Media News

Listen to the latest updates, interviews and analysis from the world of media news. Sourced from leading podcasts and talk radio shows.

A highlight from How to Run a Movie Studio (and take Tom Cruise to space)

The Media Show

05:10 min | 4 hrs ago

A highlight from How to Run a Movie Studio (and take Tom Cruise to space)

"So let's meet her. Are you happy to start? Yeah, fantastic. Let's do it. Don Langley, welcome to the media show. Thank you. We met. Earlier this year, when you very kindly hosted a letter journalists at a lovely swanky London hotel on the day you were made a dame. And you then left that party and went off for a dinner which you were hosting and the papers were full of it the next day that you had hosted amongst other people, Tom Cruise. I mean, in a sense, that sums up your pulling power. Tom Cruise was happy to hotfoot across London to meet you. If you say so. I do say so at least that's what it looks like to me. I mean, there have been reports that universal and Tom Cruise are going to collaborate together on a $200 million space adventure shot on the International Space Station. Are you taking Tom Cruise to space? I think Tom Cruise is taking us to space. He's taking the world to space. But yeah, that's the plan. We have great project in development with Tom that does contemplate him doing just that. Yeah, taking a rocket up to the space station and shooting and hopefully being the first civilian to do a spacewalk outside of the space station. Now I don't know the film's going to cost $200 million. We haven't got that far yet, but it would be a bit more. Probably going to space. How did that conversation go? He comes to you or is people come to you and say, I want to do this? It was Tom directly. And he collaborated very closely with the director called Doug liman. And during the pandemic, he asked for a Zoom call with us. And got onto the call and said, guys, I've got this great project and here it is. So the majority of the story actually takes place on earth and then the character needs to go up to space to save the day. Wow. I mean, I think that is just a big wow, right? I think so. I mean, it is worth reflecting, Tom Cruise is just one of the big names that you work with. You know, you have wooed the likes of Steven Spielberg, Christopher Nolan, they both got films underwear at universal. How do you attract those big names? What are you saying to those directors? Well, Steven has a long history with universal, obviously. And he did go and make films for other studios and as a director, he works all over all over town. But his spiritual home is at universal. It's where he made his first movie jaws, of course. And so, you know, when Steven was to make a movie with us, we are just thrilled the next static that that's the case. Does he have free reign? I mean, does he do you have to say to him, maybe three and a half hours is a bit long, cut it a bit, or do you just let him go? No. He knows what the audience wants. And he'll give it to them. You are also known for risk-taking, whether that is backing a new upcoming director like Jordan Peele to make get out, or being the first major studio to make a game one Bros, which is coming out in the UK soon and is fantastic. Early on in your career, you also persuaded universal to back Mamma Mia! where many didn't see the hit it was going to be. I'm going to make a speech. And the film, of course, went on to make hunters and millions of dollars. What gives you the self belief to think? Yeah, sometimes presumably to be the only person in the room fighting for something. Do you think you have to be a bit of an outsider to push films that others don't see the power of? I think it is, I mean, it is a lot of gut instincts. You know, what we do, you know, we can rationalize something through a business model lens, but really it is about feeling the story on a very human level and on a universal level pardon the pun. And in the case of Mamma Mia!, I grew up listening to ABBA. I loved her, but they were my, they were my favorite band, actually. But beyond that and beyond just my own, my own likes and dislikes. It really is about asking, well, why is ABBA so enduring? Why is that music so enduring? What does it tap into in terms of the human psyche and experience? That I can't let go if you can tap into that relatability root ability and universality, then the chances are that's going to be something that's appealing to a lot of people. So people didn't see that. Others didn't see that, but I think in the case of some of these films, whether it was Mamma Mia! or a straight out of Compton or others that we could talk about, their films that I did not see as inherently risky. And I know that's easy for me to sit here with you today. And say that when the proof is in the pudding, but again, they sort of check the boxes in terms of that relatability and universality. Fair enough. I mean, let's go back to the beginning right now. You were born in the UK, which is very exciting to us, of course, because you're now the first British woman to run a studio. But you were born in the UK, your birth father was of Egyptian heritage. You were adopted grub on the Isle of Wight. How did that influence your sense of self? I mean, I wonder the 1970s, the isle of white, you probably weren't seeing yourself reflected back in many of the people on the island. No, I think what they would describe me as exotic.

Tom Cruise Don Langley London TOM Doug Liman Jordan Peele International Space Station Steven Christopher Nolan Steven Spielberg Mamma Mia Bros UK Compton Isle Of Wight
A highlight from Still Loading...

On The Media

06:26 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from Still Loading...

"People come to the street and make bonfires with veils. That is not just a political and religious taboo, it's also a cultural table, but when international coverage frames the protests in Iran is simply anti hijab, it misses the point from WNYC in New York. This is on the media. I'm Brooke gladstone. Also this week, how a toxic Internet forum terrorized folks by mining their freely available data and hounding them on and off line. Those places can exist and be armies, and then the speech of regular people in this country. Citizens of this country is quashed because they can't fight the army. Plus the once and future YouTube. This is how I start my makeup routine. Sometimes I fuck my eyebrows, I pick up my skin first. I don't know why I do that, but we're gonna skip that one. From silly videos to total media domination. It's all coming up after this. On the media is supported by the Commonwealth fund's state health data center, and all in one resource with the latest information on how the healthcare system is working in every state. More at state health data dot org. The united states of anxiety is now notes from America. Still with me, kairi. This week our collective mental health has so much change in the world shifted the way we relate to each other. Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. Listener supported WNYC studios. From WNYC in New York, this is on the media. I'm Brooke gladstone. Michael lowinger is joining me this week. But first, this. Huge protests in Iran over the death of 22 year old masha mini, who died after being arrested by Iran's morality police. Iranian authorities saying she was arrested for allegedly violating the country's strictly enforced Islamic dress code. On Wednesday, Iran's president Ebrahim raisi addressed the nation on live TV nearly two weeks after masa amini's death. He condemned the chaos on the streets and when asked about possible legal reforms. Mister raisi said, sure, we're open to reform, but we're not open to changing our values. One human rights group claimed that roughly 76 peaceful protesters had been killed by security forces that continue to fire and to crowds and beat and harass people. Taking off their head coverings and waving them in the air this is defiance in Iran. And women are leading the charge. Some are even burning their hijabs. They're mandatory head coverings in protest. As the protests continue to unfold, one sensitive question hangs in the air, will this current wave of protests be any different from the ones that came before? Fatima shams a Persian poet and Professor of Persian literature at the University of Pennsylvania is among many who say this could be a George Floyd moment for Iran. It took his 17 minute video to go viral for the people to rush to the streets and create that historic moment in the United States and across the world, in fact, with the picture of masa amini, there is a similar pattern in the sense that there is a hundred years struggle for women's rights behind it. And there were similar moments in the past four decades, in fact, where women were subject to state violence and police brutality over and over and over again. We have been watching this videos coming out of Iran and this particular picture was just the watershed moment. It's a moment of mobilization and unity because a lot of Iranians feel that massacre could be their daughter, masa could be their sister, Massa could be their mother. So on June 20th, 2009, there was another killing that galvanized protest in Iran. And that was the death of 26 year old neda Aga sultan, shot by a government sniper on the sidelines of a peaceful protest for fair elections known as the green movement. You are at the protests that followed her death, and I just wonder, are there any analogies that we can draw between these two women at the movements they've spawned? Yes, back in 2009. Was coming back from her music school with her music teacher. And found themselves in the middle of the protests. A seemingly apolitical woman, randomly shot her eyes rolling towards the camera while she's dying and then the video going viral. There is also this element of innocence that you can see in the face of both women killed in cold blood that has played an extremely important role in mobilizing and triggering the protests. In the case of mass I mean, I would also add that she is not just a middle class tehrani woman coming back from her music school. She's coming from a border city of the Kurdish province of Iran, one of the most deprived neglected provinces since the victory of the revolution. The discriminated against for being part of an ethnic minority for being part of a religious minority. So she's traveling to Tehran with her brother and she is only in the capital city for a few days and coming out of the metro station and suddenly being stopped by the morality police. These details add to this brutality. Of course, media plays an extremely important role in the George Floyd moment and also in masa amini moment. The reason that these two are being compared is because they really have become the face of a much more complicated civil

Iran Masa Amini Brooke Gladstone Commonwealth Fund's State Heal Wnyc Studios Michael Lowinger Masha Mini Ebrahim Raisi Mister Raisi Wnyc America George Floyd Fatima Shams New York Neda Aga Sultan Youtube Army Anxiety University Of Pennsylvania
A highlight from 28/09/2022

The Media Show

04:57 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from 28/09/2022

"From BBC Radio four. Well, this morning you can take your pick of the headlines to look at the FT was warning of market turmoil, the times reported a house price warning, the sun simply said bricking it since then the Bank of England has stepped in to try and calm the markets by buying some government debt, but this is a tumultuous time for the UK economy. It's a story whose importance is matched by its complexities, which poses some challenges for news journalists, myself very much included, so we're going to look at how you do do this story and how you don't. Also with me, we have the scoop specialist Gabriel pogrom. He's the wider all editor of The Sunday Times, he regularly sets the news agenda. We'll hear how he gets his stories. And if you're wondering about Jane garvey and fee Glover's recently announced move from the BBC to times radio, we've got their agent on to tell us how it happened. But let's begin with the situation with the UK economy. Here with me, the media studio is Stephanie Flanders, head of Bloomberg, economics, and we're also joined by Paul Lewis, the presenter of radio fours money box, both of you you're very welcome. Stephanie even for someone like you who's covered these matters for some time, this is a particularly challenging story to get across. Yeah, and I think it's sort of a double challenge. I think the British people have always through history kind of struggled to understand the importance of the pound changing value. If they're not immediately about to go on holiday and we did start this week hearing about the pound hitting all time lows. But there's been a sort of another major part of the uncertainty, probably the more important part of the uncertainty in the market this week, which is this big run from UK government debt. And the moment I start talking about guilts and bonds and yields going up, that does become you start getting into more technical territory that people don't understand, even though it actually means mortgage products are being taken away taken off the shelves and people's mortgage rates are going up. Well, here's the question, should journalists even be using those phrases? It's been noticeable in the last few months that inflation has largely been replaced by cost of living because clearly journalists have decided that's an easier phrase to take in. I think there are times when it's easier to talk about squeezed, talk about cost of living. when it comes to the pound, I think you use I find myself just saying the world's got a lot more expensive because I can get that gets across what's at the heart of it. The problem with this dynamic in the government debt market is, I think people do have to have some kind of understanding that if international investors are becoming less more concerned about Britain's economic future about the path the government's taking it on, how much borrowing it's got in store and charging more to lend to the UK government that we do have to start teasing out the implications of that. So yields, well, it's interest rate. That is borrowing costs, not just for the government, but also for the rest of us. And Paul, I guess your job along with the money box team is to try and connect these macro issues, the price of the value of the pound, the cost of borrowing for the government with the experience of individuals and the lives they're leading. Yes, and that can be difficult. And I think journalists, they tend to worry about mortgages, because I think most journalists probably have them, but you have to remember only about less than one in three people actually have a mortgage. So if mortgage rates rise, it will affect some people. It will affect some people now. It will affect about another million a couple of million in a year. It won't affect most people, even with mortgages. So you have to be careful about saying, oh, this is a disaster for mortgages. You can say mortgage rates will go up because the bank rate is going up, but every term you use, whether it's guilt, bankrate, inflation, you have to explain it. I remember when I first did wake up to money on radio 5 live a long time ago, I would never say the FTSE 100 without saying that's the index that shows the price of shares in our hundred biggest companies. And I said it day after day after day and the producers got fed up with it. I said, look, somebody's just started listening today. If they haven't a clue what the FTSE is. And even that explanation is a bit shorthand, but it helps people understand the importance. And as for the intervention by the Bank of England today, I did hear one hapless journalist trying to explain what was going on. As he was reading the statement and I mean, I don't blame him at all. He couldn't do it. It was completely impenetrable, and he made a very good go at it, but I don't think anybody at the end knew except the Bank of England done something very unusual for a very good reason, but we were quite sure what it was. And I'm very sure I've been in that situation myself many times. I suppose the question is, how do newsrooms how do news organizations cope with stories like this when the majority of their journalists won't be specialists, they will be generalists and suddenly a story of this complexity and importance lands on them and they're the ones responsible for explaining it.

Sun Simply Gabriel Pogrom Jane Garvey Fee Glover Stephanie Flanders UK BBC Bank Of England Paul Lewis The Sunday Times The Times Bloomberg Stephanie Britain Bankrate Paul
A highlight from In John Waters' Home (But Not In His Colon)

On The Media

07:50 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from In John Waters' Home (But Not In His Colon)

"Making movies since the 1960s. And he also has a touring one man comedy show, performing live across the country to sold out audiences. I think of John Waters as a provocateur with manners in real life, but his work is famously perverse. Whether in his movies or in his debut novel that came out earlier this year. Liar mouth, a feel bad romance. This novel is an incredibly dirty romp that was so raunchy at points that when I was reading it on a plane, I had to put the book down because I felt too embarrassed to be reading it in public. The books, main character, Marcia sprinkle, is a criminal and a liar, but like many of the characters in John Waters universe. Her backstory makes her more complex. My women characters are better than my men. I think maybe, maybe. So Marcia had a reason to be as crazy as she was. She did have a terrible thing happened to her and got pregnant in a really awful way. So at the same time, you know, I always Ricky likes a good friend of mine and she has done all these documentaries about the miracle of birth and everything. Oh my God, when I saw that documentary, I said, don't let your children so you have birth and a bathtub in your bedroom. Are you insane? They'll be in shrinks for the rest of your life. So Ricky, I always say to her birth is shameful, just a kid or to make her crazy. Because I don't believe that. But when I read that people give birth in the father eats the placenta, I'm sorry. That's too far for John waters. Yeah, it is. To me, I don't get why you'd have natural trouble. To me, why didn't you just, why would you want it to hurt? I don't know. So to me, I have never given birth, obviously. So at the same time, it's such a blasphemy for a woman to be against that and everything. And I think I was being a reactionary to Ricky Lake and a humorous way because I had to watch that whole movie of her giving birth and I said, this is like Freddy Krueger for a gay man that we have to watch. People give birth for 90 minutes. I'm going to tell you something and it might shock you. When I had my second baby and it was a vaginal birth. The first one was a C section. And I noticed in the corner they're in. There's this big mirror, and I didn't know what it was. And then when the baby was coming, they said, do you want to watch? I could watch this child come out of my own body. But did you? I did. Well, that's to me. They can deal with what I watch. No. Why do I want to go on a fantastic voyage up my asshole? No, I don't want to watch. Why would you ask me that? But I can see that in a way, that's a different thing. You see the first. But entry. I'm so surprised. I think that you would be very curious about seeing your colon. No, not really. Not at this stage. Maybe in my 20 year old girl and not my 70s 6 year old. It's not my time for a close up, and that department. Without retouching. For the most part, when you were writing this, were you alone or were there people in the room? I never write with anybody in the room. They can be in the house, but they know not to come in on my favorite line ever that I always use to everyone I know. Is Anne Tyler's a friend of mine and when she won the Nobel Prize, she doesn't give interviews much. Well, the Baltimore sun knocked on her door and she answered and said, excuse me. I'm in the middle of writing a sentence. The money has line. I ever heard. So I always say that, if anyone comes in, my friend always says, I know you're in the middle of right in the sentence, but we need milk. That kind of thing. So no, people know not to call me then. And do you read sections out loud to yourself to get the rhythm and laugh out loud? Sometimes I do, and also I hand write everything. I write by hand. So when it finally gets to the stage, which is the second or third draft to give to my assistance, three of them who type, they can sort of read my thigh tomb, Lee handwriting. But I make a tape of it so they can listen as we go along. I burn those tapes. Nobody hears the tape because then I do the audiobook later. Yeah. But that way I can tell if I'm using the same word twice. I can hear the rhythm of it. And I always did that with movies because I would just play every part, say the dialog. So I do do that. Yeah, that helps me though here how it's going because I always want it to sound like I'm telling you a story. No matter it might take 7 drafts, but I wanted to sound like I just made it up right now when you're listening to her. And on this tapes that you burn, are you like cracking up when you get to the funny part? Sometimes I do. Once in a while I do, then it's a really good joke. If I can make myself laugh, that's the first audience, yeah. And then I always go through with my staff over three generations of different age women. Like what ages. 30 40 something and 60. And I asked them, you know, all right. When we go through it, they're my sensitivity readers. And they're good at it. And they bring up points that are good. But then I ask each one what was the most hideous thing do you think? And the one that everybody says is her favorite one, three different people even God thought she was a gun. And then that's a sensitivity editor. I might reject that line, but after you read the whole book, maybe not. Maybe. This is the kind of taboo storytelling that John Waters really revels in. He loves to shine a light on the worst of us. But rarely to ridicule, more as a reminder of how gloriously sinful we can be. He was raised Catholic, his father wasn't Catholic, but his mother, Patricia Anne, made sure he went to Sunday school. What was your mother's personality like? My mother, when she's also a mom, she said that is me. Really? Oh, she wasn't that. I mean, my mother, we called her Queen Elizabeth. She was very she taught me good taste, you know? My favorite thing she used to say is fool's names and fools, faces always appear in public places. So at her funeral when I spoke, I was sorry, ma, I really violated that one. She thought your name should be in the paper when you're born when you die when you get married. None of those things that I follow. She was great. I mean, and both my parents, I'm very lucky. They were horrified by what I thank God they don't have to read this. I would really be uptight to hand my parents this book. My father doesn't know what anal lingus weak is. Does he even know what that is? Has it ever entered his consciousness? I don't know. Maybe not. I've held my mother, I don't know, because once I gave him this book that I did, it was an art book, and I had this art piece that I did called 12 I assholes on a dirty foot. And I said, I want to dedicate the book to you. Well, she said, that's nice. I said, there's one thing and she said, nothing you could do with Shaw goes anymore. Then I gave him the book and then I didn't hear from him. And there was silence and she said, why? Why would you do something like that? So I felt bad. I shouldn't have given it to her. Just dedicate it without making it. Well, no, then she would have looked through it. I taped the two pages shut with a post it, and she violated it and opened it well, that's what you get. That's what you get. You really do. Yeah. I told her, don't look at this. I'm warned her. So why would you? It used to be in the old days. They looked through my drawers, and then they stopped because they found stuff so they didn't want to know. That's why they never asked me if I was gay. They thought the answer was worse.

John Waters Marcia Sprinkle Ricky Lake Ricky Freddy Krueger Marcia Anne Tyler Nobel Prize Patricia Anne Baltimore LEE Queen Elizabeth Shaw
A highlight from EHRP helps nontraditional journalists reach a wider audience

It's All Journalism

05:54 min | Last week

A highlight from EHRP helps nontraditional journalists reach a wider audience

"And enjoy the episode. And the mission is twofold. It's to change who's gets to be part of reporting. And it then change what people are reading. So get people reading about inequality that might not have necessarily thought of it before. Digital technology has altered the traditional understanding of what a reporter is. The individual who reports the news can bring a different perspective to the story being told. I'm Michael O'Connell. Welcomed it's all journalism. Alyssa quart is a journalist and the author of 5 books. Her most recent book is bootstrapped, liberating ourselves from the American Dream. Alyssa is also the executive director of the economic hardship reporting project. Is a nonprofit newsroom that funds and supports investigative journalism that tells stories that might otherwise be missed. Alyssa, welcome to its all journalism. Oh, thank you so much, Michael. It's great to be here. Well, you have a pretty impressive resume. You've been in a lot of places, but also I see sort of a line through the things you're interested in writing about. Tell me a little bit about how you became a journalist. What got you into this profession? So yeah, I just contributed to this sub stack called chills, which Lauren wolf and I said to begin with, I was obsessed with other people. And it was a better career path than being a voyeur, being a journalist. And it's like, how do you legitimately learn everything you ever want about other people and experience? If you believe that what we have on earth is what there is. For me, journalism is the kind of, I guess it is a form of secular faith. Like how do we know the world? We know it through our senses. We know it through talking to as many people as possible, understanding their experiences, their mindsets, and issues through individual experience, and collective experience. So I think that for me, it was like profound curiosity in others. I found this interview I did with the gym teacher and 8 years old that was typed up and mimeograph as dates being mimeographed and it was terrible gym. Maybe I was trying to get a handle on it by interviewing him, but that was, you know, in the beginning. Okay. That sounds like the reporter racket. Like, completely exposed. Yeah, I've had thoughts like that as well. The idea that if we believe that we're this is it and we are who we are, it'd be very lonely place if we didn't venture outside of our own heads. And begin to try to understand other people's experiences from their point of view. And I think about this because you know I go out and I interview people as part of my job and I think about this all the time, you know, people when they get comfortable will tell you just about anything. I'm just fascinated by how open people are and willing they are to sort of share their inner thoughts and their perspectives. I think when you get into a sort of a more formalized interviewing like where you're politicians who understand that what they say has consequences and so they're more guarded and what they say. But just talking to somebody on the street about their day to today life and what they think is important. It's constantly rewarding and surprising. So tell me about how did you get involved in that? And what's kind of the focus? So I did a film with a filmmaker called Maisie crow about the last clinic in Mississippi and it was called the last clinic and I wrote it and produced it and she's the director she's brilliant director. She actually went on to win an Emmy for the feature version of it called Jackson. It's all about the clinic that's in the center of the jobs decision. So we did that and we got support from economic hardship reporting project, which was this new nonprofit that had just been started by Barbara Aaron Reich. For our listeners, Barbara ehrenreich is, I guess, if you're listening to it's all journalism, you've probably never self selecting, but she's like, to me, probably one of the greatest living journalists and a wit and a muckraker and all kinds of other stuff. Who's focus and her entire life has been on working class, labor, women's labor, et cetera. So she created this nonprofit after 2008 after the recession to support journalists because also it wasn't just journalism was taking, but lots of professions, as we know, a lot of middle class professions were really contracting and it was really hard to survive. And so she wanted not only be the rich that wrote about poverty. That was one of her wonderful pursues. And anyway, I got hooked up with it through doing this film. It was quite small. I took it over in 2014 and a built it up into quite a substantial nonprofit now. So I say sometimes that I cofounded the current incarnation. It was her baby initially. She said she's incredible person. How would you describe the mission of what the project is doing? What is it you're trying to accomplish here? Well, yeah, so part of it is keeping people who are middle class and working class or like just not the most affluent elite reporters in the profession. So some of it's about supporting freelancers and independent reporters, photographers, filmmakers illustrators, et cetera. But some of it's about getting that work into journalism. So we co published. And that was a decision I made at some point where I was just like, you know, co publishing is the way it should be for a small nonprofit, figured nonprofits like a ProPublica or something's like created themselves as a destination. But I felt like, look, this is a small nonprofit, the biggest effect is going to be if we can change all the existing sites and journalism entities that exist. And we do that by offering up a very polished set of drafts, films, or photography, often by people who are non traditional, not from the IB and IV plus universities,

Alyssa Quart Economic Hardship Reporting Pr Alyssa Lauren Wolf Michael O'connell Maisie Crow Barbara Aaron Reich Michael Barbara Ehrenreich Emmy Mississippi Jackson
A highlight from The Release of Adnan Syed and the Limits of 'Serial'

On The Media

07:38 min | Last week

A highlight from The Release of Adnan Syed and the Limits of 'Serial'

"Listener supported WNYC studios. This is on the media. I'm Brooke gladstone. By now, many of you have heard that on Monday, a very famous incarcerated man was released from prison after more than two decades. The crowd swarmed adnan syed outside a Baltimore circuit court. Judge in Baltimore has overturned the murder conviction of adnan syed, who was convicted in the 1999 murder of his high school classmate hayman Lee. You might not recall that name at first, but if you are an avid podcast listener, actually even if you're not. His story may sound familiar. Global tell link be called from. It's not the first time media attention has sparked news scrutiny of a wrongful conviction and even overturn it. In 2019, James Chad Lewis clay had his conviction overturned after a report from the Detroit free press. In 2020, a Georgia man named Dennis Perry was freed from prison after 20 years with the help of local reporter Joshua Sharpe and a podcast called undisclosed about which more in a few minutes. That same year charges were dropped against accused murderer Curtis flowers. After being featured on season two of the in the dark podcast. But in 2014, we, by which I mean countless millions worldwide, took the time to download tune in and listen to ad man sayed's story on cereal. We got to know adnan, his family, his friends, and weigh in on whether he was guilty of murdering his ex-girlfriend, hey men Lee. Okay, so do you think adnan's guilty? I think he had something to do with it but I don't think he should be in prison. I don't know for sure. Listen, we can talk about this all day. No, I think he's innocent. Completely. I think he had nothing to do with it. Baltimore's chief prosecutor, Marilyn Mosby, currently facing federal charges for fraud and perjury. That's another story, was committed to reviewing the sentences of minors convicted of crimes. She reviewed syed's files and found enough holes in omissions in the prosecution's case to prompt a judge to overturn his conviction. Some of those discrepancies and omissions were exposed by investigations after the release of cereal. This act allows people convicted of crimes as juveniles to request a modification of sentence after they have served more than 20 years incarceration. Mister said, qualified because he spent more than 22 years. Becky Feldman subsequently led a year nearly a year long exhaustive investigation or as cereal's host Sarah Koenig told WNYC's Brian lehrer earlier this week. Everything that they are saying now that they have found, they either knew it or should have known it or could have known it 20 years ago. But it wasn't happy news for everyone. While adnan said's family, friends and supporters celebrate his release as you disturb, the family of murder victim Heyman, Lee say, the new developments are and I quote a living nightmare. Robbie a Chaudhry is an attorney author podcaster and criminal justice reform advocate who spent much of the last 23 years working to get her friend adnan syed out of prison, and when it finally happened. It felt a little bit like a dream sequence. What I realized afterwards was that there was something about that entire day Monday when we left the courthouse that was so familiar and I realized it was because it was exactly how I had hoped and envisioned it for many years. I used to close my eyes and just envision him coming out and being greeted. And celebrated and his dignity returned to him and his innocence returned to him. And so there was almost something very familiar about the moment. So let's go back into everything it took to get to that moment. While you were working on appeals and post conviction hearings and so forth, you faced what seemed like an endless stream of obstacles. You wanted to enlist some coverage, some public pressure, finally decided to take the case to Sarah Koenig. I was in the courtroom in 2000 when he was convicted. That day is just burned in my memory. And about a month later, I found the alibi witness who was never presented in court and I got an affidavit from her. And for years, I just took that affidavit around trying to get somebody's attention like, this should be enough to get him a new trial, but nobody does nobody examined his alibi witness his attorney greatly failed in this. But you know, we went through the appellate process, the direct appeals, then a post conviction by the time we got the hearing, it was a couple of years later. I testified the alibi witness did not show up. That's when I realized it seemed like we were not going to get good justice in the courts and I had been a long time watcher of dateline and these kinds of shows, and I thought, let me just get a journalist to look at this. Maybe the journalists can find something that we have not been able to find. And I reached out to Sarah Koenig because her name came up when I did a quick search of anybody who had written about a non or his attorney or Baltimore crime in 1999. And she had worked for the Baltimore sun then. She was working at this American life. Right. And you can hear the first time you met in the beginning of that podcast. Hi, are you Robby? Am I saying your name correctly? Rabia. Okay. I thought this would turn me into a one hour this American life episode. I had no idea they were going to make a podcast, and I had no idea what a podcast was. Frankly. And were you shocked? Was he when the series took off like a rocket? Oh, immediately. I mean, the very first day that it launched air two episodes and my phone just blew up, calls from people I knew. They were like, is this you? For media. I mean, it was an instant sensation. And I don't think anybody in the serial team expected that either. Yeah, it was crazy. Serial came out in 2014. It was a blockbuster. It was a new way to use a new medium that ultimately revolutionized the radio industry. It offered a long and intimate look into the thinking of the reporters on the producers and the process as they tried to unwind haze murder and adnan's case. When the final bell rings had two 15, you can't just leave and jump in your car, he wrote. Quote, there are 1500 other students filling the hallways and stairwells of a four story building. And then the murder itself, how would he be able to strangle hay, a tall, strong, athletic girl, quote, remove her body from the car, carry it to the trunk and place her in there in broad daylight at two 30 in the afternoon. And then I walk into the Best Buy lobby and call Jay and tell him to come meet me there. All in 21 minutes. I am 100% sure that if someone tried to do it, it would be impossible. Gauntlet so throne, producer Dana chives and I gave it a shot. It was downloaded hundreds of millions of times and reached listeners around the world. It launched podcasting as a medium, especially the true crime medium where also familiar with that it became an easy target for satire. The true crime podcast

Adnan Syed Sarah Koenig Adnan Wnyc Studios Baltimore Circuit Court Hayman Lee James Chad Lewis Clay Baltimore Dennis Perry Joshua Sharpe Curtis Flowers Marilyn Mosby Brooke Gladstone Becky Feldman LEE Brian Lehrer Syed Wnyc Chaudhry Heyman
A highlight from Axios has a brief message for journalists

It's All Journalism

04:12 min | Last week

A highlight from Axios has a brief message for journalists

"Secret in these times when we only had just a blink to catch someone's attention, grab them, communicate something important as say it clearly and that's the only way that you're going to break through and not become a browser tab that no one goes back to. Mike Allen of axios tells us not to waste your audience's time, keep it brief into the point. I'm Michael O'Connell. Welcome to its all journalism. Mike Allen is the former chief political reporter for Politico, and the cofounder of axios, where he authors the daily axios a.m. and axios p.m. newsletters. Along with Jim Vande hei and Roy Schwartz, Mike recently wrote the book smart brevity, the power of saying more with less, which debuts this week. Welcome to the podcast, Mike. Oh my God, thank you. We did the secret Mike handshake before we jumped on here. Yeah, the club of Mike's. That's my other podcast, the club of Mike's. The secret, the secret society of Mike's. So anyway, you know, you started out as a, I'm guessing you can start out as a political reporter for Politico. Tell him to get into journalism. How'd you end up becoming a political reporter? Well, thank you, Mike, and I had a very traditional upbringing in the profession. So my first job out of college if you can believe it was within afternoon newspaper, the Fredericksburg freelance bar, not so far from where you are in Virginia and then I worked for ten years at the Richmond times dispatch, and then I covered the Arlington county, Virginia, board of supervisors for The Washington Post. That's where I live. Now, then became a political reporter for The Washington Post The New York Times Time Magazine. And it was a 2007 that I and Jim Vande hei, along with John Harris, started Politico. And Mike, the big idea behind Politico, all three of us were political reporters. Was that there were all kinds of awesome digital tools that were barely being used. And so believe it or not, in those days, part of the idea behind Politico was that there was too little political coverage, we wanted to do it with more speed expertise, voice, edge, so there you have Politico. You're responsible for filling out this Internet with all of your political dross, your strumming drang, all the stuff that we're doing. And I'm sure you're guilty of your small share of that. But our penance, Mike. Smart brevity from axios. So 5 years ago, I roar Schwartz Jim Ben started axios. And part of the big idea behind axios was to deal with all those problems that you just very smartly listed. Okay. So 2007, that's pretty early in the arc of things. I guess, by that point, watching the post dot com was up and sort of trying to publish a newspaper on the Internet. In those early days, what were some of the things that sort of surprised you? Now we're in the digital space. Should we be doing the same sort of thing or do we need to adapt in some way? Most of your listeners won't be able to believe how primitive the early digital coverage was. So when I was a political reporter for The Washington Post, we had something they did something pioneering, it was called p.m. extra. And at noon or 1 p.m., they would put up, I think, 6 news stories that hadn't been in the morning paper. Oh my God, they held, they held content. And so when I was out on the campaign trail, I would, I loved the extra real estate. And so don't tell my editor, merrily Schwartz, but I would write my PMX story before I got in the bus in the morning. So that's what I mean by. We had these digital tools. We just didn't use them. And then we got to Politico. We're Ben Smith. It was our democratic blogger to bring you a little reminiscent terminology there. The Clinton campaign would have a conference call about their super delegates and Ben would write about it like half an hour later, which at that time was revolutionary.

Mike Politico Jim Vande Mike Allen Axios Roy Schwartz Secret Society Of Mike's Michael O'connell Richmond Times The Washington Post The New Yo Virginia Schwartz Jim Ben The Washington Post Arlington County John Harris Fredericksburg Schwartz Ben Smith Clinton BEN
A highlight from The media mourns a monarch

The Media Show

05:23 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from The media mourns a monarch

"This week we said farewell to the queen. Her funeral, the culmination of days of coverage across the British media that was both moving and magnificent. The new culture secretary called the BBC's efforts phenomenal and spot on, and commentators not usually known for their support, deemed what the corporation did a triumph. For almost two weeks Britain paused and reflected on 70 years of service, many of you would have found that completely appropriate that the media got the tone right. Others may have felt your views perhaps weren't being represented. Today we're asking amidst the pageantry and commentary was their room for journalism. I'm joined by Marcus Ryder, whose head of external consultancies at the Lenny Henry center for media diversity, baroness stole, whose conservative chair of the House of lords communications and digital select committee, lord vasi, a former culture secretary who was in the David Cameron government at the time of the 2012 Olympics. Emily bell, Professor of professional practice at the Columbia University graduate school of journalism and Stephanie bolson is the UK correspondent of Germany's development newspaper and welcome to you all. Thank you so much for coming. On the media show. And if we could start with you, Tina stole. What is your assessment of how the British media has done over the past two weeks? I think it's done a very good job actually. I think it's reflected both the importance and the significance of the death of our monarch after 70 years rain. I think it has reflected the emotional reaction that there's been amongst many people, but it's also, I think, been able to capture. How Britain has been on display in such a way where we've shown the best of all of us, really. And what we've what we've been able to do is demonstrate that this is a modern country which is still a great country and is proud and is not shy and putting sort of front and center all that we stand for. So I think I understand and would be able to appreciate that for some people sometimes there's probably been more than they've wanted, not everybody would have wanted to watch it all day every day, even the most Ardent of monarchists need to have a bit of variety in their diet, but I suppose they can. I mean, it has been the story, certainly, in the way it's been told of a nation united in grief. Is it that simple do you think? Thank you so much for inviting me on. Unfortunately, I don't think this has been Britain's finest journalistic moment. So, for example, I work and I look at media diversity and that's diversity of opinions and views in all the full range. And if you look at Scotland, if you look at the polls that were taken at the time of the queen's jubilee. So early on in the year, 36% of Scots did not want the monarchy to continue after the queen's death. These figures are rather consistent, year before a similar poll showed that 37%. So it's gone down a little bit. Didn't want the queen to continue. If you look at young people in Wales, 80% of adults under the age of 13 didn't want the monarchy to continue after the queen. Now this is an over public argument, this isn't a monarchist argument. But those kind of views were simply not reflected in a time and a really important constitutional moment. Yes, it's the queen's funeral. Yes, it was the queen's death, but there was also a really important constitutional moment here when the king was ascending to the throne, and at that point, good journalism make sure that we reflect all the views of the UK and different parts of the UK have very different and complex relationships with the Queen and I didn't see that variety and diversity being reflected. I probably should say the BBC says those voices were in their output and that they, you know, we have heard from people who don't believe in the institution of monarchy, for example. But I guess Ed phase, I'd ask a bigger question, which is, you know, taking on Marcus's point. I mean, was it the right time? Do you think? To ask those questions. In the last ten, 12 days. I have a lot of sympathy with what Marcus has to say. And I hate it when there's a sort of prevailing political opinion that excludes every other voice, particularly one that sort of takes the moral high ground. And I think we experienced it obviously in spades during Brexit where anyone who dared to question as it were, the will of the people. And the winners take on what Brexit should be was sometimes even called traitors. So I completely understand where Marcus is coming from. However, what I would say in terms of the queen's death is that to put it in very crude terms, a woman who had served her country for 70 years, pretty selflessly had died and she was going to have a funeral. And those ten days were about her funeral and the nation as it were saying goodbye. There is no, there was no question in my mind that in the way that that was conducted as it were in the public. I won't call it a debate in the public press as well.

Marcus Ryder Lenny Henry Center For Media D Baroness Stole House Of Lords Communications Lord Vasi David Cameron Government Emily Bell Stephanie Bolson Britain Columbia University Graduate S BBC UK Olympics Tina Germany Ed Phase Marcus
ESPN Reporter Allison Williams Steps Down From Role After Refusing Covid-19 Vaccine

Pushing the Odds with Matt Perrault

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

ESPN Reporter Allison Williams Steps Down From Role After Refusing Covid-19 Vaccine

"Allison williams woke at the vaccine. So she's no longer working sideline reporting for. Espn coming up this season. He was on a podcast where she said to say. I'm disappointed is probably a huge understatement. It's not been easy. But there are some things that are precluding me for being out there. And i'm gonna leave it at that. I love you guys when i can probably in a future episode and we can drive into whatever i can reveal as to why so. I'm super bombed. It's going to be a hard weekend for sure this weekend. But i can't wait to watch you to shine on the sidelines of your games. You'll be flipping through channels incessantly all day. I'll probably have to go get a sitter for my son or something. Because he's definitely going to have to get a knock any attention this weekend. Okay

Allison Williams Espn
 Connecting the Dots Between Covid Vaccine Hesitancy and Conservative Media

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

02:25 min | 1 year ago

Connecting the Dots Between Covid Vaccine Hesitancy and Conservative Media

"Here's something that stands out to me. When i consider the conservative media types and the way they regard cove in nineteen. It's just small and medium market host. Who are dying from ovid. Not the big shots. Not the ones with shows on fox. News fox has gone through so many chapters on kobe. Sometimes they seem to back off of the antibac- vaccine stuff or the the downplaying of it kind of thing. Sometimes they go much more in that direction. Early in the pandemic. They parted ways with trish. Reagan from fox business Because she was kind of casting doubt on this and of course early in the pandemic. i think it was reported. That tucker carlson you know went to like mar-a-lago i think it was an urge. Donald trump to like take it seriously and to urge people to take seriously and of course you know most of these house of in broadcasting remotely and fox has all kinds of requirements for their own offices so the there's also this kind of layer of of hypocrisy there of you know it's not what they're saying but if you watch what they're doing i it tells you the they're taking it more seriously on a personal level than what they're urging people to but of course we don't know if any of their big hosts are like tucker. Carlson has been skeptical of the code vaccine and certainly the government message on the kobe vaccine. You know the widespread encouragement for people to get the vaccine but we don't know if he's vaccinated or not and he said that's a personal question. The most ridiculous interview answer. I think i've heard is reporter. Asked him that and he was like well would be like me asking you about your sex life or something like it was some ridiculous comparison about whether the you know that this was personal and he wasn't going to say And so we don't know if any of these people are vaccinated. We don't know what they're doing to take precautions. We we know none of that kind of stuff. None of them have been open about it in a lot of ways. And that's a big difference between other walks of life. The people who are opposed to people have been very boldly. You know saying i'm not doing this. It's been a badge of honor. An you mentioned. Joe rogan as someone who is sort of said. Well if you're young you don't need this and those kinds of things who i think. View it as an admirable practicing what they preach kind of stand but the most of these leading conservative media practitioners have been fairly quiet On this

FOX Tucker Carlson Trish Lago Donald Trump Reagan Carlson Tucker Joe Rogan
ABC News Rocked by Sexual Assault Accusations in Lawsuit

Radio From Hell

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

ABC News Rocked by Sexual Assault Accusations in Lawsuit

"Call Thursday that she has requested an independent investigation into how ABC has handled allegations of sexual assault against the former executive producer of Good Morning America. Comments came a day after a lawsuit was filed that alleged that the producer Michael Corn had sexually assaulted a current ABC News staffer and former staffer in separate incidents. Mm Mr Corn has denied. Any wrongdoing. Utah

Michael Corn ABC Good Morning America Abc News Mr Corn Utah
ESPN Removes Rachel Nichols From NBA Programming, Cancels 'the Jump'

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

ESPN Removes Rachel Nichols From NBA Programming, Cancels 'the Jump'

"Evening. ESPN is pulling Rachel Nichols off its NBA pro Granting. It follows The New York Times report last month. The detailed critical comments the nickels made about another on air personality, Maria Taylor, who is black. Nichols had sat on a hot mic. The Taylor was picked to host NBA finals coverage last year because ESPN quote felt pressure on diversity. Nichols had been an integral part of ESPN's NBA coverage since she returned to the network in 2016.

Rachel Nichols Espn Maria Taylor NBA Nickels Nichols The New York Times Taylor
OnlyFans Will Ban Pornography Starting in October

Mojo In The Morning

01:18 min | 1 year ago

OnlyFans Will Ban Pornography Starting in October

"Are on on only fans or a fan of only fans. This is a story for you. The site is going to be banning pornography this fall. The ban sexually explicit content is going into effect. October october first and quote unquote. Outside pressure is to blame here. So they're making this big chains to get in line with requests from their banking partners and their payout partners payout providers only fan says it all. I hope that the money's a lot because you guys have just lost your fun. I mean i like non non porn. I'm trying to find what else is on there. And i can't find it's mostly nude videos. Does right it's people usually trying to like make extra money right showing their feet and sell. Sounds like they're still going to be a little bit of wiggle room for nude content on only fans. They say that creators will still be allowed to post contact with nudity as long as it's in accordance with their acceptable use policy which i have not read that. I can't tell you in detail what that means but address. There's gonna be a loophole. If all these guys didn't back page do that to one point in the back page changed and then what's the other one page even still around. I don't think. I think i think they tried to clean up their act problems. They were being used for

New Zealand Loses Its Precious 'Rings' Series to Britain

The Briefing

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

New Zealand Loses Its Precious 'Rings' Series to Britain

"And amazon will film. It's one billion dollar. Lord of the rings prequel series in britain of the new zealand. It's been described as a nightmare scenario for the pacific nations tolkien tourism and political blow to the prime minister. Justin the turn read why the online giant will set the twenty year relationship between new zealand. And jr tolkien's middle earth.

Amazon New Zealand Britain Justin Jr Tolkien
HBO Max  14 Months Later

Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

01:55 min | 1 year ago

HBO Max 14 Months Later

"We've got kelsey sutton are streaming editor kelsey. Welcome back to the show. What an introduction. Thank you so much for having me. I'm so excited. To be bad. Kills he is such a joy to work with Every single day and also to have on the show and today we've got a really a fun topic a hyper specific content because for those who listen frequently or just pay attention to anything advocate covers or to your life as a modern human being streaming services obviously just exploded Over the past two years it went from just being the same old options of. Oh you got your net flicks in your hulu and your one or two other things. And then all the sudden it's like you have nine hundred options And we have had several episodes devoted to that into this explosion of streaming. And at the time we kind of asked what's to what's gonna settle out you know what are going to be the ones that end up being kind of required Required viewing and that you actually are worth your money each month and i feel like there's some consensus that. Hbo max has become one of those services shannon before we get to the experts What's your what's your take on. Hbo max so h backs hbo. Max set a little bit of a rocky start. But it's become one of the sort of like hubs of like hidden gems like that. You start that superlative net flicks. I felt but when it comes to just really nice nuggets of content. Hbo max has really a ton to offer. And they have you know the benefit of like a really robust ip. it's just nice to find these sort of like one off like romantic comedies and Kind of cringing comedies which tend to like fall pretty middle lane for me.

Kelsey Sutton Kelsey HBO Hulu Shannon MAX Nuggets
South Park Creators Pledge 14 New Films for Paramount+

/Film Daily

01:44 min | 1 year ago

South Park Creators Pledge 14 New Films for Paramount+

"Good news. They're going to be making fourteen new south park movies. Brad tell us breath us. Yeah not only are getting fourteen newsouth part movies. But it's part of this big new overarching deal that trey parker and matt stone the creators of south park just strapped with mtv entertainment studios and viacom. Cbs because they're also Extending south park out through. It's a milestone thirtieth season and then the deal also includes these fourteen director streaming southbound spinoff movies that will be released exclusively on paramount plus. And this is a deal that is going to make parker and stone over nine hundred million dollars which is crazy I mean. I don't even gosh i nine hundred million dollars. I mean even split between the. It's still four hundred fifty million dollars and that's just it's crazy to me. That's a crazy amount of content to commit to the like rpm still like clamoring for south park at this point. I mean south park still has very loyal fans. It's you know there's a reason it's been around for this long. It's a staple of comedy central. It's the recent specials that they've done the vaccination special they did You know a previous special. They had as well. I think it was the holiday special. And so they've proven to be very popular still and it's just to show that stuck around for so long and people continue to watch it so it's you know it's one of those things where it's just a staple now of television essentially and it's gonna keep going as long as you know Viacom keeps ordering new seasons of

South Park Mtv Entertainment Studios Trey Parker Matt Stone Viacom Brad CBS Parker
Maria Taylor Leaves ESPN after NBA Finals

Morning Edition

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Maria Taylor Leaves ESPN after NBA Finals

"Her last assignment on ESPN was Tuesday's NBA Finals when the Milwaukee Bucks won the championship get history in the making history has been made. Taylor's departure comes weeks after the New York Times reported on tensions within the network over a white colleagues recorded comments that suggested Taylor may have gotten a more prominent role because she's black. Contract talks between Taylor and ESPN had also broken down more than once. NPR's media correspondent David Folkenflik joins us to talk more about this, David. So why is Maria Taylor leaving ESPN? Well, you certainly got to say it's because of the money they were millions of dollars apart. She had wanted something like eight million last year, which is in line with some of their highest paid figures. Last year, they offered five And after the pandemic it they really were wiped out for the year asking for major host to give money back to the network This year, they're offering about three million still about tripling of her salary, but not what she wanted. There's important background, though. Rachel Nichols is a notable reporter and host at the network who herself White was caught on the effectively a hot mic a year ago, saying that while she wanted diversity at ESPN, she sure didn't want those gains to come at her expense. And suggested that Taylor was promoted to be an NBA countdown host over nickels because of race. Here's a clip of what she said that was posted by The New York Times would you need To give her more things to do because you're feeling pressure about your like, crappy, long time record university, which, by the way I myself let know personally from the came outside of it like Go for it, just, you know, find it somewhere else, like they're not going to find it with me and taking my family Nichols. They're referring to it as her thing as though somehow Taylor wasn't deserving a lot of folks network think Taylor's tremendous talent. That was circulated within an ESPN last year and caused a real ruckus, particularly among African American colleagues, and then once more rupture when it was reported earlier this summer by The New York Times. How did ESPN handle the fallout? Rachel Nichols remarks

Taylor Espn David Folkenflik Maria Taylor Milwaukee Bucks NBA The New York Times NPR Rachel Nichols David Nickels White Nichols
Video Games Coming to Netflix? Latest Hiring Offers a Clue

Mojo In The Morning

01:16 min | 1 year ago

Video Games Coming to Netflix? Latest Hiring Offers a Clue

"Lastly as new tv and film streaming services pop up left and right those that have been around for a while like netflix are looking for new ways. Different ways to expand soon enough video games might be added to your netflix account. The streaming giant announced this week that they've hired a guy by the name of mike verdoux as its new. Vp of game development as part of a new venture to offer video games on the platform. I think he worked over at. Ea is that the the reports for for a long time I don't know what sort of video games netflix customers will get. Bloomberg is reporting. They are set to debut within the next year. So this is going to happen. And basically what's going to happen is it's all going to appear alongside your current film and tv options as a genre so like you know how you swipe through everything. You'll have a video game option right there. I do this story the other day. I was a tuesday morning about how two-thirds of america is playing video games. And they're saying it. They're not going to be planning on charging any extra for video game content. But what that says to me is. We're all going to have a price increase farm not only to play for your pay for my kids video games. I gotta pay for everybody else's view.

Netflix Mike Verdoux EA Bloomberg America
Video Games Coming to Netflix

Z Morning Zoo

01:10 min | 1 year ago

Video Games Coming to Netflix

"Ready for this? Okay, So Netflix is said to debut video games within the next year. Uh, yeah. Yeah, I know, right? I was gonna put this in Good idea, Betty, but it's such a good idea to even give that chance right. They're going to appear alongside your current film and TV options as a genre, so you'll have movies, TV shows video games and you can swipe through. The same way you do with films documentaries on Netflix Page Right now, they're not planning to charge extra for video game content, So it's not like they're going to throw video games on their go. Well, now Netflix is $20 a month. Yeah, so this I mean, this changes the game for everything. Yeah, 100% of what they they make available, right? Yeah, I think if you they get so like for there's like, Xbox and PlayStation, right, you can pay like monthly passes where you can, like pretty much stream any game. You won right? Um, but you got to be a gamer like, you know, I mean, you gotta be like into it to pay 25 whatever it is mine, but Netflix, it's already included. Or maybe it's just a little add on bonus and you're like, Oh, there's the new mad, And so there is the new call of duty, right makes it super easy. The next guy in time

Netflix Betty
All Universal Films Coming to Peacock Starting in 2022

Daily Tech News Show

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

All Universal Films Coming to Peacock Starting in 2022

"A new multi. Year deal we'll see peacock get movies from universal dreamworks elimination and focus films. No later than four months after their theatrical premiere streaming the films exclusively for the first four months as well as the last four months of the traditional eighteen month pay one window with the film's heading to other services for ten months in between the deal starts in two thousand twenty two and we'll also see universal produce exclusive releases for peacock

ESPN Takes Nichols off NBA Finals Duty After Leaked Comments

Charlie Parker

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

ESPN Takes Nichols off NBA Finals Duty After Leaked Comments

"Sideline reporter won't be covering the NBA Finals. Rachel Nichols was pulled from a B C s coverage after her comments about ESPN and diversity went viral. She said a fellow reporter was getting more assignments because she's black Nichols a sense apologized and was replaced for the series. The Phoenix Suns took Game one last night, beating the Milwaukee Bucks. 1 18 to 1 Oh, five. Game two is

Rachel Nichols NBA Espn Nichols Phoenix Suns Milwaukee Bucks
NBC Seeks Record $6 Million for Super Bowl Commercials

Mojo In The Morning

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

NBC Seeks Record $6 Million for Super Bowl Commercials

"Nbc is talking to potential advertisers about a price tag of six million dollars for a thirty second spot during the next super bowl broadcast. That would set a new record in pricing for super bowl commercials. Six mil thirty seconds. And what's interesting is. Nbc is pressing advertisers for higher prices. Even though the most recent super bowl broadcast had the smallest game in fifteen that was a good super bowl to kansas city vs tampa six million there was a can. There was a pandemic that was keeping people from going

NBC Super Bowl Kansas City Tampa
Summer Movie Season Roars Back, From Action-Packed Blockbusters to Biopics

The 3:59

01:51 min | 1 year ago

Summer Movie Season Roars Back, From Action-Packed Blockbusters to Biopics

"For anyone who lives in an area where theaters are opening up again. Are there actually any big movies out this weekend. Yeah there's not one but two movies in theaters too big blockbuster style temple movies. There's going to be Both of which were delayed multiple times on cruella from disney. It's one of their like live action. Remakes this one of one hundred and one asians that's going to be out. And then also the sequel to a quiet place acquire. Please part two is going to be in theaters as well. So if people are interested in going to the movies during this holiday weekend they actually have things to choose from other signs. That people are actually excited to go back to cinemas again. Yeah we're starting to see some encouraging signs especially in the us as vaccinations have ramped up. We've started to see the box office. Show some signs of life. So i think the biggest hint that people were feeling comfortable and excited about going back. Years was over the easter weekend. When godzilla vs kong came out you know overall that weekend the box office. The us boxoffice did about five hundred million dollars. That's like still half. What did two years ago before the pandemic when it was just a normal easter weekend but it was still really surprising result for this movie especially when you consider that godzilla vs kong was also available to stream the same exact time. It came out the same day as theaters on. Hbo max so long as you had a subscription to it. So i think like. I think that's really started to show that elitist for movies. Where like one of these tentpole movies special effects that going to the theater and seeing it in a darkened cinema with all the southbound and audience. The people are showing signs at the really interested to get back to that feeling.

Disney United States HBO
Amazon to Buy MGM

L.A. Times Morning Briefing

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

Amazon to Buy MGM

"In other news online. Shopping giant amazon is buying film and tv studio mgm with the hopes of filling its video streaming service with more content. Mgm is behind such notable film franchises as james bond rocky the pink panther and legally blonde on the tv side gm's recent productions include reality staples shark tank and the real housewives of beverly hills. Amazon is paying about eight and a half billion dollars for. Mgm making it. The company's second largest acquisition it bought grocery store chain whole foods. Nearly fourteen billion dollars in two thousand seventeen. The deal is the latest in the media. Entertainment industry aimed at boosting streaming services to compete against net flicks and disney

MGM James Bond Rocky The Pink Pant Amazon GM Beverly Hills Disney
Stephen Colbert Says He's Going Back Before Live Audiences

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Stephen Colbert Says He's Going Back Before Live Audiences

"CBS announcing this morning, The Stephen Colbert's Late Night Show will return to doing live episodes with vaccinated audience in the Ed Sullivan Theater in New York starting June. 14th. The show produced 205 episodes without a live audience in more than a year. Because of the pandemic audience members will be required to show proof of vaccination before they're allowed in face. Mass will be optional. Staff and crew members will be tested before coming back to work and monitored regularly for signs of symptoms. Wilbur did his first remote show march 16th of last year and you might recall he did a monologue tape from his bathtub at home that the show has been done from the offices at his home theater

Late Night Show Ed Sullivan Theater Stephen Colbert CBS New York Wilbur