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Listen to the latest audio content in Native American culture, identity, politics and history. This playlist features Native American individuals having great conversations on relevant topics through a cultural lens. Sourced from premium podcasts.

The perfect pandemic garden

Native America Calling

6:24 listening | Last week

The perfect pandemic garden

"Today. We are going to start off in Santa Fe New Mexico we have James Edwards with us. He is a Powell. Mc and organic gardening student James's Ponti and my pleasure to have him here with us today. James Welcome thank you Tara. Greetings to all your listeners in our friends and relatives out there Hope everybody's staying safe I've been living here in Santa Fe with my family for about seventeen years now I grew up around a traditional and conventional style Gardening early on in my wife. My Grandmother There in Oklahoma My family also was around that quite a bit and just over the years I moved more towards Gardening at home Especially the more I moved into Embracing more of my culture. You know many of us grew up in the suburbs in urban settings and weren't always able to you know to see that first hand you know gardening methods and not realizing the importance of it to our cultures as indigenous people in all these different regions and I Been focusing mainly on organic and natural methods and again in a suburban setting mostly containers So that to be flexible. You know either if you're moving or you know. Taking advantage of the sun a little micro climates in their yard. You know taking into consideration the needs or the different of the different varieties of different types of plants. You know some do well in shade some do well in full sun and learning all those You know different types. Assure important to your success and there's a lot of lessons that come with all of this in James just hearing some of the routes that you have a no pun intended may be a little Pun In this in why gardens are important this year. Do you feel that your garden is something else. Besides just carrying on that knowledge. Yes it's taken on a new importance for myself my family and for a lot of people out there The endemic situation going on the food chain supply Having hiccups having difficulties There are some shortages of you know usually widely available foods in our supermarkets and we tend to rely on that and so- relying on ourselves more. You know in the sense you know is giving that importance and a combination of traditional and modern methods is contributing to our success as gardeners and being able to fill our freezers. The thrown vegetables To can vegetables and fruits. That's the importance cannot be understated at all. I mean it can't be overstated as the importance for food security especially in places out here in the literal desert where there are many food desserts especially on reservations and Some herbs some suburban areas. Some folks have to go a long way to the grocery store. We're lucky that we're close here in Santa Fe to a lot of you know a veil ability for Farmers Markets and supermarkets and a lot of people. Don't have that and so it's as important to me even though we have that availability is just as important as it is to somebody out on the reservation Well away from supplies and food availability. Sure in we're seeing the other side of that of wind supply. Isn't there and so James. Tell me about what you decided to plant this year. How it's going. How early did you start and we WANNA hear Your Garden Story to? You can give us a call. Share your thoughts. Share your stories at one. Eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight glad James I use a combination of some commercials varieties and traditional varieties heritage varieties. I my family is in possession of several varieties of corn that might try took from Nebraska Oklahoma when we resettled into Indian territory when we got our agency We were very fortunate there. Several families among the Ponti who are in possession of these Koren's of one being called an eagle corn. It's a very sacred corn syrup. Ponti People There's a lot of hard work done through the Panis Preservation Project Under the leadership of deb Echo Hawk to preserve these varieties and now they're freely available tribal members and even trouble members like us who are away from our home area. They sent him in the mail to us and so I am delving more into the three sisters method. This year and traditionally that's been corn beans and squash. They're mutually beneficial companion planting concepts Like the beans give nitrogen to the corn and the squash. The squashed provides shade to keep the soil moist and the corn provides the stocks for the means to grow up. And I know a lot of people are doing this now. It's catching on all across the country. And so I'm using Ponti Blue Corn. I'm using a man Dan vining squash and I'm using black and white beans. That were I believe. Erroneously called Cave beings by some archaeologists who found some traditional being variety grown by the Pueblos here since their ancestral times. And so I. Have you know several different traditional variety working in conjunction to Create these gardens

James Edwards Santa Fe New Mexico Ponti Ponti Blue Corn Oklahoma MC Dan Vining Panis Preservation Project Deb Echo Hawk Farmers Markets Koren Nebraska
Red Lake Nation election includes measure on marijuana

Native America Calling

3:59 listening | Last week

Red Lake Nation election includes measure on marijuana

"The National Native News. I'm Antonio Gonzalez. The Red Lake Nation in Minnesota is holding an election. Wednesday citizens are being asked whether or not the tribal council should legalize the production regulation and distribution a medical marijuana. Voters will also pick four tribal council representatives. Absentee ballots are available in a video message. Monday chairman Darrell. Zeki informed the community in person voting will be held as the tribe is under covert nineteen emergency orders as a Monday. There were no positive cases of Cova. Nineteen on the reservation. The North Dakota Department of Transportation will be at five reservations this week to provide photo identification cards. Which can be used for voting the? Id's will be issued to North Dakota residents who do not have a driver's license or ID the non driver ID card is free to people. Eighteen and older and will be mailed to residents within five days. The first event is Tuesday on the Turtle Mountain reservation. The Transportation Department is asking people to take Cova nineteen precautions including wearing a mask. The events are being held as the states. At June primary nears the business arm of the Cherokee Nation announced plans Monday to address safety measures to Reopen Casinos. The plan includes enhanced cleaning temperature checks for employees and guests and the suspension of buffets and banquets the tribe operates ten entertainment destinations in Oklahoma. A date for reopening casinos was not announced but the tribal government has started a semi opening with more phases to reopen throughout the summer. Meanwhile a number of other tribes in Oklahoma have already opened their casinos with Cova nineteen safety precautions in Juneau Alaska. A weaver has created a piece of art to reflect Cova Nineteen. The cat weaving documents history and stories as owes Elizabeth Jenkins reports lily. Hope is a weaver. And she's been busy creating a commission. Chilcott blanket a process which can take upwards of two years but recently she made something else on a much tighter deadline at home after she learned about an opportunity to create art about. What's going on right now. In early April First American art magazine sent a call out for indigenous artists to create masks similar to the ones worn prevent the spread of Cova Nineteen. It was so intense to weave it on my floor with my children around me. Her piece is called. Chill cat protector. It's made from Merino Wool. And Cedar Bark Warp. To ermine tails grease the cheeks. The mask covers the nose and the mouth in their place are the distinct ovoid shapes of the chill cat face an expression. That's confident and reassuring. The Mask isn't something to be worn in the grocery store. It's a work of art. Reflective of survival hope says it also represents foundational thinking to clink it Haida and Simpson people and really like my aunt set at the best that the musk's serves to record that we took care of each other during this time. The pieces received an enthusiastic response online and hope proceed. Judge's Choice Award from first American art magazine and while she was happy her mask was recognized in the exhibition. She thinks the art world still has a ways to go until fully accepts. Chilcott weaving into the fold. A carved mask wins over the beadwork over the quilt work over the weaving. And I I love I American art for putting it into the world but I'm like that is the constant conversation. Men's work is fine art and recognized as best of show and women's work is still hustling to catch up. But she'll CAPRA. Tekere seems to be changing that. The Burke Museum in Seattle recently acquired it and hope says for the first time in her career. She's created a commission calendar for other museums. Which have shown interest in her weaving another Cova? Nineteen inspired mask. I'm Elizabeth Jenkins and demand. Tony Elkins all

Cova American Art Magazine Elizabeth Jenkins Oklahoma North Dakota Department Of Tra Antonio Gonzalez Red Lake Nation Marijuana Transportation Department National Native News Minnesota Burke Museum North Dakota ID Tekere Zeki Cherokee Nation Chairman Chilcott
Sam Herman (Cup'ik) Part 1

The Storyteller

6:07 listening | Last week

Sam Herman (Cup'ik) Part 1

"Welcome my friends to the storyteller. Will you'll find first nations people from across native North America who are following. Jesus Christ without reservation today story takes us back in time to Nunavik Island Alaska who Sam Herman shares about. What life was like? They're growing up. He also tells about an accident on the water that drew his attention to God. My name is Sam Herman near I come from regionally from Newburgh island. The Place Corey Newburgh Island A certified mile white long and fifty five white. It's not really small like island. I born joop BEC- real eskimo born in the spring. I born aggress. No no spring bet shot house and my blank dish. All do crashes put together and those are my mattress. Most of the time I sleeping now steam best where they make require steam steam house and after boy. It's really nice and warm and sleep in their boys. Nice even these winter. Most of the time in steam springtime doesn't have no stove oil just burner and now opened a tap when to and right in the middle of it. There's rocks strucks and there's hangar and put those fish And put them in a fire. Just turn around round and round finally coined done. Just put up an eat it up. We says she loyal if you have a Sheila and then after that close Her anymore smoke in the house. Close up the top. He will not go away at have. No doors is pretty warm nyland's Small religious very far bud on Macquarie a show quoted who people in there? We don't grunge show much but great great great once in a while with go to Nash. Harbor that would be some around thirty to forty miles. No no no airplay notional machine buy duct team. My Dad took me to national but one time when I was really small mar little boy I couldn't even reach tarbuck that toward Schlitt. Hang up and try to get Very hard in when stormy stormy storm carstairs. No trees down. There can be nothing. I hardly don't go around so much from Dislande Noah's Most of the time stay home and lot of times. I feel like go out when I was little bigger. I share like to go hunt. Shem Fox White Fox Red Fox and tire mickens. I Shared Act former family. Something that for who in. I like outdoors. Were I was little not Trish on that island. You can see long ways if you go up on. Tabar Little Mountain. You can almost see around island and it seems like it's only only place when I was little kit that island usually she mountains now Nelson Island mountains across across the ocean but he do s nice down there cusjveqr my home higher rates down there. My family raised me down there. Nine hundred ninety and now Christian people start coming Roy. Do we were surprising and It was nice nice to have something that speak shinning lists and the teachers came in before. Nineteen thirty six and my dad were core built a school building. He don't get no money. He paid by food like a jam. Fruit Flour Shuker. He never get new. Casts are anything.

Newburgh Island Sam Herman Corey Newburgh Island Nunavik Island Alaska Shem Fox White Nelson Island Joop Bec North America Little Mountain Schlitt FOX Dislande Noah Macquarie Sheila Nash Trish
Making music in isolation: Indigenous artist creates new work during pandemic

Unreserved

8:25 listening | Last week

Making music in isolation: Indigenous artist creates new work during pandemic

"Of all what happened to you back in February so I ended up having a stress. Inducing takes a lot of work to be an independent artists to be an independent artists in the US. You know doing the level of visibility and lack of opportunities so you know I manage myself. I produce an engineer my own music so it just takes a lot of work to do what I do and for the first time in my life I hit a limit physically and ended up having a I ever stress induced seizure of my life and I. I got taken by ambulance to a hospital on the side of Chicago. Close to where. I'm based and ended up having one of the worst experiences of medical racism I've ever faced in my life as a native person so The hospital had assumed I was. I was on hard drugs. Pcp in that's what had caused the seizure and caused my state Even though relatives were there telling them otherwise you know they just assume the worst. They saw my Ceremony Scars Khotan do some piercing ceremonies. They saw some some of the ceremony scars on my body and had assumed it was self mutilation and then I had come to in the hospital and I was intimated in. I wasn't supposed to be conscious but I ended up coming to out of the sedatives and I panicked and freaked out. I felt like I was suffocating. And they mark me with combative disorder strapped me into bed with locked restraints for a couple of days and so I went in for a seizure and when I came to a couple of days later and came out of it I actually ended up having to stay in the hospital for a whole week to undo the damage that they had done to my muscles in my body from shooting with so many sedatives and from strapping the into a bed. Like I felt like in look like I got ran over by truck so so yeah it was just. It was a really Violent experience for me. I came out of that. Just just a couple of weeks before the pandemic kit. So you know I was kind of kind of a sense of recovery already. And then we all got thrown into a tailspin after that And how did you process that that you put that into your music? Yeah you know. It's it was the only thing I knew how to do so. My music journey started when I was a very young boy and I started playing music and writing songs to heal and process my world and process my experiences. And and so you know to this day. I'm still doing that so I came out of that We're just a lot of trauma even spiritual emotional physical. I'd never really suffered before all at once and it was a little overwhelming and so I did what I what I knew how to do and I turned to my music. I'm working on a project right now album that I'm dedicating to my mother. It's called INA. Which is the LAKOTA word for mother? a lot of songs were were born out of that experience but also what was born out of that. Experience is my first ever flute album. I'm also going to release this month. It's called the along wet too. Which is the Makoto phrasing for Spring Song so I composed four songs after that experience? Because you know I'm not fluent in my language Khotan learning and so I really only speak English and English. Just doesn't capture. Sometimes what I fail and on I found when I just put it all into on native flute. Which is one of the instruments. I play because I also produced music. I but I've never really put out an an album as just a musician purely music. And so I. I kind of turned to that because it was the only thing I could do to express you know a lot of what I was experiencing so I went outside and recorded these songs outside just before the pandemic and just before we went into lockdown and recorded a liar. The songs on my home reservation outside of the House that I grew up in so I'm looking forward to release in those two project soon here and like I said they were born out of that experience. Music has always been a tool for me to heal tool for me to process and very fortunate to be able to share that process and that healing with people through music. So when you say that you used music to process the experience what kinds of And the flute which is really beautiful. How what kinds of lyrics did you find yourself writing in? What kind of You know genre. Did you play in for this album? Yes so So the the album that I'm dedicating my mother. Ina is going to be everything from hip pop to some acoustic hip hop because I also play. You know several acoustic instruments but the the food album along wet to is. Actually the music is just purely native flu. And I'll give you an example. One of the songs on there is a call calling your spirit back song and that was rooted out of a a Just A LAKOTA. Teaching we have of calling your spirit back. You know. It's a daily practice but especially if you go through something traumatic. We're taught to call your spirit back because your spirit can leave you. Even infraction are pieces and so when I came out of the hospital I really felt like my spirit left me and so I felt like I needed to do more than just call my spare back in the traditional sense. I felt like I needed to write a song to do that. And never have I ever had a song just being my head and it was in its entirety. And that's how this song came to me. I picked up my foot as soon as I got home. I stepped outside and What you hear on the album is what came out the first time I it and that's never happened before you know usually have to work on songs. Sometimes I'll tweak songs for months sometimes years but this song was already there You know and that will give you an example of the type of songs that are on this album but I also am recording the stories of how the songs were born in English. So sort of what I'm doing here. I kind of shared the experience that that that birthday song so with each song. I'm going to also show the story of where it came from and doing that I. It's kind of a LAKOTA thing too. In a lot of indigenous cultures. They kind of share the story where the song came from before they share it so I hope to do that with some of my upcoming project says well because I think the stories I also just as important as the music so really you haven't slowed down at all since recovery. It's like no no not at all. I think I just had to get creative. And how how I kept going you know. Fortunately I am doing my passion. I'm doing what I love. And I'm very blessed to do what I love. Even if it is stressful and a lot of work but every day I wake up and get to play music and make a living off of music. I feel like I'm living my gene. You know And you're not just working on on your own music. You're also sort of rippling out this. This idea of community many others and Indian countries while as yourself are feeling these These effects. What specifically are you doing to help communities through this pandemic Definitely so I'm a part of this Collective this this artists collective of Young indigenous artists around my age We're called the dream warriors and we actually formed just out of necessity in need We were looking for management for young indigenous artists. Just like a you know some sort of network support system for us to find gigs and kind of create a support system for each other and we. We couldn't really find one that already existed so we just banded together as as peers as relatives and and and created a artists collective. So we really use this collective as A vehicle to create support systems for native artists. That weren't there for us and one of the ways. We've been able to do that in this. Pandemic is a webinars. So we we we so far have done to webinars where we ended up raising over several thousand dollars in these webinars to disperse to native families in need and we put out a call and we had over hundreds of native families across the reservations. We come from and also communities beyond the communities we come from requesting assistance financial need and. I don't know if y'all are paying attention to the news and stats coming out of the states but native communities are being left out of a lot of the statistics and the numbers being recorded about. How this pandemic affecting community so we're left out of a lot of funding as well so it was really great to be able to use our collective energy and our art to to to do these webinars to generate thousands of dollars worth of funding to disperse to hundreds of families in need and we also had Donors match some of the funding. So this was. This is only the beginning for in this sort of This new creative way of of helping communities and using what we love to do that. That's amazing thank you for being such a wonderful bright light in your community. Thank you Rosanne. I appreciate it frank. Wall is Chang who Lakota rapper from the Rosebud. Indian RESERVATION IN SOUTH DAKOTA IS. New Album will be out later this summer.

United States Engineer Chicago South Dakota INA Rosanne Rosebud Wall Chang
Pomp and social distancing

Native America Calling

4:40 listening | Last week

Pomp and social distancing

"And it is my honor to introduce you to some of the class of twenty twenty joining us from Hayes. Montana is CAITLIN carry water. She is a haze lodge logical high school senior. And she is a Cinnabon Caitlyn. Congratulations in welcome to native America. Calling Hi thank you and so as a recent graduate how you feel. Kinda shock tough ride. I Bet I bet and for you. What does it mean to get to this point in? No that you're turning a new chapter Oh we had a kind of plotted out for a long time. But we knew it was gonNA make it in any words to your fellow classmates about Graduation and just getting to this point We just need to keep moving forward and we need to keep with our education and make a better future for reservation. You know all right I hear you Kaitlyn And also here with us today out of Gallup New Mexico as Dr Key Smith. He's a university of Minnesota Medical School graduate and an incoming you see. Sf University of California San Francisco Resident and he is day my pleasure to have him here and Thank you for being with us. Casey and I'm just GONNA to keep saying Hello Dr Smith. Welcome thank you for having and another great accomplishment and feel to be referred to as Dr Smith Now I think it's a while to get used to but I think there's been a lot of like challenges and sacrifices and also a that went into being able to say that and so it definitely feel it feels good But I take a lot to get used to that and so Dr Smith your thoughts about getting to this point in knowing bright now. The entire country is Looking to our medical professionals more doctors are needed. And now we can say we have another doctor Adding to the workforce in just your thoughts about getting this accomplishment especially during these times. Yeah really the question so I think just what I was saying earlier. I think as native people We tend to make a lot of sacrifices leaving our homes and our and our nation and going on to care education and so Being able to be at the point that I'm out right now and overcoming those sacrifices and challenges and being able to Say I'm a doctor now? it's just very exciting very humbling. I feel very honored to be a native person in medicine and I'm a little nervous and scared to be Kind of moving into the next journey next part of my journey during this time. But I also feel like I've been equipped with many skills and the knowledge to be able to to Treat patients and being able to learn a lot of many awesome doctors. And so I think it's An exciting but also kind of nerve wracking time but also to be on the front lines and to be able to do what I've been wanting to do for a very long time. I think I'm looking forward to it. Into what discipline are you going to be going into? So I applied to internal medicine Welby Training in internal medicine. And so you will definitely be there in critical moments in Casey just thinking of getting through all your studies in getting to this point where now it is more of the practical side where your thoughts I think I don't know I feel like at least the first part of Med school year in the books into taking lot of tests. And there's not a lot of patient interaction until toward the end of Med school. But I think I think now as you have mentioned being able to apply a lot of this knowledge and these skills that able to gain and being able to actually make changes in individuals lives is is very powerful and and and honoring into so graduation is truly a moment where you are transitioning into something new Leaving behind space that maybe you got very comfortable in. And so I know how How big of a moment. This can be for many

Dr Key Smith Casey Med School Caitlin Hayes America Montana San Francisco Minnesota Medical School New Mexico Sf University Of California Kaitlyn
Coronavirus behind bars

Native America Calling

5:52 listening | Last week

Coronavirus behind bars

"We reached out to the Washington Department of Corrections and were able to connect with Jeremy Barklay. He's the director of engagement outreach for the Washington Department of Corrections. He says there are about eighteen. Thousand inmates in the states. Twenty four facilities about a thousand identify is native American although testing is limited. The state counts twenty-six inmates total with cove in nineteen the state released about eight hundred fifty inmates who qualified as a way to help slow the spread of the virus. Barkley says his department worked with tribes for enrolled members. Who were released? The office of tribal relations within the Department of Corrections has Desert knees from each of the Twenty Nine federally recognized tribes within the State of Washington. And so we are office was in contact with those tribal delegates to let them know Which tribal members were Qualified under the rapid reentry or commutation furlough so that we could further smoothie reentry process between those native individuals and the home communities to which they returning It allowed us to ask what resources might be a need whether that is You know whether we could focus on on clothing or make sure that the tribe had available foodbank resources and any type of Services that those individuals needed on a case by case basis we were able to better communicate with those tribes And again hopefully guarantee a more smooth and successful reintegration back to the community. We've been very pleased with the reception we've received from the tribes and Very pleased with the way that We built systems before code so as to work on releases for our native peoples in that. Was Jeremy Barklay with the Washington Department of Corrections? The system also requires physical distancing mandatory face covering for all inmates and staff an additional cleaning and disinfecting. That's one view into all of this. What's yours go ahead and join us right now at one. Eight hundred nine six two eight. Four eight is the number and joining us today. Out of Seattle Washington is Gabe Glenda. He is the managing noyer for Glenda Brodmann and founder of hoyt he belongs to the Round Valley Indian tribes are pleasure to have him here. Thank you for joining us for another native America calling had Internet and gave. We just heard a little bit. What's going on there in Washington state but give us a further view into this What are you seeing? What are you witnessing especially with the Washington stance on releasing state prison inmates early? I work with Hoy which is a nonprofit off named after the she'd word that means See you again. We never say goodbye. We've been working for the last ten years on making sure. Indigenous relatives in iron houses are able to spiritually rehabilitate. We work closely with a sister organization native American Reentry Services that runs a program that prepares them particularly spiritual return to society so that we don't mind them in trouble again and we've been working hard as we could for the last several weeks With the State Department of Corrections and we very closely with Mr Barklay and Lynn. Dennis tribal liaison for the Department of Corrections. LemMe Tribal member and we should everything they've done but we've really been feeling sort of like we're on the outside looking in in sort of a helpless way We've tried to help furnish PT donations from a local tribe especially when one of its own tribal members contract to positive for the disease at Monroe Corrections Center We have a bunch of able sewers in all of our circles within the state's prison system and we tried to have them be available to so masks for example or use within the prisons and we were unable to do that. we've been hamstrung and our ability to facilitate sweat lodge ceremony drumming circle or other spiritual activities to ensure. That relatives are are coping with this catastrophe and the best way possible without compromising Their own mental ability in wellbeing. And so we've worked with the DNC tried to work with the DNC and we're not trying to criticize them because we know they're in an unprecedented situation and taking all precautions. We believe but it's been difficult for us to sit on the sidelines and not do it. We normally do over the last eight or ten weeks and watch watch this thing on unfold as too early release We are encouraged that. A number of prisoners in our state have been released We would encourage the state to do more in that respect there are certain populations of our included. That should not be behind bars for example. Our our juvenile without parole Prisoners meaning a are men and women who were sentenced for horrible mistakes they made when they were juveniles sentenced to life without parole for example. But that's been deemed accrue on usual and unconstitutional punishment and so there are certain populations like those populations which includes cinnabar native relatives. Who We know about who should be added to these lists of people either of age or Health affliction or other status. That should be considered for early release

Washington Department Of Corre Department Of Corrections Washington Jeremy Barklay State Department Of Correction Monroe Corrections Center DNC American Reentry Services Director Glenda Brodmann Gabe Glenda Barkley HOY Seattle America Round Valley Indian Hoyt Founder
Kevin Noble Maillard Discusses Fry Bread: A Native American Family Story''

Unreserved

4:59 listening | 2 weeks ago

Kevin Noble Maillard Discusses Fry Bread: A Native American Family Story''

"You already work as a journalist and a law professor. What made you decide to try writing a picture book? Did you have extra time on your hands or I have a lot of different ideas that I like to share with people. I started off as academic Focusing a lot on native issues on identity on mixed racial and cultural identity and then after being a professor for a while I started to branch out into journalism I started writing for The New York Times which I still do now still writing on all the same issues but for a larger audience. 'cause the people that I wanNA reach usually are not reading academic journals and then also with children's books it's the same topic but just a different audience and I like to think it's just like just an audience of short people write children. Parents bad are paying attention to these different ideas that I have Now this book seems perfectly suited to the timer. All living in right now. It's about food. It's about family and he sat identity. What's the story you're telling in? Fry Bread this wonderful food. That comes from a very dark place. In Native Culture and native families lives so fiber would have started out with the DA people the Navajos in the southwest of the United States. Who had their land taken away from them and then they're displaced and they're forced to live in new places ride so all of their land was stolen. People were killed. Families were changed. There was so much darkness behind all of this and not a lot of people that are reading things like Freiberg break for the first time. No about this native families would know about this. Native children would be beginning to learn about what happened in previous generations and fiber. It is a great way to introduce this talk about. What does expropriation mean? What are these lands? And where are the lands where people used to live and why were they taken away so then when people were moved to new places they had to make do with what little they add so old foods that they would have known before like the kind of things that they would hunt The fruits the vegetables that they would eat are all different now so you could take like the seminole people who started off in Florida that had been ancestral lands. Four hundreds thousands of years and that's in Florida Florida's tropical so after the seminole wars removal occurred to Oklahoma so all these people were forced to walk from Florida. All the way to Oklahoma and Oklahoma is a completely different climates than Florida. So imagine you have to you know. Move to the moon. And what are you going to eat while you're on the Moon Right? They don't have whole foods on the moon didn't have supermarkets there. They don't have the same kind of soil air so then. The government gave people commodities. And so what are these commodities that people are given flower fat sugar other kinds of things that are you know that don't expire so fry? Bread was born from the story of survival of resilience of existence continued existence and now when we eat bread. I like to think of it as a communion of sorts. Right when you if you're a Christian and you have communion or maybe even if you are Jewish and you celebrate Passover you are doing these rituals and it reminds you of something that happened previous in time and it's also a way for people to get together. It's all about community so when people eat fry bread because you always have to cook it for like forty people. You can't just make a single serving of FRY bread. It's impossible so it's coming together of loved ones friends new friends. And you're all sharing in this bread together so it's like breaking bread as a unit of people coming together and it's always fun it smells really great and then in a way it reminds us whenever we eat this where we came from and also attest to the fact that we as native people are still here and we haven't gone anywhere.

Florida Florida Bread Professor Oklahoma FRY United States The New York Times Freiberg
COVID 19 frauds and scams

Native America Calling

9:36 listening | 2 weeks ago

COVID 19 frauds and scams

"This is native America calling. I'm Monica Brain. Scammers will take any opportunity to bilk you out of your money or personal information. Currently they're using the Kovic global pandemic as a way to prey on fears about the uncertainty with the virus and economic issues around the pandemic. Here's one example of a Robo call. Some folks are getting. The Corona virus has caused the. Us declared a national emergency. The Families First Corona Virus Response Act has made corona virus testing more accessible immediately. If you want to receive a free testing kit delivered overnight to your home press one if you do not want your free testing press to do to be clear you cannot take a corona virus test at home. Here's another scam. That involves a mortgage blow due to the krona virus. Mortgage interest rates have dropped an all time low. You may be able to benefit from updated modification in refinance programs. Today we're going to go through a list of scams that are out there and give you tips for avoiding scams altogether. And we'd like to hear from you. Have you been getting calls about in nineteen? Do they involve cures or personal requests for personal information to get your relief? Check call us right now and share your experience you can be an anonymous of the number is eight hundred nine six two eight four eight once again. Is Sean Spruce? He's the programs consultant. He's a programs consultant for First Nations Development Institute and Co hosts the PODCASTS natives on a budget Schon is Laguna Pueblo. Hey Monica how you doing good good? I'm I'm excited to talk about this topic today. Even though it it's a little tricky you know because it involves people who are committing crimes and really taking advantage of Sometimes unsuspecting folks so Have you recently wrote about A scam in your doctor per cap column that involved the Corona Virus. Tell us about it. Yeah absolutely so I got a an email from a woman End into the country and she had received a phone call very late at night from somebody who claim to be her niece and then he said I'm really sick I mean hospital and I've racked up these huge bills because of Cova nineteen. I'm infected and I need help paying the bills and this woman is elderly and she was at home and you know she was again. It was late at night. She wasn't quite isn't allergic. She could have been and she just but it didn't sound quite right so I'm quite like her these even though the woman identified herself as her knees with the right name and everything. Fortunately her nephew was also home and he grabbed the phone and he very quickly could tell that this was a scam. This was not actual niece. It was basically what we call grandparents scam. Where Somebody Will Foam Cau- call it older person and pretend to be a grandchild or niece or nephew and say they're in some kind of trouble and usually it's some kind of trouble with the law or something like that This case this person claim to be sick with covert nineteen and needed help paying medical bills. So fortunately they hung up the phone and that was the end of it but she she sent me an email just to let me know what was going on. And this was something that was headed occurred in her with her personal life and You know these kind of things just always bring out. The worst. In people. Natural disasters are hurricanes earthquakes tornadoes forest fires. You know every time. One of these huge natural disasters or crises erupts. There's always some bad actors scammers fraudsters that look to take advantage and this was an example of that fortunately she wasn't victimized but scary that people will approach somebody or contact. Somebody call somebody like with that kind of a sinister plot to defraud them or steal from them. Yeah I know especially late at night and I I know I would be all confused and take me a minute to realize whether or not I was dreaming or something like that I wonder for that out there to our listeners. Have you ever experienced something like this? Has Someone called and pretended to be your family member and asked You for help And then it turned out that they weren't at all Give us a call and share. The number is one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight vessels one eight hundred nine nine native. I want to add another voice to the conversation. We've got Chuck Harwood on the line. He's the regional director of the Federal Trade Commission for the Northwest Region. Hey there chuck. I'm GONNA so are you. Seeing lots of reports of an increase in scams are the scammers. They're just taking their regular catalogue of Scams and just adding cove in nineteen to it and Is that increasing the answer. To all requested yes That's exactly what's happening. We're seeing lots of reports of scams about liberate. Thousands of reports are scams which in which Cova Nineteen Corona virus being referred to. They are taking their usual catalogue of scams and just tacking on corona virus or Cova nineteen to the for example. The one Sean talked about it they classic grandparent or family. Birds Scam that we've been hearing about for years sometimes traffic accidents or something like that now. They're saying Rovers So Yeah we've seen both. Wow that's That's upsetting to hear so Exactly how okay. Let's talk a little bit more about how this actually works with the grandparent. Scam for example. So you know Sean was saying she was saying she was in the hospital and she needed money if they had continued that conversation. What would happen next chuck? Almost certainly they would have asked for money to be sent They would have said that they need the money immediately. needs to be perfectly overnight faster that the victim can be convinced to get the money in the mail or more likely. Frankly Sent through wire Western Union or these days. They even use know gift cards to send money. like Amazon itunes gift cards That's the way they want to do it. And as soon as the money has sent it disappears and doing impossible to reverse the payment And tumors out the money. It is extraordinarily. You'd think it can't work but extraordinarily common. How often people fall for the scam and my time said one more thing about the scam described in point of an important point important Element in fighting. These scams net is consulting with your friends and neighbors family The example that Sean describe was prevented because the woman who received the call had a family member. She could consult with And that's that's really critical. Find is a lot of people who avoid scams do so because they talk to friends and family members of course in the middle of lockdowns at viruses increasingly hard to do so. They can't further like to fall victim to these games. I had this conversation with my dad. Who's in his late seventies and I told him if somebody calls saying there me and they need money for the emergency room hospital or anything like that or I'm in jail. Just leave. Just tell them now. You can stay there and we'll just go ahead and because that's not gonNA happen. I'M NOT GONNA call you that way. You know our tell them. Oh call your sister and she'll take care of it Which I think is you know I mean I. It seems weird to have a a scam plan. Sean have you talked to folks about that like having conversations with your family members in advance as a preventative measure. Not so much you know like having you know like a plan like a strategy if when whatever and I think because one of the challenges is there are just so many different ways to scam. Somebody and like Chuck mentioned people just continue to Kinda easy same scams. They just always a new twist to them. So you know it's just it's difficult to kind of create a plan because scams can come in so many shapes and sizes and like You know we talked about earlier. Anybody can be a victim of a scam. Anybody can be caught essentially Scam proof impossible. I don't care how much education you have and I don't care how many plans you create can never completely scam proof yourself. And that's because scammers know how to appeal to people's emotions and why again and again when you really effective scam designed to prey on base human emotions. You've got love. Which is those romance scams which are really effective Natural Disaster Death Sickness. Things like that people aren't necessarily thinking clearly they're not thinking straight their emotionally vulnerable and they can be victimized when they're in that setting so yeah. I really encourage people you know. Hang up the phone quickly. Don't engage with a scammer. But not so much of a game plan like which relatives the contractor not to contact although it might be effective for some people to to think like that and come up with you know basic strategy for dealing with some of these issues.

Sean Spruce Chuck Harwood Cova Monica Brain America First Nations Development Inst Consultant Laguna Pueblo Corona Foam Cau Rovers Federal Trade Commission Amazon Regional Director Western Union Northwest Region
Relief fund created for Indigenous, undocumented and mixed-status families

Native America Calling

3:43 listening | 2 weeks ago

Relief fund created for Indigenous, undocumented and mixed-status families

"This is National Native News Antonio Gonzales the native American Community Academy Albuquerque is partnering with the New Mexico Dream Team and schools across New Mexico. Oklahoma and South Dakota to provide monetary relief food supplies. The strong together. Relief Fund serves indigenous undocumented. A mixed down his family's being impacted by covert nineteen grants are intended to help those who are excluded from receiving state or federal aid. The native American Community Academy has already been a family's with food and some supplies during the pandemic will. Kanda is the schools parent facilitator. She says right now. They're serving people who've not needed a four. We have many families that are in a situation that can't Which is very similar to You know other people of Color. They may not be eligible for food. Stamps may not be eligible to get workman unemployment. And they're struggling and so for us. The right thing to do is to help them to. We see them as family so we wanted to provide some type of support and we decided to start doing food boxes on a weekly basis to our families really breaks your heart to see these families that you know used to donate to your food. Drives us to help you know. Help create food boxes and now are the ones that are struggling. Families can apply for the emergency strong together Relief Fund for a stipend of five hundred dollars. The first round of awards will be made next week. A lockdown of the wallop reservation in Arizona will begin Friday night and end Monday morning. The Tribal Council and Incident. Command team initiated the lockdown to help prevent exposure of Cova nineteen to community members as of Thursday health officials reported thirty four positive Cova nineteen cases among local tribal members and other community members and to tribal members reside. In the city of Kingman. More lockdowns may be held throughout the month to help prevent the spread of Ed Nineteen. Now the whole leaders are encouraging people to stay home this mother's Day weekend and follow emergency health and safety orders as the tribe offer support to people across the reservation. Teams are delivering food. Water firewood masks. Cleaning products and other essential items as governor Doug ducey begins lifting restrictions coconino county. Supervisor Lena Fowler is cautioning people here's Fowler in video message at a delivery site in the community of KB Toys Zona. Three Lee and Coconino County. Her supervisor's we don't see that we don't have those checkoffs that he had done saying that. There's already it's safe to go back. We don't see that in our county so we call the governor on that so in our region just wanted that you don't have that we don't see that Navajo. Health officials reported an increase of one hundred and three new cases. Thursday bringing the number of total positive cases for the Navajo nation to two thousand seven hundred and fifty seven. The Oklahoma Indian Gaming Association has removed two tribes as members from its organization. The board membership of the Association voted this week to amend its Bilaz and suspend the Comanche nation and Oto Missouri tribe for the rest of the year. The Gaming Group suspended the tribes for what it called not working. In the best interest of the association the two tribes had recently signed gaming compacts with the state as other tribes stand in a gaming dispute with the governor in statements both tribes pointed to tribal sovereignty and rights to negotiate new compacts. The tribes may seek reinstatement of membership. Which the board would vote on other tribes have been fighting the state of gaming compacts for months and some filed a federal lawsuit. I'm Antonio

Oklahoma Indian Gaming Associa American Community Academy Relief Fund Coconino County Antonio Gonzales Supervisor Lena Fowler Governor Doug Ducey American Community Academy Alb Cova Ed Nineteen Tribal Council And Incident New Mexico New Mexico Dream Team Gaming Group Oklahoma Kingman Supervisor South Dakota Kb Toys
Whole Family Wellness

All My Relations Podcast

8:13 listening | 2 weeks ago

Whole Family Wellness

"Let's start by having you introduce yourselves the way you would to a large group of people So I was born and raised in the area. That is now known as North Dakota. I'm from the Turtle Mountain Band of my Mom's side of the family. So I'm initial Bay and I'm Papa Lakota from the Standing Rock on my Dad's side of the family I lived on the East Coast for a number of years where I went to college at Dartmouth and I went to Grad School at Columbia University for Journalism and I am now the mom to a one year old and the partner to fashion. We live together in Phoenix Arizona where we run our our initiative called while for Culture. So wellness is my passion. I'm also a writer and a journalist but pretty much everything I do. Now is like health and family related Well softball scoop dodged everyone to the both of you and for those. That had a chance to me on. Yep Suga cash on knock to damage over jude are Choon. I'm from the Salt River. People around this area right here and Just happy to be here sup without the ATHOL AENA. Happy to be sitting here to be speaking with both of you. And it's awesome and you guys are one of our favorite podcasts and so we are just honored to be here and wanted to say thank you to the for the awesome work that you're doing with this in just around native country and the individual work you know we worked together. Matija in the past and I worked a little bit with us well at college horizon. So it's awesome to be here in this space to be able to be discussing more of these so very happy with that also work with the native Wellness Institute. I'm a board member there and I've been working with them now for about ten years now and Chelsea said one of the CO founders in our initiative that we call wealth for culture and and as Chelsea had said as well. Wellness is something. That's definitely my passion and the wellness that's rooted within our people and sexual ways. Yeah something that. I'm very passionate about and Just very Excited to try to share what little we know in this area of health and wellness as it pertains to family as you said and we know that that's a big part of of our communities you know it's it's the strong communities are built by our strong families and that's really the root of healing in the root of preserving and maintaining evolving. Our indigene are families and I think that's one of the most beautiful things we can put our energy and effort to especially in Mike this. You know when it's just we have so much going on and on world you know so my heart is full and I'm happy I you know I think the other thing. That's really cool. Is that you know you're a photographer. And you danced for years right with your work with Rohan long on the street. Dance B boy crews and stuff Yeah I didn't think about that what I think about this work. You do too because it's kind of like you know this evolution of becoming these. These people like Chelsea talks about you know going to Dartmouth and Columbia and becoming a journalist and and then you yourself. It's like being a photographer and working in industry and it takes so many different skills to put out content on a regular basis. And you know you to have been developing those skills for a really long time so maybe we could start just having you talk a little about the origins of welfare culture. And and your purpose and what that means to you individually. Well we founded in twenty fourteen shortly after I met. Actually we both were on our own individual healing and wellness journeys And we came together as friends and we did this cool photo. Shoot Auch Photograph me as it was at the time we were calling it like an urban warrior kind of thing but it was just this really cool fitness that we did in your city but meanwhile we were having all these conversations talking about how you know healthy. Lifestyles really are congruent. With our ancestral ways. Both of us were raised in ceremony. But both of us also kind of went the wayside with that a little bit You know during our teens and twenties and you know moving away both both of us moving away from our reservoirs and into cities and kind of just exploring the world and but eventually coming full circle back to that and so it was really cool because I connected as friends through that shared passion for connecting wellness with with our culture. At the time. We realized that there wasn't a lot of imagery of healthy active strong native people and we wanted to change that and so we co founded while for culture and it started as a website and an instagram and facebook page and then it quickly grew into basically this consulting business in Marietta. Other things that we do as well. Yeah we got together because like Jesse had said she was doing journalism. And as you'd mentioned I was doing photography and I after a while. I really wanted to start to kind of help. Help help with the movement that that you're contributing to your work is just to help to portray this our image. You know what I mean that we do have in our communities that often doesn't portrayed in so we started really like she said delve into that and we started really looking at it. And you know I was coming from a perspective of coming. From my community where diabetes obesity cardiovascular heart disease is really super high high in comparison to the non native people that are live on the border. Just a couple miles away you know. The life expectancy is just the gap between is is insane and so I was coming from from that perspective. That how we need to we need to really reclaim our health. And we need to put our health for first and foremost in our diginity to continue on and for me it was it was it was moved my body exercising and training and Alice really trying to draw those connections between that in and being a part of the community and We share a lot. Two of my personal observation is that I watched the the the the the community. I guess involvement and ceremonial things that bring wellness and love and happiness declined because of poor health. People can't show up so I just got really driven on this. This thing like you know we need to. We need to reclaim our health. In whatever way that is for people you know for me was exercising and know trend to really strengthen my relationship to food and so we got together and we start man this is. There's so much more than just you know putting out an image of somebody working out and trying to encourage and motivate people. That's a big part of it. You know but there's certainly a lot more to it so you know. We delved into it to try to create more of a wellness model. That was kind of rooted in in a lot of our cultural values and just kind of going around native country with my work. With Native Wellness Institute the Focus was always on on for sure was pinpointing historic trauma was healing but we didn't see the inclusion a lot of bringing a healthy lifestyle once again. It's as far as physical health. Bring our foods right back into the conversation healing or bringing movement and into the conversation. We're really seeing that so much too and I think that that's sort of like our generations contribution like it's what we're doing this all of us living here now so we really kind of just tried to go forward with that and develop it over the years and later on we became a family and and we realized that everything we were we were coming up with in creating and learning about and putting into practice and sharing about and doing workshops and trainings on was. We're things that we have this opportunity now to live that into model that and to to show that and I think that that's one of the most powerful things we can do is just model that you know model that that that wellness of that. Good life for all of our families to see you know. We're we're strengthening that spirit of wellness step brings families together increase healing once again to you know when when anyone participates in that and so and so you know. That's that's how we got to where we are with it today and as you said now we are really you know as a young family moving forward with that

Native Wellness Institute Chelsea Dartmouth North Dakota Turtle Mountain Phoenix Arizona Salt River Papa Lakota Athol Aena Writer Jude East Coast Partner Rohan Columbia University For Journa Grad School Columbia Mike Instagram Jesse
Whole Family Wellness

All My Relations Podcast

9:25 listening | 2 weeks ago

Whole Family Wellness

"Hello friends and relatives. Welcome back to another episode of All. My relations were so happy. You're here Hello. Good morning good afternoon. Good evening hello hello. We have a really great episode for you today. We're talking with DOS Collins and Chelsea Lugar of the welfare culture initiative. They are two of our friends and colleagues who we have known for a long time in different areas of their life And we recorded this episode of few months ago back when Michigan was still pregnant so it was a really amazing opportunity to talk with them about the work that they do In thinking about wellness from a really kind of holistic perspective and indigenous perspective and how that takes into account we eat how we move our bodies what we think about especially during The time of life that Mantica was en and that Chelsea had been in not long Before her so we were bonus. Double excited 'cause we knew we had this episode coming and a couple of weeks ago in the New York Times. There was an article about food movements in Indian country and it featured Some really beautiful photographs of Fashion Chelsea and their daughter aloe And talked to them a little bit about the work they do. So what we thought. That could be a really great entry point into our conversation. thinking that many people might have encountered. They're work recently in the New York Times but then again I started actually reading the article and the article did what did what we always see. Which is that. It reinforced that poverty porn narrative and framed native people. You know from this perspective that put them in a place of of danger of survival as extinction they think it's essentially another extinction narrative. Almost and so I'd be really interested Adrian and in wondering how you might frame that if you were going to let say bright this article for the New York Times Okay so I am someone in my education research world. I think a lot about what we call deficit framing and it's something that You see a lot in research about quote unquote marginalized communities about native students in particular Where our communities? Our students are whoever we're talking about are always framed as lacking as As needing interventions as needing resources as being just framed is in a deficit Perspective and the difference between a deficit perspective. And then one. That is more in my work. I used the word. Goodness focus or like Asset based is looking at things from a position of strength and what communities already have and what they're bringing to the table and so this article is from the beginning. It's called how native Americans are fighting food crisis and the subtitle is as the corona virus limits access to food many are relying on customs like seed saving and canning that helped their forebears survive hard times so from the start. It's framed as though the corona virus is what is causing a food crisis in Indian country. And because of this moment all of a sudden people are returning to stroll knowledge is in traditional customs quote unquote which is like a word. I hate It's very anthropological. But they go on to The reporter interviews people that are incredible leaders in these areas in their communities. Folks that she actually Got Access to a lot of the names from my friend and colleague Liz Hoover who is an incredible food sovereignty researcher who is not mentioned anywhere in the article but The folks that are profiled in here people that we know their their names through this work. Milo yellow hair in weight loss and Chelsea Rebecca and Stephen Webster in night a Folks in San Carlos like it's just a a list of really incredible leaders but they're all framed as there's a crisis and they are reacting to it rather than if I would have written this article to your question. I very clearly would have framed. This as here is a moment where we are worried about the food supply chain in what is currently known as the United States. And here's a chance for us to look to indigenous communities as leaders in how to take care of one another and how to use and social and traditional knowledge is that have always been there To lead us through this moment and into a future that looks different than what we have now. A better and brighter future around our food and food security because a lot of these communities that are profiled here actually like aren't in a moment of crisis around their food systems they are just shifting their policies and practices to to what people are needing right now. And that's a beautiful model that a lot of communities be learning from like the work that Brian Yazdi is doing in. Minneapolis around feeding Urban elders and community members through traditional foods. That in itself is an amazing story. And instead it's just a little blip in this article about how he didn't have any catering jobs so started volunteering. So I just think the framing of it overall could have really been from this point of strength talking about that. Our communities know how to help one another no. The power of traditional foods know how to work with the land that they live on All of these things that are really important lessons for everyone rather than framing it as some sort of food crisis and yes like we do have food insecurity in Indian country. There's also a lot of amazing lessons that can be learned from the work that these folks have been doing for decades. This isn't something that just popped up in the last few months lifetimes of work that people have been putting in to get us to this point to be able to access those resources and serve our communities in the ways that they need right Like the the ability. I noticed in this article that they talk about some Alaska fishermen and hunters and that these folks are doing this. You know to prepare for crisis. When in fact we know especially I being able to relate to fishing culture that we go fishing and put up food for winter and every springtime. You know it's something that my family has been doing for generations and our communities have been doing generations and it's a part of the intergenerational knowledge that we highly value in our communities. I was taken back when I read the book about Rohan White Because Rohan white is one of those women that Hey I hope we introduce you to on this podcast but B. I think of a Shiro. She's one of my. She's one of the most inspiring women I've ever encountered in all of Indian country. I had the privilege of taking one of her seed saving workshops and I was so moved by her indigenous intelligence her connection to land in her connection to seeds. And how empowering an empowered I felt after spending just one afternoon with her where she gave me seeds and made me feel like it was okay to grow them and how that important and she's been doing this work for a very long time and she started a whole food sovereignty movement along with Liz and others and in this article it talks about her growing heirloom seeds. Which is I think. It's just wrong. Because she doesn't grow heirloom seeds. She grows pre colonized seeds. Oh she she grows ancestral seeds. And you know it also says that she's doing this as a as a response to closed casino revenue which is so silly ruins been doing this empowering people because the people needed and because she was called to do this work and because she's been doing it for a really long time and I don't want to speak for her you know but I just. I'm really disappointed with the way that we are. Continuously framed in massive media and mass media especially in this New York Times article. I really hope that there will come a time that maybe instead you get to write the article nuts an outsider writing it for us.

New York Times Liz Hoover Adrian Chelsea Rohan White Chelsea Lugar Chelsea Rebecca United States Alaska Dos Collins San Carlos Michigan Reporter Brian Yazdi Mantica
President Trump hosts Native American roundtable in Arizona

Native America Calling

3:57 listening | 2 weeks ago

President Trump hosts Native American roundtable in Arizona

"This is national native news. I'm Antonio Gonzales. President Trump signed a proclamation acknowledging missing and murdered Indigenous People Tuesday during a visit to Arizona which included a round discussion with Navajo Nation Vice President Myron laser and his wife Dottie laser and Hilo River Indian community governor Stephen Role Lewis dotty. Liser is an advocate working on missing murdered indigenous women issues. The President M I W is a growing issue on the Navajo nation. Here's part of her comments from livestream of the meeting on C. Span with the Ashland Mike case that came up in two thousand sixteen where she was kidnapped and raped and murdered in New Mexico. May Second Two thousand sixteen. So that's kind of open the door for Navajo to start saying okay. We need to do something. Because I became the forefront and so since then the amber alert on that one nation has gotten better but still needs help with funding. Still needs help with getting the data together. The roundtable lasted about thirty minutes and included discussions about cove nineteen which has hit the Navajo nation. Hard this week. The number of positive Navajo cases exceeded two thousand five hundred tribes across the country have been waiting for federal cove. Nineteen Relief Eight. Eight billion dollars is set aside for tribes in the Cares Act. President trump commented about the funding including the amount to the Navajo nation as he joked with vice. President Liser is the single largest investment in Indian country in our history. So the amount of money that's being sent to Indian country as we call it is the largest amount in the history of the US. And you deserve. And you've been through a lot in the Navajo. Nation will soon receive over six hundred million dollars. That's a lot. Can renegotiate community door. Go up before the Hilo River Indian community is set to receive forty million dollars. Disbursement has been delayed. The Treasury Department announced Tuesday a plan to begin payments to tribes which includes holding back amounts for Alaska native corporations due to pending litigation more than a dozen tribes sued over the inclusion of Alaskan native corporations in the funding he l- River Indian community governor Steven Lewis commented about the funding at the end of the meeting urging for the immediate release of the money and also saying the eight billion dollars is woefully inadequate to meet the needs of tribes. Nothing Empire. I'm trying getting some of the money out today. I WanNa thank you. Also because we need help now Indian tribes and can't wait for that litigation to end before from the and also governor Lewis also asked for a cap to be put on the amount anyone tribe receives and to allow tribes to have flexible guidance to keep their governments running. The Treasury. Department's plan is to begin allocating sixty percent of the eight billion this week. Two tribes the president of the Rosebud Sioux tribe in South Dakota declared an immediate lockdown of community Tuesday due to Cova Nineteen President Rodney Bordeaux and a social media message declared the lockdown of the Spring Creek community due to a high exposure of covert nineteen law enforcement will be monitoring roads and no one will be allowed inner out of Spring Creek. The message states lockdown is to protect the rest of the communities from the spread of cove nineteen the tribal assist people in need of food and supplies. No other information was shared. A number of tribes in South Dakota have taken emergency measures to address cove in nineteen including the Oglala Sioux tribe which issued a reservation white lockdown down and the Cheyenne River Sioux tribe monitoring borders among several of. Its emergency measures.

Hilo River Indian Community President Liser President Trump Navajo Vice President Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe Treasury Department L- River Indian Community Antonio Gonzales South Dakota Dottie Laser Governor Lewis Stephen Role Lewis Spring Creek Arizona United States Treasury Steven Lewis New Mexico
Yurok Tribe and seven tribal governments file lawsuit over COVID-19 aid

Native America Calling

3:53 listening | 3 weeks ago

Yurok Tribe and seven tribal governments file lawsuit over COVID-19 aid

"This is National Native News Antonio Gonzales the LEMME nation in Washington state has extended a shelter in place mandate through may thirtieth which also includes a nightly curfew on Friday. The LemMe Public Health Department reported sixteen New Positive Cases of cove nineteen between Wednesday and Friday and on Saturday reported two more cases bringing the total to forty in the community. Tribal and health officials are urging people to stay home and follow social distancing orders as the cluster is traced to families visiting other households public health memos to the community from the health department at age demographics to show infection rate for people under forty. The most state families and children are not following shelter in place or social distancing. LemMe Business Council Chair Lawrence. Solomon in a video message. Friday said he's deeply concerned. The measures were changing. Turn you and your once. I understand that it's against their culture to stay away from our sisters brothers. Mothers fathers grandparents ran shoulder aunties uncles and cousins. Birth in the same household refrained from visiting shorter period of time. The LemMe Public Health Department had not reported new positive cases in weeks. The Euro tribe and seven other tribal governments have filed a federal lawsuit against the US Treasury Department to Release Covert Nineteen Relief Aid to tribes and the cares act. The Billion Dollars set aside for tribes was to be distributed by April twenty six according to the tribe a separate lawsuit involving the inclusion of Alaska native corporations held up funding but tribal leaders are calling for the quick release of the money to help respond to the corona virus. Your Chairman Joseph James and a statement said the Treasury needs to honor its obligation to tribes adding the health and Wellness of native citizens depend on it tribal plaintiffs in California Arizona. Wyoming Oklahoma and Washington state filed the lawsuit last week seeking disbursement of funds new interactive series features. Native artists combining creativity and company to help promote wellness during the pandemic China. Lock it house. More about a dozen people from across the state tune into a video. Chat as Michael Gives instructions grabbed objects from their house. It could be anything salt Shaker. An apple asks everyone to draw object with whatever medium? They have pencil pen krantz and he joins in after fifteen minutes to both sets down his tools and asks her. This prompt is what makes the class unique. It's not about learning to draw. It's about bringing people together and doing something fun. And during the pandemic goal Nassau. Xiaoli facilitates the class. She reads off some answers from participants as feeling accomplished thank you. That was a very chill fifteen minutes. Thankyou says I shake all you works with the Racing Magpie Art Gallery. She also works with South Dakota's branch of the National Alliance on mental health or Nami. It's an organization that provides education and support to people with mental illness. Both organizations are teaming up for the virtual wellness workshop. Creating whether it's writing or drawing or painting like is an opportunity to tap into oneself and to be able to do that safely because you have control like you have your foot on the gas and the brake and you can decide how deep you go when you need to pull back. How you want to engage. Especially if workshops are being facilitated safely unconsciously the wellness workshops are open to the public. Three more artists are scheduled through me. I'm trying to lock it in rapid city and demand. Tony Gonzalez

Lemme Public Health Department Xiaoli Us Treasury Department Washington Solomon Antonio Gonzales Me Business Council Alaska Treasury Tony Gonzalez Racing Magpie Art Gallery Nassau Apple Chairman Wyoming Michael South Dakota Joseph James California
Charlotte Evans Saulteaux

The Storyteller

8:04 listening | 3 weeks ago

Charlotte Evans Saulteaux

"I know I used to be afraid of dying because I didn't know where I was going to go. I hope that I would go to heaven but I didn't have that assurance that I was Gonna go there so I used to be afraid Steig good. Welcome my friends to the storyteller. You'll find first nations people from across native North America who are following Jesus Christ without reservation. Charlotte was afraid to die because she didn't know wish he would go. If you've ever wondered whether you're good enough to get to Heaven Charlotte story may help you. Hello My name is Charlotte Evans and My husband is clea but I grew up allowed people but my background. Soto Indian My mother was Soto and my dad gave Pelley scatcherd and he was meaty. I come from Swan of a Manitoba. Four sisters and one brother we will put a family. My mother and my dad struggled to get by but my dad always worked and always made sure that there was food on the table for US growing up and they thank the Lord that even though I didn't know him then that my mom always made us go to Sunday School We always had every morning. She'd wake us up to go to Sunday school and I said just love going to Sunday school to heal about Jesus and that different miracles that he had that he did and go to Sunday school. I think I liked it because I felt safe there because in our home though as a lot of alcohol and and so when I go to Sunday school I used to just love being there and healing stories about missionaries. Who went to Africa told US stories about both helping the people there and in my heart I had this desire when I was young to be a missionary but I never ever thought that I would be one. I was the oldest one at home growing up my other. Two oldest sisters. They were in foster home and they always had to do everything I had to. Wa- wash always said help. My mom wash clothes and hang them up and I know I missed quite a bit of school to helping at home. I didn't Lake my mom. Very much. Issue was really strict. She wouldn't let us run around. She wouldn't let us go to offense too often to go play but I think the lawyer that she was strict. Because that taught me that. I think that helped me as I got older. When I did start sneaking out it helped me to to sort of understand the difference between right and wrong because I didn't feel that I was a bad person. I didn't do anything that was really bad but God says at every little center's bad no matter what it is whether it's stealing lion or mood too but I always felt that I was good enough and I didn't realize then about having a personal relationship with Jesus. I was a fleet to die because I didn't know where I was going to go. I knew there was a heaven and a hell to go to hell if you go there. It's a place where you're going to burn and fire for the unity. Where if you go to heaven you'll be there with God and it's a beautiful place and I knew that God was God and he had to sudden name in his son's name was Jesus but I didn't have that piece. I guess and my life assurance said if I died I was going to go to heaven. I hoped I would go there but I didn't know if I was going to go there. I just thought I was good enough as I got older. I let away from home when I was sixteen because of all the digging. The my mom drink a lot. My Dad worked. He worked a lot out in the Bhushan and logging and he cooked in logging camps and my mom's Acre Lot and I didn't like being at home whether it was alcohol. I always used to wish that I could put in a foster home so Eilat away hoping that I would be put in one but I never did get put in one. I ended up in sketchy on the Nice stayed with a family there. I lived with a family for about a year before I went back home because I was lonesome so I went back home and then I was only home for probably a year and a half and then I was in Churchill for a while. With one of my oldest sister's my mom had to families who first husband died and then she made my dad and even when I lived in Churchill. I used to want to go to church sometimes but my friends. I had would always make fun of me so I wouldn't go but you know I the Lord I think was already looking in my life but I didn't know it at the time and then after I came back from Churchill and decided to go to school to bring up my upgrading because I didn't finish great twelve when I was at home. That's what I met. My husband fled was one of my instructors at school one of my teachers that I had and I used to notice that he was different different than the other people allowed him. That weren't saved and I don't know something just like drew me to him. And he used to come and set with asset coffee break and and then he used to mention the Loyd once in a while but he never but he didn't like really push it on anybody and then he used to bring these little tract papers to school and he'd had them give the he gave me somewhat in awhile and I take them to read them and then after that and he asked me to go to youth group with him because he used to go to youth group at a place called Big Edie in the paw parties of and so I started going with him when he asked me. And that's when I I met Mr and Mrs mccomb Clifford Aboard McColl and they were talking about the Lord and I used to like going there because I felt at peace. And and then I met Jay Uneven Jennings was staying with them. He was administered apart. That time and I went to a few times for suppler for asthma to go the for supper. And he used to talk about the Loyd and then he asked him on time Charlotte to you know the Lord and I said I said no. I did not understand what he meant to you. Know the Loyd and they said no is him and just talk to me about salvation. Then they asked me one time I wanted to accept the Loyd and I wanted to see yes but I was scared to say yes because I thought well. We'll buy accept the Loyd than I can't can't go out and do things like drink with my friends and that I thought I'd have to change until I have to think about it so every time we went there when I go there with he would just talk to me and then one time that I was in. May and I just felt that the Loyd told me that I should ask Jesus into my heart. So that's when Mr Jennings kneel down with the coach and we played and when he played with me I could tell that there was a change because it felt like something was lifted from me like I felt lighter and I felt different when I asked Jesus to come into my heart.

Loyd Heaven Charlotte Jesus Charlotte Churchill Charlotte Evans United States Steig Soto North America Mrs Mccomb Clifford Aboard Mcc Mr Jennings Eilat Jay Uneven Jennings Manitoba WA Bhushan Pelley
Virtual Indigenous commencement celebrates 2020 Indigenous graduates

Native America Calling

3:45 listening | 3 weeks ago

Virtual Indigenous commencement celebrates 2020 Indigenous graduates

"This is national native news. Antonio Gonzales the Mescalero Apache tribe is calling for the resignation of us. Assistant Secretary of Indian Affairs Tara. Sweeney the New Mexico tribe sent a letter to president trump this week raising concerns about Sweeney's ties to Alaskan native corporations and their inclusion in the eight billion dollars and treble cove in nineteen relief aid in the Cares Act Mescalero. Apache president gave Aguilar believed Sweeney has a conflict of interest as a former businesswoman. For An Alaskan Native Corporation. Aguilar says Mescalero is joining other tribes. Which have already called for her to resign. Time of quogue nineteen. We've been working very hard with the with everybody in the federal government working with our lobbyists and we just been trying to push and push it has come to our attention that You know mysteriously has tried to a lot corporation you know it's money set aside for tribes or a bunch of tribal leaders have been on calls. We've been talking and saying how unfair this was you know so we didn't feel it was right so we. I'm of us. We went ahead and just says you know what it's right. We can't have somebody in there representing you know. Other corporations besides tribes in mid April the Great Plains Tribal Chairmen's association similar letter to the trump administration accusing Sweeney of seeking to divert emergency treble cove in nineteen eight to Alaska native corporations a spokesperson from the Interior Department. Said it's false. Sweeney has attempted to divert funds away from American Indians and on the talk show native America calling Tuesday Sweeney commented about the controversy. I want to reiterate the I am and will continue to be committed to supporting all American Indians. And Alaskan natives My approach has always been focused on inclusiveness transparency and partnerships and I was raised with high ethical standards and I take those responsibilities seriously I made sure that my participation was evaluated by career ethics officials who determine that there was no statutory or regulatory prohibitions in the administration's ethics pledge that would limit my participation in consulting with Treasury As they went to implement the the Cares Act the issue of Alaska native corporations eligibility for Tribal Cares Act. Funding isn't federal court. Sweeney declined to comment on the litigation. Meanwhile tribal leaders including Aguilar say. They're waiting on much-needed treble cove. Nineteen relief aid. Several national organizations are hosting the event virtual indigenous commencement on facebook Friday. They're recognizing native students as cove in nineteen has cancelled graduation ceremonies and celebrations across the country. Graduates families and friends can share photos videos or comments. Melvin Monette Beraha says President and CEO of indigenous education. One of the hosts he says are already more than forty five hundred participants. Beautiful are excited to be able to share their photos People do feel a little bad. I think that they are not receiving their cap and gown Like they were going to so. We're asking people's supposed excited pictures of their treatment in their personal celebration. Maybe they're in their traditional regalia. Maybe they're not maybe photos of them throughout the year just to share who they are and what they're going to do next. The celebration is for graduates of all grades. The Hash Tags are twenty twenty native Grad and deer native graduates. The virtual commencement will continue through this summer. I Antonio's Gonzales.

Sweeney Alaskan Native Corporation Aguilar Mescalero Antonio Gonzales Alaska Great Plains Tribal Chairmen Assistant Secretary President Trump Melvin Monette Beraha Quogue New Mexico President And Ceo Facebook Apache Gonzales Interior Department Treasury America
Southern Ute Tribe’s stay-at-home order continues, as Colorado loosens restrictions. New Mexico governor says she’ll continue to advocate for resources for Navajo Nation. Native artist in South Dakota talks about financial hit due to COVID-19 measures.

Native America Calling

3:59 listening | Last month

Southern Ute Tribe’s stay-at-home order continues, as Colorado loosens restrictions. New Mexico governor says she’ll continue to advocate for resources for Navajo Nation. Native artist in South Dakota talks about financial hit due to COVID-19 measures.

Lawrence Alfred Navajo Part 3

The Storyteller

10:11 listening | Last month

Lawrence Alfred Navajo Part 3

"Steig good welcome my friends to the storyteller where you'll find first nations people from across native North America who are following Jesus Christ without reservation the change that Christ grease into the heart of men is unmistakable. That's what happened to Lawrence Alfred from the Navajo Nation. When he decided to follow Jesus Christ after that I was at work and the sky he named Santa Latsman less bless his heart. He he sent something. That was wrong with me we. We became real good France and he told me he says you know Lawrence. You know I know you're not you're running away from something and he says I sense that you are married and you're running around with these ladies. I have the ability to tell him. Quit talking to me. Because he was a good friend of mine and he had me over a Bible and told me Jesus can help me as I was reading my Bible a couple of weeks after the ceremony for me. I was prompted to read the Bible and I opened the Bible. Now a seredin. I came to a chapter in John Chapter Ten. I really love this. I in this part of my testimony and hit me right between between the I and it's in John Chapter Ten Verse Eleven Ridden Audit An IV and. It says that I am the Good Shepherd Jesus talking. He says I am the Good Shepherd. The Good Shepherd leads down his life for the sheep. The hired hand is not the shepherd who owns the sheep so when he sees the wolf coming he abandoned sheep and runs away then. The Wolf attacks and scatters the man runs away because he is a hired hand and cares nothing forty sheep. I am the

Good Shepherd Lawrence Alfred Navajo Nation North America Santa Latsman France John Lawrence
How Indigenous people are making connections and finding support during COVID-19 pandemic

Unreserved

4:22 listening | Last month

How Indigenous people are making connections and finding support during COVID-19 pandemic

"Is it important for you? To use ingredients from an indigenous worldview so to speak so becoming a chef and focusing on indigenous Lou cultures of the Americas know within the last seven years researching and in gaining knowledge. I realized that you know knowing where food comes from seasonally you know and food is our medicine and we have to continue serving or ancestral foods. No special bearing a timely. Today you know just serving on for example sage or Cedar T. for example has a lot of anti oxidants you know has a lot of these on properties that are able to help with your immune system Now you've been making large batches of food for weeks now. What would you say is the best dish that you've created on Tuesdays? We we try and and follow the traditional culinary restaurant scene. If you may so every Tuesday we do talk. Oh I know so instead of serving India Tacos we we. We focus on the South List and a Mexican style tacos of using fresh corn tortillas in Cedar Braids Bikes and hominy temporary beans. Oh my gosh. My mouth is watering right now. Brian so why do you think it's important particularly during this difficult time for people to turn to community and each other for support you know for me be? Navajo? The southwest and residing here in Dakota and territories. You know I feel like this. Is My second home being here as a chef and having a platform that I have I feel like I can use that as a tool to my advantage. So how this community dot org are forgotten about daring the ZAPPA crisis and why does send a native American elders? What inspired you to focus on them. Specifically something needed you know is just not only talk about unity when we talk about commute to you know we got to. Nali look towards our next generation of kids but also look into our roots and elders no showing that respect shown dot common love of where we came from. Well thank you so much for your efforts and your time today Brian. Thank you for the opportunity to share a story in the work that we are doing. Brian. Yeah Z. Is a Navajo Chef based out of Minneapolis? In addition to cooking. Up MEALS FOR ELDERS. Brian also sharing how to cooking videos on his youtube channel which focuses on indigenous ingredients to check out photos of some of his culinary creations. Check out our website at CBC DOT CA slash unreserved. So all in here is part of our traditional homelands this is attritional Gary Oak ecosystem which is part of our traditional food systems. So there's some more beautiful folks. I hope that you can see the chemists in bloom and we'll try to find some are walk. That was Cheryl. Bryce walking through Megan also known as Beacon Hill Park in Victoria. Her walk was shared on Instagram. Live through a series curated by the open space gallery. And it's one of the many ways that Cheryl is helping her community connect with nature. Right now Cheryl is from the song. He's nation traditionally known as Liikanen Cheryl. Welcome back to the show. Oh hello thank you for inviting me so tell me. Why did you want to do this? Virtual Nature Walk. I narrowed that everyone is staying home right now. And connecting to family and land in different ways into this is another way to connect to our homelands but also to educate and provide opportunity for people staying home to be able to visit these sites. Virtually and having me as a local indigenous women and From the songs nation being able to talk about the history of the land and this is just one spot. I wanted to share with everyone within my community in the greater community to connect with lands. Even if it's virtually right now

Liikanen Cheryl Brian Cbc Dot Ca Navajo Gary Oak Youtube Dakota Minneapolis Beacon Hill Park Victoria Bryce Megan
The realities of coronavirus aid distribution

Native America Calling

5:30 listening | Last month

The realities of coronavirus aid distribution

"Stimulus money for the federal cares act was scheduled to start flowing tribes this month but there have been a few snakes. Currently the Treasury has yet to announce how they will distribute the entire eight billion tribal dollars in Corona Relief Funds Corona virus really funds but in addition the distribution of the money in the cares act is drawing considerable backlash from tribes over what they see as an inequities and it's becoming clear that a generous As the relief is it won't come close to some estimates for what is needed to spare tribes the worst of the damage To both public and health and local economies. One of the biggest fights in all of this is over aid going to Alaska. Native corporations a lawsuit filed by tribes and tribal organizations is on the table in federal court to try and stop the mill multibillion dollar for profit entities from getting money they say is intended for federally recognized tribes and of course Alaskan Native Corporation say otherwise today. We'll get more perspective on that but we'd also like to hear from you. What do you think about all of this or even eight billion dollars set aside for tribes? The number to join us is one eight hundred nine nine. Six two eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native today. We're GONNA start off in Alaska Mike Williams. He is a tribal chief of the AC EAC native community and he is Our pleasure to have him here with us. Chief Williams. Welcome good to be here. Thank you end Mike There seems to be a lot of shifting and changing when it comes to all of this including a hearing that took place this morning and anything you can report to us on the latest of what you heard in that hearing this morning. Well I got up five o'clock this morning and got in Alaska time at five thirty and And listen to the hearing this morning and and and I think success that I've heard this morning is That judge denied the DOJ from Extension to Monday and The schedule will be extended for twenty four hours only and And I heard that. Doj's brief Do this evening at five. Pm and And their reply will be Tomorrow noon and And the hearing begins tomorrow afternoon And you know things could change along the way. But that's what I heard this morning into Mike would actually is up in the air I think The dishes in for the Treasury to decide to into the Alaskan native corporations In Culver Nineteen money And that is in Dispute Right now and And that's what I'm hearing. And that's what's in there in. So Mike would was the justification that the the OJ used for wine and extension. What was it they were still working on. I am not sure I think Concerns that We have Was that The deadline is on Sunday. The April twenty six to distribute the money to the tribes and If there is an extension there's questions of That money You know Is who would be in question and But You know we're happy. That's judge I did not extended to Monday in for you Mike. If it were extended beyond Sunday what would that mean to you? Would you say that the government has not filled its obligation? Yes I think With the Emergency situation that we are in With the covert nineteen starring in our face that It's That money has to Land to the hands of tribal governments to fight this pandemic. That is Threatening are Community residents Right now we have seen And heard the stories of my grandmother In the pandemic of nineteen eighteen where there were mass deaths in ack-ack and other villages here and mass burials and that left a lot of orphans In our villages here and that didn't stop there with TB TB epidemic and but it's staring in our face and we cannot Delay that all that measures to To get to our tribal governments

Alaskan Native Corporation Mike Alaska Chief Williams Treasury DOJ TB Culver
Another round of court hearings on Keystone XL Pipeline. U.S. Oregon Senators advocate for tribal COVID-19 funds.

Native America Calling

3:42 listening | Last month

Another round of court hearings on Keystone XL Pipeline. U.S. Oregon Senators advocate for tribal COVID-19 funds.

"This is National Native News Antonio Gonzalez another hearing was held last week in federal court involving the keystone xl pipeline largely centering on the reach of president. Trump's two thousand nineteen unilateral permit government. Lawyers say it allows only the one point two miles of pipeline needed to cross the US. Canada border opponents say it enables hundreds of miles of pipeline through Montana South Dakota and Nebraska Victoria wicks reports pipeline. Opponents were heartened by an order. Judge Brian Morris issued the day before the hearing in a separate but related case he found that the US Army Corps of Engineers permitted the K. XL pipeline without considering potential damage to endangered species and habitat and he ruled not see energy cannot build through approximately six hundred and eighty eight waterways along the three state route until the core has done a more thorough analysis. Sierra Club Attorney Doug Hayes explains that April Fifteenth Order Army Corps has to engage in further Environmental Review further consultation under the endangered species act before it can reissue. Nationwide permit twelve itself as also points out. There are no waterways in the one point two mile border-crossing at the April Sixteenth. Hearing an attorney for the Rosebud. Sioux tribe says pipeline. Construction will harm the tribes mineralised states. Along the pipeline's route a government attorney response that the tribe has no mineral estates in that one point two mile stretch at the border pipelines supporters say treaty violations and damage to land water and cultural sites is a problem to be addressed by state and local governments. Not The feds judge. Morris will consider granting summary Judgment to one side or the other and will also rule on plaintiff's request in light of the covert nineteen pandemic for a halt to construction that has begun in the one point. Two Mile Corridor for national native news in Victoria Wicks in rapid city. South Dakota Colvin. Nineteen relief funds need to be administered quickly to tribes say some US lawmakers as KFC's. Brian Buhl reports senators. Jeff Merkley and Ron. Wyden want stimulus aid to not adhere to population based formula. The Oregon. Democrats argue that such a formula limits tribes abilities to help their respective communities most are small scattered in rural areas where infrastructure and services are often underfunded and dated Senator Wyden the tribes have been hit very hard though from a health and economic standpoint. Christner sears a tribal council member with the confederated tribes of the Grand Ronde. He says because of pandemic measures they've had to close down their casino which was their primary economic generator a lot of uncertainty. And we feel comfortable with where we're at right now but staying closed indefinitely could have some pretty dire consequences for our travel government mercier. Says he's not sure what form direct aid from. The federal government will look like just sitting there hoping that arrived soon for National Native News. I'm Brian Bowl. In Eugene Oregon six tribes have filed a lawsuit seeking to stop Alaskan native corporations from accessing shares of eight billion dollars in treble cove nineteen funds the tribes from Alaska Washington State and Maine are suing the Treasury Department arguing. The money from the cares act should only go to travel governments and not Alaskan native corporations. Many tribal leaders across the country have raised concern. Will several leaders of Alaskan Native Corporation? Say they're following the law and intend to use the funds to address covert nineteen needs tribes had until Friday to apply for the funds which are expected to be distributed by April twenty sixth. I'm Antonio Gonzales.

Brian Morris Alaskan Native Corporation Attorney National Native News United States Senator Wyden Antonio Gonzalez Us Army Corps Of Engineers Victoria Wicks Antonio Gonzales Federal Government Donald Trump Fifteenth Order Army Corps Brian Buhl Canada Environmental Review Jeff Merkley President Trump Montana
Lawrence Alfred (Navajo) Part 2

The Storyteller

6:58 listening | Last month

Lawrence Alfred (Navajo) Part 2

"Stike. Good Day. Welcome my friends to the storyteller. Will you'll find first nations people from across native North America who are following Jesus Christ without reservation. Today we'll hear more from Lawrence Alfred a Navajo from Tuba City Arizona. As he shares how he needed to hit bottom before he was willing to look up and he is always testify to me that there's a way there's a way out of trouble this hurting you. He said talk to me and tell me that you can't get out of this trouble. It's there's a way what what Jesus Christ he died on the Cross. Portia he went to the Cross and suffered and whatever is bothering you. Give it to him and he can go down tonight at that. Go down to your feelings and and hug you and bring you up hot at their. He understands you. Imagine a my son for five years will say that to me. I don't know where he got that wisdom from but he seems to me that he knew exactly what was wrong with me. Maybe Jesus is talking through him but he he said those saying semi and of course. I didn't listen. Sometimes I think if a man don't listen to wisdom to people telling you things the way to cries I think you're gonNA have to fall a little further down in your life fall way down deep down into the pit until you get rid of your pride and start looking for help. That's the only way you will. We as native men can understand are looking that Christ. Jesus so I think that that's what happened to me. I didn't understand. I didn't want to come to Kreis and I needed to fall. Further down emotionally economically losing my respect. Losing my character losing everything to allow astounded pit. Only WE I. I could learn anything and My son Jr he. He used to say things like that and he hugged me. And Tell me that I love you and of course that would say son. Don't talk to me light that I fe- too close to I care for you. I do all these things for you. Don't talk to me that way. I know my way my ways right. You chose away that your mom sway that that's how my way. My ways following the traditional ways but later on I learned that Jesus Crisis Way Truth and the life. That's the way I learn in in my experience What the background I I. One day was going to flag south and I used to work over there and I walked away from my family and I thought I was okay. I had heard trump made money. I had a job our stress. Okay I live okay. I Ate Okayo hungry. I was starving. I wasn't in the heat burning flames or any of those things I just described but I was in the pit one day. I was striving and all of a sudden I started to cry. I didn't know why and I got out of my vehicle on eighty nine. It's very busy highway. Pull off way to decide no was crying and I didn't know why was crying. Got Back in a vehicle and I left again. Went to work a couple of weeks later. Same thing happened to me. I crying and I started feeling this awfulness of what I was. Storing the awful feeling of my sense what I did to my wife for. It to my my children. What I did to people that I hurt ally the cheating and all these things that I have done and avoiding things and and I had this awful feeling silent and I was went to some people I really love and respect. They told me they said Lawrence here. You're Navajo your traditional novel. You go see a medicine man. I will pay for everything and I noticed person. Let's go see him. He'll help so I agreed with it and I said okay so we went and we went to the person and at night he was sitting there with his sons and they were eating with down by him and we told them why we came in and he says let's finish eating first. And how tell you a story so we finish eating and he told me after we ate here? We without around. He told me he says you know. Oh about a week ago. A strange she says about a week ago. It was a man that came from loop loop Perez on. He came to me with the same thing that you were saying. They started crying and he didn't know what what's wrong with him. I do star gazing. I look into the crystal and I sing my song and never has at Lou misled me. I always know what the Great Spirit tells me

Lawrence Alfred LOU Tuba City Arizona Perez North America Portia Kreis Donald Trump
Created during Spanish flu, jingle dress dance now helping First Nations people cope with COVID-19

Unreserved

10:42 listening | Last month

Created during Spanish flu, jingle dress dance now helping First Nations people cope with COVID-19

"The cove in nineteen pandemic women and girls across north. America have been posting videos of themselves performing the jingle dress. Dance it's a dance. It has historical ties to another pandemic from one hundred years ago way. People in the United States and Canada tell a similar story about the origins of the jingle dance tradition. They cite a young girl being very sick her father after having a vision about a special dress and dance associated with it gate. The little girl that dress. She began dancing in the new jingle dress and survived that was University of Minnesota professor. Brenda Child on the origin story of the Jingle Dress. Dance Brenda is a member of the Red Lake. Agip way reservation in Minnesota and she's been doing some research into the history of the jingle dress. She joins me from Minneapolis to tell us what she discovered. Welcome Brenda thank you so much. What did you find? Was the origin of the Jingle dress. Dance or I was really surprised when I started doing the research. I couldn't find a single photograph of what you would call. Jingle dress before Circa nineteen twenty in the United States or Canada. And I thought. Wow you know as a historian. It occurred to me that something very big had happened. That created this new healing tradition a century ago so when I started doing further work into it. It seems that it was the big flu. Epidemic of Nineteen nineteen very similar in some ways to the global pandemic were experiencing today. And so the story whether it's told in Whitefish Bay Ontario or central Minnesota on them lacks reservation. Both of them name a little girl as being the first jingle dress dancer and the girl was actually survivor of the global pandemic of a century ago And there was something else going on at the time as well as this Influenza pandemic there was there is this law. I guess outlawing I indigenous a spiritual holiday so that really added to to the power of the dress right. Yeah it was. I like to say that the jingle dress dance was a radical tradition from its origins because in the context of the United States the Indian office in Washington had outlawed ritualistic dancing on reservations in this kind of infamous dance order of one thousand nine hundred twenty one but it is true that the jingle dress dance emerged during a moment when these kinds of traditions were being suppressed on reservation communities and so in that sense the jingle dress dance was sort a radical tradition from its beginning very cool. Is there a history of new? Data's being created out of Specific need or issue that needs to be addressed in our communities. Well I mean I think we have a tradition of new dances being created. But this is the first dance. I traced to a kind of global epidemic. And what's interesting to me? Is Most of US know that Indian tribes in North America? Ever since the coming of Europeans experienced many different kinds of epidemics and pandemics and smallpox and what the jingle dress dance sort of shows me is maybe this was a way that native people had of coping with these earlier generations of epidemic says. Well how is the jingle dress itself connected to healing? I think most native people know that the jingles themselves argued with kind of healing power. Ojibway people think of spiritual power as being passed through the air and so sound is very important in that world view. And so if you've ever been to a powwow and you've had the wonderful experience of listening to many Jingle dress dancers dancing together you know. It's a really interesting sound in that it's a tinkling sound. But some people have described it as almost being like a summer rain or or voting sounds of a rainfall what we learned this past year. My students and I at the University of Minnesota were putting together an exhibit for the Malek's Indian Museum thinking about it being the hundredth anniversary of the Jingle Dress. Dance tradition and we had an opportunity to look at dresses through the decades and so from the Twenties Thirties forties fifties and more recent years. And what we found. Is that the jingles over the years. Where made of different materials we often think of. The Classic Copenhagen Snuff Can Lid and that has been a consistent material that our people have used to make jingles but we also saw dresses with Prince Albert tobacco cans. We also saw dresses made from baking soda cans early. So yeah so people. American Indian women and women in particular have been very creative. We had one early Dakota dress. That had a jacket. Both of them with jingles and the skirt and jacket were made of drapery fabric. Wow it sounds like a jingle dressed dancers were kind of contemporary in that they were able to go with the styles of the time they did and in fact some of my favorite dresses are the first ones from the collections at the Minnesota Historical Society. They're often black kind of Slim dresses that resemble the flapper dresses of the Nineteen Seventies. And so it's surprising. And that's sort of one of the things. We wanted to show with the exhibit that in many ways. The Jingle dress dance evolved through the decades. There isn't one consistent style but the jingles are what they all have in common a lot of the dresses from the thirties and forties. We found had long zinc zippers. Up The side showing that they were probably purchased in department stores. When you and then we're embellished later with jingles and that's something that may be would surprise some of us who always say you know you have to make your own jingle dress or you have to have it made for you. Because in the nineteen thirties and forties women sometimes purchase them and added the jingles. Later I imagine many people think that Powell dancing has been around for hundreds of years. But as you say the jingle dress dance and the dress itself is relatively new. How do people respond when when you tell them that? I like to talk about that idea very much. Because many people can only see indigenous people as historic people. I know we have that problem in the United States where sort of viewed as always in terms of the past and so with the Jingle dress even though the Powell tradition is older than the jingle dress dance shows me. Is that native people and Ojibway people here in the Great Lakes were part of the making of the modern world. And who would've thought one hundred years ago a century ago that this global epidemic that people experienced all over the world would go into the remote communities of the Great Lakes and be very devastating and that women would respond to that epidemic. By you know I always say it's like applying. Sav to wounds that they were able to kind of create this new tradition. That is still with us. A century later. Wow now you mentioned earlier that you helped curate and exhibit at the Mill Lack indie museum in Ohio which took a look at the history of the Jingle Dress and was organized for the one hundredth anniversary of this dance. What kinds of dresses did you have contributed to this exhibit from some some of the you know the the dancers out there well. It was really fun because we started the exhibit with the idea that we were going to bring historic dresses so that the community could kind of look at what I mentioned earlier. The how the dresses evolved over the decades but then what we also found is there almost became like a second exhibit because women wanted to bring their own shingle dress into the exhibit as well and. I think the one that is photographed. Most often is one where it belongs to Vanessa. Northrop from the fond laco devoid community in Minnesota and she turned her police uniform into a jingle dress. And that's a very powerful dress When people see it another favorite is the one I mentioned made out the Baking Soda. Can lintz and that was from our spiritual leader from Kind of central Minnesota and Wisconsin. His name is Lee Staples and he asked if we would like to have his mother's dress which he's still had Lee himself is in his seventies so he brought in his mother's very beautiful dress and we that to the exhibit as well. Just a beautiful sight to see yeah. The exhibit is called the BOSCA. Uganda good day. The Jingle dress at one hundred and as I said it will be having another season. Hopefully when the museum reopened again later this spring it. It will be there for the summer months as well. Now you may have noticed over the last couple of weeks. We've seen women and girls posting videos of themselves dancing Jingle online in response to cove nineteen how does it make you feel to see indigenous people turning back to the Jingle dress dance as a dentist healing? Well it makes me feel great. It makes me very happy to think that another generation as being inspired by this tradition. You may have noticed early last summer that Google had doodle in the middle of June about the jingle dress dance and it was the first time that Google had commissioned a native artist to make a doodle and I thought that was a very interesting thing to happen in the last year too. So what's interesting to me to the timing of these particular events because who would have thought a century after the jingle dress we'd have another global pandemic and just at the time we were remembering that history so strongly that we would have a similar kind of episode in the midst of our country and any in our communities so the timing of. This is all very interesting to

Jingle Dress United States Minnesota Brenda Child University Of Minnesota Canada Minnesota Historical Society Powell Twenties Thirties Great Lakes Minneapolis America Professor Agip Smallpox Google Uganda Red Lake Dakota
Tribal solutions and challenges

Native America Calling

8:15 listening | Last month

Tribal solutions and challenges

"Today. We're GONNA start off in Tacoma County in California. We Have Greg. Sarah's he is the chairman of the Federated Indians of Grayton Ranch Ria he is a tribal member of the Rancho Rio which includes descendants of the southern. Pomo and coast me walk. People are pleasure to have him here and Sarah's welcome thank you terra. Good morning and chairman just want to start off in understand more about what is your tribe is facing and where things currently stand in terms of facing cove in nineteen Well I think as with all tribes are. I thought of my first thought. Is the leader in. The leadership of this tribe is to take care of our tribal citizens How do we ensure their health? How do we continue programs at service? The elders and so forth With of course short with do less revenue At the same time we have a large casino One of the largest in California. We have fifteen hundred nearly fifteen hundred tribal citizens and at the same time we have over two thousand team members that work in the Casino Resort Casino. Close about a month ago And so of course. Revenues dried up. We've been very fortunate. I will have to say we've been able Well with spending money we've been able to take care of our citizens that's far and continue per capsule albeit somewhat reduced or You know pull back lever connector cavs ability to pay for caps. But we've been able to keep our been most of our programs going And we've been. I think very worked very hard. It's been very stressful for me to make sure that the all the team members who've been furloughed Since that time and for the indefinite future will be Will continue to receive their medical benefits. We will continue to. We have a very good plan. A the Chitral Cadillac plan whereby they pay nothing out of their paycheck so while they're furloughed. We continue to do that. We paid their salaries until many I After which we made sure that with the bump in the employment from the federal government to six hundred dollar bump that they will have somewhat close to equitable pay And so we figure with that and the insurance which will go on indefinitely. They're they're covered but it's been really really stressful About how to get monies We Hope Tara that we will get We believe we're GONNA get the employee retention credit Because we kept our employees. We have a hundred employees just in our travel office with our programs and we had to reduce furlough some of them and reduce salaries there We Governor Newsom here in. California has been very good he. We don't have to pay our compact fees. He's weighed compact piece for six months. Which of the Health? And of course we hope to apply for the Stabilization Fund for the tracks. It sure interment. Is there any talk that those funds will have to be paid back eventually the compact fees? No I don't because again The money the the casinos are closed down. And they're not generating any revenue and remember the very good question the compaq fees based on revenue and when there's no revenue that okay and I think the guy. I don't believe the governor's going to ask us to pay them back or if he does It'll be able to do away in a way that it won't break if he's been very good insensitive to our situation but for the time being of course the casinos are generating revenue and a big other question that we have right now. Those of us that are operating casinos. How do we reopen when if and when we do reopen? We're going to have to practice. The you know six feet distancing measure how do you what would you imagine a casino with Slot Machines and card tables? How do you open a large facility? Which is the one we have Where whereby? You have to have people six feet apart all of Asli. Your revenue flow is going to be greatly reduced when you do reopen so again. That is something that I will sit down and talk to the governor about when that time comes. I'm working on a model for how to do that with him. Now but again we have no idea when that limited opening will begin in. This is something in a lot of tribal leaders are thinking about 'em especially because the tribe makes the call whether it's open or not and A lot of tribes have just on their own heeded the call to Bring more awareness. And that's why a lot of them have closed down end so chairman says anything else you WANNA share about dealing with the state to either get funding or aid or assistance needed Often in the past. It's been the story That sometimes there are way too many hurdles when it comes to working with the state having a seat at the table. We've heard a lot of different things too when it comes to fema funding. Where do things stand now? That relationship with the tribe or with the state. Sorry well we were in A. We're in a very good place. We WE HAVE A. We are our particular type we have. I have a good relationship with Governor tribes here thus far have had a good relationship with governor newsom so Again one of the things as I was waiting We didn't want to furlough any of our people until I kept in touch with him until he negotiated with the feds to get that unemployment bump once he got that then for instance we could take care of our furloughed people and quit paying them salaries. We were paying the full salary until we heard that. But that bump so we waited we worked with him for that we also as I said are working with him. have worked with him to For the time being away the contact sees So So far so good I mean given the situation now regarding the opening I will. We will defer to him when it is safe and ready. I know that some smaller tribes others may want to do differently We also have as you indicated or inferred the option of not opening. But we're doing everything we can. And when we do reopen we're already looking into the various devices which To tell people have a fever coming into the casino An all that sort of thing. So we will comply with Whatever he suggests regarding avery opening my tribal I can't of COURSE SPEAK FOR OTHER TRIBES. Serio in chairman when it comes to your tribe are there any reported cases of covert nineteen? No not that I know of We have taken really strict measures to talk to. Our families are traveled families of particularly keeping the elders inside Sheltering in place a lot of things are kind of sad. I mean we were. We have larger organic garden where we were delivering vegetables and so forth to elders Our some of our staff were in. You know we've had to stop even things like that But yet our services are still in place so that if tribal elders have any health issues they are staff in the tribal office are in contact with the families and with the elders. So that if anything comes up There is an infrastructure in place to support our people in the matter of any health issues that arise

Chairman California Governor Newsom Casino Resort Casino Sarah Grayton Ranch Ria Greg Tacoma County Chitral Cadillac Compaq Federated Indians Rancho Rio Stabilization Fund Tara Serio Slot Machines Fema Fever
Federal judge invalidates key permit for Keystone XL pipeline. Tribes push back on ANCs included in tribal COVID-19 funds.

Native America Calling

3:54 listening | Last month

Federal judge invalidates key permit for Keystone XL pipeline. Tribes push back on ANCs included in tribal COVID-19 funds.

"The National Native News. I'm Antonio Gonzalez a federal judge. Wednesday invalidated a key hermit for the keystone xl pipeline. Judge Brian Morris says a permit issued by the US Army Corps of engineers bypassed necessary environmental reviews the order says TC energy formerly trans. Canada cannot build across waterways along the pipeline route until the core does more work on the permit Victoria wicks. Has This report. Doug Hayes is an attorney for the Sierra Club one of six environmental agencies that sued the Corps of Engineers Hayes says the core used a streamlined approval. Process called nationwide permit number. Twelve that precludes public review and circumvents transparent approval processes good pipeline would cross approximately six hundred eighty eight. Different waterways rivers streams and wetlands across Montana South Dakota and Nebraska and the Army Corps of Engineers is the agency that approves those crossings in the Order. The Federal Court notes that the expediter permit is used. When a project will result in minimal damage to aquatic environments Judge Morris also notes that the core failed to consult with us fish and wildlife or national marine fisheries before determining the pipeline. Construction would have no effect on endangered species or critical habitat. Hey says the car has to do further environmental review and consultation under the endangered species. Act before it can reissue the permit. Qc energy cannot build through any of the waterways along the pipeline route until it revamped its process into related cases tribes and environmentalists have challenged permits for the one point. Two Miles of pipeline. That crosses the border between Montana and Alberta. Tc Energy has started preconstruction on that segment for National Native News. I'm Victoria wicks in rapid city. South Dakota Judge. Morris is hearing arguments in those two related challenges to the keystone. Xl Pipeline. Thursday. He'll issue an order in those cases at a later date. Many tribal leaders are calling for Alaska native corporations or an sees to be excluded from funding. Set aside for tribes in the Cares Act Wyoming Public Radio Savannah Mar reports. Gerald Grey is chairman of the little shell tribe of Chippewa in the Rocky Mountain Tribal Leadership Council he says Anne Siese Corporation status should preclude them from accessing the eight billion dollar tribal stabilization fund. The last good native corporations should not be getting any of the funding because they're not tribes and We just basically don't feel that you know a good idea to be doing that this week. The Rocky Mountain Tribal Leadership Council urged the US Treasury Department to exclude an sees from the emergency funding. The Great Plains Tribal Chairman Association when a step farther calling for the removal of Tara Sweeney. As Assistant Secretary of Indian affairs. They say since she wants worked for an there's a conflict of interest at play but Shauna President of the KONIAK regional corporation says Sweeney simply following the law simply put Alaskan native corporations are eligible for funding under the cares act because we're included in the law and we're going to use the funding from the cares act to help our communities prepare and respond to the nineteen tribes in an CS. Have until Friday to apply for their slice of Betrayal Stabilization Fund. It's not yet clear how the money will be divided up for national native news. I'm Savannah Mar Oglala Sioux Tribal. Police have verbally warned or issued citations to more than one hundred and fifty people on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota for violating curfew or shelter in place orders the tribes currently on a fourteen day lockdown due to a public health response to Cova nineteen. I'm Antonio

Brian Morris National Native News Us Army Corps Of Engineers South Dakota Savannah Mar Oglala Sioux Trib Tc Energy Rocky Mountain Tribal Leadersh Antonio Gonzalez Montana Great Plains Tribal Chairman A Victoria Wicks Doug Hayes Tara Sweeney Corps Of Engineers Canada Federal Court Pine Ridge Reservation Wyoming Alaska
Hub community in Alaska prepares for COVID-19. Some Montana tribes report first cases of COVID-19. Oglala Sioux Tribe issues 14-day lockdown order.

Native America Calling

3:59 listening | Last month

Hub community in Alaska prepares for COVID-19. Some Montana tribes report first cases of COVID-19. Oglala Sioux Tribe issues 14-day lockdown order.

"The National Native News Antonio Gonzalez nome Alaska serves as the hub community for the native villages in the Bering Strait region. That means that most people are reliant on travel to nome for essential medical services now most of those communities have passed self quarantine requirements for anyone entering their villages to prevent the spread of Cove in Nineteen K N. Oem's Emily hoffstetter reports the local hospital nor in Sound Health Corporation is setting up living units in nome to help patients in need of a temporary place to quarantine. Most villages have some type of wording in their local travel ordinances that allow for patients to leave and reenter for medical assistance providing that they undergo self quarantine with a return home but in western Alaska residents are also faced with overcrowded housing produced flight schedules out to the villages and as always the potential for weather delays. This means that during this pandemic there are likely to be people stuck in nome in need of a place to serve their quarantine and SHC medical director. Dr Mark Peterson says that Norton sound is preparing living units all throughout gnome to help medical travelers undergo that process safely. These units are in a variety of locations. Some of them are very close to the hospital so we can access them very quickly and easily with staff and some are located in other parts of the community but they'll all be very comfortable unit of that bedroom bathroom and other Amenities Peterson says an. Shc has one hundred and fifty living units prepared for patients in nome. Some of those are currently vacant apartments and even potentially hotel rooms that are currently closed by city Mandate Norton Sound region has not yet had confirmed case. Ecofin nineteen appears and says that if and when that happens the quarantine units are meant to be turned into full isolation units right now and SHC only has seen it's available in nome. Dr Peterson explains that the hospital is also working with the local. Tribal Consortium to identify spaces in each of the Bering Strait communities that could be used as quarantine or isolation units locally. We also know that we have schools available. Should we need that so just like in nome were getting isolation and quarantine units all on a master plan? We're doing the same villages as well so as soon as they're needed we'll know where patients can go if they can't stay home performing in nome. I'm Emily Hoffstetter. The Crow tribe of Indians in Montana confirmed its first cove in nineteen case last week. According to a press release the individual who tested positive is in self isolation the tribe has extended a stay at home order through April thirtieth and the four-pack tribes in Montana last week notified residents of two cases within the boundaries of the reservation to healthcare employees tested. Positive according to a post on the four-pack Ascena Boyne ensue. Cova nineteen information. Facebook page tribal officials are asking residents to comply by the tribes shelter in place. Order the Oglala Sioux tribe in South Dakota has issued a new lockdown order. The tribe ordered a lockdown last week after the first case of covert nineteen on. The reservation was confirmed. A non tribal citizen who traveled to California and return to the reservation tested positive. The initial lockdown was lifted Friday so residents on the reservation could get food and other essential items on Saturday a mandatory fourteen day lockdown order the Pine Ridge reservation was issued a curfew. An shelter in place will be enforced as well as border monitoring a homeless shelter has been established on the reservation for people who have nowhere else to shelter at this time. Tribal officials and members of the treble cove in Nineteen Task Force are updating residents on the radio and on social media. I'm Antonio Gonzalez.

Nome Dr Mark Peterson Bering Strait Sound Health Corporation Antonio Gonzalez Alaska Emily Hoffstetter SHC Tribal Consortium Montana Medical Director Facebook Norton Pine Ridge Ecofin Ascena Boyne South Dakota Cova