Audioburst Search

Mental Health

Whether you're struggling with your mental health or trying to support someone who is, we've got you covered. Listen to the latest tips, strategies, and practical advice from a series of honest and lively conversations. Aired from leading talk radio shows and premium podcasts.

Using Nature and Animals to Manage Anxiety

The Psych Central Show

7:03 listening | 5 d ago

Using Nature and Animals to Manage Anxiety

"Richard. It's great to have you. A lot has been talked about the connection between mental health and nature mental health and animals. And I kind of want to start off in this place. I'm a big fan of social media loved or hated. It's probably here to stay and one of the things that I often see on social. Media's this meam that says the best antidepressant is a walk in nature and I know that you don't feel that nature replaces medical science. But you do feel that a walk in nature has real real support and real help for people who are suffering from depression. Can you talk about that for a moment? And that's new. When I wrote last child in the Woods College in two thousand five. This was ignored the impact of the natural world on human wellbeing on on health on cognitive functioning all of that pitted been in basically ignored and I could find maybe sixty studies because many of them were about the growing disconnect between children and they're for adults to and nature and some of the some of those studies dealt with the benefits and some of those studies with mental health and physical health. That is a drop in the bucket. Compared to how much money is spent researching just about everything else and it struck me that something. So large as the impact of the natural world experience on human health and wellbeing have been ignored. How could that be and as I looked into it? I was working with some neuro scientists. Them they were studying brain architecture development and young children and they were looking at all kinds of things and how that affected brain architecture development everything from parent child attachment to add daycare too dangerous neighborhoods in all of that and those things they were. Aim literally shapes the brain. You Early Childhood and I asked them on. Have you ever thought about how the natural world helped shape the brain young children experiences actual contact with the natural world? And they look at you with a blank face and they said what's nature and I understand that that science has difficult time defining nature. But you know I said to the neuroscientist. This isn't rocket science or and it isn't brain surgery. Come up with a hypothesis and tested hundred. Twenty trees pray or whatever. They still had trouble so I decided that was one of the reasons why this was so under. Studied is the blind spot in science about nature the rest of nature which we are part the second reason. Where does the research money come from? What till can you manufacturer? What thing can you commercialize out of that? Now there are some things I mean parks and outdoor hiking organizations things like that. There are some but for the most part people don't think about cert- certainly funders. Don't think about this as something that they can get something out of by funding. That's changing today. If you go to the chill nature network which you mentioned your introduction. We have a research library here that we built and it is for anybody in the world is free. And there are now probably. It's just tipped over one thousand studies. We have abstracts for him links to the original studies when they're available so it's gone from about sixty two over a thousand in about fourteen years after not existing before. I think that it's interesting. That one of the things you said and this really plays to the pessimist in me is. We don't want to tell people to go for walks because there's no funding for it and you can't make money it you know. We can't prescribe one. Walk a day or hug your dog every day that that's not something that you can fill at the pharmacy and this is kind of cancer. Balanced against the medication is important. Look at the advances that we've made with cancer by coming up with better treatments etc but I would even argue that taking somebody who is suffering from cancer and completely isolating them taking away their friends their support systems their animals and even a window would put them in more of a bad way than they already are. And I think that's what you're saying and you've talked about in your work. How animal assisted therapy is becoming one of the biggest healthcare trends and I don't think that's a bad thing but you also talk about the controversy surrounding it and then you back it up with science. Can you talk about animal? Assisted therapy for a moment. Because I I just find it absolutely fascinating. That people wouldn't respond to this favorably but I also understand that this is our culture. Everything is good and everything is bad seemingly at the same time I think it's more nuance than that. I think that most people understand that their dog helps them. You know most people get get it at this level and in terms of organized animals therapy whether it's dogs or or wine therapy with horses or going outside and connecting with wild animals. No matter what that is people necessarily understand that it's the science is coming now and the science is really interesting though that some of it is controversial but nobody. His watched a kid with disabilities in an equine therapy. A Horse therapy course assisted therapy. Setting cannot be not moved. It's very moving to watch this. One person who works in this field told me that her mother was bringing her child who is autistic to animal assisted therapy sessions which involved horses and he would ride horses with a helmet and somebody would lead the horse and he was. I think about nine years old and he had not talked ever and one day when they didn't go when they were supposed to to the horse. Therapy Her son walked into the living room and said there were horse. First Time she had heard him say a word so there are moving stories like that I talk about a woman another woman who is on the autism spectrum and she tells quite a moving story about not only how her service whose name is Cobo has her but how she has learned to help Cobo using some of the same techniques to Kobo. Us to help her so often. What is occurring is a kind of mutual. Azam is not one way. I don't want it to be seen as just what we get out of our relationship with other animals my promote something in the book called the reciprocity principle which basically holds it for every bit a healing that they give us hamels whether they are domestic or wild animals. Give us we need to give back to them. The same we need to protect them as they protect us.

Richard. It Cobo Woods College Azam Hamels Kobo
Some New York hospitals to allow visitors under 2-week pilot program, Cuomo says

Jay Talking

0:20 listening | 6 d ago

Some New York hospitals to allow visitors under 2-week pilot program, Cuomo says

"Sixteen hospitals in New York state will allow visitors as part of a pilot program addressing the heartbreak of covert nineteen patients isolated from their families and friends governor Andrew Cuomo says visits under the two week pilot program will be time limited visitors will need to wear protective equipment and will be subject to temperature and symptom

Andrew Cuomo New York
How to Feel Your Pandemic Feels

Unladylike

10:41 listening | Last week

How to Feel Your Pandemic Feels

"Basically been living in the upside down where one global pandemic and to home is where the everything is allegedly essential jobs gyms daycare centers doctors offices. Your neighborhood B. Y. O. Beaver like they've all moved home. Yeah covert has really put a fresh spin on the idea of having it all kristen which is why. We're starting this season of unladylike with one of the most loaded questions you can ask someone these days. How are you doing? Yeah I mean I think we can all agree with the unladylike listener at the top of the show that it is not ideal. This is a super emotional. Time for folks on so many levels and a lot of us are experiencing just different shades of grief over lost loved ones lost jobs or simply just like a loss baseline peace of mind and kristen as of this recording. You and I haven't had close friends or family members who've gotten sick from Cova but the pandemic has definitely changed our plans for twenty twenty like by this time we would have already been back from an East Coast tour where we were supposed to meet one of our favorite humans face to face for the very first time. Yeah our first tour stop was going to be in. Chicago home to Tyler. Fetter the amazing artists who illustrated are unladylike book and we decided that we still needed to call up tyler anyway for this episode to find out how she's doing so tyler just published a book of her own and it honestly couldn't come at a better time for those grappling with a lot of loss right now dancing. The pity party is a graphic memoir. Which is like a graphic novel. But it's a true story. It's not like a regular memoir with a lot of graphic injury in. It feels weird every time I say Anyway it's about my mom dying of cancer when I was nineteen and it's like the whole Enchilada from Lake. She first felt symptoms diagnosis than when she died on the funeral. And everything and then learning to like be an adult without a living on and it's not one hundred percent sad. A lot of it is sad. But it's not only it's not like the no folk or something. This unladylike episode isn't one hundred percent sad. Ever Tyler says that creating dancing at the pity party was essential for her processing her. Mom's death and also being able to make art through that and we think that hearing from someone who's really been through it and come out the other side of grief can hopefully offer some perspective and comfort listeners. Right now and speaking of listeners. Kristen after we hear from Tyler we're going to hear from an ladies who've left us voice memos and called in to share. How cove is impacting. Their day to day lives. Then we're closing it out with a much-needed zoom trip to our favorite unladylike therapist Dr Joy Harden Bradford Christian one of the things I love the most about tyler is her way of embracing the absurdity and awkwardness in the awful. Like the time she and her two sisters had to make a very weird trip to the mall. We went shopping for like funeral. Close at Forever. Twenty one and it was like blasting like club music there and a cashier said to me in sister. Or are you looking for anything special? And we're like no that's just like keep going through all the colorful clothes trying to find anything. That was all black flash forward to this spring when tyler was supposed to be out and about for her dancing at the pity party book tour. And let's just say she hasn't needed to shop for any new outfits this time around. What is it been like to have your book come out during a pandemic? I mean not at all what. I was expecting this book. But it's kind of been nice. I mean it's such a personal story and it's about a time of like illness and death which is what's happening in the world right now so I don't know the fact that everyone is like stuck at home which is sort of the way I am even not when it's a pandemic feels like almost appropriate. It's like I don't know if it were like an adventure or something like an action book. Maybe it would be different. But it's this like emotional. Like family thing in everyone is emotional and stuck with their families. So a lot of people are experiencing grief right now. You know whether that's because family member passed or like just because life is so upside down but grief is never just like one thing and it's not static so I'm curious like how has grief evolved for you and what have you learned about it. Especially now that you've written a whole book about your mom. I think grief is something. That's really personal. And it's really different for every person who goes through it and it's something where you can't really predict how it's going to affect you so like when my mom I died. My Dad was just crying and public all the try and was kind of embarrassing the and but now I'm like you know what like it's fine. People can deal with seeing someone showing motion and like that's what he needed a now. He's doing way better and with me. I like got really sentimental in capped a ton of my mom's staff and I found myself being angry a lot at lake people who had complained about their moms where it's like. Oh my mom calls me too much. I just WANNA like punch face and I would never say any of that. I just feel like Oh yeah. That sucks but yeah. It's just everyone's different and it's still very much a part of my life. That's like another thing I've learned. It's not GonNa go away and I'm okay with that I mean so it's been eleven years now since my mom died and most of the time. I'm totally fine. It's just like something I know about myself is that I have a dad. Muhammad's like a quality of who I am but sometimes I'll just like have a whole like breakdown from like watching a movie or something really small and it's just like something I have to deal with just like any other part of my mental health has the like the current environment. The way things are like has this moment stirred up any additional emotions for you around the book or like around grief. I'm like not a particularly like touchy feely physically kind of person but I have just been wanting hugs so badly during the pandemic and I live by myself with a cat who does not like hugs but he has to deal with that. Because I'm going to give them anyway. But there is there's something relatable about the uncertainty and all of this and that was something that was really hard about my mom. Being sick is that we were sort of like itching for any kind of like positive like theories or possibilities that we could find so it sort of feels like. That's what we're doing now. It's like Oh could serve pandemic end by fall like. Are we going to be able to do Halloween? Like normal and that is like kind of how it was with my mom. I I used to think like a. Will she be able to see me graduate from College? Like do you think what's going to happen. And that uncertainty is really hard to sit with and I think we all have to do it now which is tough. What is your advice to listeners? Who want to support friends or loved ones who are experiencing grief but might not know the best way to express it and we don't want to be awkward and we don't want to bring it up because we make things uncomfortable but we also want people to know that we care. What as as someone who has gone through it. What's your advice for for folks? Who want help from the outside. I think something that's always nice is bringing up the person's parent or whatever loved one in a way that's like unrelated to their death or like if your friend mentions they're like dad or whoever to ask questions and be like. Oh Yeah what was he like? Or whatever because it's it's such like bomb to get to just talk about her when I'm sad talk about not sad stuff. I also found one of my cousins said to me after my mom died. Like I can't imagine what you're going through. And that was like my favorite thing that I knew on had said 'cause like he couldn't imagine it and he was like acknowledging that and it just made it easier to talk to him about it just like it really like validated. How I was

Tyler Kristen O. Beaver Cova East Coast Chicago Muhammad Dr Joy Harden Feely
Anxiety Bytes: Am I Doomed by My Genes to Be Anxious?

Not Another Anxiety Show

8:18 listening | Last week

Anxiety Bytes: Am I Doomed by My Genes to Be Anxious?

"Hey guys autumn to not another anxiety. Show I'm your host Kelley Walker and joining me. Today is my co host Eric. Lay them head low. This these days I now and we get to do a little Anxiety by segment today. I know and I'm still angry about the it yes B. I t I s you. Don't all the grudge It's been a year more than a year it's been I think you have some exciting news. I'M GONNA share it for you okay. There are guests who knows how to sign into the show's instagram page. I do I know signing instagram. I even made a fun. Little time lapse video that I'm figuring out how to upload so stay tuned. It'll probably be like a week or two. I'm toying with doing once. We can like put it together. It makes us look like we're professionals. Yeah I'm not there yet. I'm just learning. I don't honestly we could talk about this after. I don't even see where you like. Start a new post or something so overwhelmed by. I like we're just GONNA TAKE BITES ICE says around coaching advice. Which is gonNA take fees Where you start a new post where you start a new post. Yeah we'll talk right after that will take that off. Line okay so anxiety by its. I'm kind of pumped about this one. Because I have had this question many times we we had a really great up that I can't remember the which one but it was sort of towards the beginning of things where we talked about We talked about this and it's one of it was when I was going through panic attacks. That was one of my biggest fears in the things. I got stuck on the most common questions I get asked. Okay really. It's like it's got to be like top five most common questions just in like my personal kind of one on one coaching experience. And I know it was a big question for me when things were really when things really felt like a big struggle. And we're really sticking well challen. Let's do it okay. So wait are need to set a timer. Is it going to be? Siri renew us all right. I'm GonNa see if I can do it with my voice. He Siri set a five U. Two's flower girl. God Oh my God all right. Forget I'm going to be hearings. A man you know what? Don't judge not that's okay. I've never heard man. Siri is my Syria. Identifies AS A British man? That's better than regular Siri. But you can tell me how to do that after two regular series. Okay ready so the question is am. I doomed by my jeans to be anxious. Ready go answer is now and that's the end of this segment. Thank you so much for tuning in today if you want to. Why do we do no no? None of us are doomed by our genes to be anxious In fact according to an article published in the advances in experimental medicine in Biology Peer Reviewed Journal Genome five times fast fast. You know when when you cited. It's nice abbreviated. But saying it. Out Loud so mouthful But you know. According to this study Genome Wide Association studies have failed to identify any genes significantly associated with anxiety diagnosis so You know this was published by the National Health Institute. I think it's like on the APA website too but They're very clear that we really just haven't been able to find any genes associated with an increased risk for developing anxiety But some recent research suggests that like epigenetics may be playing a role here so if you remember from old episode epigenetics can be thought of as genes that are more flexible so they can be turned on and off throughout our lifetime and they're also influenced by Environmental factors and environmental factors or like a very broad-based charm for like influenced by all sorts of things And this is really quite a bit different from how we used to think of jeans. And if you kind of want a quick review about genetics EPI This is a quick little anxieties segments bite. But you can listen to episode one seventy two With Dr Sarah Circus where we go into a bit more detail about Epigenetics and now apostasy by her so much much longer so much. Allah for so much But Anyway so preliminary research animal studies. Only there's no human studies yet but in animal studies suggests that some epigenetics may play a role in regulating our HP access which we talked about in episode fourteen so basically may influence. How sensitive are flight or fight response is under stress? So what happens is when we're feeling resilient on top of things good our fight or flight response may work absolutely beautifully but if our system is under stress which can be caused by external factors like financial strain Or internal factors like worrying. You know like certain behaviors or habits. We may innocently have But when our system is under stress epigenetics may kick our fight or flight system into higher gear a little faster than it would in someone else with the different genome but the great thing is there are genetic factors that positively influence the sensitivity of our HP Access Aka fight or flight response. So just some other factors that really like you can think of like enhance or late or you know. Increase resiliency with our fight or flight response. One factor is exercise. You know impacts this system. Positively nutritionally dense whole foods impacts this system positively human connection impacts the system positively A regular mindfulness practice can impact the system. Positively one of my favorite studies found you know just to go off. That is one of my favorites that he's in the world found that mindfulness practices. You know different. Mindfulness practices reduced on. Ibs symptoms in in study patients and and more importantly which shows sort of like the nature like a micro like a microcosm of the nature of epigenetics It also reduced these mindfulness. Various mindfulness practices also reduced expression of a gene associated with. Ibs Flare Up. So people were experiencing reduce symptoms and we were able to also see this in their genome so in short recent preliminary research suggests like there may be an EPI genetic factor here and also you know what we do know Have Known for little while there are so many EPI genetic factors that influence hauer fight or flight system behaves right like stress is one that can kind of tilted towards the unfavorable Paul. And there's so many other behaviors or habits that we can cultivate or have control over which is nice to know that. Can SORTA on nudge it back towards a more favorable place. Some right right right. I love that you keep learning things. Yano I'm like I told you Erica. Scientists forever yes mate just made it

Anxiety Siri HP Kelley Walker Biology Peer Reviewed Journal Eric EPI Genome Wide Association Yano Dr Sarah Circus Syria APA Hauer Erica Paul National Health Institute
Fighting Loneliness? Try Friending Yourself.

SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

6:56 listening | Last week

Fighting Loneliness? Try Friending Yourself.

"Hey all you sober people hand anyone else. Who is interested in listening to me talk about mental wellness? Some of you might remember that my word for the year is clarity and especially with. Cova did that word has not changed my journey. This year is very much about taking the noise out of my daily life and boy has that been difficult in this time of lockdown and isolation and loneliness which is why. I'm GonNa talk about loneliness today and what it means. Not only to me but to you all as well. The statistics are growing. Not only because of covet but prior to Cova. We are becoming more and more lonely. And why is that and more importantly what can we do about it? I live alone and if I am feeling the loneliness even though I have people built into my daily work. I can't imagine how other people are feeling who don't work any longer or don't necessarily engage with people daily in their line of work before Kovin. I liked living alone. I enjoy the peace and quiet and frankly I like my relationship with myself but now that I'm confined an had been confined by the way. I'm still very much. Laki myself down except for a walk that I take almost daily with some friends Monday through Friday but we social distance or physical distance during the walk. I carry a mask with me so although I'm getting Interaction I still spend most of my downtime. My non work time by myself and it's become more difficult. I only imagine how difficult it is for some of you who live in bigger cities and can't get out to walk every day on walking past like I do. It has to be really tough. Interestingly the rate in which we are living alone has been on the increase for the last fifty years Grand Julie Aching up to about twenty eight percent in two thousand nineteen of our total population here in the US which means at thirty five point seven million people here in the US live by themselves in a recent study by CIGNA which is a health insurance company here in the US of twenty thousand people. Us adults they found that half of Americans feel like they are alone. Only slightly more than fifty percent of the respondents said they had meaningful in person. Social interactions on a daily basis and fifty percent said that sometimes or always they feel that the relationships are not meaningful and that they're isolated from a smaller but still surprising number of people. Twenty percent of the twenty thousand said they never or rarely feel close to people and eighteen percent felt like they have no one to talk to and this same study by Cigna revealed that Young People Age Eighteen to twenty two are far more likely than senior citizens to report being lonely and Import Health. Making them the loneliest generation and well loneliness itself is not an diagnoses or a mental health disorder. It goes hand in hand with many of the diagnostic criteria in the DSM. Five diagnostic statistical manual. That most of us in the mental health professionals zone us. Furthermore there's no accepted definition of loneliness. Sometimes it gets jumbled together with social isolation but the two concepts are very different social isolationism indicator of how much contact. Somebody has with other people. Whereas loneliness is the subjective feelings of isolation and there is no agreed. Tipping Point at which acute loneliness transitions into a chronic problem with long term mental health and physical health ramifications. Alone doesn't necessarily mean that you're lonely nor does being around people mean that you're not loneliness is a very subjective. Feeling loneliness is a feeling that only you the person experiencing it can truly identify the fancy schmancy definition of loneliness is the distress that results from discrepancies between ideal and perceived social relationships. That's according to the Encyclopedia of human relationships. What that means is that loneliness is a feeling and a perception. It involves a wave seen ourselves and the world around us. We can feel lonely. In a wide variety of social settings and circumstances. It doesn't take being alone. Some studies have shown that people who struggle with loneliness may actually perceive the world differently. Does that sound familiar to some of us. I know it sounds very similar to the world that I grew up in the world that I created for myself through my perceptions and certainly when I was drinking boy did I create A world within a world one researcher even found structural and biochemical differences in what he labeled the lonely brain. Okay and I'm going to murder his name. I'm sure John Casio Gosh. His research revealed that a lonely person can experience more difficulty recognizing positive events and have more trouble picturing the thoughts of others known as mental ising.

Cova United States Social Isolation Cigna Kovin Encyclopedia Of Human Relation Import Health Researcher Murder DSM John Casio Grand Julie
Will Coronavirus Lead To A Mental Health Crisis?

Mentally Yours

5:53 listening | Last week

Will Coronavirus Lead To A Mental Health Crisis?

"I mean that under the moment we're doing things differently because of the epidemic which adds it experts about mental health and all things around the Korean virus epidemic today on Chetan Marjorie Wallace. She's the CEO and founder of Mental Health Charity Sane. We'RE GOING TO BE FINDING OUT. About how the epidemic is affecting those with long term mental health issues around the country. And what saying is doing to support them saying is the Charity Mental Health Charity which I founded over thirty years ago and I found it then because we call it the forgotten illness. I was a journalist. Investigative journalists and DOT DOT com. Nobody was writing about mental health. It was confused with mental handicap and was the care in the community had started but people being thrown out of hospitals onto the streets shop doors and back to families who simply couldn't cope so that was the beginning of sane then then have three aims one was to Actually do research into the causes and better treatments and therapies and we have a research centre in Oxford called the Prince of Wales International Center for Sane Research on the second aim was to continue with campaigning for improved services and fighting and giving some voice to mentally ill people and the third aim was able to immediate help and that we did in the form of a help line was the first mental health helpline which recess up over twenty five years ago For anyone can ring any member of the public when it's who care a family member a professional person or person with any mental condition themselves. So that's what's saying does and our main activity now is of course trying to keep in contact with the people who arrhenius who are becoming more and more desperate. Yes the line that you mentioned that. That's cooled sane line. That's why it isn't it. Yes what are some of the main things that people coming to you with at the moment loneliness and `isolation slightly different things? It's not the sort of isolation were talking about. It's the way of loneliness is pervading their minds and they thought for should go on month after month is becoming something very desperate for some people. There are also calling more about other people because they're very anxious about other people. Thirty percent of our callers are talking about the active suicide steps. Yes incredibly worrying. The reasons for this are partly that people are afraid to seek the help. They all Maybe offered but partly because so much as being withdrawn mean. People are told that their phone calls if they're getting jobs. Don't we can't sold. We're going get counting. That's being postponed that it's been diversion of the mental health nurses and they're very few of them anyway seven thousand acres before the Pandemic they've been called away to deal with covert patients so less more attrition on the Mental Health Services so that the people who really need that kind of contact to sustain them are getting less and less moment that also afraid that their problems are trivial compared with people who are darn to overwhelm the NHS. Now that is a very dangerous situation. That's about physical on this is what's your opinion of the things that are being be blunt and mental health is at the moment. Like for instance of phone calls Video counseling things like that. Well quite a lot of the people who are contacting us are not as happy with video counselling as as they are with face to face encounters or people where they can feel in contact. But what we offer with all callback service. They do appreciate what they won. Called often isn't enough but if they know that someone is thinking about them is going to call them back if they know. They've got a point of contact to their northern his black code that they're suddenly left in the sense of being in Limbo Thought Community. Great Dude and we've been getting incredible tributes from people saying that just knowing that you're there and knowing that you are going to be in touch this is Keeps US going through the day? So that's very very important but of course we can only do so much what we are hoping is that the mental health services will be prepared for this as they as we were and should have been for the pandemic itself and the problem is all the diversion of resources where worried that. They're not going to be there for what is going to be. Possibly an epidemic of people reached a crisis point in mental illness. Do you think this is mental? Health time bomb waiting to happen in terms of present make is we definitely think that we're sitting on a time bomb while we're guessing. Many more people with very very high anxiety mean. Obviously they bring us normally thanks to put Nov anxiety rates are very much higher and also feeling that they have nowhere to turn give. An example of a call came the other day. Those a young woman and she'd been discharged from hospital having attempted suicide and she was told to wait at home for a follow up call from the cat team and then she waited and waited and then they said was cancelled and then she felt she had absolutely no where to go and she didn't want to ring up while the next because she felt her problems with trivial that she was thinking of suicide and blaming herself and yet she was still very very suicidal so she rang ause. Thank heavens she did because we've been able to sustain her and she's more much less suicidal

Mental Health Services Chetan Marjorie Wallace Wales International Center For CEO Oxford NHS Founder
UN chief warns psychological suffering from virus is growing

AP News Radio

0:56 listening | Last week

UN chief warns psychological suffering from virus is growing

"The current virus is not any attacking off physical health but also a mental health that is the message that you have secretary general Antonio Guterres delivered to the world I Ching governments civil societies and help authorities to urgently address mental health needs arising from the current virus pandemic the U. N. chief said in a video message launching a policy briefing that some groups are more vulnerable than others those most at risk our frontline health workers older people adolescents and young people those with pre existing mental health conditions and those caught up in conflict and crisis Guterres also pointed to grief job loss loneliness stress from difficult family dynamics and uncertainty and fear for the future of some of the effects the outbreak is having on families and communities and as governments to address the issue before they get worse mental service he's out in the central part of all governments responses to profit nineteen they must be expanded and fully fund I'm Karen Thomas

Karen Thomas Antonio Guterres U. N.
Breakthrough Solutions for Anxiety, Depression and PTSD With Apollo Founder Dr. David Rabin

Dr. Drew Podcast

6:59 listening | Last week

Breakthrough Solutions for Anxiety, Depression and PTSD With Apollo Founder Dr. David Rabin

"This particular juncture in human history. We're in a very strange time because the most powerful evolutionary way that we express safety to one another is touching it hugs and now we're self isolate and so. How do we reconcile that? It comes out as your ability to what you were mentioning earlier. So I think I'll a big part of this is I think as you said four Sabbath. It's forcing us into a day of self reflection or three months of self reflection where this is an opportunity to be grateful for what we have and to figure out how to make. Sure this never happens again talk talk more about your research with psychedelics. And where you think this is all going so my research is ongoing presently I think going back to what we're talking about earlier with Eric handles emotional learning. I think Dr Rachel Yehuda who is an incredible researcher at Mount Sinai in the Bronx. Va took things a another step further from understanding just how Neuron Neuron structures and synapses change as we grow and learn and she actually started looking at markers on the DNA That are called epigenetics. So genetics. Dna means tends to mean in DNA when we talk about it means in the act's and Jeez that are literally the same in every single cell in our entire body except in our sperm cells for the most part however if all the DNA and all the genetic code in all of ourselves the same pretty much. How does a skin cell different for brain cell and the way the skins almost different from a brain cell is there little markings on the DNA that tell the skin? Hey Skin your skin don't make rain proteins and it tells the brain that hate your brain and your the specific part of the brain. Don't make skin proteins or any other proteins. Don't make sense for where you're located in your in the in the by albeit regulation right through epigenetics on the markers on the DNA. The answer was really passing. Rachel found that others have fat had echoed in the in the scientific sphere since then is that she found that a lot of hints that Trauma Causes Changes to stress in reward response genes a pass on overtime not only pass on overtime over the course of our lives but pass on over time generations in that ancestors of people or sorry ancestors of people who were in the Holocaust their children and great grand children and Grandchildren. As far as they went in the study they expressed similar the same. Epa genetic markings at correlated with. Ptsd as their parents who were traumatized and so then the next step was hey. Let's try this. Let's explore this a causal model in mice and they traumatize mice at very young age in a red those nights and they watch the genetic The expression marking patterns and they found that without a doubt there were significant changes to stress in reward response gene expression that occurred with that first trauma at a young age that were passed on for up to four generations a safe living before they were eventually or sorry at least four generations of safe living before they were eventually eliminated from the DNA so day ever raised these the the subsequent generations with the EPA genetic markers outside of their Genetic Pool in other words because you know we we always thought about g the one of the things about intergenerational transmission of trauma. It's something about the parent is emotionally transmitted somehow transmitted through the caretaking. They do any control like that. That's a great question I have to go back and look But I but but regardless. I think it is more realistic to not do that. Because that is not representative of what we experience in our lives. Typically in our in our lives when we're traumatized and we resolved their trauma. We do traumatize our children and so I think what's interesting in mice in mice you can. Actually you can look at all these different time points because mice don't have the same rights in our society that human humans do and you can section their brains and take samples. Dna over the course of you know all these different time points in their lives and see that you know when a mouse is born a young mouse born from traumatized parent That baby mouse before has been exposed to negative behavior from the parents still has the same or similar changes and so. I think what's most important about all? This is that trauma and a lot of the symptoms that we're experiencing as a result. Louis experiences result of trauma are not permanent. What this is showing us? Is that epigenetics. If these changes are in the EPA Genetic Code. That's a really good sign because epigenetics are modifiable by things that happen in our lives if trauma which can be defined in reductionist way as you know powerful negative intense meaningful experiences one or many and that EPA genetic changes that result in clinical expression of PTSD depression anxiety. And then we see people going through one. Two three extremely intense meaningful positive experiences with psychedelics or with amazing therapists and their symptoms are within with just three doses of medicine and a bunch of psychotherapy basically gone for years afterwards. That could only be the case if it was acting on the same part of the of the genome. And so because that's the only thing that lasts in our bodies for years and years and years passed onto roster so I think it works long right now. It's very exciting with maps and folks at Yale and in USC. And Dr Huda is. We're looking we're looking at is can psychedelic medicine. Using the proper way actually reverse the EPA genetic changes that result from trauma. And can we then use that? Study to explain how the sort of the interface between science and spirituality where where is where does healing her healing occurs by allowing ourselves to feel safe enough to heal and when we feel safe enough to heal. That's when the recovery nervous is on that's where the para sympathetic system gets resources diverted to ward it to facilitate. Hopefully what we will see as EPA genetic remodeling that restores recovery.

EPA Epa Genetic Code Dr Rachel Yehuda VA Ptsd Mount Sinai Eric Dr Huda Representative Researcher Yale Louis USC
What Cocaine Tells Us About Depression

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

1:35 listening | Last week

What Cocaine Tells Us About Depression

"Today on sixty seconds side. What cocaine tells us about? Depression come starts now in this study in Cardoso and colleagues followed five hundred eighty five patients who appeared to have Yuna polar depression on the mini structured interview when they followed them up later after an average of years twelve percent had converted to bipolar disorder. The risk of conversion bipolar was three and a half times higher in those with a lifetime. History of cocaine use although they were careful to ensure that these new bipolar patients had mainly as our hypo mania during times of sobriety they admit that cocaine can cause persistent changes in the brain. That may mimic mania even during abstinence. The results are in line with prior studies. Which have found that even after rigorous testing every year one in twenty five people with depression convert the bipolar. The same rate they came up with and that substance abuse increases the risk for example. There's a large epidemiologic study where Jules xts and his colleagues found that co Morbidity Between Depression and Substance Use disorders was entirely explained by mixed features whether those mixed features occurred as part of full bipolar or a bipolar spectrum disorder like the Dsm five depression with mixed features people with bipolar disorder and substance abuse. More likely to present in a mixed state and more likely to respond to anti convulsants or atypical. Antipsychotic Stendhal

Bipolar Disorder Depression Cocaine Jules Xts Stendhal Yuna Cardoso
The toxic residue that lingers inside you from people that make you feel bad about yourself

The Overwhelmed Brain

7:20 listening | 2 weeks ago

The toxic residue that lingers inside you from people that make you feel bad about yourself

"My name is Paul Kalaiana and I'm here to help you. Increase your emotional intelligence so that you can avoid dysfunction handle toxic situations with grace and ease and show up as your authentic self. Everything I talk about on. This show is my personal opinion. Has Meant for information on educational purposes only always gonNA sell medical or psychological professional before making any changes that could affect your physical or mental health. I thought it'd be a good idea to talk about something that came across my desk and that is an idea that you may have heard about before that is who you surround yourself with your kind of the some of those people from an old. Jim Rohn quote that. Says you are the average of the people that you hang around with. Most and I'm paraphrasing. But you get the idea is who you end up being how you end up feeling how you end up thinking and how you see the world are really interconnected or at least related or associated with how to the people in your life because you are affected on a daily basis if you see these people on a daily basis and even when you don't even when you see them on a weekly or monthly basis some people can kind of linger around in your brain and your thoughts are preoccupied with them. And you're not exactly in your own space so what what is happening. Is that the people that you hang around the most. Even if you're not thinking of them specifically like I am thinking of Joe Right now. If I'm not thinking of Joe Joe still affects me and this can be good and this can be bad. This can be good if joe affects me in a positive way. Every time I see Joe I'm just making up a name for every time I see Joe I feel good and it's very helpful to understand that feeling and it's not just feeling good. It's feeling good about myself and I think that's what differentiates healthy positive relationships from either Benign relationships acquaintances or on the other end. Unhealthy toxic relationships is that who we relate to associate with and connect to in our intimate with and are friendly with all of these people have an influence on us. So when you walk around in your own thoughts they are still influenced by the people around you and the reason. I want you to make sure that. That's that's understood. I mean I know you understand what I'm trying to drill it in there is because sometimes you might think. Well I haven't seen that person in six months and not gonna see that person again for another six months so life's good until ban but there's a small part of you. That doesn't want to see that person you know. Let's talk about someone who's toxic someone who doesn't affect you well someone when you're around them you don't feel good or especially in this sort of my definition of emotional abuse as well is that you don't feel good about yourself emotional abusers will do that to you they they will cause you to not feel good about yourself so you might feel bad in the first place but imagine on top of that you feel bad about yourself and there's a difference there. I hope that makes sense. There's a big difference in feeling bad feeling bad about yourself. That's like saying I feel bad that I got a flat tire because now I have to deal with it. And it's you know it's effort and it's inconvenient and maybe I don't have a tire now. I gotta go buy attire so that all kinds of variables when you get a flat tire for example if you don't know how to change it or if you don't have a spare or if you don't even have the strength to work the Jack to lift the car a lot of variables so it's easy to say. I feel bad that I got flat tire. You may not use those words. But you feel something about equal negatively That's different than saying I feel bad about myself that I got a flat tire because that changes the feeling and flat tires not necessarily the best example about saying something like I feel bad about myself unless it could be totally related unless you beat yourself up and say you know what I should have got spare tire when I had a chance. I was in the auto store in. They said I should have won but I never did so. I'm kind of worthless. I'M STUPID IDIOT. And at that moment we can feel bad about ourselves but some people know how to do that. I mean some of us do that to ourselves all the time but other people know how to do that to us to keep us in a bad feeling about ourselves state so when you're walking around not feeling very good about yourself and in fact feeling bad about yourself it could be directly attributed to what somebody did or said to you or how they treated you so coming back to the person you don't see for six months and you're happy and you feel good about that. They're still the seed that's blossoming or growing or spreading. Its roots inside your mind that because they're in your life in some way shape or form and there's a future time that you're going to see them and connect with them that the seeds days watered the seed of feeling bad about yourself and that can include a Lotta stuff self doubt self worth self esteem even loving yourself caring about yourself thinking you're a good person thinking you're attractive thinking you're smart. All of these things are affected by the negative people that you have ever associated with and that you are going to continue associating with in so it's important to understand that that exists the people that affect your life when they're not in it. They still affect your life. That doesn't mean somebody twenty years ago. That treated you badly. I is still in your mind because maybe you did some healing. Maybe you're over that. Maybe the trauma happened in now. You no longer have trauma and you feel pretty good. So don't listen to Paul saying. Hey now you should feel bad. Because they're always there no. That's not one saying I'm saying that when there are people like that in your life that have a negative impact that it can absolutely continue to preoccupy your mind even subconsciously. While you're walking around even feeling good about yourself.

Joe Joe Paul Kalaiana Joe Right Jim Rohn
Students and teachers struggle with remote education

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

10:57 listening | 2 weeks ago

Students and teachers struggle with remote education

"That's Jimmy Fallon on the tonight show earlier this week. I think voicing the thoughts of so many families. The song was a nod to national teacher appreciation. Week which ends today. But you'd probably go on all year long like schools across the country. The week looked very different compared to years past instead of apples on their desks or gift cards from parents teachers might have received an Apple Emoji or some on then mo. You know why. It's because forty seven states and the district of Columbia have ordered or recommended school closures for the rest of the school year. Teachers across the country have taken their lessons online to try and weather this pandemic so today will some of these teachers struggles and successes in navigating remote learning. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction. We had really try to make everything work in the virtual world and that's challenging to do because most teachers like myself we don't sign up for that. We sign up for the interaction. We sign up for the collaboration and we sign up for those human moments that you can't really replicate online. That's Chris deer. Two Thousand Twenty Louisiana teacher of the year and a finalist for the two thousand twenty national teacher of the year. I teach at Shawmut High School in Louisiana right outside of New Orleans. Dear teaches world history to seniors and AP human geography to Freshman. I didn't know what that was. He said it's sort of like anthropology inspired to teach partly because of a formative personal experience. I was in high school when Hurricane Katrina hit. I was a senior. It was our second week. It disrupted the entire region down here. I was forced to Texas. I stayed in hotels in shelters in bounced around different schools. And I missed out on a lot of big events that a lot of people look forward to their senior year sound. Familiar deer has a pretty good idea of what is current students. Probably feel. It's a time when you're supposed to be celebrating all of your hard work your dedication. Your accomplishments When your family supposed to watch you walk across that stage cheer? So it's it's a time that you'll never get to Redo and you'll never get back and it's not just a loss for dear students. Some of them will be the first in their families to graduate from high school and the ceremony would have been meaningful to the relatives as well. Dear has students who are also dreamers undocumented immigrants who arrived in the United States as children Andy has students. They're working essential jobs while they also balance online classes. Learning Online. Might seem easy enough if you're a student with the computer or the Internet but deer also has students who didn't have the luxury of these tools so a lot of students that originally didn't have Internet when this happened. We were Distributed work in packets in just literally papers out when we were distributing food but my district personally has been a given chromebooks out to students who need them and trying to collaborate with local organizations to get hot spots to get kids connected so I think teachers all across the country are doing everything they can to get kids online and to keep that that learning going as Peron's a community school in Phoenix Arizona has also handed out chromebooks in Wi fi to some of its students. But that's not all the school is providing. I think a lot of US forget how schools are to our communities. Even if you're not a student there Hannah Wysong teaches science and English at Esperanza mostly to low income students. She has helped distribute food boxes and gift. Cards to grocery stores. But as this pandemic drags on why song in her colleagues are looking ahead. To long-term challenges families might face food is available and a lot of schools in food. Banks is. This has gone on for a couple of months and parents are not working or working less The next set that working right now is to build a fund for rental assistance. And that's just the creative problem solving. Why Song has been a part of outside the classroom after students have been set up with food and Wi fi is when her real job and the real connection begins and these teachers have come up with all kinds of new ways to do that as well something that we normally at our school? This House monthly family nights with movies are dinner or games or whatever it may be and we were really mourning the loss of family nights and we decided to do it. Virtual dance parties so we got a local Dj from a radio station. And then we invited all of the families to get on zoom there. Were I think between forty five and fifty people on between families and staff and pretty cute to see a bunch of little squares of third graders? Dancing Chris Wyckoff who teaches American history to eleventh graders? North Carolina has taken advantage of our reliance on the Internet to send his students. Some encouragement been sending out digital cards. To let them know that I still see you. I still see your work. I still see you're working hard. Wyckoff has been proud of how well his students at the Johnston County career and technical leadership academy have taken online classes after all they could easily just turned the video off and go do something else online learning you know it has its it has its good and its bad. Even depending on the type of learner you are in a lot of our students are capable of making the adjustment at home all of those the social and emotional atmosphere of home versus the social emotional atmosphere at school all of those things combined to either create atmosphere for success or failure for for the students. Chris dineen this is another. Chris said there were hiccups using video-conferencing at first we had zoom bomb the first or second date but his middle school students at Albuquerque Academy in New Mexico. Have come around. The students themselves had to adapt to a totally different style of teaching and they've actually had to become somewhat more accountable for their own behavior. Because of course we can't see them and monitor them in the ways that we normally do. Laurie Abrahams finds this challenging to. She's a special education teacher on Long Island and works with three to five year olds. Who have special needs during normal times? Work incredibly physical and requires personalized interactions with each student. These days she struggles to get her students to sit still in front of the camera. All kids do well with schedule. Especially the kids with special needs listening issues and attending issues. They really need that. They need that routine. And the you know it's very hard. It's very hard for them but like everyone else. Abrahams has come up with ways to make it work. In fact she borrowed one method of calming her students. Down from children's Yoga certification course. What I'm doing with my fingers touching my thumb to forefinger middle finger rain finger and pinkie and so you have them do that. So it's four touches and then you just say peace begins with me and they understand that peace means quiet and then we keep doing it at any time. You feel anxious or that. You need to calm down you can just you can. Just move your fingers like that. It's thoughtful it's innovative. It's what's necessary the teachers we spoke to said they've mostly worked out the kinks of remote learning and they feel optimistic about finishing the year apart from their students but in the long run. They're still not so sure. I think these kids are young enough. That if it's just four months in the scheme of along is this is not gonNa make the biggest difference because they didn't have four months of preschool. I think that in the fall if kids can't go back to school if they have to learn online. I think that's going to you know really impact this whole generation. This won't surprise you but Chris Dear Louisiana teacher whose own senior year was interrupted by Hurricane Katrina this pandemic once again highlights the need for more investment in education. I know a lot of times when the economy starts to Tank a bit. The first thing that gets cut is education and people might say well. Why do we need as much you know money for education budgets when they do things virtually and whatnot but at this time? I feel like we need more because we need more counselors. We need more. Social workers we need more therapists need smaller classes. And that's how we're going to get through this. These five teachers said the feedback. They've gotten from students and parents has mostly been positive but during the strange difficult national teacher appreciation. Week it's nice for them to hear that their efforts haven't gone unnoticed so since they can't hug their teachers in person this year we got some amazing shouts from students all over. Who want their teachers to know that their students are grateful? My Name is Dalton Davis. I am seven years old from flawless. Oregon. I want to say hi to my first grade teacher. Mrs and Mr Hello. My name is MIRA sing and I am in seventh grade. I would like to thank all of my amazing teachers. Hi My name is Leah. And I'm a fourth grader. I want to give a shot at to my awesome teacher Mr Festival. He is there every day with a smile. Hi My name is Cassie from Whittier California. And thank you to all the teachers especially my Fourth Grade Teacher Mrs Cutler and I'm Kassy's MOM Krista I also WanNa say on behalf of my fourteen year old David who has autism. We appreciate the Special Ed teachers like Mrs Gain. Thanks hi I'M AMELIA. Ham seven years old. I'm in second grade. I have the best teachers and I can't wait the virus to beautiful so I could go back to school.

Laurie Abrahams Hurricane Katrina Louisiana WI Chris Wyckoff Dr Sanjay Gupta Jimmy Fallon CNN Columbia Shawmut High School First Grade Teacher Chris Deer Thousand Twenty Louisiana Apple United States Long Island Texas Leah
First climate change, now COVID-19: Tips for managing the stress

Climate Cast

3:43 listening | 2 weeks ago

First climate change, now COVID-19: Tips for managing the stress

"Of Choosing HOPE IN TIMES OF CRISIS. I'm NPR. Chief meteorologist Paul Hutler. Here with climate cast in the past few years many psychologists reports seeing patients with physical and emotional impacts from climate change. Now I had cove nineteen and it's easy for some of us to feel overwhelmed even hopeless at times but mental health professionals say hope can be an effective antidote to climate and Cova Nineteenth Stress Kristie white as a clinical psychologist practicing in the twin cities. Hi Christie welcome to climate cast. Hypothe- thank you for having me. You recently wrote about this for the nonprofit climate news website. Nci what kind of emotions are patients feeling with climate change? Many young people are expressing concern about whether to have children what their careers might even look like. I'll also talk with people who are experiencing a sense of loss so noticing. Some of the environmental changes in the places where they use to Spend time enjoy nature. Climate change is really a magnifying of health equity and health disparities. So those are some of the things that people of color are coming in expressing concerns about. Cristiano WANTS REMEMBER READING SOMEWHERE. That action cures fear can acting to face. Your climate fears have positive benefits. Yes absolutely I love that quote. A very common reaction to fear is avoidance. This is kind of a typical survival response but one of the problems with fat is does exacerbate our fear and our anxiety by teaching us at the only way we can cope with it is is running away from it one of the things that. I am frequently helping people with is developing some courage and the emotional stamina to face their fear so that they can turn something previously was may be experienced as a threat that needed to be avoided or escaped from into a challenge that is capable of being faced. I love that you talk about choosing hope. How can we do that and make it feel productive in real? So it's more than just a temporary attitude. One of the key pieces to being able to choose hope as I acknowledging and making space for those difficult emotional experiences viewing them as inherently valuable and useful data points that. Tell us that. There's something happening that matters to us. Kristie my job. I feel like at least I'm doing the work on climate. I think it helps me deal with my apprehensions. What other tools our advice? Can you give our listeners? For dealing with climate change or other emotions they might be feeling right now. Identify what is within your control acknowledged. What's within your control? And maybe even start thinking creatively about how you define. What's in your control? So for example if if you need to develop skills to manage something effectively think about how something might be able to come within your realm of control or influence by cultivating those skills or developing that resource capacity. Self-care is key which means getting good sleep getting physical activity eating healthy setting limits on the amount of information. That's coming in and being very self aware and adjusting your approach based on that awareness

Kristie White Cristiano Chief Meteorologist Cova Nineteenth NPR Hypothe Paul Hutler Christie
20 Minutes About Emotions, Anxiety & More With Lori Gottlieb

20 Minute Fitness

6:41 listening | 2 weeks ago

20 Minutes About Emotions, Anxiety & More With Lori Gottlieb

"Laurie run to introduce yourself. And Your Work Sarah so Lori Gottlieb. I'm a psychotherapist in Los Angeles. I'm the author of the book. Maybe you should talk to someone. And I write the weekly your therapist column for the Atlantic riots. You had an interesting career progression from first starting out in the TV and soon industry and then transitioning to Med School. And then eventually becoming a psychotherapist. How how did that come about? So I've always been interested in story and the human condition and so I started off after college working in film and Television and one of the shows that I was assigned to when I was over at NBC was Er and we had a consultant on the show who was an emergency room physician and I spent a lot of time in the emergency room with him to do research for the show and he kept saying to me. I think you like it better here. They maybe she go to medical school and say. I was a French major in college. I was very math and science. You but I was always insisted literature language but I did go to medical school and when I was up at medical school I was up at Stanford and it was This time when the healthcare system was changing it was a lot of talk about managed care and I had this idea of really guiding patients through their lives and it didn't seem like that was going to be the kind of clinical environment that would be easy to manage and so because I was still interested in story in the human condition. I left to become a journalist. Writing Roth and I. I still have a journalist but after I had a baby I've been a journalist for about ten years had a baby and I really needed to talk to adults during the day and so the ups guy would come in he'd like I would detain him with conversations if he would back away to his big brown truck and at a certain point he just tip toe to the door gently placed package out so I could not you know engage him in conversation so I called up the dean at Stanford and I said maybe I should come back and do psychiatry. And she said you're welcome to come back. But you might be doing a lot of medication management and. I know that you really want those those longer deeper relationships with your patients. Why don't you get a graduate degree in clinical psychology and becomes psychotherapist? And that was exactly what I did. I feel like I simply went from being a journalist where I help people to tell their stories to being therapist where I help people to change their stories and how you think your your initial background in the TV industry has been influencing your current work then is it really the storytelling telling or what is it. Exactly it is. I feel like when I sit in the therapist's chair that I am really editor and People come in with a faulty narrative generally because every single one of us is an unreliable narrator meaning that we're not trying to mislead but we tell our stories in a particular way and from a particular perspective and usually that version of the story is what's holding people back. A lot of people think that they're coming to therapy to know themselves by really. I feel like what we therapy is helping. People unknow themselves to let go of the limiting stories that they've been telling themselves so they can live their lives in some faulty narrative that they've been telling themselves about their lives. And how does it look in practice? What we now are like the radio said tell about themselves and how how is that changing after. Actually those with you. A lot of people come to therapy because they want something to change. Something's not working in their lives and usually what they want in the beginning. Is they want someone else or something else to take and what they come to realize is that they have so much agency to make changes themselves. That it's not about changing someone else or something else it's about. How do you respond to that? What kinds of changes can you make in your own life? And so we shift the story. So they become the protagonist in their lives and they're not just reactive to something that's going on around them right in you've seen riding that those individuals stories form to the call our own lives and you've been deeper meaning. Can you elaborate on that? Yeah I think that we're natural storytellers. Even starting with cave drags always wanted to communicate through story. And I think it's so much easier to see ourselves through somebody else's story so in. Maybe you should talk to someone. I followed the lives of four very seemingly different patients on the surface and then there's a fifth patients in the fifth patients is of course me as I go through my therapist. I go for something in my own life and I think that really the book is about the human condition. It's about the reader so so many people who read the buck say oh. I learned so much about myself. I saw so much myself in those stories. Because if you say to someone you know you do this or you're like this. Our instinct is to say no not notes but when you see somebody else do something. It's almost like having a mirror held up you where all of a sudden you see yourself much more clearly. And that gives you so much more agency and power in your life when you understand why something isn't working and what you can do about it and does require us to have you know these compensations to have basically that bureau held against us to really understand our own story better or something in play of how our own stories are forming in the first place like something that we can do actually to be more conscious about unknowing ourselves. I think it's hard to do by yourself because it's kind of like if you're zoomed into a picture you just see a little portion of it but if you zoom out you see this wider perspective and. I think that's what other people do for us. Were so close to ourselves that we lose perspective. We don't see the big picture and talking to somebody else can help me to see something that you haven't been either willing or able to see it's almost like. I think going to therapy is like getting a really good second opinion on your life and for those of us that don't have access to a therapist is like another way of actually realizing how the people in our own environment perceive US actually. Oh yeah absolutely. I mean the title of the Book May Be talked to someone. Doesn't just mean maybe you should talk to a therapist. Maybe we should all be talking more to one another and this was written before the pandemic so no this this applies all the time even more so now course but I think that a lot of times. We don't really take off the mask and talk to people about what's really going on with us because we have shame because we're afraid of how they might react because you know we're embarrassed whatever it might be and. I think what people come to realize when they do make contact with another person in that way is how much the same we all are that that underneath all we all want the same things we all want to love and be loved. We all have regret. We all have anxiety about certain things were also similar and so I think that we feel isolated so much time partly because everyone's going through something similar might look different but underneath the courts very similar and yet nobody wants to open up and share that so we feel like we're the only

Stanford Los Angeles Med School Laurie Lori Gottlieb Sarah NBC United States Roth Editor Consultant
Breathing Exercises

Mentally Yours

8:12 listening | 2 weeks ago

Breathing Exercises

"Hi and welcome to mentally ause. I'm Evan and NASA's mentally it was corona virus a special episode out the pandemic and how we can look at mental health during it. Dan returned to her own. She's a free diver speaker on a breadth trainer. We're going to be talking about how we could use our time in lockdown to improve our breathing because so many of us have gotten into bad habits myself included especially with our terrible wise heracles. Do while from home and hunching overlap dope or going through some breathing exercises can help with anxiety and stress and struggling to fall asleep in lockdown. So how did you get into some silly? How did you get into breathing? I does sound like Israeli question but it's not really at. I discovered free diving Seven years ago now free diving is breath hold diving and I practice the death depth the depth disciplines which means I loan surface of the ocean. I take one very deep breath. And then we don't have as deep as I can on that one single breasts and I come back up on the same breath And in learning how to free dive your taught better breathing habits and how to use breathing to help relax station because that's incredibly important in free diving and Piqued my interest. And the more I continued with my free diving more interested. I got in how we breathed in how it can help us And that helped me to discover how bad breathing habits can can hinder us. Really Dumb and just Both physically and mentally and Yeah I go go quite interested all of that now. I help people improve their habits if necessary Why do you like free diving because to me? That sounds terrifying horrible. My parents think exactly the same thing I I loved a little bit about my history. Twenty years ago I was suffering from chronic depression and I was actually on the verge of suicide and I was very lucky to be able to find the strength to reach out with the sport of the Jess and family and friends. I turned my life around and I live a life today that I could ever dreamed of twenty years ago and one of the things that struck me so profoundly when I started free diving. Seven years ago was the peace and quiet as soon as I put my head under the water. Always background voices that a Gemini Negative at times And Forever Yapping. Away in the background just suddenly disappeared and they sense of calm and wellbeing being totally present in each and every moment as it happened was a intoxicating and I fell in love with it immediately. Yeah I can definitely see because I think so. Many people talk about What's it called open-air cold water swimming? And how powerful is Philip? Quieting your thoughts yes again. I think that's along the lines of the shock. Therapy of your mind can be wondering here there. And everywhere and suddenly the power. The intensity of the coldness of the water brings you frightened to yourself right in that in that very moment and it's refreshing. It's re- physically and mentally It's a release from the everyday chatter. That's going on in your mind and that's that's very pleasant to experience that so yeah I do think what is it about free diving. Because I think what you're saying about having to hold your breath for that sounds quite like intense life or death. Stop do you find that helpful for your mental health? It's life death if you don't follow some very simple rules and watched like he would never put to learn driver in Formula One car and the Nice basic rule free diving is you do not do a breath hold new water by yourself because if you do that you push too hard. Which isn't actually as difficult as it sounds you blackout and the thing about blacking out is it. Feels like it feels when you fall asleep. You're not aware that you're doing it. So the first and biggest rule of free diving is do not do breath. Hold near water by yourself And if you are doing it make sure you have someone who knows what they're doing looking off to you And from their Ronin The depth that I do and the the length of time. It takes me to do my dive. I've I've graduated to. Those levels vary slowly over very many years with lots and lots of training and. I don't come up from a dive about to sort of on that cusp at all. I'm very safety conscientious diver. I always dive with a safety. Taymor all my buddy who on training with and we look after each other and so while it certainly pushes each people's buttons because they consider it to be an extreme sport and the reason why is because we're denying ourselves one of the ultimate things that we need to live by denying ourselves It's actually an incredibly relaxing Cathartic peaceful sport. That's a wonderful way to face your fears in very calm controlled manner trashy work. Count what you're capable of and where where what you thought might have been assaulted barrier actually can flex a little bit you can achieve more so once you go into that and then you said you kind of Interest in breathing in general and learn more about. How did? Where'd you go to learn more about that? How do you learn more about breathing? The Internet's very very good place to start. But you over just save out the kind of the real stuff from the notes so helpful stuff and you know in the free diving world. There are lots of people who are much more experienced than me you. I've I've listened to learn from and I've looked into The medical side of things a lot. There there's in terms of breath were there is a massive spectrum that ranges from The sort of health side of things through to at this Rebirthing elements you can do this. Yoga prony come exercises that you can do which I actually incorporate some of them Into the stuff that I teach. But an says through to kind of the Cold War to therapies. That people can do as well. We're taking the styles of breathing or involved to help people to build up the sweat the list that she gets on and do it in and step into that ice bath and so it's it's a massive spectrum an I tended to on me have gone more towards the medical side of things whether as says documented reports and studies to show that this debris thing how it can be helpful both physically and mentally to us Because it just it carries more weight for me and I come from a medical family and my father would laugh. May Add to town. If I didn't wasn't able to back things up so yeah it's it's been very useful having that

Nasa Evan DAN Taymor Philip
Laura Prepon Opens Up About Having Eating Disorder

Skimm'd from The Couch

3:30 listening | 2 weeks ago

Laura Prepon Opens Up About Having Eating Disorder

"It's so interesting in doing prep for this interview. That in seeing you from that seventy show to October road and two oranges a new black. You've always come across as so confident in this book you bravely right about your experience suffering from an eating disorder during your early years as an actress and you were struggling with your body image. An industry that is very focus on appearance. How did you get out of that? What was your road to recovery? Like will you bring up a really good point? Which is yes in my industry. Unfortunately the way that you look. There's a Lotta pressure for that. Which is why I was so fortunate to be on something. Like orange is the new black. Because it's so celebrated women of all different shapes and ethnicities and backgrounds. But the thing about what happened with my mother. Yes she equated. Being thin things successful hundred percent and another thing I had to do was look at how she was raised and get understanding. Because I couldn't understand why you would teach your child while teaching them all these other great things and then you teach kind of dysfunction. That did take me years to get out of. But it's really understand where they came from the fact that she equated that with success in thought she was helping me. That's what was very complicated about it and for us for myself on my mother it was. It was a shared secret. It was how we bonded and because I so badly wanted to bond with my mother you know this was how we would spend time together and when we were growing up my mother was always off doing some. She was eccentric chef. She was always off doing things at restaurants perfecting her picking duck recipe. And all these odd wonderful things that I grew up with but when I did get time and spend time to hang out with her. I couldn't wait and my father. He was an orthopedic surgeon most of cases in two hospitals. We never saw him either. He was gone in the morning before we went to school and he would come home very late at night. It was a very odd upbringing. You know and then so when I have this time to be with my mother. It was really special. So that's what was so hard about this thing that she taught me and the other thing too is the reason why I struggled with this dysfunctional relationship. To food for so long is because you have to eat to survive. You can't just quit smoking or stop drinking alcohol or stop doing drugs and things like that. You have to eat to survive so there's triggers all day. It got to a point where it was just. It was bad and then when my mother was diagnosed with Alzheimer's that's was a game changer. For me while the blame Ya. I don't think that the dysfunctional eating attributed to that it might have. I don't know but when that happened I couldn't help but wonder could it have been different if she was so better care for self and that was a game changer for me and then when I got pregnant it's like a switch left and when I got pregnant. That's when everything truly shifted for me. I would never even think of doing that kind of abuse to my body

Alzheimer
Take Back Your Life  Coping with Change

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

3:05 listening | 3 weeks ago

Take Back Your Life Coping with Change

"For here today to talk about how caregivers can take back their life but also more specifically. We're GONNA talk about change in the changing roles. We face when we're dealing with somebody living with Alzheimer's so thanks for joining me Lauren. My pleasure thank you Chen. I'm glad to be here. There's a lot going on but The caregiving which I thought had sort of ended is ongoing My husband passed away three weeks ago and my son is in a medically induced coma right now dealing with both leukemia and he did get the virus so he's where holding positive that he's GonNa come through this so my my daughter and I are healthy and supporting each other through this. Well I can relate as you know. My mom passed away on March thirty first. It's a little bit of surprise although it probably shouldn't have been but other than that everybody's doing well we don't have any of the other issues that you're dealing with. Was I really appreciate that? You can take the time and enjoy me in the midst of all of that at some very One one of the things that I tell people because I'm seeing clients doing video zoom telephone sessions and I say it's very grounding for me because what can we do. That's part of the issue everybody's dealing with that. We feel very powerless and part of being a caregiver is we like to feel in control. We like to feel empowered. That we can make a difference that we can do things. So it's all very surreal for sure but I think it's very surreal for a lot of caregivers especially if you're not living with your parents or spouse or whoever who has out timers your caregiving role has changed in And it changed in a different way if you are living with your loved one because you can have the same outside support that you had previously so change happens whether we instigate it or not definitely evident right now our living in a pandemic and trying to figure out how we're going to restart our country and go back quote unquote back to normal. Even though I don't think that's going to happen I'm hoping for some improved normal. It will definitely be a different normal. Yeah I hope it's different in a better way absolutely and I think that it can be but

Coma Alzheimer Chen Lauren Leukemia
Helping Others During Lockdown

Mentally Yours

9:09 listening | 3 weeks ago

Helping Others During Lockdown

"Save welcome to mentally oils. Thank you thank you for having me event. Thanks for coming on. So you're wanted with the Samaritans held on if you've been working with them actually not long about two years. I started doing it when I start work and I'd worked in a very busy high pressure job. That really left no room for anything else and when I stopped doing it uh suddenly thought I really would like to investigate Samaritans And it was thought that just came out of a clear. Blue skied at know. Why but it did I discovered that was a branch quite near me and I went to the information evening. I was really impressed with what I saw. And Went straight into the training and at all it all the way through. I was thinking if I feel this is quite right. You know just stop. It's fine but I never once felt it wasn't quite right and I've never felt wasn't right since And I look forward to shifts at Shelly. I find them really interesting and ment- mentally you know mentally stimulating and So I have no regrets about about volunteering tool. I think it's incredible. What am on the podcast. We always refer people to some of the end just because some people might have been Things come up if speaking about difficult issues and it's it's really fantastic to know that the Samaritans that just to listen in to have chats what sort of things that you deal with On a daily basis in terms of chatting to people oh my goodness Coolest issues are like snowflakes. There are two that are the same Era kind of broad categories that they can fall into such as `isolation loneliness mental health issues. Physical Health Issues Worries about work will finance family could be violence or abuse or things Those are very broad categories and when you to king to Kula it's completely incredible unit. You Cou- you couldn't you couldn't make up what some people have to go through And everyone everyone is different before Marson. I went to newspapers. And I thought I'd seen and heard do. But I realized when I when I became a smash in that hadn't even scratched the surface of what goes on in people's lives on a day to day basis. It's been very illuminating. Have you seen things change during the epidemic? Because I'm sure this Martin's being inundated during the stressful time interesting. We'll always inundated to be perfectly honest Shift and you take a cool and he put the phone down and immediately rings again. This just never any less up the calls. Just keep coming through and it's the same now And we have had a category added to the categories that we deal with one being covered. How the in my own experience of doing shifts through the lockdown I haven't had any cools specifically about Kovin. And when I think about it. I think that possibly mental health when it comes to mental health. It's a little bit like physical health. So people who have mentioned Cova to me have also go other issues. So it's a bit like you have underlying issues and then code and the challenges of coded Sorta the exacerbate these issues as it has done with physical health unit so the people who were suffering most with covert was the people who had underlying issues. And that for me. in the cools. I've taken has been the case. That people have got issues going on in their lives. May they may be prone to depression. They may be feeling very lonely. Anau lockdown has sort of those issues into much sharper focus. I haven't had anyone cool specifically about vid frightened of that actual many peop- law I think a lot of people to listening to the Picasso's probably relate to that because just vanik totally sort of from friends and even family who have sort of long-term half the she's Winstons if you sort of have anxiety General anxiety disorder that sort of become west because of to defensive in my case bipolar disorder in. They've been issues in terms of getting medication. Because of Kovic so it is also give lots of things become west sort of people yes I admit rishton about the unnaturally People with mental health issues and depending on how acute those mental health issues all often have quite a good comprehensive support cap package in place with the NHS and because of social distancing and because of not being able to see people face to face the many people with mental health issues. That support system has evaporated actually during lockdown. And we do. We do see people calling us because they can't any longer speak to that key worker. Will that support worker And Yeah I think I think it's. It's very difficult for people in that situation. Because the the package they used to be able to rely on. Isn't there the same thing happens a bit Christmas and Times like that holidays? People are away and doing other things. And it's a bit like that with lockdown some Jim Peas and mental health. Wise are offering example. Counseling defy laptops obsessions over the phone. I think it's probably pros and cons. Who Different people? I think some people find that helpful. Princeton's if you're depressed you might find easy to just sort of pick up the phone chat someone not she go into a surgery but then as he signed for a lot of people. If you're used to seeing the same pass in face to face it can be quite difficult to get used as a new way of talking to them or if together. I think doing what they can where they can. I think I think doing an incredible job. But it's inevitably gained be a bit patchy and maybe you'll key worker has to a self isolated is an can't be there for you I also had another cooler. He couldn't go to church for her. Church was a vital part of her of her weekly routine really was a point where she saw to touch base every week with the community that went to Sch- and suddenly that was taken from her and that was very hard So yeah it's it's people are finding that that regular support system has been taken away and therefore it leaves you feeling very on anchored and bit A little bit out of balance and I think there's no question that lockdowns been huge adjustment for all of us in. Its massive. What what has happened? In the last few weeks countries come to a standstill lutts huge. And you can't pretend it's no huge. It will have an impact on all of us to one degree or another. You know someone must have more resilient than others But you know being less. Resilient is not a sign of failure it is just the person you are and you may need some support and certainly smartened serve to support anybody. Who is struggling through this time?

Samaritans General Anxiety Disorder Kovin Marson Cova Martin Jim Peas Kovic Princeton NHS
Dieting to Death

The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

7:54 listening | Last month

Dieting to Death

"So when you wrote this letter you were feeling pretty bad. That was my wits end. I've been that way a lot lately. I just feel. There's no hope no hope. How long have you been blaming seven years since I was sixteen? This is fascinating thing to me. It's like how do you come on? I mean where do you I decide that? I think I'm GONNA go eat a lot now. I'm GONNA throw up. Why started out overweight and then I went on a crash diet I went to the health. Club five times a week and I would wear like two pairs of sweats and workout. And I would drink diet pop for about six months and I lost about sixty pounds. It got to the point where I wanted to eat and I couldn't keep the weight off. I started gaining weight so at a party one time. French have throw up and for about two years. I would keep it a secret and like I throw up in anything garbage cans pots pans store at my closet and to my parents would leave. And then I'd go get rid of it in the toilet. It came to the point. Where after about two years my parents found out and they hospitalized me. I signed myself out. Went Away to college and I thought I'd get better but I didn't just last year. Signed myself back in again. They put me on antidepressants. I got out of the hospital and my insurance company decided that they weren't going to cover me and I got stuck with twenty five thousand dollar bill. I tried killing myself. I took the whole bottle of anti-depressants than I was in intensive care for about half a week and then I was brought to medical unit and then they put me to a state hospital because I was Or to the state because I had no insurance and it took a really hard time for my parents to get me out and I swore I would never kill myself again but I don't WanNa live that way more recently. Just alluded that me. I Live Tiv I e. that's all I do. I mean that work. I just can't wait to get home and I've gone through. How many jobs a year five six jobs a year? I can't hold friends I Kendall job. I don't even consciously think about it. I write the check for Food Restaurant a grocery store and just so I have food. I live eat. I could eat one hundred dollars for the food and one day I is it. Sit there and eat three e. I just meet this consciously. It doesn't and so you still do this every day. I just filed bankruptcy about Islam few weeks ago and I was told I could never learn to check again so I ripped up on my checks and everything but off another ways. I'm intelligent I'm smart. I have a lot going for me. I'M NOT STUPID. I I find other ways to get money to support my habit. I would do anything. The habit is food right well. I know it's not. The food is not the issue is what's going on in my life and I just know I need long-term intense treatment and no insurance company will accept me just feel. There's no hope because no one will take me. I've been an outpatient therapist now. I CAN'T AFFORD IT. I I live on my own. My parents won't let me back in the house They just can't live the way they live. When I was living there so is it just disrupts the rest of the family. I know I talked to routines parents. And they they are still very supportive a routine but you can tell the the I mean. It's broken them. You know not just in terms of financially and the bills and the hospital but it's first of all most people don't understand that they're trying to figure out what is going on you're miserable has nothing else. Say you're miserable now. Then your life students to work you think it is superficially for a day or two or for an hour for a minute. It distracts again. You're never happy. So did you date. Did you have boyfriends? And Yeah Basically. I have no girlfriends. All my friends are basically guy friends. I can only guys and whenever that person's not there for me I think they hate me and it always seems I'm always by myself. I always end up by myself. I never keep friends too long. And so do you urge every single meal if you avenue on the set meal. I don't you know you do what I just eat when I have the time or when it's convenient a lot of times if I wake up in the morning and I even have a cup of coffee. It sets me on a bench like and I call in sick to work. And that's basically. Why Miss My job because I I just don't go to work. I'd rather sit home and be by myself in my own little apartment and just east. And what do you eat anything make? I don't have a big thing for sweets basically like Meats and potatoes and noodles and eggs thing breakfast thing for eggs and sausage and how much you eat. Well when I usually go shopping I go like I spent forty dollars but I- generic I also I can get more for my money and I. I just buy everything and anything. I probably about two dozen eggs in one sitting sued things a sausage with a whole big thing biscuits and then I go through up and then I'll go make myself a steak with some baked potatoes. Then go throw that up and then I'll go to pancake something sweet to insult time. I'm numb I don't I don't realize it and I swear when I'm scrolls but when about tonight's where I would never do it again but it just soon as I pick my head up back there again. I have no control and I know any treatment. I I want treatment but no one looks at me. No insurance will cover it. It's just really sad. And I know that there's a lot of things medically wrong with me and this destroys your body and I can't do anything about it and parents can't help me anymore. They've helped me. They can So what is what is the answer for you. What do you think I mean? Obviously I know you are. Here are the being. Here is a major cry for help because everyone thinks I start on anorexic and everyone thinks that Iran are except. I've never commit to blame you. Not everyone knows I believe you. I need long-term intense treatment. I've been in hospitals twice before you know month and a half month it. It does good while I'm there in a few weeks after I get out but it's right back to it. I've been doing it for seven going on eight years now and it's GonNa take a long time to get back off fit again and there's nothing nothing state-funded nothing available for you. Understand this. Yes I do I also feel. I'm sending a little bit further away from that. Because I feel there is hope and I do see a light at the end of the tunnel and I really honestly feel that I can get over this do you. Are you still binging and purging. Yes I knew on a daily basis yes on a daily basis but a much more controlled basis. Yeah what is that child? It means that I've learned how to feed myself so I'm not starving so I have to go and binge eat something It means that I've learned that there's a lot more life or throwing up ten times a day. Oh that there have been days but not as much as it used to not like. It used to be no. I just don't want to do that anymore. I wanNA live my life. I want to move on. I'm not sure how I'm going to do this last time you were binging and purging yesterday yesterday but as far as the same for you. I wrote my coffee this morning. That's all I had this morning but it's only coffee so is it. It doesn't matter. I've gained five pounds over the weekend. 'cause I was so nervous eating I fervently income right now. I'm just having a hard time dealing with because you gained five pounds over the week. I don't have a scale. I went to my mom's this morning and stepped on a scale. Animals freaked out because the five pounds. So when you say you live for food means your entire life your entire life is controlled by either. What you way or what you or what you didn't eat and yeah. I could be with my family which basically all I have in life anymore and be having a good time. Everyone seems to think I'm going to get time and I just I'm thinking about God tomorrow at home and just eat eat. Eat when you're eating when you're in the midst of eating two dozen eggs in two packages of sausage and throwing that up and then making a steak and making some pancakes does it feel. Do you feel comforted. You feel soothe. You feel at peace. Do you feel as my friend? That's my front and never let you down. It's always there. No one else has always been there for me. That's always there for me. That's my one crutch in life one

Food Restaurant Iran
How Does Agoraphobia Work?

BrainStuff

7:02 listening | Last month

How Does Agoraphobia Work?

"Doesn't it seem like some people aren't afraid of anything? But you know what those people? They're phonies because they're scared of chainsaw clowns just like everybody else. They're just better at hiding it. Everybody has fears. But not everybody has a phobia medically recognized. Phobias are different from normal fear in that they provoke a very intense reaction they're unreasonable or unwarranted for instance being intensely afraid of guy with a shotgun in a ski mass while that kind of makes sense but being intensely afraid of balloons doesn't so much and finally they can interfere with a person's ability to live their life but there are other anxiety disorders that while very real and potentially very disruptive of a person's life are far more insidiously. Vague and Agoraphobia is one of them according to the DSM. Five every year one point seven percent of adolescents and adults will be diagnosed with agoraphobia. So what is it well? A lot of people have heard the term and have a vague idea of what it means but a lot of these ideas are wrong or at least they don't tell the whole story so for instance some things that a Gora phobia are not are a fear of crowds a fear of wide open spaces or a fear of being outside though all of these may be a manifestation of actual agoraphobia. Agoraphobia is actually a broader complaint that will often include some or all of the fears previously listed so for some general layperson definitions to help. You get the gist of it here. We go agoraphobia. Is A type of anxiety disorder in which you fear and often avoid places or situations that might cause you to panic and make you feel trapped helpless or embarrassed. That's from the Mayo. Clinic OR AGORAPHOBIA. Is An intense fear and anxiety of being in places where it is hard to escape or where help might not be available. Agoraphobia usually involves fear of crowds bridges or of being outside alone. That's from the National Library of medicine at the National Institutes of health. One More AGORAPHOBIA is a fear of being in situations where scape might be difficult or help wouldn't be available if things go wrong. That's from the National Health Service in the UK so really agoraphobia is more broadly the fear of being trapped in a vulnerable situation especially when exacerbated by an existing predisposition to panic disorder. Very often the person with agoraphobia specifically dreads experiencing a panic attack or other panicked like symptoms in a situation where such inexperienced would be especially inopportune according to the DSM five and this is the latest edition of the professional diagnostic handbook for mental health professionals. According to that to meet the diagnostic criteria for a goer phobia. You must have quote market fear. Orange Zaidi about two or more of the following scenarios standing in line or being in a crowd being outside of the home alone using public transportation being an open spaces or being an enclosed spaces so the DSM five reports that the person with a Gore phobia fears or voids these situations because of thoughts that escape and might be difficult or might not be available in the event of developing panic like symptoms or other incapacitating or embarrassing symptoms. What physically happens is the following according to the US National Library of medicine these symptoms. Show up when you're experiencing agoraphobia chest. Pain or discomfort choking or shortness of breath dizziness or fainting nausea rapid heartbeat sweating and trembling also according to the DSM five. You can only meet the criteria for diagnosis. If you always are almost always have the fear response to these situations. You actively avoid these situations or require the help of a companion. The level of fear you feel is disproportionate to the threat represented. This condition lasts for six months or more the fear anxiety or avoidance causes coat clinically significant distress or prevents you from living a normally functional life and the suite of symptoms. You experience is not better grouped under another diagnosis for example if your fear only occurs because you fear people's reactions to perceived flaws in your physical appearance this might be a body dismore disorder instead of general agoraphobia. So if you have intense persistent debilitating fear. That you'll begin to have a panic attack or another embarrassing or incapacitating episode while you're stuck in a place or situation you can't get out of or where you can't find help. You might have a Gore phobia. We'll that's a long one and this can have some really serious consequences for example more than one in three people with Gora Phobia are completely homebound and unable to work and sometimes people inappropriately self medicate with the abuse of drugs and alcohol. Agoraphobia often develops out of an existing panic disorder for example if a person experiences a panic attack in particular type of place say for example like an airplane or an elevator. He or she might start to avoid ever being in that situation again over time. This can develop into full blown agoraphobia. Something like Agoraphobia can sometimes be difficult to accurately diagnose since it's associated with something like panic disorder and because the functional symptoms may resemble those of problems with different causes for example may dread and avoid flying an airplane because of a Gora Phobia or maybe simply because you feared death by plane crash. The situational phobia is outwardly similar. But it happens for very different. Reasons are all right. So maybe you're wondering if I've got a Gora Phobia. How do I treat it? Well the most common treatment responses are a combination of cognitive behavioral. Therapy an antidepressant medication. Cognitive behavioral therapy is basically a common form of psychotherapy where the therapist helps the patient talk through thought processes and common behaviors and then replaces those bad thoughts and behavior patterns with better ones antidepressant. Medication could also include drugs. Such as selective Serotonin reuptake inhibitors or s our eyes or Serotonin Neuro. Epinephrine reuptake inhibitors. So if you or someone you know are suffering from agoura phobia. There's help out there. All you have to do is seek it out.

Agoraphobia DSM Gore Us National Library Of Medicin National Institutes Of Health National Library Of Medicine Epinephrine UK National Health Service Orange Zaidi Mayo Nausea Agoura
Rip Van Winkle

The Struggle Bus: Self-Care, Mental Health, and Other Hilarious Stuff

8:59 listening | Last month

Rip Van Winkle

"We have some. We have a big show today. We're going to just do our things. Oh Oh man I. I don't know man like I woke up. What's the story about the guy who goes to sleep for like a hundred years and wakes after whatever is that a retail it's not rapunzel it's It's is that echoed crane or. Is that the headless Horseman Sandwich. It's the one In a look at apple look I I could easily Google but I'm not going to. The point is okay. Thank you the point is that. I woke up this morning and I felt like I was waking up from being dead for like one hundred years so I'm tired and disoriented Rip Van Winkle Rip Van Winkle like I said Yeah I feel like Rip Van Winkle but I'm okay like I'm fine but like just I think we would be remiss to not mention that the life is really like tiring right now. Yeah Yeah Wednesday just Just left me. We're recording on on a Thursday crutches. Thursday it's allegedly. Yeah we're all like messed up and like my schedule has totally I? Everything is just is just like kind of a weird Amorphous Blob of time and it's every day is a question of like. How am I going to sculpt this time blob and every day as a surprise? Yeah how fun. Yeah it's a really good time But actually so that's a that's a transition that I'm going to take advantage of talking about this article Yes it has. Oh with the headline training for this our entire lives. And it's by. It's by Todd EMCO. Who's a listener of the struggle bus and the the dog parent of Piggy a very adorable service animal legged SOG piggy offer talk about Peggy for a second piggy is literally the best thing ever piggy is emotional service dog as well and can tell when you're feeling sad and goes up to people randomly and just knows when they're feeling sad so piggies doing overtime? Feel Yeah I feel like yeah piggies like working around the clock probably because picky so good at like human beings But todd takes piggy to schools and and Kids come up to piggy initials relieved beautiful disease. There's a lot of videos about Peggy. But were all linked to this on. Go Bus PODCAST. Dot Com this. Article's really interesting so yes there is really at article by Todd. And it's like talking about how What will the idea is basically that there are many people out there who are what what everyone is experiencing right now in a way there are people who have been kind of you know quote unquote like he says training for this their entire lives so lang todd says as as a severe obsessive compulsive disorder post traumatic stress disorder anxiety sufferer someone with compromised immune system? I know that people like me of spending our entire lives self isolating compulsively washing your hands in dealing with systemic exploitation of our plight and then the article he just he just goes on to talk about the various strategies that He uses in. That are familiar to him for like just dealing with the reality that we're in right now and it's really it's really interesting. It's really helpful. It's published in a mad in Asia Pacific and you can willing to it in the show notes but it's it's really good. I reread at this morning. And there's just like just a bunch of Just like awesome tips in there and not just tips but like just someone talking about you know aspects of a lot of us are feeling right now and it just feels really nice to kind of have that you know be recognized like called out so check that out as someone who has. Ocd and anxiety These are not the things I'm used to like washing. The hands is not my thing. You know checking doors or you know not talking to people and so. I've learned to adapt right so I think it's it's a really beat Florida about adapting and and how our anxiety is you know it can be real and you know we. We talk a lot about What's the word you use the Rip Van Winkle. Yeah no but sort of like just sort of like over thinking things and thinking like Oh. This isn't a catastrophic catastrophic thinking. That's all right. Thank you and and at this point we can think that way and I think that that's in in a very strange way Very welcome for those of us who have catastrophic thinking it's like okay Yeah yeah one thing that like. I can't remember if you and me were talking about this I forget who I spoke about anything on Zoom meeting with the I know. Yeah totally but like I. I've been feeling like Like my in a weird way. I especially felt this way in the very beginning of all of this I when people were like really starting to come around to how serious this was When people finally started to come around I was. I felt like finally relieved in a way. Oh well yeah absolutely but like that my like my like anxiety and vigilance about the world and its dangers and being safe that like other people were finally like thinking about that too and there are many people who think about that all the time because there are plenty of people in our country who are under extreme threat all the time just by virtue of they are but but like. I think that until this happened and like reality set in for a lot of people There were there. Were just a lot of people who aren't accustomed to thinking about what it means to live in uncertainty and to feel you know that the state not only will not protect you but is actively harming you And that there's chaos outside your doors and all the stuff and there's something about like people kind of also realizing that that's happening that made me feel like finally people are getting what I've always gotten like you know just because like we. We all have our own things that were bringing to everything in like my one of the things I bring to. Everything is being hyper vigilant and being like Yeah like thinking catastrophically cause me to spiral and have like not unproductive thoughts but cows probably thinking is also what has like my my like history of catastrophic making my propensity for it is. I think what has positioned me me personally to like. Be Relatively okay during all of this Yeah I'm very surprised. How calm I am during all this. You know I went through my spiral a few weeks ago. Like oh no and now like I'm good right so it's like these are things that we we just talked to our doctors and talk to our friends and it turns out that a lot of people that we know have had this or are carriers and it's very serious and we should take seriously but I like that people are well. I don't like anything about this but I like the people are finally taking it seriously and so when I tell people they're like oh myself as well and I'm like oh now we're sharing and unfortunately I mean this may be we'll go into your your next segment of debris Jabra of I really wish people took this more seriously if they aren't already Know New Yorkers are taking this seriously because we're very close spaces but I see a lot of things on social media where people are like but can I just walk around the block and do this friend and it's like no no. You're hurting us. If you if you heard other people you could be a carrier. I'm sorry to get negative sally. That's fine but do you want to like. How are you feeling are you? Are you doing? Okay just want people to know listening wisely. Yes how allies I am doing. A thousand percent better. I have I still have a low fever which is weird but you know it is what it is and I feel a thousand percent better. I've been just cleaning the apartment and cook and food as much as I can the even though my landlord turned the gas off. But that's another subject entirely

Rip Van Winkle Lang Todd Piggy Apple Peggy Todd Emco Google OCD Asia Pacific Florida Fever
Mental health challenged by pandemic

10% Happier with Dan Harris

3:35 listening | Last month

Mental health challenged by pandemic

"I just want to get back to the pandemic for a second I think it's not a new observation or an original observation. But we're primarily justifiably thinking about the pandemic as a public health issue and as an economic issue but I also think it is going to be am probably already is the largest mental health challenge to the world. Since I don't know World War Two. I don't know what to have all these people on lockdown. At have you know the justice it increases the salience of your own issues in your own mind because as you said before. They external distractions aren't there. You're not getting many of us. Aren't getting the social interactions. We need to feel healthy. Some of us are locked down with our abusers are reluctant with our children who we love but drive US crazy and they're just so many ways in which or where we've got anxiety about the virus who got an anxiety about the economic situation. So many stressors here. I mean I can feel in my own life. I started thinking about this when you talked about how my grounded nece can be a transmission or a social contagion with my neighbour. And I'm like wow. I don't know how grounded I am right now I can feel like I'm regressing. Back to two thousand three levels of anxiety Because of this situation and I'm in the point. Oh a one percent of the luckiest and very mindful of and very aware of through my role in the news media of the people who were really not that lucky and so. That's me I'm just wondering for you have there. Have you noticed Increase in difficulties as a consequence of you know what we're living through together. I have I mean for me. This whole period is inseparable from the fact that I'm a new dad too so this is the first. I'm still in the first seven months of my son's life and so my wife and I are. Life has been turned upside down and that was true before the pandemic and as the pandemic is settled in. It's just exaggerated some of the challenges of new parenthood in terms of the isolation just needing to be there all the time that continual need to be with this kid you know and when your sleep is just shot to hell. I mean. We haven't had a good night's sleep in says probably before he was born so already. There was this sort of attrition happening and now with this added extra stress for me worrying about my parents. My friends who are doctors in those industries and also my friends who have small businesses were falling apart. You know who've lost their jobs I feel like I am talking to a lot of people like that and trying to support a lot of people so I do feel that. I'm you know working at fifty percent. Sixty percent may be but that just for me. It's just been that much more also practicing more than I ever have probably in my life like it's called practices so much more obvious and I find that the practice I have done has massively helped me if this happened to me five years ago even I think you know it would have been a different story. We have been much more. I would have been much more volatile and dysregulates but it's even five years ago but the past five years practices really dropped down to a much deeper level. So I feel much more capable of being with this experience and being able to be present for others and I'm less regulated than I. Even though I'm not nearly at full capacity I still feel like I could have been much worse.

United States
Thriving/Surviving in Lockdown

The Emma Guns Show

9:38 listening | Last month

Thriving/Surviving in Lockdown

"I am your host emigrant wardner and this is just a midweek check and see how you doing and also to thank you for all of the emails. I've been receiving I mean if there's one thing that's good that's coming out of the situation it's that I am hearing from so many of you. feedback on so many episodes. Not just the recent ones and also questions about future episodes things you'd like to hear from or hear about but I just wanted to say thank you to everyone who's been in touch Particularly about the doctor. Jeffrey rediker interview the compensation about Moore calls and the basically spontaneous remission and miracle healing and so many people saying that they had such a such an intense reaction to that one in how positive they found it and my wonderful friend the makeup artist. Sarrebruck actually emailed me saying it had a profound effect on her which was so kind of her and also the conversation. I had on the poker with Dr. CBO loads if you were really interested in that. And not just about his surgical abilities and how he talked about the human body and performing cosmetic surgeries but also his approach to business. I know a lot of your really very business minded whether you running your own business or you have a side hustle or whatever. It might be new really intrigued by his approach. I know lots of you had taken on his advice about yes. We've got time during quarantine during lockdown to learn a new skill. And there's all these ridiculous things as I've previously spoken about where you don't have to do that. You have to learn a new language or an instrument but how you can actually learn a complimentary skill. Perhaps we'll just investigate something that might help. Whether it's your business. Whatever it might be you can learn an adjunct skill that could actually benefit you. After this point something that you would normally think I really wish I had time for that to support my business or whatever it might be an move forward with it during this particular time so I know lots of you really took that as a as a bit of a call to arms to actually. I'm going to. I'm going to investigate that. So thank you for all your messages to everybody. There were same anchalee about that particular episode saying about the various things that you were actually finally going to look into Some people were learning coding. Which is going to help their job over. Going to really understand their finance side of that business because it's something that they felt that they didn't have enough insight on so it was really interesting to hear how a conversation with a plastic surgeon and actually really motivated lots of you to look at various other experts aspects of your life and how you could use the time in lockdown to maximize or potentially not. Don't particularly want because we talked about in the last mid week show or the one before Wendy Roe came on and talked about how ridiculous it is this pressure of well locked down there. Treat it like a an intense some of course where you come out with a skill at the other end which is just absolute nonsense. I'm speaking of Wendy Roe. Lots of you got in touch saying you loved listening to her career story and how so many of you a lot of you know me or have been with me for a long time so you know that my background is the beauty journalist right at the very beginning of my career and lots of you saying how you really enjoyed hearing about the garage. After a makeup artists trying to make a name for themselves and the graph of working on photo shoots and what it really took and how actually it really is. All those component parts the graph the not working for money the learning learning when to shut up knowing who to learn from and then figuring out how how and what. Your style is really interesting and how soup hearing her explain. Her journey really made it very clear. How those building blocks really fit together and have carved out this wonderful career Wendy House. They think he's everyone he listened to those episodes now. I did say a couple of weeks ago. I talked about or a few weeks ago. I talked about the The way to work more efficiently from home and and this is very much much. I ever bonus show really about the corona virus. Which is something I want to necessarily linger on. Because obviously there's a lot to say about that. I did a particular podcast about working from home and I think we've all been over a month in this now and there are some new developments that even. I'm I've learned that I've made mistakes even though I thought I had a pretty rigid structure in place so I just thought I'd really update you on that. And hopefully that might help you. If you're feeling you're getting to the four or five week mark and maybe your wobbling a little bit and just feeling a little. Bit like Oh. This is getting tough now. I talked in that episode which was how to be productive while working from home which brackets because of the corona virus. But I talked about having a structure. I talked about having a routine about getting up at the same time every day about going to bed at the same time every day. So that your body basically gets into a rhythm because when you're in a rhythm everything else kind of happens on autopilot if your body is in really nice easy rhythm then everything else seems to fall into place whereas what we don't have at the moment is a particular structure because we don't have to be anywhere at a certain time or do it a thing at a certain time so all of that has thrown has been thrown out of the window so for me structure is still really key. Is that my mom at seven. Am on weekdays. And I usually wake up this game. Does anyone else do this? I wake up and then I look over at my clock before I turned it around. I can see it. I guess an unusually within ten minutes of it which is always very weird but anyway anyone else do that. Please do and let me know worry moment. Let me know. But I get up at seven o'clock on Weekdays and eight o'clock on weekends and I find that that works really well. I always tend to sort of start making my way to bed at around ten o'clock. That's I have a cup of sleepytime t at ten o'clock maybe nine o'clock or just begin to sort of wind down and then. I'm going to get into bed together because I'm puttering around weeding doing stuff. Skin-care comes into and that can take awhile at this age so I do tend to sort of move towards the bed at around ten o'clock and I definitely definitely don't want to be out of bed any later than eleven sound like a boarding school or something but that routine is structure really works for me and that is a real they are really pillars and foundations and really cornerstones for me of making this work but then the other thing that I find really important is moving and If you follow me on social media you know most mornings I just do a little post before. I'm about to yoga on my exercises and just say hello. Everyone I'm up. I did talk about doing something different every hour. Even I'm not really doing that but as if I had in the back of my mind I feel like if I'm beginning to feel my entity dip. I can look at the clock and think it's quarter to five. I better move and do something between five and six this different from what I've been doing for the last few hours but I find that getting up in the morning immediately getting into some form of Jim Kit and moving really really helps and a it just helps wake me up wake my brain up and it just makes me feel good and it makes me feel like achieve something so Monday Wednesday and Friday I do little circuit workout with weights in my living room so I do love going Monday. I do for body on Wednesday and I do cool on a Friday. My golden intention during those thirty minute workout is to keep my heart bay or get my heart rate to and above one hundred eighty beats per minute for the on average for the half an hour and also just mind. My form do really good exercises. Make sure I'm before them. Well and then I can take that box and it's done and it's only thirty minutes and by the time you get into the second set of something or other you can kind of get them halfway through. It's not so bad and then again it's just that feeling of tick. I've done a workout. And then that's usually by eight o'clock eight thirty so that always sets my day on a really good fitting on the days. When I don't do those workouts I go for a walk early on. I found actually that doing a twenty minute. Yoga flow and I'll put the link in the show notes that the one that I do from Yoga with Adrian. It's really energizing. But it's still gentler enough to be good for beginners. Just gets me in the fame of mind and then I go out. I walk with per about our work with. I can imagine what even looks like but you know what I mean. I'd like to join with a bit of pace just sort of moving. Not just sort of doodling with purpose and then I come back and my day seems to pan out really really nicely in front of me and I was actually speaking to my friend Amy Lawrenson. Who is a fellow beauty journalist writer health writer and she's also a trained personal trainer qualified personal trainer. I should say and she was saying. Actually it's not a bad thing to exercise every day when we in lockdown. Because we're not getting the sort of you know we're not doing the movement we would normally do of getting on a train getting on the chew walking to work walking to the bus all of that activity that we all used to doing when we're going to places and being out and about when doing so actually exercising every day as long as you're mixing it up and you're doing a mix of strength of walking yoga if cardio is perfectly acceptable at this time so it makes me feel a lot better and I do like. I don't know if anyone asks why. Do like getting outside and I have found that going out early the as Moseley fresh and it's really warm. London and I'd like to go out before it gets really hot. So it's nice to sort of hit hit the day when it's nice and cool moti busy all of that kind of jazz so that has been really positive.

Wendy Roe Writer Jeffrey Rediker Dr. Cbo Sarrebruck London Wendy House Moore Amy Lawrenson Moseley Jim Kit
Couples Therapy And the Coronavirus with Certified Relationship Therapist Mary Kay Cacharo

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

6:54 listening | Last month

Couples Therapy And the Coronavirus with Certified Relationship Therapist Mary Kay Cacharo

"Let's bring in our special guests. Mary Kay could Shero. She's the certified Imago relationship therapist. She's been working with couples and families for over twenty five years. She utilizes encounter centered couples therapy for communication conflict resolution anxiety and depression. Her expertise is needed. More than ever these days. Welcome Mary Kay are you doing? Okay thank you bill. Thank you for inviting me onto the show You know it's not a merry go round. It's a roller coaster. And just like all the people I'm working with their good days and there are days that are more challenging than others so it would seem that there are different types of couples that we've got listening today. We've got new couples where they're together all the time for the first time and it's all good and we've got old couples. They're together now more than there used to being together and we've got the loving sexually active but together now all day and all night and all day all night and all day and all night. We've got couples that were already stressed. Pre pandemic in pre safer at home. Then we've got couples with kids and we've got couples that were kind of getting ready for divorces but they're together all the time and then we've got couples that are running out of things to talk about. So let's let's address the different couples for just a minute so the couples that are running out of things to talk about. Let's start there Mary. Kay How do we manage that kind of situation? Well first of all. It's clear that when we talk about couples we're talking about two people. There are couples. Who are trying to homeschool their children and to to to them and clean the house and Cook and all of this without the help of secretaries nannies and housekeepers and teachers so there's an awful lot of stress there also people who are unemployed who really have too much time on their hands and they really are feeling bored and lethargic and they're beginning to ruminate and worry and and sink into a bit of depression some seeing high anxiety in the couples that I'm working with and I'm also seeing some- slipping into some lethargy and depression for mothers and you know so much of what is going to happen. Between two people is contingent upon. What's happening in each of those individuals so depending on how strong the couple is like what you were saying if a couple already has some cracks bill and seeing those cracks widen a one of the things we know is that the divorce rates in the Asian countries. That are a little bit ahead of us in this journey had higher divorce rates. When I think about that I think it's really to the point of what you said. Which is that. These are probably couples where there was already Some discontent couples. That weren't getting along who don't communicate well and certainly being locked down together. Intensifies all fat. This is also maybe a life death experience so people suddenly start reassessing. What's important is that that kind of motivator or is it just a stress reaction that you're seeing. I think that when we are under existential threat as we are now that it accelerates our decision making kind of like when I have a couple. I'm working within. Somebody's diagnosed with cancer. You know suddenly it's the stakes are higher. People start to think if this is all I've got left. Is this the way I wanNA spend it now? In my world we see in the intensive care unit. How families as well as practitioners that this kind of stress tends to bring out the best as well as the worst in various individuals. Have you seen the same? With respect to the couple's absolutely I've been getting a lot of requests to help people to let go of the marriage in a very conscious way a less stressful way and conversely I've seen a lot of couples really grow closer because they're depending on each other their reprioritising. What's actually important? They're spending time with their children. Maybe for the first time or maybe for the first time in a long time. They're really hyper focused on family and that improves the relationship. Have you seen challenged couples because of the situation get together? I absolutely have. I've seen couples really let go of some of their petty differences in the face of this more important life threatening situation. You know when you talk about the fact that suddenly we have this existential threat that we're facing when you think about our lives things that seem to be so important day in and day out and you're saying that people now are sort of redefining. What's really important? What can you do in your couples therapy that can help people continue to focus on? What's important once? This pandemic is over. My fear is we're going to just go right back to our same superficial lives focusing on those things that are really important and yet I somehow think has terrible as this is that it's an opportunity globally for us to start learning and focusing on really what's important as human beings. Initially I think we experience this is acute stress. This was new. It was different. It was frightening. It required a lot of transitioning and now people are starting to say things like well. This isn't a sprint anymore. It's a marathon. Yeah this is going to last longer than we initially anticipated. And it's going to require and new normal. Do you find that. The external stress that's placed on us in some couples is bringing them together and other couples has exactly the opposite effect. It ends up being kind of transference sort of thing where you end up putting stress into the relationship. Where the actual stresses outside. Absolutely because I find that a lot of people aren't very fluent in there are articulation of. What's actually going on emotionally for them? This is not created in pandemic. Our adaptation to stress happens in our childhood but then we carry it into our adulthood. And most of the time we can manage and have a mature cortex. That's called our adult brain. The toddler brain is the reactive part of the brain where all in toddler brain more or less right now because the threat is so unusual. It's so different than anything we've experienced before so we're having to adjust and the thing that I am hopeful about back to what you had asked Steve about you know. Is it possible that we're going to actually use this? As an opportunity to change is that I think if couples manage the stress right now together they can begin to heal some of the dysfunctional adapt patterns that they have and they can really get through this

Mary Kay Shero Steve Cook
Lulu Miller Treats Her Depression With Fish Research, Finds Fish Dont Exist

The Hilarious World of Depression

7:56 listening | Last month

Lulu Miller Treats Her Depression With Fish Research, Finds Fish Dont Exist

"It's the hilarious world of depression. I'm John from can come comfort. Not In the chaos itself but in the human effort to defy it to recover to overcome to navigate through Lulu Miller and I'm the CO founder of the NPR Radio Show and visit villa and a contributor there and a contributor to radio lab and do some editing. Nancy and heavyweight and I have just written my first unlikely only book called. Whitefish don't exists. We'll find out why fish don't exist in a little bit. I promise in her work. Lulu Miller has this ability to tell stories related science in a profoundly human way science gets explained but the relevance to people trying to live their life gets examined as well the listener comes to understand science and people to like people looking to treat their depression. You you tackle it with a fascination with long day taxonomic sts who fish the the tried and true Technique of archival research of obscure nineteenth century theologists. You Know Right. Yeah. There's the talking cure. The Pharmaceutical Cure and the X. Theological cure exactly exactly but let's back up the Depression Lulus been addressing through long dead fish. Experts is not a new thing goes back to growing up in Massachusetts. I think it was third grade. Maybe even second grade I had to start seeing a therapist and then again in fifth grade. Yeah definitely definitely later on in middle school and stuff and I think I think there was just this encroaching. Worry about how cruel the world can be and kind of like a pressure like a guest just a pressured to ease it for myself and and cheer but other people and make the like the cruelty and the uncaring and the bad going away like I think that started me maybe before the depression and then maybe the Arise the fact that lake a seven year old eight year old girl is got a pretty doomed shot of that and and just this overwhelming feeling of like just not knowing how to to make the bad go away and then and then feeling exhausted and down or something anyway so it was. Yeah I think it was like I think it's privately been there for a long time and manifested in different ways. The therapy wasn't helping and she wasn't helping the therapy. For a long time I I felt like therapists. It was like an adversary like a game where it was this sick. I wanted to prove that I didn't need help. And so I would just lie to them and like say everything was fine. I mean that's the main thing that I started. Manifesting was eating stuff And there were these times in early childhood where I was like restricting and losing weight and and and so I'd have to go to see your child therapist and then I say I'm meeting and and I'm laughing at it only because it was it was so silly immediately to treat it that way because those are probably people who totally could have helped but I just wanted to like even reassured them. I was fine and trying to reassure yourself. You're fine where you're trying to believe the lies. You're saying it was so weird. I didn't some part of me didn't want people In my family to know that I needed any help like I think I think I mean basically a think that the house could be a little bit of a loud disorienting place. My oldest sister had some stuff various stuff going on with mental health and was misdiagnosed. All over the place which made it so hard for her and so hard for my parents she was there first and there was just a lot of confusion And I learned. I'm the youngest of three girls and I learned quickly that like I could make the loud and the confusion go away by just like just being gentle or delightful or simple just being A souder or pleaser like it just. It was just very quickly. I learned that like that could make some of the tears or the loud stop and and I liked that I liked it. It was selfish. Wanted the loud to stop. I wanted people to smile. You know and it worked and I knew how to do it and I think that probably the meaning I have made of it all is that yeah like. I think some part of me felt like that was too much pressure for a little girl and maybe the eating stuff was a way of actually showing adults. I needed help and I wasn't as okay as it was telling everyone. Honey okay. That's how I've made sense of it but then when I would when I would like in those early service appointments I would just you know my body was probably crying for help and my words and my brain were still smiling and laughing and reassuring that I was fine I think it just felt forbidden to be another thing that needed help in that house. Even though again. In retrospect I totally needed help. People were helping me but I started to like take that need that. Worry of of delighting like I just started taking it all out like where it wasn't even needed you know but like I'd worry about the worry about Fra like someone in class. Who seemed like a loner in a in a really gentle tender way? I'd have these patronizing now. I think they're patronizing thoughts. But like where I think if I wasn't nice to them they might die like that like I could heal them. And this. Just in retrospect is ridiculous but like I would. I would worry empathetic though too like you. Sound incredibly empathetic. Yeah but I think I think that's how I thought of it in the moment but in Russia like now as I look back I also see how like patronizing. That is in a sense like that. I that I have the key to whether this sadder anyway. I just WanNa like acknowledged that it's ridiculous. Can I ask you a therapist question here? Yeah yeah which is. Why is it important for you to Establish that it was ridiculous and patronizing? Why is that important to you now? Just because there's Why I don't know John No? I think it's important. Okay you know what it probably is. I think it's important for me to laugh at myself and mock that that impulse in me as a way of life like getting some handle on it because I still feel it I still worry and I think if I don't write that Fran if I don't call them back if I don't at the end of a long day what I'm a now weary like I think I think to call that impulse Hubris. Actually lets me off the hook. And he's like Oh Lulu. You're being they don't they don't need you to survive. I think I think it helps me. Nowadays diffuse what still feels like a a a worry that that can like consumed my head a lot

Lulu Miller John Nancy Co Founder NPR Massachusetts Fran Souder Russia FRA
Feel Good Habits | Jordan Samuel

The Emma Guns Show

8:32 listening | Last month

Feel Good Habits | Jordan Samuel

"Jordan. Now we've done together but this is your first appearance on the show. I am so excited and so honored seriously hundred. Honored thank you. I've been such a fan. I've Yup such thank you so much. There's very nice of you to say now. We met only a few weeks ago and I would like to think it was. I like to think it was cute. It was love affair size far as I'm concerned and partly because you are such good energy we had a good fund giggle fast time. He met which was very very lovely at your launch in London. We had a lovely dinner. Didn't we always amazing if we could go back? That'd be lovely and it was a nice lemon meringue pudding. If memory serves yes well so just seeing that you would be a really good person to speak to feel good habits because you seem like good energy or very disciplined and yeah. I just really wanted to find out from you. What your feel good habits are like what do you do? Whether it's you can't make up in the morning or you just think oh I just want to roll over and stay in bed all day or when you just feel like life really isn't going your way. What your strategies are that help you keep moving forward because you all the founder and CEO of Jordan Samuel. Skin you have pushed to business. Forward is a very competitive place. So what are your star student? I love this topic. Because it's you know it's really really critical now but in general. I just think it's it's great to always have in your back pocket and something that not to get too far into this but I was formerly Professional Ballet Dancer Which was my entire identity for the whole life and when I retired from that there was a bat an eye transition to skin but I felt like I still have one foot in each professional. Most I hadn't fully grieved my professional ballet career but I wasn't fully established in my aesthetic skincare career and I went through like a really bad outings. -iety stress and anxiety for the first time in my life so and was put on like a low dose of medication which I hate it and immediately got off because it was helping but I was not myself and I knew that was wrong but anyway through all of that I found meditation looming to me. That is just like my number. One feel-good tip and meditation that works for you so this is not me doing an hour every day carving out time stressing about the amount of time. I have to do it Funny enough since we've now been working from home being inside not being able to go out. I will do meditation for three minutes. If I've three minutes I will just sit and close my eyes and do breath work do a little mantra or five minutes or whatever that time period is I really haven't actually done it for more than probably five in the past few weeks but just that consistency of quieting your mind as much as possible for me it helps. I don't see how structure the day it helps put me gets me in a different mindset for the day so then if the news happens to be on the way I'm reacting to. The news tends to be a little bit better if I had that little. Bit of something going on If Ya I mean it all comes back to the news. Whether you're reading the news online on Social Media Sina posts on social media that maybe sets you off or actual news on the television But simple and you know the thing too is i. I really recommend that people look into it because people think they need to sit and be quiet and not have thought come into their mind and if they don't have that they're failing at meditation which could not be further from the truth. The whole process is to sit there with those thoughts. Let those thoughts come in acknowledged them and then let them go doing that. Until you sort of are in that silence base and that might be like for me. Now meditated for years and some days are better than others and some days there it is clear mind and other days that mine is not clear whatsoever. But that's not the point. The point is is consistency In that so for me meditation is like my number one. You can do it from anywhere you can do it laying down you can do it sitting. Ideally get a quiet space turnover. But I'll do it laying in bed and just close my eyes and do some breath work and there's great ads. Some are free a lot of free right now. Actually Guided Meditations Oprah and Deepak Chopra. That's actually how I got into meditation. Funny enough was Oprah and Deepak. Chopra did their first like twenty one day. Meditation Challenge Years Ago. Maybe like eight years ago at this point I did it and it was great because it explained everything and it it gave you the guided meditations. It just put sort of tools in your hands and I and I love that. Do you remember the first time you meditated and did you feel ridiculous or Sub Question? How long before you realize it was actually having an effect? I felt ridiculous because I was doing the whole thing. Like you know I'd cross my legs. I was home which you can do. You don't have to do. But like there is that nice sort of peacefulness to it. But yes no. I felt like a farce away. It was not something that I'd ever like tuned into. Were was into didn't really know what I was doing but I did it. It was sort of. I got to the point where I'm like. I don't WanNa do this. So let's try this and But then I'm trying to think I was one of those things where it probably started helping from day one but it wasn't until probably six months later where I realized. Oh my mood actually been fine lying. It wasn't you know so there wasn't a time period where I noticed it immediately work probably months afterward. I realized oh I have been stressed. I haven't been anxious and realized that that period had gone on for a long time. Tracing it back so yeah. It's just a little bit to me. I liken it to taking medicine or taking well no. That's not fair because I actually will take medicine doesn't make you feel better but I think that has a negative connotation but to me is more of A. It's a workout for the brain. So you got a good sense of wellbeing afterwards too and without wanting to revisit difficult place but do you have just a way that. I feel like if you had to describe it to someone who anxiety manifested it was just complete impending doom out of control not out of control. It wasn't ever dangerous it wasn't ever but it was. It was just yet impending doom. It was like everything was bad. Like the walls caving in it that the best way to describe it just anything whether it was health or business or personal life it just felt like I would always go to the negative. I was in a bad loop in my head really an explanation of it yesterday. I read it somewhere which is is being trapped in the present by the fear of the future. Yeah exactly exactly. That's exactly what I had a little bit of grieving the past which I think through in a whole different type of like bad mix to a absolutely. That's a great. Yeah that's perfect. And so if someone's listening to this thinking okay. I keep hearing people talk about meditation. I get I'm going to give it a go is there. Is there a resource that you would recommend that you whether you try to yourself with you know that your friends have had success with when you suggested it to them? Honestly it's the I would start with Oprah and Deepak show premeditation challenge. It's there is a website for it because they just waiting yes and they just launched a new one maybe a few days ago maybe a week ago in reference to everything. That's going on now so I think that's helpful but what I like about. It is Deepak Chopra specifically walks you through as a beginner things. You might feel ways. You might be wall meditating how to sort of let that come in and come out. There's great APPs once. You sort of. Get the gist of it. Perfect starting place. Because there's there's explanation behind that you're not just jumping in with music and a mantra or something which would be absolutely fine but I like a little bit more explanation so people know what to expect

Deepak Chopra Oprah London Jordan. Founder And Ceo Jordan Samuel