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A highlight from How To Prepare Yourself & Your Business Against A Recession #2098

Marketing School

03:30 min | 23 hrs ago

A highlight from How To Prepare Yourself & Your Business Against A Recession #2098

"To optimize your site for load time. And one easy way to do it is use the host that Eric and I use. Dream host. So just go to dreamhouse or Google it, find it, check it out, and it's a great way to improve your load time. Today, we're going to talk about how to prepare yourself and your business against a recession. So Neil, I think first, we should define what a recession is, which is I believe it's two quarters of negative GDP growth. Is that correct? Something like that, and then I believe with the recession, they market a recession after it's happened. Just a little bit delayed. And so here's the thing, before the pandemic, I was feeling like at some point we're kind of overdue for a recession, right? But it's starting to feel a little closer, closer. Again, Neil and I are not economists here. I think we're really just going from our gut feeling into signals that we're seeing. So Neil, why don't you start off first with what your prediction is and then I'll go and then we can talk about it. Forget what the prediction is. We talked about this in a few episodes ago where we said where we think the world is headed and what to do about it and you should check that out. You know, when you were focusing on how to prepare yourself for a recession, the big thing that I want all of you guys to optimize for is conversion rate optimization. So ads, historically, haven't gone down much during recession, sometimes they even go up. The cost with inflation and things that we're facing right now are starting to go up. So how do you combat some of these things? You got to get your users to spend more money. So I want you to spend a lot more time on your CRO. So from upsells and downsells for optimizing your funnels, if you don't have a funnel, go create more intricate funnels, email sequences, testing out text alerts to see if you can get more people to convert it through text messages. But optimize for conversions because if you can increase the revenue generating per user, it helps you combat things like inflation and it helps you continually spend money with advertising cost rising. Yeah, on the prediction piece, like none of us, even if we say there's a recession coming, we don't even know when it's going to happen. So you can't really try to time it. It's really business as usual for right now and then kind of continue to see what happens and making sure that I mention two or three episodes ago. Having some type of buffer, having some type of margin of safety. And that's also good too. Like if a recession really does hit and you have a really strong margin of safety, you can even choose to go out there and invest, like be greedy when others are fearful, right? Using the Warren Buffett quote again. But for me, aside from what Neil saying with conversion, really optimizing for relationships, right? Like I've been saying, what's been working with marketing over the last couple of years even has been investing into dinners, right? When I say relationship, it's like dinners or hosting a live event or doing podcasts, right? Or even LinkedIn organic reach, right? That allows me to kind of cultivate other relationships to SMS and email too. So for me, it's figuring out what matters when a recession actually happens when a recession actually hits, and guess what? If you need to renegotiate terms with advertisers or you need to renegotiate terms with vendors, you could do so. If you need to renegotiate terms with clients as well, you can do so because you have a relationship that's there, right? All the other things I mentioned right now, can you start building it necessarily right now? Not all of it, but you might have some of these going already. So if you double, can you triple down on those? And can you really focus on your relationships right now? Because people like to do business with people at the end of the day and if you're just like a line item and you're just a vendor or a vendor, people aren't going to care as much, right? So how can you get people to care? Because that's what matters when times like this happen. So I think that's it. Make sure you rate review this podcast. We really appreciate it. It helps us grow. Thank you for listening. We appreciate you joining us for this session of marketing school.

Neil Eric Google Warren Buffett Linkedin
A highlight from Handwriting AI -- Rick Elmore // Simply Noted

MarTech Podcast

08:16 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Handwriting AI -- Rick Elmore // Simply Noted

"The martech podcast is a proud member of the HubSpot podcast network to find great business podcasts like this one, visit HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. From advertising to software as a service, to data. Across all of our programs and clients, we've seen a 55 to 65% open rate. Getting brands authentically integrated into content performs better than TV advertising. Typical life span of an article is about 24 to 36 hours. We're reaching out to the right person with the right message and a clear call to action that it's just a matter of timing. Welcome to the mar tech podcast, and I hear everything production. In this podcast, you'll hear the stories of world class marketers that use technology to drive business results and achieve career success. Will on earth the real world experiences of some of the brightest minds in the marketing and technology space, so you can learn the tools tips and tricks, they've learned along the way. Now here's a host of the mar tech podcast, Benjamin Shapiro. Welcome to the martech podcast. I'm your host Benjamin Shapiro, and today we're going to discuss how to personalize marketing automation. Time for a one minute break to hear from our presenting sponsor HubSpot. The HubSpot CRM platform combines a suite of powerful marketing tools that work seamlessly together so you and your team can deliver better experiences for your customers. You can save, reuse, and share your best performing emails with your team or use social media tools to schedule and publish updates and analyze your performance, and you can even use bot builders to create robust automated multichannel marketing campaigns. To learn how to grow better by connecting your people, your customers and your business at HubSpot dot com. All right, back to today's interview. Joining us is Rick elmore, who's the CEO of simply noted, which is an API first platform that streamlines the creation and distribution of genuine handwritten notes. Simply noted is customer funded with hundreds of top startups, unfortunate 5000 companies that help them integrate automate and scale their handwritten outreach. Yesterday, Rick and I talked about automating personalization and today we're going to continue the conversation talking about handwriting AI. But before we get started, I wanted to say thank you to insightly for sponsoring this podcast. Most businesses struggle to manage customer data and relationships across their teams. And site leaves unified CRM elevates the customer experience by aligning sales, marketing, and service into one platform, and this helps businesses like yourself smarter, grow faster, and build longer lasting relationships. Visit in sightly dot com slash martech for a personalized demo that's insightly in dot com slash martek. All right, here's the second part of my conversation with Rick elmore, the CEO of simply noted. Rick, welcome back to the martech podcast. You're driving me back. I appreciate it. You excited to continue our conversation. Yesterday we talked about this notion of automating personalization, which seems a little bit like an oxymoron, right? You're creating a personalized piece of content, but you're using machines to do it. And we've got all this rich data through our CRMs and there's multiple different platforms and channels and mediums, which you can deliver personal messages or something that seems like personal, but they don't feel personal. Except for simply noted, you've got this technology that takes the nuance of someone's actual handwriting and allows them to create a message with just makes it feel like it's coming from the heart. So talk to me a little bit about the underlying technology. How are you able to take someone's handwriting and allow them to make a message that seems like it's actually coming from the right person? Yeah, that's a great question. I could talk about this for weeks because it's an insanely complicated process and something we've been working on for years. But really, it starts with a handwriting software handwriting engine and then handwriting robots. Back in 2017 when I was really developing this company, we started with the pen plotters and there's just little tiny writing robots that engineers used to use back in the day. But we quickly found out that these just weren't good enough and they weren't going to allow us to scale the company and run our company the way that we wanted. So we quickly went into a very long research and development period for the past three years. But what we've developed is a gantry and leads group based writing robot with an automatic paper feed with our own proprietary handwriting engine that allows us to mimic and write real handwriting. I mean, every nuance of the way of person rights, our machines actually do it better. And anybody can do it, we can create any font in our handwriting robots or completely proprietary patent pending and we're really excited about the technology. You use some big words that I need definitions on gantry was one of them. Yeah. What does that mean? So if you seem like a 3D printer, the gantry was just the mechanism that runs over the platform that allows the writing mechanism to run back and forth. Unlike a 3D printer, the base moves, and that's what allows the 3D printer to build whatever product it's doing. But with ours, the hand moves. Yeah, well, the base and the hand moves on ours. We have four lead screws that allow the writing mechanism to move all over the platform in the platform space stationary. This is a very complicated product and we try to make it even though it's as easy as possible to use, but there's a ton of technology behind it. And one of the most complicated things to solve is a paper feed. I knew that it was going to be hard, but getting paper to move just 6 inches reliably and consistently is much bigger feet than it sounds. If your handwriting is going off the page, your automated personalized message is going to make you seem like you were drunk when you were writing it. And getting it to move 6 inches and hit that same zero zero endpoint every single time reliably over and over and over for days on end. It was a big feat to do, but yeah, there's a lot of technology behind this, even though these are robotic handwritten notes, I believe it's better than a person running it because a person after writing one or two cards are handwriting is going to get very sloppy for marketers, continuing a message, making sure that it stays consistent throughout the organization tracking it within a CRM, plugging in variables, imagine somebody trying to write a hundred custom personalized messages in one day. It just can't happen. And our technology allows people to do that. The mechanics are interesting. I'm actually a little bit more interested in some of the software that makes the handwriting look like it's from the same person. I've got below average looking handwriting, but maybe somebody that I am sending letters to on a regular basis would recognize what's written from me as opposed to what's automated. And I've gotten some of these from real estate agent letters that look like they're printed. They're not actually written with pen, they're on a printer and it's a handwritten font. How do you actually make handwriting or take a handwriting sample from someone, and then figure out how to put that together so it looks like it's from them. Yeah, well, first thing we aren't a laser printed font company. The biggest way to tell the difference is to just take your finger and lick it and smudge the ink, these laser printed companies, the ink won't smear on ours it does. The ways that we convert handwriting say if we wanted to take your handwriting and create your own handwriting style, you're going to write out all your letters, your numbers, all your punctuation symbols, and they're going to have you write some silly sentences. So we can find your ligature styles. Ligature styles are the ways that two T's connect to each other. If you have any unique handwriting nuances, like for me, the way T connects to an age is very unique to me. And we find all those ligature combinations and program and into your handwriting style. And what's unique about our software and our own handwriting engine, unlike those pen plotters that people try to use to do what we do, they're kind of held within a box to the amount of variation or a variety that you can add to a handwriting style. It's about 300 to 350 glyphs. One character is one glyph. And with our handwriting engines completely unlimited. So if you wanted to add a 150 as a 150 B's or a 150 C's, you're able to do that. So the customization of our handwriting styles are what I believe makes us extremely valuable.

Benjamin Shapiro Hubspot Rick Elmore Rick
A highlight from The Post-IDFA Era Aint Bad, With IronSource CRO Omer Kaplan

AdExchanger Talks

05:11 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from The Post-IDFA Era Aint Bad, With IronSource CRO Omer Kaplan

"I'm Alison Schiff, and on this week's episode, we'll be talking to Omar Kaplan, the CRO, and one of the many cofounders of newly public Israeli unicorn iron source, which is a software company for app monetization, mediation, and user acquisition. And the roughly ten years since iron source was founded, the mobile app landscape has changed and then some. It's been so long. I had to Google the name of the identifier that was replaced by the IDFA in 2012 because I couldn't remember it while I was recording this episode. It's the UDI D, by the way. And now the idea itself is far less easy to come by. As the mobile world turns, but one thing will always be true. As Omar says on this week's episode, every app is someone's business. Let's dive in. Omar, welcome to the podcast. Thank you. It's great to be in here. So as people who listen to ad exchanger talks, no, I like asking my guests to share something about themselves that not a lot of people know, you know, something that you might not be able to figure out about you by just Googling you or checking out your LinkedIn. So yeah, what's something about you that not a lot of people know? And as a sidebar, I was trying to think of something about myself to share because I'm always asking people this question, and I couldn't think of anything. I think I'm a really boring person. But what about you? What do you have? Citizen now I feel like I have to share something. And also I'm so I'm actually also a musician. I have an album out and I'm going to also release in U one. So music has always been a big part of my life. Something that I like between the work and the three kids I have every second at night or early in the morning goes to go to music and writing songs and so I guess that most people don't know about that. What kind of music? So I'm mostly affected by the classics like Dylan and The Beatles and this type of music. So I would say some will be between rock and purple like warm warm version of The Rock side. Some of that. So less about the new trendy pop music, more I would say kind of traditional affected. So I'm going to ask you to send send a link to your SoundCloud or wherever you host some of your if you're giving me the opportunity to advertise, I'm actually going to release a new song in English soon which I think is pretty good so I'll send you the link happily. I hope it's about IDFA. Google's new privacy. So what is the iron source origin story? Because you were the founder and CEO of a company called after download. I believe, which was a monetization platform. A good 12, 13 years ago, something like that. And then it was the march of 2013 that you merged with iron source, but iron source was founded a few years before that, but you're a cofounder. So what is the story? Yeah, so basically the history is that there were three companies that were founded around 2000 and ten or 2009, one of them was the original level of the other one was a company. Second company. What was the fun fun? Fun with the original, I think, and then after download like you said and then we did kind of three way merger. We worked very closely together as companies and we were all in the ecosystem of helping developing apps back then it was more equals more desktop, but very quickly mobile. To help apps to go and monetize and we also had really, really, really good personal connections. And we feel that if we find the right formula to connect all of these, then we can definitely build something which will be very substantial and that's what we did. So and that's why we kind of felt that when we connected, there was when the I was so that everybody knows today was founded because before that, by the way, the original was actually B2C. It wasn't about a platform. They were building add ons and stuff like that. But then they were building technologies from themselves and when we connected, we felt that the biggest opportunity is to really focus on B2B and provide app developers with more and more tools that aren't

Idfa Alison Schiff Omar Kaplan Omar Google Linkedin The Beatles Dylan
A highlight from #461: If You Want Lasting Success, Step Up Your (Long) Game

Online Marketing Made Easy with Amy Porterfield

01:38 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from #461: If You Want Lasting Success, Step Up Your (Long) Game

"Instead of moving on to the next best thing or even worse calling it quits because you're beginning to believe you weren't cut out for this, which let me tell you, is dead wrong, you are cut out for this. I want you to take a moment and remind yourself of the reason behind your goals. And then just keep on keeping on. You literally must learn to say, okay, if I'm in this for the long haul, I'm playing the long game. This launch didn't work out as planned, or this promo didn't go as planned. Let me figure out how to fix it because I'm not going anywhere. I'm Amy porterfield, ex corporate girl turned CEO of a multi 7 figure business, but it wasn't all that long ago that I lacked the confidence. The budget and the time to focus on growing my small but mighty business. Fast forward past many failed attempts in lessons learned and you'll see the business I have today. One that changes lives and gives me more freedom than I ever thought possible. One that used to only exist as a daydream. I created the online marketing made easy podcast to give you simple actionable. Step by step strategies to help you do the same. If you're an ambitious entrepreneur or one in the making who's looking to create a business that makes an impact and a life you love, you're in the right place friend. Let's get started.

Amy Porterfield
A highlight from Spray and Pray, the Best Way to Get Started With Social Media #2097

Marketing School

03:58 min | 1 d ago

A highlight from Spray and Pray, the Best Way to Get Started With Social Media #2097

"To optimize your site for load time. And one easy way to do it is use the host that Eric and I use dream host. So just go to dreamhouse or Google it, find it, check it out, and it's a great way to improve your load time. Today, we're going to talk about a controversial topic, spray and pray. The best way to get started with social media. If you're trying to go after TikTok LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram, it doesn't matter what social network it's funny. A lot of people come to us and they're like, what's the best approach to get started? And we tend to tell people spray and pray. Because you don't necessarily know what's the right approach. We don't necessarily know the right approach. What's worked for us may not work for others will work for others, may not work for you, but the whole philosophy is just go out and test out a lot of stuff. Try different concepts each and every single day, do that for a month or two, and you'll start seeing patterns on what's working and what's not. And then from there, take the patterns on what's working, double down on those. And then the stuff that's not working stop creating that type of content. And that's how we recommend that most people get started in social media. Of course, you want your content quality to be high. You want to look at competitors, other people in your space, see what they're doing to come up with ideas, but it really is a spray and pray approach in which the best way to see what works is to just test out a lot of random stuff because what works for one profile may not work for another. Yep. Here's how I'll give a real life example here. On my TikTok, which I don't post to that often, but my team's been trying to repurpose a lot of these videos or from interviews, right? Those videos don't do that well. But I'll make a random video about me like at a conference standing around and it will perform like 5 to 6 X better. That's an example of experimentation, right? Do I have time to double down and triple down on that and make 30 tiktoks a day right now? I do not, right? But I just want to play around with it. But when you do stuff like that, you'll start to see signal, right? You start to see patterns that emerge and you decide if you want to double down on that. Now, what I focus on doubling down on is the things that I find at work, right? It's this podcast. That's one of them. YouTube we're constantly iterating on it. Right now, YouTube has pegged me into this NFT marketing YouTube page, right? Like if I talk about marketing now, it don't work as well anymore. If I try to talk about investing, it's not going to work. So now all I have to talk about is NFT marketing, right? And then the channel is going to grow. But that's me looking at analytics, testing out different things, seeing what works and doubling down on it. But you have to take a look at the numbers. So that's qualitative or quantitative. And then also you have to look at the qualitative feedback. What are people saying? And then you're just constantly iterating. But it's the same thing for each and every channel, right? You're constantly testing over and over and over. Neil? Yeah. And look, just make sure as you're doing the spray and pray approach, you do have analytics in mind and you're looking at the insights that these platforms provide you, because if you don't adjust based on the data, you're just wasting time. Yeah, the other thing to, Neil, I think maybe the question here is, how many channels should I try spraying and praying, you know, initially, let's say I'm starting out in the first year. As many as you can, because take the same content and put it for all the channels. Adapt this whole works on that channel, but I would use as many channels as possible because then you also figure out which channels are giving you the most traction and those are the channels you should double down at the beginning and then push the rest aside. I think it's important. So you try a bunch of things and you focus on one or two that are clearly working, right? That's one. The other one is also taking into consideration. If you're going to try doing SEO from scratch, that's going to be very hard. But when you think about TikTok, you actually can take off and blow up with just one video alone, right? So thinking about the organic reach and using a framework, there's a rice framework, right? So that R stands for reach, I stands for impact, C stands for confidence, E stands for ease, right? So if you want to be a little more methodical here before you start spraying and praying, thinking about, okay, what are the channels? What do we think has the biggest potential when you score these on a scale of one to ten across the board? And then go from there. But I know a lot of us are resource constrained in the beginning. So it's important to kind of allocate accordingly. Anything else, Neil? No, that's it. All right, don't forget to rate review and subscribe. Because it helps us grow. And we'll catch you later. We appreciate you joining us for this session of marketing school.

Youtube Instagram Linkedin Eric Neil Facebook Google
A highlight from Automating Personalization -- Rick Elmore // Simply Noted

MarTech Podcast

08:01 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Automating Personalization -- Rick Elmore // Simply Noted

"To action that it's just a matter of timing. Welcome to the mar tech podcast, and I hear everything production. In this podcast, you'll hear the stories of world class marketers that use technology to drive business results and achieve career success. Will on earth the real world experiences of some of the brightest minds in the marketing and technology space, so you can learn the tools tips and tricks, they've learned along the way. Now here's a host of the mar tech podcast, Benjamin Shapiro. Welcome to the martech podcast. I'm your host Benjamin Shapiro, and today we're going to discuss how to personalize marketing automation. Time for a one minute break to hear from our presenting sponsor, HubSpot. The HubSpot CRM platform combines a suite of powerful marketing tools that work seamlessly together so you and your team can deliver better experiences for your customers. You can save, reuse, and share your best performing emails with your team or use social media tools to schedule and publish updates and analyze your performance, and you can even use bot builders to create robust automated multichannel marketing campaigns. To learn how to grow better by connecting your people, your customers and your business at HubSpot dot com. All right, back to today's interview. Joining us is Rick elmore, who's the CEO of simply noted, which is an API first platform that streamlines the creation and distribution of genuine handwritten notes. Simply noted is customer funded with hundreds of top startups, unfortunate 5000 companies that help them integrate automate and scale their handwritten outreach. And today, Rick and I are going to talk about automating personalization. But before we get to today's interview, I want to tell you about a new show that my company is launching. It's called the revenue generator podcast. As it turns out, us marketers are under attack. That's right, the walls between marketing, sales and customer success teams are all falling down and unless something changes quickly, your CMO is going to be calling him or herself a CRO in no time. And that's why we're creating the revenue generator podcast. The revenue generator podcast tells how innovators of the revenue generation orchestrate teams to deliver world class customer experiences that integrate data, SaaS, people and processes to expedite demand and increase revenue. The show is hosted by my good buddy Doug bell who is a 20 year technology veteran that has been instrumental in driving revenue growth and scaling marketing organizations across some of the world's best known brands and nimble startups. And in each episode of the rev gen pod, you'll hear how industry leaders integrate sales marketing product and customer success into a single business unit with a common goal of optimizing their revenue cycle. So if you're ready to join me and Doug bell as a member of the revenue generation, search for revenue generator in your podcast app or head over to rev gen pod dot com that's revenue generator in your podcast or head over to rev gen pod dot com. All right, here's the first part of my conversation with Rick elmore, the CEO of simply noted. Rick, welcome to the martek podcast. Thanks so much for having me. I appreciate it. Excited to have you as our guest, excited to talk a little bit about using our hands to actually do some marketing. It's one of those things we live in such a digital world now and we don't actually think about sitting down and putting pen to paper quickly, let's talk a little bit. How did you get into this business? I know that you were a football player, how does somebody go from being on the NFL field to handwriting automation? Yeah, and I'll start with I went back and did my MBA in 2017. I got into medical sales right after I got done with football, but always had this little bug to be an entrepreneur. My parents were both small business owners, medical billing and contracting. But I saw the lifestyle that they had and I always wanted to be an entrepreneur so I went back in 2017 to my MBA. They started as a project and I felt there was really a big need for this as the industry was going more digital. I always felt that handwritten notes were very important. There just wasn't really an easy way to do it. So I started the project, grew organically, fast forward, four and a half, 5 years. We have a team of about 30 people, including our part time employees. But yeah, we're going to qualify for 5000 this year. It's been going pretty good. All right, so you're on fire here with your entrepreneurial journey. I want to talk a little bit about the problem that you're trying to solve. When you're trying to scale personalization, that can be challenging, right? Personalization means that you're sitting down and doing some sort of one to one communication hopefully in person in most cases. You're trying to basically blend the digital and the personalized that one to one communication. Talk to me about why that's important and what's your approach? Well, everything today can be automated. If you really think about it, emails, phone calls, text messages, voicemails, social, everything's automated and really the last form of communication that people really believe that can't be automated is handwritten notes and the problem that we're trying to solve is make it very easy, scalable and efficient for companies to automate sending handwritten notes and real genuine personalized handwritten notes. And we really believe that they're extremely impactful of the open rate, the lifetime value, the shelf life, is just insurmountable when it comes to comparing it to all the other digital foreign communication. The idea here is that you're I mean, we can look at all the metrics that work with personalization, right? Well, I'm going to get a better open rate on this communication or I'm going to get a higher click through rate. There is a non measurable aspect to what you're doing, which is delivering a message in a format where it actually makes a real impact on the person that's receiving it, handwritten notes, not something we think a lot about, where in front of keyboards all the time, why does putting pen to paper or automating the process of putting pen to paper make such a big impact? I mean, especially today, we just live in such a digital world. I have to put my phone down and put it on silent because I'm just nonstop and inundated with notifications if you think about Twitter and Facebook and Instagram and TikTok and slack and all these different channels that just take up our lives, email, right? You know, we all get over a hundred emails a day. It's all annoyance, and all blends, it's all almost annoying. And then when you get something in the mail that's handwritten, it's almost like a treat. The curiosity is there like you want to open it and then the perception is whoever sent it to you must have been really important that you're actually going to open it and read it. So the handwritten notes in today's day and age, they're incredibly powerful. And they're great relationship building tools. They're great opportunity, opening tools for prospecting. They're just extremely powerful. I think the concept that you hit on is breaking through the noise. And it's ironic because it used to be all of our communication was a handwritten, even when I was a kid, we would write letters and lick stamps and send them to our friends to try to communicate with them. The notion of a pen pal. Now it's something that we don't think about. The mailbox is something for paper that we throw in the recycling bin, Amazon packages, and for the IRS to tell us how much money they owe them. And so when you can show up in that basically provide a little joy or something unexpected in that medium, it could be very well received. Time for a one minute break to hear from our presenting sponsor, HubSpot, from ride sharing the file sharing and everything in between. If you use an app or a website to engage with your customers, you know that your platform needs to be able to keep up with their needs. HubSpot is trusted by enterprises and entrepreneurs to keep up with customers needs and deliver a seamless customer experience no matter the interaction, with easy to use web editing tools, HubSpot helps your team publish an update your website with ease. And with the developer quality code free drag and drop website editor, anyone on your team can update pages and edit content, helping your customers access the site updates

Benjamin Shapiro Rick Elmore Doug Bell Hubspot Rick Football NFL Instagram Twitter Facebook IRS Amazon
A highlight from 107. The Secret of Consistency

Purposeful Social Selling

07:40 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from 107. The Secret of Consistency

"Your business every day to get to the greater result down the road. So I talk about that concept, but what I want to what I've been thinking about lately is how does someone learn to become consistent even when you are feeling discouraged? Even when it feels hard when it feels disappointing and when it feels like your efforts aren't making a difference. This is when I see people really struggle with staying consistent. This is when I see them kind of take a few days off because they're bummed, they're disappointed. And maybe they come back, but I guess I'll come back to my business and I guess I'll do it or they take a break from maybe two weeks or three weeks or whatever else or they start negotiating with themselves saying like, well, it's okay if I don't make a post today. It's okay if I don't follow up with the customers today. I can do it another day. I mean, I don't have to talk about hosting a party. I don't have to do these things. It can wait, it can wait this concept if it can wait. And I was really thinking about consistency. I was thinking about this the other day. I have a peloton and frankly, it's been collecting dust for far too long, and I decided that damn like, you know what? It's time to get on the bike. And I know where I want to go. I know the goals I want for myself. I know, you know, the health journey I want to go on. And I had to have a conversation with myself about why I was getting on the peloton that day. And honestly, I had a lot of stories that were very loud. It was like it's going to be really painful. You're really out of shape. You're going to be really out of breath. It's probably going to hurt. You're probably going to have to modify, you're going to need to pick a workout that's really slow and the stories I was telling myself was like not making me want to get on the bike. In fact, it was making me dread the bike, avoid the bike and I'm like, hold on. Okay, why am I choosing to get on the bike today? Because, and I'm going to tie this back to your business. I was thinking about this when I was thinking about getting on the bike. I looked at the bike and I said, is getting on the bike today, going to change anything, noticeably with my health. Am I suddenly going to have better endurance at the end of this workout? Am I going to lose a pound at the end of this workout? Honestly, knowing myself, my body's going to hold on to the water and bloat and probably gain a pound. And is it going to make my pants fit differently? When I get on the peloton today? Is it going to make my legs more tone today when I get on the peloton? And the answer definitively to all of those things was no, not today. So then I had to ask myself, well, then why am I getting on? If it's not about it yielding me a result that I can see and feel today, then why would I do it? And this is the exact same conversation you need to have every day when you're thinking about engaging with your business. I want you to think about it like a bike, like getting on that bike and deciding why. Is it important for me to get on that bike today even when I know? It might not. You know, cause this result. It might not equate to a new customer today. It might not equate to my paycheck growing significantly today. It might not equate to getting a team member. It might not equate to my volume blowing up at the end of the day. So why would I choose to engage today? And you have to ask that question because you need to know why it's worth engaging in your business when results aren't happening. And I see a lot of people only engaging or getting on the bike with their business when they know or when they believe or think that a reward is going to happen. No, I want to get on, I want to get on that and then I expect, I think a lot of people will make a post expecting, I should get a customer from this post. I should get a team partner, a brand partner, a new affiliate, a new client, I should get it from this post. And so you're coming to it with such pressure and it's robbing all the joy out of this business activity because you're expecting it to yield a result right now. Like I'm only doing this because I need it to yield a result. Instead of what you need to be thinking about, if it's not about the results, then what is it about? And why is it worth doing? And for me, the conversation that I had with myself before I got on that bike was, okay, it's not about losing an inch, losing a pound, anything fitting differently, my endurance, what it's about. Is it's about me learning to trust myself. It's about me saying, I'm going to get on the bike today, and then following through and getting on the bike. For me, I'm like, okay, this is going to be evidence that I follow through on what I say, and that matters to me. I get the satisfaction at the end of this knowing that I am following through on something I said was important to me. That I'm keeping my promises to myself. And that matters. I also know that today is one of many future workouts. I'm going to be doing and I know that while this one singular isolated workout does not yield me the result, I know this one that's going to be a part of 300 or 200 or however many workouts compounded over time, I know this one workout does count in the long term. I know that this one choice compounds into the next choice and compounds into the next choice. And for that reason, it matters. I also know that I'm going to feel good because I'm prioritizing my health. I'm prioritizing myself. I'm taking myself seriously. And it was all those reasons I got on the bike. It was not, I'm going to get a result. I'm going to be down a pound when I get off this bike. Nope, it's in fact, it's like, who am I becoming by choosing to get on the bike today? When everything in my mind is saying, nope, I'd rather do something else. And trust me, there are many other things I would rather do. And I even thought, do I want to do this? Now, unless I'm a tie all back to your business, if you're not already, if you're not already doing this parallel yourself. Was it something I wanted to do? No. In fact, it felt heavy. It felt like, ugh. I'm gonna have to go and do this. I should do this and I had to check in with my stories, Kristen. Why is it important that we do this? But I didn't feel a lot of light fluttery feelings getting on the bike. It felt very Gritty. It felt very determined and it felt committed. Like, oh, this is what commitment feels like. When it feels light when it feels easy when it feels fun, that's not what commitment feels like. That feels like actually motivation. But this is what it feels like to take committed action. It's like, I'm going to move through this internal resistance, I feel, to getting on the bike, and I'm going to do it anyways. Even when I don't want to. And I thought about this story too, I thought about, as I was really sitting with myself and just noticing all of my thoughts, I really thought about this concept of who I'm becoming in choosing to get on the bike. I'm like, okay, this is about the person I'm becoming. And I might not enjoy it now. It might not be my favorite thing to do. Mostly because it's physically painful and

Kristen
A highlight from Where We Think The World Is Headed (And What To Do About It) #2096

Marketing School

04:29 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Where We Think The World Is Headed (And What To Do About It) #2096

"To optimize your site for load time. And one easy way to do it is use the host that Eric and I use dream host. So just go to dreamhouse or Google it, find it, check it out, and it's a great way to improve your load time. Today we're going to talk about where we think the world is headed and what to do about it. Yeah, so the reason we want to talk about this today and you're probably wondering what the heck are Neil era talking about the world, this is a marketing entrepreneur type podcast mainly marketing because we think what's going to happen with the world is going to affect marketing. When money gets more expensive, which is what's happening with interest rates rising with inflation rising as well as creating a lot of problems for businesses. And we both know businesses that have shut down just due to things like inflation in the ecommerce space. They kind of got screwed on that and combined with the Facebook iOS update or the Apple iOS update, which adjusted how Facebook ads work or how well they work. But I think the economy isn't the strongest. I think a lot of people agree with that. And this is going to cause marketing to be in turmoil. Marketing is one of the first budgets to get cut. You're going to have to see people become scrappy or produce a better ROI. And you should expect seeing that my guess is within the next 12 months. People are going to have to be more accountable and companies are going to have to start producing better ROIs from their marketing spend and if you're not right now, eventually you're going to get into trouble. Yeah, you know, we talked about this in one of our episodes maybe ten or 20 episodes ago, but talk about marketing trends that we're excited about and effective alternatives. That's the episode. So this is episode 2073. Effective alternatives to the competitive landscapes of PPC and SEO. So I'm talking about this from a marking lens right now. What's going to happen is marketing is going to get tougher and tougher, right? And what that means is you think about, sure, there's SEO as she was getting harder, paid media has gone harder with the iOS updates as well. And so what used to be easy a while back maybe two, three years ago, is not so much an easy mode anymore. And so thinking about, okay, where can I podcast work really well? Live events work really well, right? Organic reach on TikTok where link didn't work well too. So really what you're playing at the end of the day is you're trying to figure out where's my audience hanging out and where can I get under priced attention, right? And it's harder and harder to find underpriced attention. But it's still possible to do so, right? And it's just a matter of finding the right audience and making sure that the resonate with your message and making sure you have a really good offer, that's going to help with your marketing at the end of the day. So that's on the marketing side, right? But in terms of where the world is headed, so we're not economists by any means, right? But I think when you look at all the signals, when you look at things being tightened, right? So interest rates or continuing to raise interest rates and buy like 50 basis points and I think that's going to happen next mayor. So that's at least what's being said right now. So when interest rates go up, what ends up happening is, well, that means people aren't going to borrow as much, right? There's not going to be as much activity in the economy. And so like Neil said, budgets get cut and when budgets get cut, that means the marketing is spending stops. So what do you do exactly? I think what's important is if you're trying to protect yourself, what happens for yourself is you're typically looking for having some type of emergency savings sometimes it emergency fund, right? So you don't go completely broke. But you do the same thing for your business too. Making sure that you stash up accordingly, and maybe right now what you can do is if you're buying ads, you're buying podcast ads or anything like that, your negotiating ahead of time and maybe trying to get some type of discount for the future, right? And I'll say this too, when something bad happens, you probably will be able to get a discount there as well. Yeah, so look, time will tell what happens, how you got to adapt, but just think of it this way in which you should end up making sure that you're set in a place where if things get bad, you're okay with your marketing, you can keep pushing forward and you can keep driving new customers. And be ready to be able to cut back and figure out where the big waste is. And you should either be ready for that or start cutting that back right now. Yeah, you know, two lessons from Warren Buffett here and actually, if you can see the video, he's over here, you can't really tell that it's him, but Daniel's point. So Warren Buffett says be fearful when others are greedy, but be greedy when others are fearful, right? So that is kind of an opportunity. I'm talking more from investing standpoint. And also, you know, the other quote he said is it's when the tide goes out, you see who's swimming naked, right? So just a couple of lessons there. And we've been overdue for one of these for a while. And hope everyone stays safe. And with that being said, please don't forget to rate review and subscribe because it helps us grow and we'll catch you later. We appreciate you joining us for this session of marketing school.

Neil Era Facebook Eric Google Apple Neil Warren Buffett Daniel Swimming
A highlight from Scaling Organically With Virtual Assistants -- Nathan Hirsch // Outsource School

MarTech Podcast

06:49 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Scaling Organically With Virtual Assistants -- Nathan Hirsch // Outsource School

"The martech podcast is a proud member of the HubSpot podcast network to find great business podcasts like this one, visit HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. From advertising to software as a service, to data. Across all of our programs and clients, we've seen a 55 to 65% open rate getting brands authentically integrated into content, performs better than TV advertising. Typical lifespan of an article is about 24 to 36 hours. We're reaching out to the right person with the right message and a clear call to action that it's just a matter of timing. Welcome to the mar tech podcast, a Ben J chap LLC production. In this podcast, you'll hear the stories of world class marketers that use technology to drive business results and achieve career success. Will on earth the real world experiences of some of the brightest minds in the marketing and technology space, so you can learn the tools, tips, and tricks, they've learned along the way. Now here's a host of the mar tech podcast, Benjamin Shapiro. Welcome to the mar tech podcast. Today we're going to discuss scaling your business without scaling your headcount. Time for a one minute break to hear from our presenting sponsor, HubSpot. The HubSpot CRM platform combines a suite of powerful marketing tools that work seamlessly together so you and your team can deliver better experiences for your customers. You can save, reuse, and share your best performing emails with your team, or use social media tools to schedule and publish updates and analyze your performance, and you can even use bot builders to create robust automated multichannel marketing campaigns. To learn how to grow better by connecting your people, your customers and your business at HubSpot dot com. All right, back to today's interview. Joining us is Nathan hirsch, who is the CEO of outsource school, which is an education platform for entrepreneurs that want to learn how to scale their business with reliable virtual assistance. Yesterday, Nathan and I talked about finding the right virtual assistant for your team, and today we're going to talk about scaling organically with virtual assistance. But before we get to today's interview, I want to tell you about a new show that my company is launching. It's called the revenue generator podcast. As it turns out, us marketers are under attack. That's right, the walls between marketing, sales and customer success teams are all falling down and unless something changes quickly, your CMO is going to be calling him or herself a CRO in no time, and that's why we're creating the revenue generator podcast. The revenue generator podcast tells how innovators of the revenue generation orchestrate teams to deliver world class customer experiences that integrate data, SaaS, people and processes to expedite demand and increase revenue. The show is hosted by my good buddy Doug bell who is a 20 year technology veteran that has been instrumental in driving revenue growth and scaling marketing organizations across some of the world's best known brands and nimble startups. And in each episode of the rev gen pod, you'll hear how industry leaders integrate sales marketing product and customer success into a single business unit with a common goal of optimizing their revenue cycle. So if you're ready to join me and Doug bell as a member of the revenue generation, search for revenue generator in your podcast app or head over to rev gen pod dot com that's revenue generator in your podcast or head over to rev gen pod dot com. Okay, here's the second part of my conversation with Nathan hirsch, CEO of outsource school. Nathan, welcome back to the mar tech podcast. Thanks so much for having me. Excited to have you back on the show. Yesterday we talked about some of the dynamics of who you can hire, what the costs would be, how to get them on board and where to find the right virtual assistant talent. I want to go into a little bit more about how to use the virtual assistance when you have them on your team and specifically talk about marketing and how virtual assistants can be used to drive organic growth. Talk to me about some of the ways that people are growing their businesses with virtual assistants without having to pay for advertising. This is one of the things that I think shocks a lot of people. I mean, we scaled my last company free up to 8 figures and we were acquired without spending any money on ads. I mean, we've realized early on that, while it's not impossible to run ads to free up, I actually think the new owners will do a better job than we did. It was just a very difficult business model because you can sign up for free with freelancers, you start and stop. It's kind of hard to track back ROI and projects and all that. So we really focused on the organic and we really came into this not knowing anything about marketing and left with a really great organic marketing blueprint that we now are using to grow outsource school. We now teach to our members on how to do it with virtual assistants and that blueprint really comes down to 5 things that I'll list out and then we can kind of go through whichever ones you want. But that's podcasts, partnerships, backlinks, networking, influencers, and the last one is affiliates, although you should have an affiliate program, regardless of whether you're doing organic marketing or not. All right, so we got a lot to unpack there. First and foremost, something near to my heart, podcasts. How are you using your virtual assistants to help you generate growth through podcasts? So one of our most popular formulas is called the podcast outreach formula. And it's something that I've been using for years. I mean, I've hired podcast agencies and stuff like that. And they get on podcasts just by invites too. But I have a VA working behind the scenes to just do podcast research for me. And they have specifications on the types of podcasts that are looking for, both in terms of quantity of reviews and stuff like that, but also in the industries that make sense for my business. And we have different pitches that we send out to hosts and all this is running behind the scenes without me. And I try to get on one podcast today. I used to do more, but since I sold the company, I backed off a little bit. And I'm booked out until October. So you don't have to be like me and go on a podcast today, but you should at least be going on a podcast a week. It's great for networking and meeting other people in your space. It's great for brand awareness. I can't tell you how many people say, hey, I found out after a school I heard you on a bunch of podcasts. It's great for SEO and backlinks. A lot of people don't think about that. It's great for a snowballing effect that leads to better podcasts. Guest speaking opportunities, Facebook Live, summits and kind of rolling from there. And it's great for authority, just add your website and grow your brand. So there's just so many benefits. And again, the VA can do 90% of the work. I don't even hire a VA full time for this role. And I go on a lot of podcasts an hour or two a day, maybe a few hours a week is

Hubspot Nathan Hirsch Doug Bell Ben J Chap Llc Benjamin Shapiro Nathan Facebook
A highlight from Reaction to Elon Musk Offering To Buy Twitter #2095

Marketing School

03:27 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Reaction to Elon Musk Offering To Buy Twitter #2095

"To optimize your site for load time. And one easy way to do it is use the host that Eric and I use dream host. So just go to dreamhouse or Google it, find it, check it out, and it's a great way to improve your load time. Today, we are going to give our reactions to Elon Musk offering to buy Twitter. So as of this recording, as of yesterday, actually, from this recording, Elon tweeted, and he not only tweeted but he actually spoke at the Ted conference and who's basically grilled for like 20 minutes on how he plans to make Twitter better. And so I want to give our thoughts on this and kind of the overall importance of Twitter. He's defined as the world's richest person, but even he himself says he doesn't think he is compared to like Putin, for example, right? But he's still very influential and I think he's one of the most important entrepreneurs of our time. So Elon Musk offering to buy a Twitter, we'll give our reactions from a business and kind of marketing perspective here. So Neil, why don't you start first? Because Elon has always kind of been your hero. Yeah, I think Elon's amazing. It was funny because mommy he put out the offer to buy Twitter within I think a day or so. He also put that he has the funds because of his net worth, but he would have to figure out how to pay for it. Same day. It could be because yeah, 'cause you would have to liquidate maybe stock from Tesla or whatever it may be. The big thing that I saw is Elon's great, he's smart, I would never bet against him. But I do think he already has too much on his plate. And if you look at what Twitter was valued in the past, I doubt that they're going to accept it and even the CEO of Twitter said before all these offers came out is he did mention that there may be some distractions that come ahead in the short run. Yeah, I mean, he did offer a premium to buy it. I think what this goes to show again is if you have one of the smartest people in the world, clearly defining that Twitter is like an open public square it's open town square and wants to kind of help keep it that way. It's just goes to show the importance of twitters where Twitter stands in kind of the social landscape, right? And for marketers, what matters at the end of the day is where is the attention going? And I do think Twitter is very important. I didn't think it's very underrated right now. And in terms of what he's going to do with it, I mean, I think he could come up the funds no matter what. Whether it's his own buddy having to sell stocks or like getting a group of people together. He could definitely do that. SPF, who is the CEO of FTX, has mentioned that he wants to help put Twitter on the blockchain. He wants to help Elon, even though they don't know each other that well. So I think this is just really interesting, right? I think what's going to happen is Elon, whether he buys Twitter or not. He's probably going to, if he doesn't, he's already mentioned that he has some type of plan B, right? Because he's talked about on Twitter wanting to build something that could rival it, right? So I do think we're going to see some of these really successful people. Jeff Bezos, for example, he owns Washington Post, right? I think we're going to see more billionaires trying to consolidate or own media properties just because the intention is very valuable. And I think in this case, Elon's not necessarily trying to make money. He's even said it himself. It's more so trying to make sure that he builds a great product or a service, which is what he's done time and time again. So there you don't think anything is going to happen. I think Twitter is going to be just the way you're used to it. So nothing's really going to change from a business marketing and for pretty much any of us in the short run or long run if I had to take a bet on that. All right, so please don't forget to rate review and subscribe to this pod. It helps us grow and we'll catch you later. We appreciate you joining us for this session of marketing school.

Twitter Elon Elon Musk Putin Eric TED Tesla Neil Google Jeff Bezos Washington Post
A highlight from Finding The Right Virtual Assistant Talent -- Nathan Hirsch // Outsource School

MarTech Podcast

09:31 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from Finding The Right Virtual Assistant Talent -- Nathan Hirsch // Outsource School

"Generator podcast. As it turns out, us marketers are under attack. That's right. The walls between marketing, sales and customer success teams are all falling down and unless something changes quickly, your CMO is going to be calling him or herself a CRO in no time. And that's why we're creating the revenue generator podcast. The revenue generator podcast tells how innovators of the revenue generation orchestrate teams to deliver world class customer experiences that integrate data, sass, people and processes to expedite demand and increase revenue. The show is hosted by my good buddy Doug bell who is a 20 year technology veteran that has been instrumental in driving revenue growth and scaling marketing organizations across some of the world's best known brands and nimble startups. And in each episode of the rev gen pod, you'll hear how industry leaders integrate sales marketing product and customer success into a single business unit with a common goal of optimizing their revenue cycle. So if you're ready to join me and Doug bell as a member of the revenue generation, search for revenue generator in your podcast app or head over to rev gen pod dot com that's revenue generator in your podcast or head over to rev gen pod dot com. Okay, here's my conversation with Nathan Hirst, CEO of outsource school. Nathan, welcome to the martek podcast. Thanks for having me. I'm excited to be here. I'm excited to have you on the show excited to talk a little bit about getting some help and doing it in a cost effective way. I'll start off by saying that for my business, we run a series of podcasts and we have a dispersed global team, all of them who are independent contractors. I'm the only employee here, so we're big advocates of finding talent to do micro tasks around the globe. It seems like that's kind of core to your product offering as well. Yeah, I mean, my whole thing is scaling businesses that are run by virtual assistant. So I scaled an Amazon business to $25 million over 6, 7 years with a team of VAs and then I scaled the free up marketplace, which is a marketplace for freelancers, but my internal team on the platform, not the people offering services, the people that work for me was 35 remote VAs in the Philippines. And we had no office, no U.S. employees. We hit 8 figures in four years. We were acquired at the end of last year. And now my new company outsource school, not only teaches people how to scale businesses with VAs, but our internal team is VA. So that's really my thing is just scaling businesses without the high overhead costs. So you're eating your own dog food, you're an entrepreneur that's had success doing this. Talk to me a little bit about finding the right talent. It seems like that's really the big problem at first is I guess isolating the roles that you need to fill and then finding the people to fill them. How do you match roles and responsibilities? So to start off, I always like to just define the three different levels of hiring because a lot of people, they'll say virtual assistant, but they don't really mean virtual assistant in the way that I mean virtual assisted. So for clarity, there's three different levels of people you can hire. You've got followers, doers, and experts. And the followers, that's what I consider virtual assistants. 5 to ten bucks an hour, non U.S., they might have years of experience, but they're there to follow your systems, your processes, if you don't have those, you're going to struggle to hire them, then there you got the specialist, the doers, the graphic designers, video editors, writers, you're not teaching a graphic designer, how to be a graphic designer, but they're not consulting with you either. And then you've got the experts, the high level freelancers consultants, agencies who are bringing their own systems, their own process, the table, and you're not going to train them how to do it. They already know how to do it at a high level. So understanding those three levels is important because as you're going to hire, you need to break down your cast into the tasks that you know how to do that you have systems for, the tasks that are more project based that you really need to just build up a rolodex of stuff that you need here and there, like I need graphic design work done throughout the month, but I don't need it every single day. And then what are the tasks that, yeah, you could spend 6 months becoming an expert at it, but you can't do that with everything in your business. You have to hire experts for your email marketing, your Facebook ads, whatever it is for your business. So I think the starting point is understanding the different levels and creating lists of what you need followers, doers, and experts for. Now, the people that are listening to the mar tech podcasts are all intelligent, capable individuals. Some of them are working in enterprises, some of them are working in smaller companies like mine, essentially, band of one. When you think about understanding how to scale businesses more like mine, where it's one person that, you know, I could spend time learning a new skill and creating the training system, I know how to run Facebook ads. I can go teach somebody else to do it and have a VA or hiring somebody that has that expertise. How do you make the tradeoff of creating a system documenting it and educating somebody as opposed to just finding somebody that already knows what to do? There's lots of different factors in there. I mean, part of it is cost and what your margins are. I mean, yeah, maybe you and I'm not talking about your business just in general. Maybe you could hire a Facebook ad expert, but the second you do that, your margins are out the window. But maybe the second you do that, you get more money from the Facebook ads. So money's obviously an element in there. I think there's also an element of time. And lastly, it's how much do you want to own your systems? Because in the perfect business, you're running it like a McDonald's where any part of your business can hopefully be done by any given person and you don't want your systems to walk out the door. I've seen entrepreneurs who let's say they're running an Amazon ad agency. They'll hire a team of VAs who already know how to run Amazon ads or run Amazon accounts and maybe they even white label to another agency, but they don't realize how much leverage that really gives that other agency. And other agency increases their price or walks out or whatever it is, it can lead to issues. Now, at the same time, McDonald's has a marketing team. They hire experts to help with marketing and other higher level tasks. So it really comes down to figuring out what systems in your business you really need to own versus what systems that you want to experiment hiring and experts to ideally do it better than you can because you don't want to hire an expert who can just run Facebook ads at the same level that you can, but you don't own the systems. You want to hire someone who can do it way better than you ever could, no matter how hard you tried. And that's what you really need to figure out. Yeah, and for me, the process is a solopreneur here was to create the process document and hand it off. And most of what we've used are virtual assistants for has been micro tasks. It's everything from, you know, once we have our content edited, having somebody draft show notes or having somebody take the files and publish them, they can be complex tasks, but we're creating as much processes as we can to make it easy on the people that are doing them. And of course, they're going to be listening to this podcast. So let me just say I really appreciate the team that we have and their level to take on additional work beyond the original scope that we've had. When you are thinking about outsourcing and your documenting your processes, what's the process that you go to find the right person to make sure that they're consistent, they're going to follow your rules and they're going to be available for a long time. So I like to break hiring down into four parts. You've got interviewing onboarding training and managing. And most of the issues actually come from the onboarding, but in terms of the interviewing, we call it our care interview process. We're focused not just on experience, but on their communication on their attitude on their experience, but also what are the red flags? What are the red flags that are showing us? They don't have the experience. They say they do. They don't the attitude we want or they can't communicate at the level that we do. So what we have in interview process, we have about 20 questions that we ask people. The real way that you prevent issues is through the onboarding and this is where people mess up and I'll give you an example. What most entrepreneurs do is, well, let's say they interview Jane, they want to hire Jane at 5 bucks an hour. And they'll say, hey, Jane, that was a great interview. You're hired a 5 bucks an hour. Let's start on Monday. Will we teach people to do is say, hey Jane, that was a great interview. I want to hire you at 5 bucks an hour, but first, let's make sure you're really good with 5 bucks an hour. Maybe here are other clients paying or 9, maybe that she got a raise at another client recently or another job offer. Then we want to go through rates or bonuses and raise it. So we want to make sure Jane doesn't expect to make ten by next year if we're starting her at 5, and we only give bonuses for a dollar every single year because that won't blow up on me now, but that'll blow up on me in a year. So we make a 100% sure that we're on the same page with rates and bonuses and raises. And then we take them through the sick method. And this is so important that 20 to 30 minute conversation that saves you so much time, where you go through schedule, you go through issues, you go through communication and you go through culture with the virtual assistant, getting on the exact same page, answering any questions that you have. By the end of that, you're going to know how many total hours they're working. You're going to know what their backup plans are when they have Internet issues or power issues. And you want to give the VA a chance to back out. And that's what's key because the virtual system might say, hey, your expectations are too high. They're not in line. I don't want this job anymore, which is great. You'd rather they do that now than two months down the line. So almost all the issues that people have with VAs can be fixed with a good onboarding process.

Doug Bell Nathan Hirst Amazon Facebook U.S. Nathan Mcdonald Philippines Jane
A highlight from What You Should Never Do When You're Selling (How To Lose A Deal) #2094

Marketing School

03:48 min | 4 d ago

A highlight from What You Should Never Do When You're Selling (How To Lose A Deal) #2094

"Welcome to marketing school, the only podcast that provides daily top level marketing tips and strategies from entrepreneurs that practice what they preach and live what they teach. Let's start leveling up your marketing knowledge with your instructors, Neil Patel and Eric Sue. Today we are going to talk about what you should never ever do when you're selling and basically this is how you lose a deal. You know you want to start? Yeah, so the big thing is is lie. And I know that he was like, eh, lie, I'm not talking about blatant lies that you shouldn't do. But people say a lot of small fibs and you're just going to get caught in them. And even if you're like, oh, we don't do that. Listen to recorded calls of your sales reps. I bet you if you have a big sales team, eventually people start saying fibs and you got to just crush that and make sure that people are telling the truth. The other thing that you should never do when you're selling and this causes you to lose the deal even if you close it is you over promise. You got to set the right expectations from day one. You got to have the mentality of under promise over deliver. Once you do it the other way, it just creates bad expectations and you're going to have a customer who is not going to like you. You know, ultimately what you're trying to do when you're selling is not to be the slickest salesperson out there. Your goal is to not try to sound like you're the smartest person. What you're trying to really do is you're trying to instill confidence. And when you're trying to instill confidence in someone, it's just people want to know that if a, can you do the job, can they trust you? And that's what they're really looking for, right? So really, if you're trying to instill confidence, what you want to do to reverse confidence is to Niels point, you oversell, or you try to act like you know more than the other person, right? Because in some cases, let's say you're selling to enterprise level, right? They might know their business more than you do. And if you try to act like you're higher than them or better than them, I've seen this happen so many times on gong calls. I'll listen every now and then, where our people on our team acting like they know more, right? But it's having a sense of humility and it's having a sense of, hey, you know what? My job here is to be an orchestrator as a salesperson, connect the right people into the call and do a good job. But no, different story if you're selling like a SaaS product or like a typical product, you might actually be the expert there. So it's important to also know what type of sale that you're making, right? And here's the other thing. A nice way to kill the deal too is pestering the customer, right? Immediately after the call, calling them right afterwards or calling them every single day, right? That's a really nice way to destroy confidence. But you should follow up at the same time. You should follow but not that frequently. Yes, you just need to have boundaries. And when you follow up, try to add value because then it won't be seen as much as pestering. Well, we should talk about how to add value there too. So I think that would be helpful. Yeah, so adding value, let's say if you follow up, you'd be like, hey, just want to, you know, in our last episode we talked about competitor analysis and keeping up with your competition. When you're following up, you can be like, hey, by the way, did you see that X, Y, and Z of your competitor just did this? Maybe something that you want to end up checking out. That's the example of adding value that could intrigue your conversation and get them back in following up and signing up with you. If you can make each of your follow-ups, John Maxwell says the fortune is in the follow-up. If you can make each of your follow-ups a marketable moment, meaning that it's like, oh, it's a nice nugget, right? It's like, oh, I found this competitive thing. Oh, I found this resource over here. Instead of just checking in, just following up here, just circling back, right? It's a very different conversation because you're using those little marketable moments to say, oh, I can trust these guys, 'cause they're still continuing to work hard and they're doing everything that the other people, the other companies we're looking at are not doing. Anything else, Neil? That's it. Make sure you rate review this podcast and text us. 310-349-3785 again. 310-349-3785. And we will catch you later. We appreciate you joining us for this session of marketing school.

Eric Sue Neil Patel Niels John Maxwell Neil
A highlight from Community Led Growth -- Mike Rizzo // MarketingOps.com

MarTech Podcast

02:19 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from Community Led Growth -- Mike Rizzo // MarketingOps.com

"Always excited to chat with a fellow marketer, a fellow podcaster. Can I call you a creator as well? What do we call people that run communities? Are you part of the creator revolution that's going on now? I don't even know. That's a great question. I refer to myself as the community led founder on LinkedIn. So I'll go with that. You're a founder, you're a community leader. You're just a great guy all around. Ah, I appreciate it. And I've got some questions for you. Okay. You've got this budding growing, monetizable, valuable community of marketing ops professionals. And I've got this little podcast that I've been doing for 5 years that connects me to the people in the martech community. But I've always wanted to have a deeper relationship with my listeners, and I've also wanted them to be able to talk and collaborate with themselves. Give me some guidance here. I want to learn a little bit about growing a community and not just specifically for the mar tech podcast, but there's lots of companies that are interested in community led growth. Talk to me about what you need to know to found a community and then how do you actually extract some value out of it and help it grow your business? There are a number of thought leaders in the community space that you can go follow. I will provide Ben and team with links to their information so you can look them up by name and by link in the show notes perhaps later or you can reach out to me directly and I'm happy to point you in their direction. Community led from a sort of subject matter expertise and thought leadership perspective is being championed by an organization known as consor. They do it a tremendous job of what it really means to be community led. And one of the things that they sort of talk about and before and after state is that you're going from broadcasting your message to really connecting with your members, whether that's your customers or your prospects or both your maybe undervaluing the way in which you treat community and instead thinking of it as how do you empower this function within your organization. It shouldn't be siloed. It should be cross functional, much like the marketing operations function is the community function touches a huge part of the business.

Linkedin BEN
A highlight from Growing NFT Now to 700,000 Followers in 1 Yr, Coaching, and Jackson Hole, with Alejandro Navia

Marketing School

05:51 min | 5 d ago

A highlight from Growing NFT Now to 700,000 Followers in 1 Yr, Coaching, and Jackson Hole, with Alejandro Navia

"President of NFT now, which is the premier source of NFT content and analysis. And look, I've been following their podcast. They've got some good stuff. As far as I know, they're one of the few kind of NFT focused media companies and I wanted to have him come on this podcast to talk about the space and kind of what he's seeing and also what's working from a growth perspective. So Alejandro, how's it going? Eric, thank you for having me. Pleasure to be here in super excited to dive in. Yeah, pleasure to have you, man. So yeah, before we start, I mean, I guess we're starting. But tell us about your story a little bit and how it's led up to where you are now. Oh man, it's an interesting question. I think my stories, it's both an anomaly and an enigma and I think I love that because I spent a lot of my 20s in the process of exploration and discovery. So so many people are just so gung Ho about really focused on one area or one something that they're really passionate about it. For me, it was really more about exploring my different passions and seeing where those things would lead us. But somehow my constant element has always been the intersection of storytelling and emerging tech. And so I've always found myself in the media world or storytelling world or in the people centric world, right? And so I've been in digital media for about 13 years. I helped build and sell a leap day lead four $50 million back in 2015, then I was the youngest member of the content strategy and acquisitions team at Verizon and had some great successes in my history, but also some really great failures. A lot of learning experiences, you know, I launched two companies with the cofounder that we didn't agree eye to eye. That was a lot of deep learning experiences on that front. Launched the ocean nonprofit organization that's still very much very alive. And I've been in the crypto space since 2014 where I've bought my first Bitcoin. I've been in Ethereum from, I think, 2016 when Jesse gershon introduced me to it with my friend Amanda Gorman, 19 census, I got in at $7. We helped Amanda and Jesse stand up a lot of those spokes in terms of a branding and storytelling perspective from ethereal to the enterprise alliance and a few other companies that they were launching at the time. So to an incredible journey, I've been doing a few things in aerospace, AI, to entrepreneur, and then in 2020, I found myself burning out at the beginning of 2020 pre COVID. And I took some time off and two days before the pandemic hit, I quit my job, and I was like, oh, what am I going to do? What's next? I didn't really have it. And I became an executive coach. And I really loved helping founders and high performers, create freedom and fulfillment in their lives. And specifically through the areas of their work. There's a lot of times we as founders and entrepreneurs, we get lost in the work, right? We've find achievement and but not fulfillment. We have this elusiveness around what we need to accomplish next that if we do that next thing, we'll feel fulfilled, et cetera, et cetera. So I wanted to help a lot of founders avoid the pitfalls that I went through. And really helped them navigate a more well balanced, conscious leadership based journey through while they're building amazing companies that are changing the world. And when the pandemic hit, I ended up moving to Jackson hole on a whim with my wife. We sold everything in our apartment in Brooklyn, New York. We had been living there for a decade, and we bought a Jeep Wrangler. We packed up our stuff. We packed our dog up, and we drove across country, it was an incredible adventure. What was supposed to be a 6 week escape and ended up being an 11 month I think 11 or 12 months out in Jackson hole and it was just really epic to be living on a 20 acre property where you barely saw any people. So it was just you and you and nature, I got to see more moves and help and humans. It was really dope, small town vibes, but really being in the core nature. And so I invited my friend Matt mad, who's now my cofounder, I don't have to now, and he came in December 2020, and he came wide eyed and foaming at the mouth, and he was like, yo, nah. NFTs bro NFT. This NFT band. And I was just like, that's really interesting. That's really dope. I'm still into coach and I was doing my thing. I was heavily into mushrooms and psilocybin. So helping people really navigate that mental health conversation and seeing the power of that plant medicine. And so I was like, oh, that's really cool. That's really interesting, bro, let me know how it can be of support. We've always been sounding boards for one another. And then two weeks later, I came home to find my roommate Sam, who's now my cofounder as well. And Jackson hole plugged in directly to the router. And I'm like, yo, what are you doing, bro? Like the Wi-Fi is strong enough, dude. We got a gig. Like, you don't have to plug in. He's like, bro, NBA topshop. They're doing a drop, and I was like, NBA top, what is this? Like, what are you doing? There's no stadium here. And he was just like, nah man, you know, digital, you know those cards that collectible cards with basketball players. I'm like, yeah, yeah, what's up? He's like, the digital version. I'm like, what? That's a thing, and he's like, yeah, bro, and be a top shot. I'm like, what is, I mean, he goes, NFTs, bro, NFTs, and the moment he said that, he had that same look that Matt had, just two weeks prior. And so when I know that these two very highly respected people in my life that I really love and care for, who are very much in the forefront of culture, bring me something, it's either they're crazy or they're onto something. So I decided to lean on to onto something and Matt started an Instagram account. I think a week later, I started which was NFT now. And it started growing organically. And as much as we started doing research as to what NFTs were, things of that capacity, there wasn't anything in the space. Everything that we found was either fragmented, broken, self serving, or just straight up scams. Like there wasn't a trusted objective voice that can

Jesse Gershon Amanda Gorman Enterprise Alliance NFT Alejandro Jackson Matt Mad Eric Verizon Jesse Amanda Wrangler Jeep Brooklyn NBA New York SAM
A highlight from Building The Marketing Operations Community -- Mike Rizzo // MarketingOps.com

MarTech Podcast

07:43 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Building The Marketing Operations Community -- Mike Rizzo // MarketingOps.com

"The martech podcast is a proud member of the HubSpot podcast network to find great business podcasts like this one, visit HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. From advertising to software as a service, to data. Across all of our programs and clients, we've seen a 55 to 65% open rate. Getting brands authentically integrated into content performs better than TV advertising. Typical life span of an article is about 24 to 36 hours. We're reaching out to the right person with the right message and a clear call to action that it's just a matter of timing. Welcome to the mar tech podcast, and I hear everything production. In this podcast, you'll hear the stories of world class marketers that use technology to drive business results and achieve career success. Will on earth, the real world experiences of some of the brightest minds in the marketing and technology space, so you can learn the tools tips and tricks, they've learned along the way. Now here's a host of the mar tech podcast, Benjamin Shapiro. Welcome to the martek podcast. I'm your host Benjamin Shapiro, and today we're going to discuss why community could be the next big thing in marketing. Or is it already? Time for a one minute break to hear from our presenting sponsor HubSpot. The HubSpot CRM platform combines a suite of powerful marketing tools that work seamlessly together so you and your team can deliver better experiences for your customers. You can save, reuse, and share your best performing emails with your team or use social media tools to schedule and publish updates and analyze your performance, and you can even use bot builders to create robust automated multichannel marketing campaigns. To learn how to grow better by connecting your people, your customers and your business at HubSpot dot com. All right, back to today's interview. Joining us is Mike Rizzo, who's the founder of the marketing ops dot com website, which is a community for marketing obsolete. Marketing ops is the go to resource for current and aspiring marketing ops professionals that want to build their professional profile and skills by connecting with a growing community of thousands of marketing operations pros. And today Mike and I are going to talk about building the marketing operations community. But before we get to today's interview, I want to tell you about a new show that my company is launching. It's called the revenue generator podcast. As it turns out, us marketers are under attack. That's right, the walls between marketing, sales and customer success teams are all falling down and unless something changes quickly, your CMO is going to be calling him or herself a CRO in no time. And that's why we're creating the revenue generator podcast. The revenue generator podcast tells how innovators of the revenue generation orchestrate teams to deliver world class customer experiences that integrate data, SaaS, people and processes to expedite demand and increase revenue. The show is hosted by my good buddy Doug bell who is a 20 year technology veteran that has been instrumental in driving revenue growth and scaling marketing organizations across some of the world's best known brands and nimble startups and in each episode of the rev gen pod. You'll hear how industry leaders integrate sales marketing product and customer success into a single business unit with a common goal of optimizing their revenue cycle. So if you're ready to join me and Doug bell as a member of the revenue generation, search for revenue generator in your podcast app or head over to rev gen pod dot com that's revenue generator in your podcast or head over to rev gen pod dot com. All right, here's the first part of my conversation with Mike Rizzo, the founder of marketing ops dot com. Mike, welcome to the Marta podcast. Hey, Ben, thank you for having me. It's a great honor and a pleasure to finally join you on the podcast officially, given that we had a chance to connect, I think, one on one prior to this, this will be fun. It's always a privilege to have not only somebody that's influential in the marketing space on the podcast, but also somebody that I've talked to before we start recording. So this is like, I feel like we've got the hard part out of the way. We know each other a little bit. And you're doing some really great things helping marketers connect, get educated on your specifically focusing on marketing ops with marketing ops dot com. Tell me what marketing ops is and tell me a little bit about the community that you've built. Marketing ops as a function, I think, has been around for 20 years, probably coming up on that, but I don't think it was a formally recognized function within an organization or marketing team for that matter. Probably for the last decade or so. It's probably really about ten years ago when it started to be recognized as a real function within a team. And what happened in my early days of my career, implementing mar tech tools as that martech landscape continued to grow. I found myself quite alone in the role. And trying to talk shop with a handful of people internally about some of the technical challenges I was faced with or the life cycle management, I was trying to come up with mostly resulted in eye rolls and possibly falling asleep in the chair because they just didn't really care. They weren't as passionate about the topic at hand, which is perfectly all right, right? Everybody has their own career passions. And so what happened was I said, you know, hey, this slack thing is kind of new, and this is like 2017. I'm going to spin up a slack channel, and if I meet people at conferences back in the before times when we could all go to conferences, which thankfully is starting to happen again. I would say, hey, do you want to hang out and talk shop about marketing apps on this thing, the slack group and wrote a blog post about it, long story short, the community ended up being the sort of invite process got automated. And suddenly we were growing at about a 120 people a month. And people kept coming in and talking shop about marketing apps. And so today, the community, which is known as the mo pros, which is MOP, is rapidly evolving to become the community of marketing ops dot com. And within that space, we're going to continue elevating the function of marketing operations and the professionals that work within that space, helping them learn from each other. We're going to help brands reach them with educational material in a constructive manner that isn't spammy, but most importantly, it's a space to elevate your career and marketing apps, which is sorely lacking. Until now. So marketing ops is a function you mentioned didn't exactly have an official launch date. You know, I kind of think about the rise of marketo and some of the marketing automation tools as the beginning of really the martech revolution where all of a sudden we've got a couple of different tools that we have to tie together and we're facing some of the same problems that the sales organization did with Salesforce. And so we're looking about a decade in of this function of marketing operations being an actual job title and you were right person right place right time started the slack group and all of a sudden you see this organic growth of your community. So I'm interested to hear sort of the community building story of yeah, I met a couple of guys and girls at a conference and we decided we were going to chit chat. When did this move beyond something that you were using as a networking tool into a community that you needed to manage

Benjamin Shapiro Hubspot Doug Bell Mike Rizzo Mike BEN Salesforce
A highlight from Building an Instagram Content Strategy That Lasts

Social Media Marketing Podcast

06:21 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Building an Instagram Content Strategy That Lasts

"How are you doing today? I'm doing great. Thanks so much for having me. Mike, I'm excited to be here. Well, today Katie and I are going to share how to create an Instagram content strategy that stands the test of time. Now, before we go there, I would love to hear your story. How in the world did you get into Instagram, start wherever you want to start? Yeah, that is a great question. So my story actually the beginning of it takes us back many, many years because I started my journey of content creation on social media as a very awkward young pre teen. So I was kind of becoming a teenager around the time that social media was really becoming more popular and I was a bit of a nerdy kid. I grew up in a very small town. I didn't have a ton of friends that kind of shared some of my more niche interests. And so I kind of started exploring social media as a place to find content about the kinds of things that I was interested in. So primarily that was Harry Potter for the nerdy young Katie. Nice. Who was looking for Friends to talk about the kind of stuff that she was into it, right? So I found my way onto YouTube, and then also at the time, logging was kind of big. So at this point, Instagram wasn't even invented yet, but I sort of found my love of creating content of being able to connect with other people that shared my interests. And so I became passionate about the idea of having a community online. And the way that I access that community was by watching other people's content, but also creating my own. So that was kind of my origin story of how I started making videos, how I started creating stuff and sharing it. And then I started my current YouTube channel, which has been a primary part of my business in 2011. So that's over ten years now, which is kind of hard to believe. It's really evolved over time as a creator on YouTube. I really tried so many different things. I've always been a really multi passionate person. And I think a lot of other creators can really relate to this where we love so many different things and we want to be able to create content about all of them or even we like different platforms and want to try creating on YouTube, Instagram blogging, whatever it is. So definitely found myself doing a lot of experimenting. I tried everything from vlogging to commentary videos. So I was really all over the map with creating lots of different social media content on YouTube, blogging, and then, of course, Instagram eventually comes along. And I became very intrigued by this photo sharing platform and really started experimenting there as well. And just kind of sharing about my life. And again, what I was interested in. But as I started getting older and thinking about like, okay, my undergrad is almost finished. Maybe I want to start considering what a career would look like. I felt really torn because I had all these different passions. I always liked exploring these different topics. And I didn't really know what my purpose was meant to be. You know, everybody asks themselves, what's my passion? And I kind of had this realization that even though I tried all these different things, really the common thread through all of it was social media. It was creating content. So I kind of realized that that was really what my passion was. It was creating stuff for the Internet and then also kind of inspiring other people to do that too because I had found so much joy in it. So kind of to bring us forward to about 2019 now it's from 2011 up to almost present. I was experimenting on Instagram trying different stuff and also making YouTube videos at the same time. And I found that I was getting a lot of questions from just my small community on Instagram. Oh, how did you make that story? Or how did you do that editing technique? And so I decided to create a YouTube video to answer some of those questions and to share some of my best tips and tricks. So I made a video called Instagram story hacks. And when I posted the video at the time my YouTube channel had just about 3000 subscribers, but within a few months of posting that video, the video had brought in over a million views. Wow. And has now brought my YouTube channel to over a 100,000 subscribers. And just totally skyrocketed my social media growth and really brought me to the position I am now and help me discover that I really did have a lot to share around Instagram and content creation and it's really helped my channel evolve to the place where it is now, which is basically sharing tips and strategies that I've learned through my own experimentation with my own social media profiles, but also what I've learned from helping to grow my client's accounts with my agency, create early media. So that's kind of how I got to where I am now. So tell us a little bit about creatively media and kind of who your ideal customers are and kind of what you're doing there. Yeah, for sure. So creator Lee media is a social media content creation agency that I founded. I've got 6 team members now helping me out as well and basically what we do is we work with a lot of small business owners, a lot of personal brands, coaches, to really help them with their social media content with their ideal customers and building a community. So we do that through producing podcasts, managing YouTube channels, and also creating Instagram content for them. So let's talk a little bit about why you feel like having a sustainable strategy on Instagram is so important. I know a lot of people struggle keeping up with all the content that they feel like they have to produce on Instagram and I would love to hear your thoughts on why this is kind of important. Yeah, exactly. I feel like a lot of folks in the social media world are overwhelmed by keeping up with all of the content that we need to post. And I think that there's enough people in the space talking about creating a sustainable Instagram strategy, not just something that is effective. And the reason why creating something sustainable is so important because your strategy on Instagram or any other platform for that matter is only as effective as it is sustainable because you can have the best plan in the world of exactly what content you're going to post, who you're going to reach with it. Hashtags that you're going to use all of this stuff, but if it's not sustainable, if it's not something that you can actually keep up with and execute on a consistent basis, then it's not going to help you grow. Yeah, well, and talk to me a little bit about burnout. I don't know if you experienced burnout, but I'm sure during the pandemic, a lot of people did experience burnout.

Youtube Instagram Katie Harry Potter Mike Lee Media
A highlight from #460: How To Set Up A Flexible Business With Annie Chang: From Live Launching To A Membership To Evergreen Success

Online Marketing Made Easy with Amy Porterfield

01:59 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from #460: How To Set Up A Flexible Business With Annie Chang: From Live Launching To A Membership To Evergreen Success

"People in our program. And with live launches, though, of course, that gives us a huge injection of sales, and really allow us to track the people who need that momentum and energy, you know, doing this with a community, a group of people. And in terms of our conversions, so it's around ten to 11 from live webinars versus 5% from evergreen webinar. I'm Amy porterfield, ex corporate girl turned CEO of a multi 7 figure business, but it wasn't all that long ago that I lacked the confidence. The budget and the time to focus on growing my small but mighty business. Fast forward past many failed attempts in lessons learned and you'll see the business I have today. One that changes lives and gives me more freedom than I ever thought possible. One that used to only exist as a daydream. I created the online marketing made easy podcast to give you simple actionable. Step by step strategies to help you do the same. If you're an ambitious entrepreneur or one in the making who's looking to create a business that makes an impact and a life you love, you're in the right place friend. Let's get started. So I have a little homework for you. I want you to head to your favorite podcast listening platform, search for the podcast success story, hosted by Scott D clary and start listening. Success story is a new podcast obsession for me. And it features Q&A sessions with successful business leaders, keynote presentations, and conversations on sales, marketing, business, and entrepreneurship. Scott recently spoke with a guest about the importance of socially conscious entrepreneurship and I love that conversation. This is such an important topic right now, so be sure to check out that specific episode

Amy Porterfield Scott D Clary Scott
A highlight from How To Keep An Eye On Your Competitors in 2022 #2092

Marketing School

04:18 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from How To Keep An Eye On Your Competitors in 2022 #2092

"It, find it, check it out, and it's a great way to improve your load time. Today, we are going to talk about how to keep an eye on your competitors in 2022. So first and foremost, Neil, why is that still important in today's day and age? There's so many marketing channels out there. You got to keep an eye out on what your competitors are doing from what marketing channels that they're using, but also what ads that they're running, what strategies that they're using because it takes so many people to run marketing. These days, I know there's tools that help automate a lot, but because there's so many channels, you need a lot of headcount when people are creating content to strategies, to responding a community management, but just knowing what your competitors are focusing their time and energy on, it'll give you a directional sense of what's working and what's not. That's why it's super important, especially if they're constantly running experiments, it'll save you time because you can learn from their experiments. Cool. So the first one I'll go with, one of us is going to say it will be similar web. And here's the thing, I actually didn't know that similar web tracks at visits as well. So when you look at zoom, maybe this is website visits too, but zoom gets like 1.7 billion visits a month, something like that, which is pretty nuts, right? And so if you're a competitor to zoom, you probably want to take a look at that. But similar web will show you traffic breakdown, I'll show you kind of similar websites in the category as well. It's a good starting point, and they'll show you a lot of other competitive data too. They're kind of like an all in one tool. Neil? My favorite one is wayback machine. It's free, and everyone's just like, way back machine. A B testing is a big part of digital marketing in the future because ad costs are going to be rising. So you got to continually tweak your copy, your images, your CTAs, your landing pages, way back machine shows you all the changes that a landing page is making over time and you see screenshots, you can use that to figure out what kind of experiments you need to run. Cool. Next one is href. So from an SEO standpoint, you can take a look at how your competitors are doing. You can see what the content gap is, what the ranking for, that you're not ranking for. You can see where they're getting their links from, what their anchor strategy is as well. Even though that's less of a thing today. And also ahrefs has the ability to show you the traffic value. So approximately what you'd be paying Google for your SEO traffic, I find that to be valuable, it will also show you kind of paid media ads too. So they'll show you PPC ads as well. The next thing you want to do is follow your competitors on the social web so that way you can see what they're doing for their profiles. And you should also check out the Facebook ad library to see what ads people are running on Facebook. All right, next one is taking a look at social blade. So social blades, I'm going to give two YouTube tools. One is social blade so you can see kind of who the top YouTubers are and how they're doing from a posting average videos per day type of thing. I also using a tool like you can use TubeBuddy that's QUBE that's buddy afterwards or you can use vidIQ. These are good competitive analysis tools too. But if you're going to be spending a lot of time on YouTube, you want to have those insights so you can continue to make the best video. I really like what mister B says about YouTube. The best way to grow on YouTube is just to make the best video possible for every single one. Neil? Another tool that I love using is user testing. But what I do, that's interesting and user testing is you can actually have people review your competitor site and get feedback. And then you can also have people review your site and give feedback. So then you can see how people perceive your competitors over yourself. Great. Another thing too, qualitative feedback kind of similar to what Neil saying here is talking to your customers and saying, hey, have you used any of our competitors? Corey using right now, why do you like them more? What do you think they do better than us, type of thing, right? Because your goal is to constantly try to improve and constantly level up your product. And also the meals point with Facebook in terms of looking at other people's ads, you can use Facebook's ad library. You can also use a tool called add beat that's AD, BEAT to take a look at Google display ads as well. Ahrefs also does the same thing too. Is there anything else that we might be missing here, Neil? I think I said what runs where, but we pretty much got the majority of them. That's how you keep track of your competition in 2022 and even beyond. If you have any questions, let us know we're here to help you can always ping us on one of the social platforms. If you enjoy the podcast, rate review it, really appreciate it. Thank you for your time today. Oh, and also text us. We're bringing it back. 310-349-3785. Once again, 310-349-3785. We paid $99 a month for the things. So we might as well continue to build that community. Catch you later. We appreciate you joining us for this session of marketing school.

Neil Youtube Facebook Google Ahrefs Corey
A highlight from Why B2B SaaS Companies Create Podcasts -- Doug Bell // LeanData

MarTech Podcast

08:13 min | Last week

A highlight from Why B2B SaaS Companies Create Podcasts -- Doug Bell // LeanData

"The martech podcast is a proud member of the HubSpot podcast network to find great business podcasts like this one, visit HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. From advertising to software as a service to data. Across all of our programs and clients, we've seen a 55 to 65% open rate. Getting brands authentically integrated into content performs better than TV advertising. Typical lifespan of an article is about 24 to 36 hours. We're reaching out to the right person with the right message and a clear call to action that it's just a matter of timing. Welcome to the mar tech podcast, and I hear everything production. In this podcast, you'll hear the stories of world class marketers that use technology to drive business results and achieve career success. Will on earth the real world experiences of some of the brightest minds in the marketing and technology space, so you can learn the tools tips and tricks they've learned along the way. Now here's a host of the mar tech podcast, Benjamin Shapiro. Welcome to the mar tech podcast. I'm your host Benjamin Shapiro, and today we're going to talk about why marketers should consider making daily podcasts. Time for a one minute break to hear from our presenting sponsor, HubSpot. The HubSpot CRM platform combines a suite of powerful marketing tools that work seamlessly together so you and your team can deliver better experiences for your customers. You can save, reuse, and share your best performing emails with your team or use social media tools to schedule and publish updates and analyze your performance, and you can even use bot builders to create robust automated multichannel marketing campaigns. To learn how to grow better by connecting your people, your customers and your business at HubSpot dot com. All right, back to today's interview. Joining us is Doug bell, who's the CMO of lean data which delivers modern revenue orchestration for today's growth leaders, Doug is also the host of the revenue generator podcast, a member of the I hear everything podcast network and today Doug and I are going to discuss why he decided to start a daily podcast. But before we get to today's interview, I want to tell you about a new show that my company is launching. It's called the revenue generator podcast. As it turns out, us marketers are under attack. That's right, the walls between marketing, sales and customer success teams are all falling down and unless something changes quickly, your CMO is going to be calling him or herself a CRO in no time. And that's why we're creating the revenue generator podcast. The revenue generator podcast tells how innovators of the revenue generation orchestrate teams to deliver world class customer experiences that integrate data, SaaS, people and processes to expedite demand and increase revenue. The show is hosted by my good buddy Doug bell who is a 20 year technology veteran that has been instrumental in driving revenue growth and scaling marketing organizations across some of the world's best known brands and nimble startups. And in each episode of the rev gen pod, you'll hear how industry leaders integrate sales marketing product and customer success into a single business unit with a common goal of optimizing their revenue cycle. So if you're ready to join me and Doug bell as a member of the revenue generation, search for revenue generator in your podcast app or head over to rev gen pod dot com that's revenue generator in your podcast or head over to rev gen pod dot com. All right, here's my conversation with Doug bell, the CMO of lean data. Doug, welcome back to the mar tech podcast. Glad to be back. Always a pleasure to have you here, Doug. Look, I need a favor from you. We've been working on this project together. The revenue generator podcast. And I want to tell people about how it's going and a big part of that is understanding the rationale for you the host and the sponsor of the podcast for basically putting in your time, effort and budget into building a daily podcast. So let's start off tell everybody what lean data is, what it's about and where you are from a marketing perspective. We are a platform that helps connect buying signals to buying decisions. And what does that mean at the end of the day, my company is extremely good at taking things like leads or intent data and making sure the people that are going to take an action against that information are aware and 90% of this making sure it's getting to the right person at the right time. Okay, right person right place right time you're like the matchmaker of the data world. I am the matchmaker of the data world that is correct. All right, so talk to me a little bit about lean data and marketing you are a B2B company, a SaaS company, a high growth company, borderline a unicorn for companies that you're size stature, growth problems. What are some of the things from a marketing maturity that you're working on and what are some of the problems you're facing? If you're pre scale and we're definitely pre scaled, what I mean by that is we're still looking for scale efficiency in terms of how we run our business. But we have explosive growth. So we're seeing this kind of big hockey shape happening on the right end. If you're clever, you're looking out 6 quarters in advance and you're saying, okay, what are the things going to trip up this growth? And for an organization like lead data, quite often you're leaning no pun intended into short term investments that are going to drive a lot more pipeline. And you've probably over time not been able to figure out how to drive awareness, right? And I think that's pretty typical bet. I think you and I have worked a lot of software companies and you tend to sacrifice that short term need for pipeline. Meaning you're not investing as much in awareness. That is true for lead data. We are a really well kept secret. And I'm facing that type of situation I'm thinking, great. I'm looking for two first. Doug, what do you mean by twofer? Okay. I'm looking for every opportunity I can to do one thing well and do the other thing well at the same time meeting. And I ban the idea of awareness and lead gen yesterday. So I'm going to use short and long-term growth. Wherever I can take an activity that allows me to create short term and long-term growth, I'm going to do it. Thus, the podcast. So talk to me before we get into the podcast. Talk to me about some of the challenges that you face in the role of a CMO at this growth stage company. Your managing demand gen, you have to focus on awareness. I'm sure that there's some sort of a team, staff building, your time has to be a scarce resource. What's the day to day like for you? Well, then I almost want to pull up my calendar and show you, but a good day I'll have 15 to minutes to half an hour to say hit the restroom. That's my calendar. And it usually leaks into the weekend. So I'm a busy, busy, busy boy. And I'm a busy boy because I'm trying to juggle this idea of short and long term growth and prioritize things from IT. So it's packed. Okay, so look, we work together. We work together at your last company where you were the CMO, we built a podcast. It started to gain some traction, and when you took the role of CMO, we sat down together and said, we want to work together how are we going to do that? And I pitched you on the idea of we should do another podcast, but it should be a daily podcast. And this time you're going to be the host. Now, without saying how you felt about that at first, I want you to tell everybody what your agencies and the people that you told that you were thinking about doing a daily podcast said when you raise the idea. Well, I pay them, but I also pay them to push back on me. And I have to say that's true for my teams. And I had by the time I mentioned this to them, given them the leeway, the permission to push back. And to a person internally, they said, that's nuts. That's nuts. You shouldn't create a daily podcast, and yet for some reason, you decided to do it anyway. So walk me through the rationale for you wanting to host and sponsor a podcast. I think I need to give a little background here, Ben, which is that I'm going to put myself in this conversation, understanding that it was really mostly one Benjamin Jay Shapiro pulling

Doug Bell Benjamin Shapiro Hubspot Doug Hockey BEN Benjamin Jay Shapiro
A highlight from How to Come Up With The Perfect Messaging For Your Product  #2091

Marketing School

02:21 min | Last week

A highlight from How to Come Up With The Perfect Messaging For Your Product #2091

"Product like a software or even if it's a service. Now here's the trick to coming up with the right message. You talk to your existing customers if you have them, and you figure out what the lights them about your product, what they love, why they use it, why would be the main reason the recommend it, that'll give you idea of what people are passionate about, and that's what you know that you want to emphasize within your copy. Now, if you don't have customers yet, what you can end up doing is release your homepage, look at your competitors, look at their ads because their ads are based on click through, especially on Google and Facebook. Facebook ad library will show you their ads on Google just Google for some keywords. You'll see the messaging that it relates to your potential customers and consider using some of that within your copy as well. And then what I would do is using tools like optimize the VWO or crazy egg, you can a B test that copy to see which one's converting the best. And there you go. That'll give you a jump start on what copies working. It doesn't mean you won't need a tweak it in the future, but that will get you your start. Well, I guess this one's going to be short because Neil said a lot of the ones I wanted to save. But it's okay. I got some other ones for you. So in terms of customer development, what Neil mentioned, talking to your customers, right? It's something that at least for me, I don't really like doing it that much, but it's important, right? There's a company invested in called levels and I mentioned this before, but there's CEO Sam corcos did like over 4000 customer phone calls, something like that, right? Where he just asked a ton of questions. What do you use? Why would you be using us? Why do you love us? Questions like that. Why do you not love us? What can we improve at? Also, if you're a consumer product, can you look at your Amazon reviews for the people that really love you? What are they saying? You're looking for signal here. What are the constant things they're saying over time, what really resonates? And also, I mean, you're going to get a good opportunity on the one to three star reviews. Those are opportunities for you to improve as well. This is known as qualitative feedback. And you can also look at the quantitative stuff too, right? You can tools that Neil mentioned as well. But the key thing here is to really iterating at the end of the day. You're not going to have how you come up with the quote unquote perfect messaging is to constantly tweak. Because what's perfect today is probably going to be tomorrow's average. So you have to keep tweaking it over and over and over. And when you have very simple messaging that people understand in a very simple offer that people understand, your conversion rates should skyrocket. Anything else, Neil? That's it for mine. Make sure you rate review this podcast. Thank you for listening. We appreciate you joining us for this session of marketing school. Be sure to

Google Neil Facebook Sam Corcos Amazon
A highlight from Is Rev Ops A Thing For Marketers? -- Doug Bell // LeanData

MarTech Podcast

07:27 min | Last week

A highlight from Is Rev Ops A Thing For Marketers? -- Doug Bell // LeanData

"The martech podcast is a proud member of the HubSpot podcast network to find great business podcasts like this one, visit HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. From advertising to software as a service to data. Across all of our programs and clients, we've seen a 55 to 65% open rate. Getting brands authentically integrated into content performs better than TV advertising. Typical lifespan of an article is about 24 to 36 hours. We're reaching out to the right person with the right message and a clear call to action that it's just a matter of timing. Welcome to the mar tech podcast, and I hear everything production. In this podcast, you'll hear the stories of world class marketers that use technology to drive business results and achieve career success. Will on earth the real world experiences of some of the brightest minds in the marketing and technology space, so you can learn the tools tips and tricks they've learned along the way. Now here's a host of the mar tech podcast, Benjamin Shapiro. Welcome to the mar tech podcast. I'm your host Benjamin Shapiro, and today we're going to talk about the rise of chief revenue officers and the important of rev ops to marketers. Time for a one minute break to hear from our presenting sponsor HubSpot. The HubSpot CRM platform combines a suite of powerful marketing tools that work seamlessly together so you and your team can deliver better experiences for your customers. You can save, reuse, and share your best performing emails with your team or use social media tools to schedule and publish updates and analyze your performance, and you can even use bot builders to create robust automated multichannel marketing campaigns. To learn how to grow better by connecting your people, your customers and your business at HubSpot dot com. All right, back to today's interview. Joining us is Doug bell, who is the CMO of lean data, which delivers modern revenue orchestration for today's growth leaders. Doug is also the host of our newly launched revenue generator podcast part of the I hear everything network and a long time friend of the mar tech podcast. Yesterday, Doug and I talked about the emergence of the chief revenue officer and today we're going to continue our conversation talking about what the rev ops is a thing for marketers. But before we get to today's interview, I want to tell you about a new show that my company is launching. It's called the revenue generator podcast. As it turns out, us marketers are under attack. That's right, the walls between marketing, sales and customer success teams are all falling down and unless something changes quickly, your CMO is going to be calling him or herself a CRO in no time. And that's why we're creating the revenue generator podcast. The revenue generator podcast tells how innovators of the revenue generation orchestrate teams to deliver world class customer experiences that integrate data, SaaS, people and processes to expedite demand and increase revenue. The show is hosted by my good buddy Doug bell who is a 20 year technology veteran that has been instrumental in driving revenue growth and scaling marketing organizations across some of the world's best known brands and nimble startups. And in each episode of the rev gen pod, you'll hear how industry leaders integrate sales marketing product and customer success into a single business unit with a common goal of optimizing their revenue cycle. So if you're ready to join me and Doug bell as a member of the revenue generation, search for revenue generator in your podcast app or head over to rev gen pod dot com that's revenue generator in your podcast or head over to rev gen pod dot com. All right, here's the second part of my conversation with Doug bell, the CMO of lean data and the host of the revenue generator podcast. Doug, welcome back to the mar tech podcast. Well, grandma's happy to be back. Yes, yesterday I made the joke, calling you grandma, really all I wanted to say is you're in my world now, grandma, because I've basically been on your podcast a bunch, and you haven't been here in a while, but Doug, it's always a pleasure to have you on the mar tech podcast. It's good to be here. So look, when we started working together, you were the CMO of a company called search metrics and SEO company, and you were traditional marketer working in the marketing space. And now your marketer working in, let's call it revenue, rev ops, this sort of new area that connects sales, marketing, customer success. A lot of what you're doing is funneling the right data to the right place to make sure people are operating efficiently. Now in marketing, we've had marketing ops for a long time. Honestly, I feel like most of the time when people are thinking about mar tech, they're thinking about the marketing ops function. How do I get Salesforce to talk to marketo? How do I get HubSpot to talk to pipe drive? How do I get hubs about to talk to mix max? Whatever it is. In my case, it's pipe drive in mix max. But there's this whole other wave of this ops that are happening that are basically turning marketing sales and customer success into revenue. So talk to me about what rev ops is and does it actually matter for marketers? The first thing I'd say is there's this idea of revenue ops as an umbrella way of describing Mark ops sops, CX ops. That's an umbrella term. It's used a lot in the marketplace. I think what you're asking me then is, is this unified organization operations organization, a real thing, and what is its potential for the market and especially for marketers. So the first thing is they both exist. And I think most commonly people are using it a shorthand describe all those different operations functions. However, for a lot of leading or bleeding edge organizations, they've actually combined these functions. It's typically to borrow from our conversation yesterday about the zeros office. It typically is about unifying that process people and data layer underneath the single banner, where reports these days is kind of all over the place. But it tends to report up to the CRO because they do have that singular view. So it's a thing in the sense that it drives, it's driving a new wave of process, if you will, singularity of process. But it's also causing a lot of organizations to take a strong look at their tech stack and how that stack is organized and how they're executing on that stack and I will tell you there's a little bit of a snippet here around how destroyed of those stacks are that can tell you why rev ops exist. In other words, it's been a lot of investment, but not a lot of commonality between how these different elements of the stack work together. I guess my big question here is, you know, I know the role of marketing ops. It's to help clean our data to make sure it flows from tool to tool that are segments are built that were building the right automations to send email triggers at the right place right time. Hopefully to the right person. It sounds like there are similar roles in every other silo in the organization. Sales ops, CX ops. Now is the idea that the marketing ops person is doing the same thing so they can go horizontally between the different organizations and now we're just calling them rev ops or is there a separate organization of ops people in each one in a scaled organization has responsibility for an individual channel? Is opposite its own thing or are the marketing

Doug Bell Benjamin Shapiro Hubspot Doug CMO Grandma Salesforce SEO
A highlight from The ROI Of Doing Good, With Good-Loop CEO Amy Williams

AdExchanger Talks

05:35 min | Last week

A highlight from The ROI Of Doing Good, With Good-Loop CEO Amy Williams

"Ten at checkout. See you there. Amy, welcome to the podcast. Thank you. Thanks for having me. So I'm going to start out as I have become a custom to doing, asking for a, I guess, a fun fact about you. Basically, something people can't just figure out by looking at your LinkedIn or talking to you for 5 minutes at a cocktail party. As if I've been to a cocktail party in the last 700 years, but you know what I mean? Okay, fun fact. I have ridden a weirdly wide range of animals. That's quite fun. I grew up riding horses. And then had the obligatory birthday party where you go and see the dolphins in sea world and rode a dolphin, which is incredible. I've ridden an ostrich in South Africa, which felt awful and cruel and I regret doing that. And I also wrote an elephant, which is also cruel. We shouldn't ride animals. We should just respect them. But yeah, in my past, when I was less enlightened, I have definitely ridden a weird number of animals. I did not know one could ride an ostrich. I didn't. I'm not sure. I still not convinced it felt much more like I was just really a passenger. There was a joke I had with a friend of mine who had this massive dog. A huge dog, the kind of dog you can't keep in a New York apartment or any apartment. And I have a cat that I'm obsessed with named mermaid and our joke was that we would get a little bridle for her dog Murphy and that mermaid would ride Murphy around. It's very much cats are lazy. Baby monkey riding a pig sort of vibe. I think that could go viral. I think you could be onto a winner. I mean, maybe. Are people as into cat videos now? The ship might have sailed. Oh, come on. I'm never going to turn on a cat video. I mean, either will I, but anyway. So good loop. Good lube, right, yes. Why did you decide to launch good loop, and what is good loops, reason for being? Well, the two are quite interlinked answers actually because I love advertising. I've always worked in this industry and I think that we're just not as proud of our industry as we should be, you know? I worked in an advertising agency using a huge amount of money and influence and scale to make people buy more fabric conditioner, which is interesting and creative and important, but it felt like there was so much more potential to do good with what with the tools that we have our disposal. And I was very aware this was back in 2014, 2015, the rise of ad blocking was really coming to the fore. And it did feel like when I went to the pub at the end of the day and told people I worked in advertising, though, is this sense of like, oh, God. Advertising. That's the thing I block and actually advertising can be world changing. It can tell beautiful stories it can move you and make you laugh, and advertising created consumerism. So we also have a potential to create new models of society. I just think there's so much opportunity and good loop was really a manifestation of that. You know, thinking about ad blocking and why people do that and what advertising could be, something that I kept coming back to was this idea of creating a more positive experience when brands and people interact online. These moments where we connect with a brand, often they're the thing getting in the way of the cat video, right? Like I'm not here to see your fabric conditioner ad, but I am forced to watch and so with good loop, I sort of designed this system where advertising is fully optional. We empower people to have a choice. But if they choose to give that advert, some of their precious time and attention, then they unlock a donation funded by the brand. So the user gets to do good for free, simply by watching. And the advertiser gets a really nice, really positive, really proactive moment of engagement, but also, you know, they can connect with some of their bigger brand purpose initiatives, their social responsibility, their CSR, tell some of those more emotive stories that really is what brand building is all about. And what are some of the other, I don't know if I would call them ancillary offerings, but sort of satellite offerings. There is a green ad tag, which I think is really interesting. And a carbon calculator, which I've used, although it seems to be focused mainly in the UK because that's where your base, but still is pretty interesting. So what are those two things? Yeah, so we started the product I just described is what we call watch to donate. Skippable pre roll. And that was the product that we first started when I built the business. And since then, as you say, we've really expanded the portfolio, just really looking at ways to help connect brands, people, and good causes. And make it really, really easy for our industry to do good. So the green media work that that's something we kicked off about 18 months ago. Firstly, just looking internally, our own carbon footprint, when we run ad campaigns, what is the carbon emissions of that and how can we confidently tell

Murphy Linkedin Dolphins AMY South Africa New York UK
A highlight from #459: 4 Ways To Make Sure Youre Growing Along With Your Business

Online Marketing Made Easy with Amy Porterfield

00:56 sec | Last week

A highlight from #459: 4 Ways To Make Sure Youre Growing Along With Your Business

"Made easy. Quick check in, how are you doing? I'm doing pretty good. It's halfway through May and May is a crazy month for me. Super busy. We're rerecording the entire digital course academy program. If you are an alum, you will get the entire new recording we're making it better, adding new modern marketing strategies, really excited about the new program. So if you've never joined me in digital course academy, it's coming out in September. So we've been doing that in May and then I'm going on a sabbatical in June. I am very nervous. I'm literally taking the entire month of June off. We have a Lake house here in Nashville. I've never had a Lake house before. It's been remodeled over the last year. So I haven't really even gotten to enjoy it yet. So hobie and I are going to spend the entire month of June at the Lake house and I'm very excited. Very nervous because there's a lot of work to get done before I leave, but we'll see. We'll see how it goes.

Lake House Nashville
A highlight from With So Many Marketing Channels, Which Channel Should You Pick? #2090

Marketing School

04:01 min | Last week

A highlight from With So Many Marketing Channels, Which Channel Should You Pick? #2090

"To optimize your site for load time. And one easy way to do it is use the host that Eric and I use. Dream host. So just go to dreamhouse or Google it, find it, check it out, and it's a great way to improve your load time. Today, we're going to talk about the issue with having so many marketing channels and which one you should actually pick first. So this is a simple one. Eventually you're going to have to leverage as many channels as possible. It's called omnichannel marketing. Before you can build a business off of just one channel, Facebook did it, Dropbox did it. Yelp did it. Pinterest really grew fast through SEO. But here's the thing these days, all marketing channels, good ones. Eventually get super competitive and you have no choice but to leverage as many as possible. But the real question is which ones do you leverage first? And there's no right or wrong answer because it's going to be different for every single business. But there is a strategy that you can use. Think of marketing channels like spaghetti. You know, when I was a kid, I was always told if you want to know spaghetti's cookie throw against the wall, if it sticks, you're good. If it doesn't stick, you're not good. I have never heard that before. That's what I was told as a kid. So try that out, but instead of throwing something against the wall, try a handful of marketing channels out that you think your competitors are using. You can see a lot of that data on tools like SEM rush. And or similar web, try that out, see which ones your competitors are using, try a handful of them out. The ones that are giving you the best traction, focus on those force and ignore the rest. Then scale them up, get them to work, and then continually add more channels until you got all the ones that you can find that work well. And then eventually, you're going to have to end up removing the ones or you're going to have to end up going back to the ones that you couldn't make work and keep experimenting and try to make them work. Cool. So the way I look at it is there's two things you have to look at first, right? A, where's my audience hanging out? So if you're blogging and your audience is hanging out on TikTok, then probably you're rowing against the tide here. So where is your audience hanging out? And then also what's native to you, right? So if I were to think about early days for me, 9, ten years ago, starting in market or longer than that, actually. I started in blogging, 'cause a lot of these channels weren't available. Neil started in blogging first. And then he built his audience there, building email lists, and he kind of moved on from there. So the idea here is that you're starting with one pillar channel first. Where that pillar channel ideally, your audience is hanging out, and it's something that resonates with you. So for me now, it's actually mostly podcasting, right? I love podcasting. I love talking. And then this video that we have can be repurposed into other areas too, right? I'm simplifying it right now. But bless you, Neil. And so also when you look at Joe Rogan, it's like, okay, long form podcast, two to three hours. Okay, and then a bunch of clips. And that's basically it. When you look at Lex Friedman, for example, long form interviews, right? Kind of same deal here. So the whole idea is you start with one pillar channel first, get it working first before you start to think about all these other channels. And then repurpose. There's a really good thing from GaryVee. If you just search GaryVee, GaryVee 68 pieces of content, you'll find his framework on how to repurpose. Neil? I think that's pretty much it. First off, thank you for the bless you, but I think that's pretty much it. Look, you have no choice but to leverage all the channels, you got to repurpose content, just think of social media. You don't actually have to create a unique piece of content for YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, you can just repurpose the same thing over and over again. As I said a few channels, see what works, go from there and you'll be off into the races. Final thing too, post natively to these channels as well, right? Because like I mentioned before, when I mess around with my TikTok, when I will do like a native TikTok video where I'm like walking around or just like making a random like joke or whatever, I'll get like 6 to 7 times more reach versus a nice repurposed, edited video from my team. That being said, if you do have a significant audience, like with a hundred K plus on your tiktoks or instagrams, you can still probably get away with the repurposing. I've seen it work really well. It actually works pretty well with Neil's channel. So that is it for today. Please don't forget to rate review and subscribe to this pod because it helps us grow and we'll catch you later. We appreciate you joining us for this session of marketing school.

Omnichannel Marketing Neil Dropbox Pinterest Yelp Eric Lex Friedman Facebook Google Rowing Joe Rogan Instagram Youtube
A highlight from Emergence Of The CRO -- Doug Bell // LeanData

MarTech Podcast

07:31 min | Last week

A highlight from Emergence Of The CRO -- Doug Bell // LeanData

"The martech podcast is a proud member of the HubSpot podcast network to find great business podcasts like this one, visit HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. From advertising to software as a service to data. Across all of our programs and clients, we've seen a 55 to 65% open rate. Getting brands authentically integrated into content performs better than TV advertising. Typical lifespan of an article is about 24 to 36 hours. We're reaching out to the right person with the right message and a clear call to action that it's just a matter of timing. Welcome to the mar tech podcast, and I hear everything production. In this podcast, you'll hear the stories of world class marketers that use technology to drive business results and achieve career success. Will on earth the real world experiences of some of the brightest minds in the marketing and technology space, so you can learn the tools tips and tricks they've learned along the way. Now here's a host of the mar tech podcast, Benjamin Shapiro. Welcome to the mar tech podcast. I'm your host Benjamin Shapiro, and today we're going to talk about the rise of chief revenue officers and the important of rev ops to marketers. Time for a one minute break to hear from our presenting sponsor HubSpot. The HubSpot CRM platform combines a suite of powerful marketing tools that work seamlessly together so you and your team can deliver better experiences for your customers. You can save, reuse, and share your best performing emails with your team, or use social media tools to schedule and publish updates and analyze your performance, and you can even use bot builders to create robust automated multichannel marketing campaigns. To learn how to grow better by connecting your people, your customers and your business at HubSpot dot com. All right, back to today's interview. Joining us is Doug bell, who is the CMO of lean data, which delivers modern revenue orchestration for today's growth leaders. Doug is also the host of our newly launched revenue generator podcast part of the I hear everything network and a longtime friend of the mar tech podcast. And today, Doug and I are going to talk about the emergence of CROs. All right, here's the first part of my conversation with Doug bell, the CMO of lean data. Dog, welcome to the martek podcast. Thanks for having me on. Excited to have you here. Do you remember the movie happy Gilmore? I do. So in happy Gilmore, there was the part where grandma has to go to the old age home and when all the adults leave with the elderly people, Ben Stiller turns around and says, what does he say? Are we ready to party? Nope, he says, you're in my world now, grandma. I've been on your podcast twice recently. You launched the revenue generator podcast. We're working together to produce it. You've been asking me all the questions. My turn, are you ready? I wonder why I'm suddenly your grandmother, but that's fine, Ben. Let's roll with it. All right, well, thanks, grandma. Anyway, you got a job. You're the CMO. That seems like a really important thing. You're working on a rocket ship, lean data, approaching unicorn status. You got a big boy job and you're still working in marketing, which leads me to question whether your job's going to be around and dug it's not because I don't think you're a talent marketer or a good person to be in the organization. It's more of a macro question of our marketer is going to be in the jobs or is your lunch get to get eaten by somebody who calls themselves the CRO, chief revenue officer. Our CMO is still going to be a thing. It's a fair question from a couple of angles. The first angle is we sometimes this marketers have this great privilege of being able to look inwards, if you will, in other words, there are trends that affect us as marketers. You deal with us all the time on the mar tech podcast, right? Then it's also something we have to pay attention to in terms of trends in the market that we have to pay attention to because we're selling stuff. So I will say we hear this a lot from Forrester and Gartner and what they're saying is that the zero, this is and they're staying with the zero is going to do is over time subsume marketing as a function. So it's going to be one big old revenue organization and marketing is going to be substituted. The CMO is not going away. Maybe the title is. There's still a head of marketing. They're folding under the CNR zeros. I don't want to make light of any of the conflict in Eastern Europe, but the metaphor that comes to mind is actually a little bit akin to sort of the Soviet Union and some of the Eastern Bloc countries where revenue organization, it seems like your neighbor to the north, the sales team is starting to expand, call themselves revenue and then assuming responsibility for marketing and customer service is to just your VP of sales is getting grabby and start to assume new territory. I don't think that's the case. And what I would say got to pay attention to the market dynamics in the market standpoint. It makes a lot of sense. If you think about you are a, let's say emerging commercial organization. And you're having a hard time connecting the dots between what marketing is doing in sales is doing. And you're looking for efficiency. So from that standpoint, that's a sensible move. One organization under one umbrella is the sales organization try to consume or subsume marketing. I don't think that's happening. I think it's trend that's occurring because there's some sort of external force. In this case, the force is quote a study that we recently completed at lean data, which is a state of lead management for B2B organizations. 51% of companies that were spotted in that sweet spot B2B sweet spot for saying they're really struggling with growth. So how do you pivot when you're struggling with growth? What are you doing? And one of the ways you pivot or organizational structures. Doug, you've been around for a little while. You've seen some things. Is this a trend that you think is going to hold up? Do you think it's going to last? I don't, and there's a bunch of reasons. But I think the primary reason that's not going to last is that ultimately, what ends up happening when the zero's office absorbs the marketing function and absorbs that other C suite position, that zero's job is revenue, right? It's a quarter to quarter fight. It's fistfights. It's hand to hand combat. And that zero is naturally over good time to make sure that those resources are applied to that short term need, right, that combat. And what will end up happening is guess what's going to get dropped. Brand awareness, identity, thought leadership, all that stuff. Sarah's going to look and be like, what is this? Why am I doing it? And when they cut that what'll happen is two years later the cirrus fired a year and a half later zero fire. I'd also say like I've seen that pendulum swing happened before and just the zero title didn't exist, but 15 years ago, the rage with sales and marketing leadership. In other words, VP of sales in the marketing can buy. And that's exactly what happened, but it blew up. Time for a one minute break to hear from our presenting sponsor HubSpot, from ride sharing the file sharing and everything in between. 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Benjamin Shapiro Hubspot Doug Bell Gilmore Doug CMO Ben Stiller CRO Grandma Forrester Gartner BEN Eastern Europe Soviet Union Cirrus Sarah