordered eating how you can start to take action if this is something that you struggle with. So we'll start by talking about what disordered eating actually is. And then i'll share with you. How dieting is very similar to disordered eating so when we look at the definition of disordered. Eating it's really used to describe a range of irregular eating behaviors. And it's important to know that this is just a description. It is not a diagnosis. So disordered eating is not a diagnosis. But it doesn't mean that it's not a valid struggle which will talk about a little bit. Everyone who struggles with an eating disorder has disordered eating. But not everyone who has disordered eating struggle with an eating disorder. So i think that's a really important distinction here An eating disorder must fit a very specific narrow criteria in order to be diagnosed and disordered. Eating doesn't have to fit that particular narrow definition And also it's not a diagnosis. But here's the thing. I really don't want you to get caught up in the fact that there is no official diagnosis for disordered eating. Because that doesn't mean that your struggles aren't real. It doesn't mean that they aren't valid. You do not need a diagnosis in order to get support in order to ask for help in order to know that what you are going through is really

Eating the Foods Your Genetic Background Needs With Dr. BJ Hardick

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

02:32 min | 8 months ago

Eating the Foods Your Genetic Background Needs With Dr. BJ Hardick

"I know you work obviously with different clients. All over the place in your clinic is in london ontario. Yes right and talk about your experience working with people and really helping them. Adapt more of a ketogenic and nate lifestyle using intermittent fasting. Things like that sure. Well the first thing just trying to move towards more of a ketogenic lifestyle when you're actually eliminating grains and sugars is even though there's a lot more awareness right now people still freak out when they're told you can't have grains you can't have sugar right and a lot of times people say well wait a second you know. These are foods of the earth. The mother nature gave us pineapples and oranges and pears. And all these things we tell those be bad for you. And i always go back to this and and i think first of all you have to recognize that people have different. Genetic backgrounds are gonna processed foods differently They're going to have different types of metabolism. Some people based on where they're where they're from the world may do better with one type of food than another but in principle when you think about the higher sugar foods and the ones grains that turn into sugars. You know the reality is you know. I'm a northern caucasian. I would not be from a part of the world are pineapples are growing year round saying well what would my culture have thrived now it starts to get a little dicey when through the years. Go on twenty two in me and you find out that five percent this. I said it's not always necessarily black or white. So i do believe in listening to your body and seeing how you should in the first place but the first thing is when you tell people to eliminate these foods that they could. Actually you know a mother. Nature's foods are god's people say well that's not right because i'm supposed to eat those tax and the reality is you have to also differentiate not just. How's your body's supposed to eat but are you really trying to deal with some type of illness or a disease because there are certain illnesses that can do better under certain diet programs even though those changes are associated with the cause of the best one for example is sealy people if need gluten but consuming. Gluten doesn't cause ceac right so same thing with you know if somebody has information and they have gall bladder issues while they probably shouldn't have a ton of fat all at once but just eating fat. Your whole lifetime isn't going to give you those gallbladder so we could go on and on and on about that i. I had a friend who was dealing with cancer not consuming any fruit. Well we've never suggested that consuming fruit gave you the cancer. But we do know that getting into this state where your body's not having relied on sugar is going to benefit the immune system to help nutrition. Yeah exactly so so you have to look at it. I doing this for some clinic. Some clinical name. Or am i doing this because it is just the way my body was designed writers

Ontario London Sealy Cancer
Biopsychologist, Prof. Marion Hetherington, on the Effect of Psychology and Physiology on Appetite

Sigma Nutrition Radio

02:05 min | 8 months ago

Biopsychologist, Prof. Marion Hetherington, on the Effect of Psychology and Physiology on Appetite

"Professor. Welcome to the podcast. Thanks for having me like i said. I'm very excited to dive into a lot of these topics. And i think something that might set the stage for people early on is when we think about this psycho biological approach to human appetite. You've written really excellently. In some of your work abou the mistake we might make if we were to consider appetite solely on the basis of physiology or psychology particularly when we think around what drives food intake and that they are inextricably linked wondering. Could you just frame that. For people of what is a the most accurate way we can think of that. Overlap between physiology and psychology when it comes to appetite unless a behavioral scientist. I'm very interested in human behavior. But you just can't get away from the fact that human behavior is driven by really strong physiological needs however food and in our society as everyone is aware is very much shaped by our culture by our cuisine by our environments and to great extent what we eat is powerful identity so when we think about psycho biology appetite. We're thinking about the behaviors that we express and we think about what drives those behaviors and in particular. I'm very interested in genetics. I'm interested in the genetics of obesity. For example and the way. I understand that is to think about the risk factors for obesity being highly heritable. And then ho. That's expressed in terms of behavior and i'm not saying that genes our destiny. I'm simply saying that. The genes are really important and as a psychologist. I need to understand a little bit about the heritage ability of some of these eighteen treats and risk factors for overweight obesity so that i can understand the behaviors

Obesity