Leadership

What makes a good leader? What are the skills, qualities and basic characteristics individuals need to organize, co-ordinate and manage a team's path to success? Listen up for essential info, testimonies, research and theories on the business of management, aired on leading talk radio shows and premium podcasts.

A highlight from 2/2 Totally Reimagining the Engagement Model: Carson Tate

Leadership and Loyalty

00:48 sec | 2 hrs ago

A highlight from 2/2 Totally Reimagining the Engagement Model: Carson Tate

"I'm Tay, I'm a management consultant and executive coach to Fortune 500 companies and leaders and the author of two books own it, love it, make it work. I'm a first book works simply. My work has been featured in Harvard Business review, The New York Times, Inc Forbes, and numerous other publications. And today, on the show, we're going to talk about loss aversion. While staying committed to what no longer works is undermining your profitability and your business. We're going to explore why employee engagement is no longer a one size fits all. Gain and how to stay curious, courageous, and collaborative to co create the future work. And as a bonus, I'm going to share with you how one company is going to lose one of their top performing executives.

Inc Forbes TAY Harvard Business Review The New York Times
A highlight from GAP: Mickey Drexler

Wisdom From The Top

08:00 min | 10 hrs ago

A highlight from GAP: Mickey Drexler

"If you're under the age of, say, 25. It might have thrown you off a little bit to hear me describe gap as a hot brand just now. And I don't blame you because right now the brands with the most buzz aren't necessarily the legacy brands that have been around for a long time. But hear me out. Because at one point, it seemed like everyone was talking about gap. They were SNL skits that parodied the stores. Jeanine Garoppolo played a gap manager in the cult classic film reality bites. Sharon Stone even wore a gap turtleneck to the Oscars. In other words, gap was a big part of pop culture. And the person who was pretty much responsible for that was Mickey drexler. But when Mickey got to gap in 1983, the brand was actually in trouble. And the company's founder, Don Fisher, was on the hunt for someone who could turn things around. So he hired Mickey, who at that point had already rescued the women's clothing brand and Taylor. And so for the next 20 years, gap became the place where the cool kids shopped. And as you will hear, Mickey even went on to create old navy, then eventually ran j.crew and started a brand new brand, madewell, which is a pretty incredible story, especially considering that Mickey drexler grew up a pretty shy kid in a working class family in The Bronx. With zero plans to become a businessman. I don't remember having the greatest childhood in the world, I think there were issues my mom was sick with breast cancer when I was a youngster and I kind of knew that. My dad worked in the garment business, he worked as a button and piece goods buyer for a coat manufacturer. I knew intuitively as a young kid, he wasn't that successful. Because I'd go to work with him at the coat manufacturer's offices. He worked in the shipping room and the reality of his job was not one where he was kind of a boss to anyone. He was actually taking orders from a lot of people. It all led me long story short to be very ambitious about what I did to try to not be my dad. And so I think that was a really important motivation for me growing up in The Bronx. When you were when you were a kid, I have to assume that you didn't have a whole lot of money that your family didn't like did you live in a house? Did you live in an apartment? Yeah, I grew up in a ground floor apartment, it was a one bedroom, small apartment, small kitchen, a tiny foyer, a living room and a bedroom. I slept in the foyer after I was out of my crib. So as you walked into the apartment, there was my bed. Wow. Right? In the center of things, but you know, when you're a kid growing up like that, you don't realize if you're rich or poor or whatever, because the only life I knew was the life in The Bronx. But my father reminded me that we were not really rich. Well, I remember how much money he made because he always had a wallet with a lot of cash in it, but he actually made in those days because I once took the payroll to the bank, and I was always curious what he earned. So I was probably 15 years old or 16. So I took the payroll to the bank and I went through everyone's paycheck, I felt a little guilty about it, but what the heck I was curious, and he was making $15,000 a year, probably in 19 60 two, but what would really disturb me is most of the other people were earning more of a salary than he was earning. People who I thought would be earning less than him were earning more than him. So that was very difficult for me to take. Because he always talked about the rich people he did business with and rich in the 1950s or 60s sometimes meant owning a Cadillac, but he instilled in me this wish and I say he and still did and it was probably him and maybe myself to get out of The Bronx someday to live a better life some day and I was quietly very ambitious in that regard. What about school? Or are you talented student? Did school come easy for you? Well, I had school phobia. I remember going off to school and one could be in hindsight more psychological, so to speak. But I believe I was deathly afraid of leaving my mother. So my father would drag me off to kindergarten the first few days. And he wasn't a warm, fuzzy guy at all. As I know him and remember him. But so I had a school phobia. I never said this to anyone before, but every morning I'd wake up and I gag a bit about going to school. So I disliked an intensely. I was, I was always anxious about it. And I carried that through my years now, either gagging, I'm embarrassed to say I gagged, but I did. And I didn't take that through my entire life, but through the grade school, et cetera, I was incredibly unhappy leaving home every day, not at home was so great, by the way. It wasn't like I was leaving anything. But I was fearful of school. But the irony is the irony is I think I did pretty well. I was very shy in class, but I think I did pretty well. There were 5 kids who got into Bronx high school of science in a class of I'm guessing 250 kids. And I was one of the 5, which kind of was privately a huge honor, oh my God, you know, that's really, I mean, I know all you do is you took a test. So I passed the test, made a huge difference in my life. By going to science and therefore I went on to college in which I am not sure I would have gone on to college because it wasn't even though it was a Jewish family where education is important. It didn't hold the same importance in my family and my mother died when I was 16, so she wasn't there pushing me at all. Yeah. And my father wasn't ever pushing, but I went to city college for two years. And then went to buffalo for two years. So I went off to school. Of course, everyone at science went to college. So that was a huge positive in my life going to Bronx science, made a huge difference for me. When you, when you were when you went after college and sort of started to think about what you wanted to do with your life, did you think I'm going to get into retail? I'm going to run companies like, what was the thing that you thought you were going to do? Well, you know, it's a funny thing. My father always talked about owning a company someday getting into business, buying a house. So he created these imaginary fantasies I had in my life. So I think for me, it became part of my life where I worried about how will I make a living? No, I never thought about retail. I never thought about anything other than getting a good job and hopefully doing well. I always worked. One thing my dad did for me is he always made me work when I was in high school. Yeah. Get up. Don't sleep

Mickey Drexler Mickey Bronx Jeanine Garoppolo Don Fisher Sharon Stone J.Crew SNL Oscars Navy Taylor Breast Cancer Bronx High School Of Science Buffalo
A highlight from Kary Oberbrunner | How Blockchain & Web 3.0 Will Affect Our Lives

Dose of Leadership

01:27 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from Kary Oberbrunner | How Blockchain & Web 3.0 Will Affect Our Lives

"I'll tell you why I think it's smart. Because I'm not the one talking. I just said I want to learn. So I have a 25 year old metaverse architect. I have someone who's launching their NFTs. I have a blockchain woman from India who's an expert in just blew my mind. I would say just listen to some voices that you trust. And if people are asking for money or do this or do that, I think you kind of just put up some red flags. Hey, welcome to the dose, a show dedicated to deep and engaging conversations, highlighting individuals that are in the pursuit of authentic and courageous leadership, who approach life with insatiable curiosity, bold action, and common sense in these divisive and uncommon times. It's my hope you take something away from each and every one of these conversations and apply it to your own life as we all intentionally attempt to become the best we can possibly be. By living out our purpose and calling, committing to life a service and helping make this place better than we found it. I'm thrilled to have you listen to this great conversation with my friend Carrie ober bruner. He's been on the show before. It's been a while. He's finally back. He's earned a doctor degree in transformational leadership, training over 250,000 authors coaches speakers and entrepreneurs he's an international speaker on personal growth, human performance publishing and business. Past 20 years, he's ignited over 1 million people with his content, what I really appreciate Carrie where he's going now is he's a futurist creating solutions for integrating intellectual

Carrie Ober Bruner India Carrie
A highlight from The Lies You Believe About Success with Tim Schurrer

The EntreLeadership Podcast

05:09 min | 2 d ago

A highlight from The Lies You Believe About Success with Tim Schurrer

"We're going to kick it off with Tim shirr. He was the right hand man to Donald Miller for almost a decade, serving as COO of story brand. More recently, he's branched out as an author and speaker with a new book called the secret society of success. We're going to get into some of the concepts in the book, namely why we often look for success in the wrong places and a better place to find the fulfillment we're looking for. Let's jump into it. Here's my conversation with Tim. Tim, it's great to have you on the podcast. I'm so fun to be here. This is so fun. I can tell by your face you're very excited. I love it. You are one of the happiest guys I know. We're excited to have you. And you're on a new journey here as an author in the spotlight, which plays perfectly into your book. So here's my question. As a guy who was behind the scenes for many years, I've known you for many years as Donald Miller's right hand guy, COO, helping Donald Miller build this amazing business that everyone knows and loves. And here you are writing a book about how you don't have to be in the spotlight as you step out into the spotlight. What's going on there? It's a fair question. It's a very fair question. So, you know, I wrote this book and I'll actually kind of start with the story and I'll get around to what you're saying. So there's this beautiful story of Apollo 11. A lot of people are familiar with it. You know, you have Neil Armstrong Buzz Aldrin. One small step for man one giant leap for mankind. But what a lot of people don't know, there was actually a third astronaut on that mission and his name was Michael Collins. So after Michael, Uber's Neil and buzz to the moon, he drops them off so they can do these various tasks on the moon's surface, and then he actually orbits them in something like 26 times until these guys are ready to be picked up and everybody make their way back to earth. So what would make this a pretty miserable story is if Michael gets with the press, you know, says something like, you know, it sure would have been nice to actually walk on the moon. And you know, acted like a victim and felt really resentful. They would have been such a human response. I feel like people would have understood, but what's beautiful about us, he did not respond that way. He actually talked about how content he was to have had one of those three seats. He was happy to be part of the mission. What I think is so interesting is that it seems as though this cultural narrative that we are all being told is that to be successful, we have to step in the spotlight, climb the ladder, be the boss, and you know, what I found in my time with dawn and really over the last 15 years of my career is, I've actually experienced a ton of fulfillment and contentment playing the role that I had on that team. So it is a little bit ironic that now I'm coming out and releasing a book, but for me, it just felt like I couldn't not. I had to really talk about these themes and actually show people there's another way to define success that is not everything that we are hearing these days. It doesn't have to be money, fame power. There's a lot of ways to define success. So I'm on this journey to help people find more of that meaning and fulfillment in their lives by just thinking a little bit differently about some of the stuff that we're up against as the culture. Man, that's awesome. And that's, I mean, our leaders need to hear that message because there's this toxic leadership culture out there that says it's not enough. You got to get to the top. You got to be C suite. You got to be CEO. You got to start your own thing. And that can be just that can crush you if you're not careful. So in your personal and professional journey that you've been on, what's your experience been with money, fame and power as you've been around these types of people? Yeah. So I really wanted to be John Mayer. That was my goal whenever I was, you know, this is 15 years ago. I just thought I was going to be the guy in the lights. And you know, I think that the way that we are all seeing this is because the one message that we are hearing is that this is the way to find that success. So if you think about it though, and I want to make this is a very important point. These things, money, fame, power, the spotlight. That is not the problem, actually. The problem is often our intention. And so what I talk about in the book is we're up against what I call the spotlight mindset. This unhealthy desire for tension and recognition. So what I wanted to be John Mayer, I wasn't actually trying to do all of that to make people's lives better. I just wanted to be famous. I wanted people to know my name. And so what I've learned though is that there's a group of people who I call the secret society of success that are just showing me a new way to live and a new way to define success. And so some of these people that I've been really inspired by, it doesn't seem like they're really trying to make themselves more known. And one of my favorite stories, you have Tim Cook, right? So Tim Cook is now the CEO of Apple, but before that, he was COO under Steve Jobs. So Steve Jobs passes away and Tim actually becomes the next CEO. He was the one that Steve had been grooming for that position. So here we are at the Apple watch launch, which is the first new product release since Steve's passing. And they had released other iPhones and computers since that time, but this was the first new product in new category.

Donald Miller Tim Shirr Secret Society Of Success TIM Buzz Aldrin Neil Armstrong Michael Collins Michael Neil John Mayer Tim Cook Steve Jobs Apple Steve
A highlight from 1/2: Own it. Love it. Make it Work. Carson Tate

Leadership and Loyalty

02:03 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from 1/2: Own it. Love it. Make it Work. Carson Tate

"The number one podcast for Fortune 500 executives and those who were dedicated to creating a quantum leap in leadership. Your host, dove Barron. He's an executive mentor to leaders like you. A contributing writer for entrepreneur magazine. CEO world, and he's been featured on CNN, Fox, CBS, and many other notable sites. Dolph Barron is an international business speaker who was named by Inc magazine as one of the top 100 leadership speakers to hire. Now, over to dove baron. Welcome to your friends fans and fellow aficionados of leadership excellence. Thank you for joining us on this episode of leadership and loyalty tips for executives. You know, I met Michael casually through a friend. We were sitting and chatting and then came to that inevitable moment of, well, what do you do? And Michael told me that since the pandemic, he really had given him time to reexamine his priorities. He was taking time off, he said, and he was enjoying it. Well, you know, I sent something wasn't right, and I leaned into that. And he said, if you don't mind me asking Michael, you seem a little uncomfortable when you were talking about the time off. And he said, yeah, maybe. I just don't know what I want to do next. I can't be unemployed for too much longer, but I don't want to do what I did before. I replied that I loved that he had the courage to jump. But I asked him, did you jump because you'd had enough? Or did you jump because you'd done the work to know what your path was? Consider this. We were all hearing this moment, a time where we're in this quote Great Recession, a great resignation I apologize. We're in this great resignation, but the question is, is resigning the answer? Or could there be another opportunity you've never even considered? Well, stay tuned because that's where we're going on the next two episodes. As always, we need your help in saying relevant. So please get over to wherever you tune in from and to favor. Please rate review and subscribe to the show. And if you write as a little review, maybe I'll read it out online.

Dove Barron Dolph Barron Inc Magazine Michael Entrepreneur Magazine CBS CNN Baron FOX
A highlight from 2/2 The Practicality and Profit of Putting Good First: Mark Babbitt and Chris Edmonds

Leadership and Loyalty

01:07 min | Last week

A highlight from 2/2 The Practicality and Profit of Putting Good First: Mark Babbitt and Chris Edmonds

"Hi, I'm Chris Edmonds of the purposeful culture group. I'm here with my co author, Mark babbitt, our new book is out. It's called good comes first. And we were thrilled to connect with dove this morning on the leadership and loyalty podcast to talk about three things that might interest you. One of them is that work culture is vitally important. And if you compromise on the quality of your work culture, you get exactly what you deserve. Which is crap. A second key is that thinking like old white guys, okay, there's three old white guys on the screen in front of you, but the old boomer male syndrome philosophy of leadership and wanting to go back to normal now that the pandemic is starting to move past us. That'll kill you and it'll kill your business. And the last thing you've heard of the great resignation, you've heard of the labor shortage and 48 million plus U.S. workers voluntarily quitting their jobs in 2021.

Chris Edmonds Mark Babbitt U.S.
A highlight from When More Is Not Better: Roger Martin

Wisdom From The Top

01:44 min | Last week

A highlight from When More Is Not Better: Roger Martin

"Business strategy thinker and prolific business book author. He advises CEOs worldwide at companies like Ford, LEGO and Procter & Gamble. But Rogers also made his mark in academia, leading the university of Toronto's rotman school of management as its dean for 15 years. So to say the least, he's kind of a big deal in the world of management strategy. And one of Rogers most influential ideas maybe what he's best known for is a concept he researched and developed called integrative thinking that he laid out in his book the opposable mind. The basic idea is that exceptional business leaders are integrative thinkers. And it allows them to navigate difficult decisions more effectively. To roger, the obsession with efficiency at work is actually unhealthy and inefficient, and it's the opposite of integrative thinking. Roger Martin grew up in a tiny farming town in Canada in between Toronto and Detroit called wallenstein. And when it came time for roger to decide what to do after graduating high school, he didn't quite know what he would do next. When I went to see my guidance counselor about where I should go to university, he said, and I will never forget these words that are etched forever my brain well roger, it doesn't really matter. They're pretty much all the same. I'm presuming it's because I was an Uber jock. And so maybe he just thought I had me stereotyped as a dumb jock. But in that moment, what popped into my mind was, I will show mister con and they're not all the same. I'm going to go

Rogers Rotman School Of Management Procter & Gamble Ceos University Of Toronto Roger Lego Academia Wallenstein Ford Roger Martin Detroit Toronto Canada
A highlight from Antong Lucky - Part 2 | From Incarceration to a Life of Activism

Dose of Leadership

00:59 sec | Last week

A highlight from Antong Lucky - Part 2 | From Incarceration to a Life of Activism

"On today's episode, part two of my conversation with Anton lucky and his redemptive path forward from incarceration to a life of activism. When I look at active vision today, because it comes from a condemnatory perspective for me, when it comes from that perspective, it is already gotten in his own way. You can challenge systems what you got to do it with principles that we know can win. And that's love that's justice that's carriage and that's redemption. You have to approach it with those four persons because when you approach it with those four principles, you allow the situation room to change. You allow modification to happen. You allow me to have dust moving us forward. But if we condemn, if every side is condemning, we remain at a stalemate, our country remained at a stalemate, and we never

Anton Lucky
A highlight from Why Your Routines Shape the Future of Your Leadership with Jocko Willink

The EntreLeadership Podcast

05:43 min | Last week

A highlight from Why Your Routines Shape the Future of Your Leadership with Jocko Willink

"You, grow themselves, their teams, and their profits. Thanks for joining me today. Coming up, I talk with Jocko Willink, a decorated, retired navy seal officer, bestselling author, and cofounder of Echelon front, where he's a leadership instructor, speaker, and executive coach. I'm going to talk to Jocko about why he posts pictures of his watch every morning. What is routine looks like, and we find out what Jocko considers a worthy excuse for skipping the routine. So let's jump right in. Here's my conversation with Jocko. Jocko so great to have you back on the podcast. Hey, thanks for having me. Good to see you. So I was just perusing Instagram. And of course, I see your daily post. I don't know if it's for accountability or to impress me, but about four something in the morning every day. You post a picture of your watch. What's the deal with that? What is the deal with that? So when I first kind of started entering the world's publicly, I was on Tim Ferriss podcast. And when I met Tim Ferriss, he was a great guy. He still has a great guy. He's a good friend. But he was telling me I needed to get on social media. He told me to get on Twitter and I kind of asked him what Twitter was, what's it all about? And he said, well, you know, it's a great platform. You can get introduced to a lot of different people. You can meet a lot of different people. You can get a bunch of information. It's just, you need to do it. You know, just sign up and then I'll talk you through kind of how it works. And so I signed up, he never talked me through how it works. Never told me anything about it. But other than to sign up. So good on you, Tim. But he knew that it's a very intuitive tool anyways. So I had this platform, the Twitter platform, and I didn't know what to put on it. What would someone want to see? But Tim and I, on his podcast, had talked about the fact that I woke up early and was a good way for me to get a jump on the day. Get up before the enemy, start working, and so one morning, when I got Twitter, I just took a picture of my watch 'cause it was, you know, four, 40 or something in the morning, I took a picture of my watch, I posted it and then I went about my day. And a bunch of people that had just, I guess, been introduced to me through Tim Ferriss, kind of posted their watches and then I just kept doing it. So that's how it started. And now it's become, it's become your thing, which I love. And people love it because it also holds them accountable to their own routines and to their own goals. And that's become the bigger the bigger picture. I think it definitely has caught on that a lot of people do it. A lot of people just reply to me and post their watch, and you know, then there's the other side of things is people say, you know, what are you doing? You need to sleep, sleep is good for you. And they're right. Sleep is good for you. And you should sleep. You should get plenty of sleep out to tell you rest. That's how you recover. So I'm not anti sleep. But I do think if you're waking up at 8 o'clock, 9 o'clock in the morning, you're missing out on some key hours of productivity and your life would probably be better if you went to bed earlier and you woke up earlier. Yeah, especially for leaders out there who, you know, they've got a lot on their plate. They have to be very mentally sharp to be able to lead their teams and do what they need to do. So what is your normal morning routine? You get up. Today was four 19 in the morning. What happens next? Get up, you know, brush my teeth, do all that. And then I go work out. You know, I spend a hour and a half, maybe two hours. Hopefully, I don't have to two hours working out, stretching, running, that kind of thing. You know, I have the luxury of having an ice bath in my house, so I spend, you know, 5 or 7 minutes in my ice bath when I get done working out in the morning and that feels good. I'm still cold right now, actually. So, yeah, that's what I do. Wake up, work out. That's really simple. Really simple, not easy. Yeah, your post today, post workout, said keep struggling. So what are your thoughts on struggling not only in your routine, but just as a leader? Yeah, I think what I wrote was it's a struggle. It's always a struggle, keep struggling. So if you ever get to a point where you think, wow, doesn't this get easier? No, it doesn't. It doesn't get easier. It's not going to get easier. It's always going to be a struggle. That's the way things are. That's the way the world is. Well, anything that's worthwhile, I guess it's not a struggle to sit on your bed and watch TV, but that's not going to get you anywhere. So doing something productive, doing something that's going to make you better is always going to be a struggle. And so, yes, keep struggling. From a leadership perspective, same thing. The minute that you're thinking, well, you know, I'm a leader and I already know what I'm doing and knowing no one's going to surprise me. Well, that's when you're going to get surprised. So as a leader, when you're leading a team and you're growing a team, there's going to be struggles all the time. You're always going to have a person that just came on board that maybe doesn't understand what it is we're trying to get done and you're going to have some unexpected competitor that comes out of the woodwork and starts attacking what you're doing or they come up with a great product that now you've got to compete with. It's going to be a struggle. Life is going to be a struggle. So keep struggling. You also have this saying discipline equals freedom. Everyone, that's one of your great taglines. How does that process unfold for you as you compare discipline and freedom? What kind of freedom is on the other side for those leaders out there? In an organization, well, for an individual, I mean, the more discipline you have in your life, the more frequent you're going to have. So financial discipline is the easy one. Anyone that is listening to this show understands the fact that if you have financial discipline, that's how you'll end up with financial freedom and you'll get to yell freedom at the top of your lungs, right? That's really clear. That comes financial freedom comes through financial discipline. Free

Jocko Tim Ferriss Jocko Willink Echelon Front Twitter TIM Navy
A highlight from 1/2 Good Comes First: Chris Edmonds and Mark Babbitt

Leadership and Loyalty

08:00 min | Last week

A highlight from 1/2 Good Comes First: Chris Edmonds and Mark Babbitt

"Right, let's strip it down and dive right in. How important is doing good for others in business? Well, you might be surprised. Let's find out together because I'll guess what the next two episodes are. Chris Edmonds and Mark babbitt. They are the co authors of a timely book called good comes first how today's leaders create an uncompromising company culture. Chris Edmonds is a sought after speaker. He's a bestselling author, highly regarded executive consultant CEO and founder of the purpose culture group. He is the author of two bestselling books, culture engine, and the latest, which is good comes first. It was just released in 2021. Chris has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, smart brief people, people. He was people's most handsome men of the year. I think it was. CNN Fox 31 NBC and fast company. Chris is the co author with Mark baggett, Chris is the co author with Mark babik marked is a fellow Inc magazine top 100 leadership speaker. He is an author, blogger, culture architect, executive coach, and career mentor. He serves as president of work IQ and CEO and founder of U turn. That's why. He is in also an in demand speaker in addition to being a bestselling author of good comes first Marcus co authored a book called a world gone social mark's advice and is available through entrepreneur, CEO world Inc, New York, USA Today, Forbes and many other publications. They are joining us today in this conversation to inspire some real talk about why employees are leaving their jobs by the millions. And spoiler alert, they do not believe it's because there's a labor shortage. So ladies and gentlemen, put your hands together and help me to welcome author of good comes first. How today's leaders can create a couple ways company culture Chris Eggman? Well, at least the three of us do. There you go. Look at all the underwear that's being thrown on this stage for you. I miss that. I didn't really. Yeah, I don't have that special effect. People thought you were at some Jones there, Mark. There you go. But we just dated ourselves, even knowing who Tom Jones is. Hey, hey, hey, don't you talk? Don't even say anything disparaging about Tom. Tom's my hero. Here we go. So in the context of leadership development, a question I always like to sell with. What is the most frustrating thing that seems glitteringly obvious to you, but he's ignored or dismissed by other people in leadership, you know, we're brought in. All three of us are brought in to solve the problems for companies and cooperations. And oftentimes, it's not really the problem. So in the context of that, what is the most frustrating thing that seems glaring about leadership development that is ignored or missed for both of you? It might be different from each other. Let me jump in. It's interesting because the challenges that leaders have faced have not changed much in the last 50 years. And the beliefs that leaders have about what is going well and what is going not so well may not be dove as you have said very accurate. And so for me, the presenting problem is often the easiest that leaders think might be addressed. So they bring in a speaker a trainer, a consultant, and the reality is that if the work culture itself doesn't treating people in a civil fashion, God forbid, a respectful fashion, that's your root problem. And nothing is going to gain traction if you don't solve that respect issue first. So, respectful. So from your point of view, everything else that's talking about is kind of mute, that's the main point if we don't have respect. Okay, what about your mug? What are you seeing? You've heard him touch him as though this whole concept of a labor shortage? We take people. It's not like people don't need to work anymore. We still have mortgages to pay and tuition to pay for. And we're going to sit in this state of denial and say, oh, people just don't want to work anymore. No, people don't want to work for you anymore. People don't want to work within your disrespectful demeaning culture anymore. And over the last two years, we've all had an opportunity to including leadership to sit back and say, you know what, I kind of like this not being a workaholic, not being on a train all the time, not being in a hotel all the time, I like my life better this way and I'm not going to go back to the old normal despite your insistence that I do. I'm going to quit instead. And the whole concept of, oh, people just don't want to work anymore. They got lazy during the pandemic? No, they didn't get lazy. They got particular. And they're choosing not to work in a culture that doesn't fit their new lifestyle. They're new normal. Really well said. And I think that when we look at that, you're absolutely right. I mean, it's not like everybody's bills went away. So the pandemic killed everybody's bills there. All my bills died in the pandemic. No, that's not how it works. So people do, but one of the things I talked about is that in 2008, we had the crash. And I think that from 2008 until the pandemic, we were living in the hustle culture that was based on scarcity. Oh my God, you know, it could be another crash, but get a lot of money and hold it. And so people were killing themselves. And you said, working with workaholics and killing themselves. And then they got forced into not doing that by the pandemic. And people went into high anxiety at the idea of not being able to go to work, you know, 80 hours or a hundred hours a week. But it's not our natural state, and we broke that habit. And as you said, now we're coming back and we're going. I kind of like to see my kids. Kind of like knowing I actually have children, it's not just a concept anymore. This is something that's very real. Oh, okay, I'm going to stay with that. So I think that the standards have changed. And that's what I love about the book, and that's what I love about what you guys are talking about is that it's not just simply about doing good, of course it is about that. But it is also about understanding that that mindset, that scarcity and hustle has been shot in the foot and I'm glad to hear that. You know, I've always said that Gary Vaynerchuk is the high priest of hustle. And I love Gary, of my name is good guys. But that hostile culture, it's got to stop. It's got to stop. So when you look at that, let's go back to the book. The book is titled good comes first. It's not called respect comes first. It's called good comes first. So tell us why good comes first. Well, the concept was one that both Mark and I have been working with senior leaders for years to help them realize that if they create an environment where people feel validated and respected for their ideas, their efforts, their contributions, they're going to stay with you. They're going to invest their brain cells in solving problems for you. So it's a

Chris Edmonds Mark Babbitt Purpose Culture Group Cnn Fox Mark Baggett Mark Babik Inc Magazine Chris Marcus Co Ceo World Inc Chris Eggman TOM The Wall Street Journal Tom Jones Usa Today NBC Jones New York Mark Gary Vaynerchuk
A highlight from Ep 158: 3 Big Trends That Are Altering the Nonprofit Sector (with Eric Nee)

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

01:06 min | Last week

A highlight from Ep 158: 3 Big Trends That Are Altering the Nonprofit Sector (with Eric Nee)

"When I consider the ingredients for effective leadership, I find myself thinking about understanding trends. Either in the sector or in society writ large that will impact or change or shape how you lead. And I know that in your world it's hard to keep up with this. It's easy for it to head to the back burner or fall off the stove altogether. So I thought I might be helpful by focusing an episode on this very subject. A dose of context and trends from a person who curates the leading voices in the sector and is one himself and who presents insightful and thought provoking articles to those of us committed to the power, impact and possibility that the social sector presents to a society that really needs us to do our very best work. A publicist friend of mine once told me that he turned a client down and I asked why? My friend said, this guy wants to be a thought leader, but after an hour long conversation, I realized he really didn't have any thoughts. I thought that was funny. So today, a conversation with a leading expert on the social sector, and I promise you,

A highlight from 2/2 None Ordinary Ally's: Shameen Prashantham

Leadership and Loyalty

07:05 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from 2/2 None Ordinary Ally's: Shameen Prashantham

"Conversation with doctor shamin brush anthem. He is a Professor of international business and strategy and associate dean at China, Europe, international business school in Shanghai, China. He teaches across the world everywhere from Edinburgh to Zürich and I have a lot of places in between. On top of that, he is the author of a gorillas can dance. And we've been talking about this asymmetrical relationship and the paradox is in it of how one side can add to the other it's not one sided between these giant guerrilla organizations and the startups, we were talking about how to reach out how to make sure you make that connection and we've talked about how a lot of these larger organizations these gorillas often will develop a skunk works to develop innovation and the frustration of that has been up until recently that a lot of times the people involved in those sort of get left on the periphery. It doesn't get to be integrated. And it causes problems in a culture. It causes all kinds of challenges. So I want to start that. We want to stop with this paradox of the symmetry and we also want to talk about how that how we can get those peripheral skunk works ideas, these innovative ideas, these startup company pieces to come into the main stay of the organization to be part of the stable and actually bring everything forward. So let's jump in from there. So don't exactly, as you say, there is this very interesting challenge that big companies have as they're trying to reach out to startups based on the recognition that they need to be more entrepreneurial, the world is changing around them. They have to do things differently and generally a struggle for a big established company. So on the one hand, it sounds like a marriage made in heaven. The big company has the scale, the reputation, the legitimacy, the startups have the agility, the creativity, and so on. And so if you, you know, there is the promise of complementarity between these capabilities. But in fact, when big companies had tried working with startups, whatever observed in over a decade of research is that they then get frustrated because as it were, the very differences that make it attractive to work together also make it difficult or at least not straightforward to do so. And that's the paradox. And so then you could walk away from this and say it's all very frustrating or you could persevere. And the companies that I've studied, they Microsoft from the tech world, Bayer from the world of pharmaceuticals, BMW Nissan from automotive, Walmart from retailing. So in other words, from a range of industries, I found that there are three things that they try to do to address this. And so the starting point is you need to unpack what the asymmetries are. And there are many, but three that I think are particularly relevant. One is the asymmetry of goals. These companies want different things. And at different time scales, which is very important. And then there's the asymmetry of structure, you know, it's not the same as two big companies engaging with each other much easier to find raw counterparts. Vice president marketing of one can reach out to the vice president marketing. The other much more difficult with the corporation and startup. And the third is what I call the asymmetry of attention. Big companies see an ocean of startups out there. And they aren't sure which startups are worthy of their limited managerial attention. The startups know who the big companies are, but they struggle to get the attention of the people that matter within the company. The key decision makers. So startups can waste a lot of time going from pillar to post. So corresponding to these three is what I would observe companies do is that, first of all, to address the asymmetry of goals, they clarify what the synergy is. Is it a building blocks synergy? Are we a tech company that has cloud computing platforms or other technological platforms? We want startups to build on top of this. And the synergies we could potentially call cell. So there's revenue for both. Or is it a pain point synergy, which you find in a lot of traditional sector companies? Or we realize as a car company that digitalization is more and more critical, but our cybersecurity is as great as it might be. We then want to engage with startups within office solutions. And we, in effect, become their clients, but it's a strategic partnership because this is cool to us. So that sounds blindingly obvious, but I'd be making clear what the win on either side is in portrait clarifying the synergy. Yes. And then the second is creating the interface. And these interfaces meaning a first port of call. So I'm a startup. I want to engage with you, mister gorilla, which entity do I speak to first, and now you find BMW startup garage, Unilever, foundry, Microsoft, for startups. But these can also be structured differently. So the interface can be cohort like, for example, Microsoft's accelerators. You become part of a peer group doing having a very structured set of interactions and the peer interactions are also important part of it. Or you could have more of a funnel like interface where you don't get to meet the other startups. The big company has a goal and they sort of screen you out along the way till they get the small set of startups that they want. Each has its own strengths, funnels are good for predictability, but cohorts are good for surrender pity. You may have an anticipated outcome. And then thirdly, cultivating exemplars or showcasing success stories in a very intentional way because that then helps you to understand what success can look like to both parties. So the big company managers are able to prioritize their attention better. And the startups also understand that, first of all, is this a guerrilla worth talking to and if yes, what are they looking for? Because if I'm able to deliver on that, I'm more likely to get the attention of the people that matter. So synergy interface exemplar is framework that I observed across different companies and I think can be

Shamin Brush Zürich China Shanghai Edinburgh BMW Microsoft Europe Bayer Walmart Nissan Unilever
A highlight from Are You Delivering the Customer Experience You Market?

"You're In Charge: Conversation that Spark Change" with Glenn Pasch

04:49 min | 6 hrs ago

A highlight from Are You Delivering the Customer Experience You Market?

"Our products and services. But according to my guest today, with norad, who is the head of client marketing and strategy for flex dealer, a marketing agency in Canada that serves both the Canadian market in the U.S. market. She said there's two things that businesses really need to pay attention to. One is, are they really connected? Are they delivering on the experience that they're marketing in a consistent and sustainable way and secondly is do the leaders of the organization have the patience to understand that marketing takes time to generate the results that you're looking for. Fascinating conversation she is a great guest I can't wait for you to meet her. So let's dive into today's episode of urine charge. Now what with norad. All right, so I'm very excited that you're So let's just dive into the whole marketing game here because you've been doing marketing for a very, very long time. And when we connected on Twitter, you're very passionate about it. Opinionated about it in a good way. But for businesses or someone who's sitting there listening right now and saying, well, I'm in charge of marketing for my company. Where are some common mistakes that people are making today in terms of their marketing? I think the biggest thing that I encounter is lack of planning. And I think that partially comes from yes, the person in the driver's seat of the marketing department, if you will. But then oftentimes from business ownership, where it can be tough for people to actually get buy in from the people that write their paychecks to whether that's to hire an appropriate photographer or they're expecting that person to do too much. So that piece is really, they all tie together in terms of cost and in terms of what making a plan looks like. And then also following through on that plan. Because it doesn't really matter what the industry is, every industry moves fast. Everything's quick. Everything's changing. So it's not so much about having this 5 year plan or a 12 month plan that needs to do X, Y, Z, exactly, at any given point, but having a generalized road map of being able to prioritize what matters most. So sometimes that means prioritizing individual channels, one at a time, you look to different companies or even different solar printers that have done this successfully. It's not as if they go guns of blazing to every single platform all at once. Right. So it's really pinpointing priority and then matching that to a strategy over time. So when you're talking about and I agree with you, I think this idea of planning, well there's two areas I want to cover because you touched on both of them. One is getting buy in. And that connection between leadership and the marketing department. And then this other idea of the channels and trying to do too much. So let's talk first about the buy in. I see people when they clients who hire, let's say, our agency or your agency. There are some clients who are just great. That's what I hired you to do, go do it. Sometimes when you're dealing with somebody on their end, it seems like they're either just overwhelmed, as you said, they're given so much to do. Or in some cases, they're isolated. Meaning nobody in the building knows what they're doing, that's slow. That's Glenn over in the corner there. They do marketing. So if someone's sitting there going, yes, that's mine. I can't get buy in. Is it that the person who's receiving that higher up doesn't understand it or it's not communicated in a certain way that they can understand? Where do you see some of those disconnects or how do you think someone could improve their communication to get that buy in? Yeah, so definitely communication is piece number one. I would even say there's three second being education but to the right extent and then at the same time being able to break things down in ways that make sense so that leadership or business ownership views cost expenditures as an investment rather than a cost. Because that very much is how marketing works and especially for second third gen business owners, oftentimes I think they've maybe been sort of taking it on the chin a little bit when it comes to, okay, let's reduce costs. Let's do all of these things. But at the same time, there is very much an element of marketing where whether it's in terms of hours, time, paid media, you're spending money to make money.

Flex Dealer Norad Canada U.S. Twitter Glenn
A highlight from A Leaders Vision is Only the Beginning | A How I Lead Interview with Greg and Deborah Stapley

Leading Saints Podcast

04:49 min | 7 hrs ago

A highlight from A Leaders Vision is Only the Beginning | A How I Lead Interview with Greg and Deborah Stapley

"Today I'm in Salt Lake City, Utah in a corner of a hotel lobby. I wasn't going to I wasn't going to reveal where we're at. But here we are, nonetheless, we make these interviews happen. Rain or snow in downtown hotel lobby or not, I'm with Greg and Deborah stapley. How are you two? We're doing we're doing well. Thank you for having us. Awesome. Now maybe put us why are you in Salt Lake right now? You're from Southern California, right? Yeah, so what led to this meeting here? Well, Greg and I have been recently asked to serve as mission leaders for the church in queretaro, Mexico. We begin July 1st and part of that process is obtaining a Visa. And so the church flew us up here today so that we could meet the lovely people at the Mexican consulate office. Who took our picture and our fingerprints and hopefully we will receive that Visa in time to leave on July 1st. Are you nervous that you won't receive it or is Mexico? I think the church's relationship with Mexico has been pretty good and it seems like they're on top of this. We should get there in plenty of time. I did make me nervous though mailing my passport. Yeah, that is a little nerve wracking. Drop it in a mailbox and hope you see it again. Yeah, right. But I saw it today with my own two eyes. I didn't give it back to me yet, but I'm pretty sure we will eventually get it back. So Greg, maybe there's the story out how did this call come to be? Usually starts with a random phone call. I've been a state president for the past 8 and a half years and so regular contact with the brethren and they just, you know, more areas 70 that I knew called and what's your situation? A couple of years ago. And, you know, financial personal families, everything okay, health. They ask you a few random questions and then they tell you, okay, think nothing of this conversation. So this was with an area 70 that you do. It was with actually a friend. And he said, you know, give me an ever hear anything again. And so this last fall, we had another phone call, and it was a secretary for elder Stevenson and the core of the 12, said he wanted to chat with us. And so we set that up and had a Zoom call with him to spend about an hour as delightful as you might imagine. And at the end of it, he said the same thing. Okay, well, nice to get to know you. Let's stay in touch. And in fact, he said, not only let's stay in touch, but he said, hey, if you're ever up in subtle Lake, you know, give me a call. We'll go to lunch. Or something else. Always available. This is so cool. That's so cool. The nicest guy. And so he at the end of the year and he said, you know, we make all you for something we may not. And lo and behold, about a week later, coincidentally, I was flying back from Washington, D.C. where I had been speaking at a healthcare conference, and as the plane touched the tarmac in Salt Lake, my phone rang, and it was president Nelson's secretary asking if we would come over. And I was meeting Debbie. Should we were coming up here for some meetings. And. All worked out, we got to meet with president Nelson and received a call, and it was a wonderful experience. So here we are. And at that point, it's not the call as far as a specific location to just say, this is happening. Location came, I think, that was off to a mid October. I think location came first we could December. Nice. And where did you serve as the young missionary? I served in southern Spain in the Spain, civil mission. So were you hoping for a Spanish speaking? We knew that we knew that the Spain missions were not open. The mission leaders and those missions have some time left to go. Which we had never heard of. When you look at it and study it, it's so the Spanish influence is very heavy. And it's all Spanish colonial architecture and some of these older towns and it just seems like a perfect, we've just got the immediate feeling that this was the perfect calling for Greg and Edward stapley. Nice. Now, your family is experienced the bishop calling before and the snake president calling and I'm sure you have a unique story just sort of going into that that responsibility I see it as a family responsibility with some of those colleagues.

Greg Deborah Stapley Queretaro Mexican Consulate Office Mexico Salt Lake Elder Stevenson Salt Lake City Utah Southern California Spain President Nelson D.C. Debbie Nelson Washington Edward Stapley
A highlight from Defeating Fear, Doubt & Discouragement | An Interview with Dennis Deaton

Leading Saints Podcast

07:28 min | 3 d ago

A highlight from Defeating Fear, Doubt & Discouragement | An Interview with Dennis Deaton

"Dynasty and welcome to the leading saints podcast. Thank you. It's great to be with you. Yeah, now you are in queens creek, Arizona. Yeah, singular Queen Creek. Oh, Queen Creek. Okay. We've actually a river of Queen Creek that comes out of the glob superior area of Arizona and comes down in the Queen Creek into the valley. So I'm sure most people in Arizona know where that's at, but it's basically around the east of Gilbert and south of mesa. Nice. So is the Gilbert temple your temple? Yes, in fact, my wife and I are ten four workers there, Thursday, third session. Nice. Nice. And are usually from Arizona? No, I was born in salina, Utah and I grew up in Salt Lake valley. I was baptized in the Salt Lake tabernacle and married in the Salt Lake temple. Typical story, huh? Yeah. And I wound up calling price you to kind of my hometown because that was where my wife lived. While I was on my mission, my father got transferred. He was in the highway department. He was made director of highways in southeastern Utah. And I got a letter 6 months away from my departure date, saying my family were moving my family is moving to price your time. And it sounded like, you know, what they talk about in the biblical Nazareth, can anything good, come out of pressure Utah. A great chapter in our life. And I met my wife the second day that I got to price and we hit it off right immediately. We both had one of those instant revelations that we were meant for each other. I was thrilled. She was disappointed, but we went ahead and got married anyway. Yeah. Life went on. That's great. Your story starts out in dentistry as far as your career goes. There's a lot of good latter day saint boys who dreamt of dentistry and then maybe didn't end up there. So did you expect to have a lifelong career in dentistry? I actually did. Yeah. And I was very happy to be a we had a lovely general dentistry practice in price Utah. We developed a system of uniting the team where we saw problems about days off and vacations and raises and so forth. And I actually started doing some training to other dentists about the system that we had. But that was sort of driven by something that happened previous to that. I had just, as I said, I love dentistry because I can work with my hands and I can work with my brain and I love the study of the human body and the many ways it testifies of Christ and its anatomy and functioning and so forth. And I was very happy with kids were coming along they're healthy. I was actually in the state presidency at the time and yet I started getting just the word is restless. Something was missing. I couldn't put my finger on what it was. It wasn't about the purpose of life or my testimony. I just was ill at ease. And my wife said, well, why don't you get your patriarchal blessing? See, this is the irony. I'm now a state patriarch, but I didn't get my patriarchal blessing until I was 31. Oh, wow. I grew up in an inactive home. I never even heard of patriarchal blessings in young Manson young women's back in those days. They never mentioned it. And I never heard of a patriarchal blessing until I got into the mission field. And my companions, most of them had one, and they had read excerpts from time to time. And it seemed like they were great blessings in there that were based on faithfulness. And I was planning on being faithful, so I didn't know if I needed somebody to tell me to be faithful. And like I said, the minute I get home from my mission, I met Susan, and then 14 months later, we were married, and I got accepted into Washington University, dental school in St. Louis, and we were out to St. Louis four years later. We come back in the practice dentistry and the price and the practice took off and life was good. So I didn't feel like I needed a patriarchal blessing. But when I went and got the blessing and it had very little to say about teeth. But it had quite a bit to say about teaching, said that I had a gift to teach, and that I read develop I think it says lesson plans that would help people around the world understand gospel principles. Wow. And people would see me a happy person and would want to know more about my lifestyle. And so I began thinking about how I could be involved in teaching more. And I volunteered to teach an Old Testament class at 6 a.m. at the institute at the college of vision Utah. Institute director was happy to have somebody take that early morning class Old Testament. Nobody wanted to come to it, but eventually I saw that this is really about heavenly father wanted me to do. Yeah. And I had an experience to really confirm that after I really got into it, but I don't know if we want to go into all of this history or not. So what launched you often do sort of the leadership world with, because if I'm understanding it, you spend a lot of your career in leadership consulting, is that a good way to frame it? Well, it was really in leadership training and human development training. The primary premise of our training was this statement that consummate truth of life is that we all do our destiny by bothering our thoughts. The mind is our most crucial determinant, our crowning asset and our ultimate arena of battle, but if we can master the power of our minds, we may do or be whatsoever we will. And that's where I would put it in secular terms and I would have to put in through the atonement of Christ and with the help of the spirit we may do or be whatsoever we will, but it really was a message that resonated on all levels for all people. Upper level management needed it. We had them focus on creating a sensory rich emotion laden vision that the people could see and live into. And we started talking about how to deal with change and challenge and adversity. And it all comes back to how you process your experiences in your own thought process. Yeah. And I hope we're going to dig into some of those principles in this discussion. But I'm curious, was there a typical clientele that you had like an industry or did you try and teach other dentists to start with? We actually started teaching other dentists and developed two day seminar called dental practice with peace of mind. And the first day I taught my dental practice management seminar and the things that I had been doing in my own practice. And then on the second day, I taught what I called mind management. It was really based on the reading that I had done in the scriptures and also reading the work of William James the father of modern psychology and Napoleon hill. We talked about whatever the mind can conceive and believe it can achieve. And when you have distinctly defined mental image of where you want to go, what you want to do and you have enough commitment to stay with it, it always comes about and I believe those principles that because they resonated with the gospel. And what I think that we're really talking about when we talk about faith, in fact, one of my favorite passages in ether is about this great list of

Queen Creek Arizona Utah Queens Creek Gilbert Temple Salt Lake Temple Salt Lake Valley Salina Washington University, Dental Nazareth Mesa Gilbert Salt Lake St. Louis College Of Vision Utah Manson Susan William James Napoleon Hill
A highlight from Sanctifying Gathered Israel While We Gather Scattered Israel | A How I Lead Interview with Tim Welch

Leading Saints Podcast

05:00 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from Sanctifying Gathered Israel While We Gather Scattered Israel | A How I Lead Interview with Tim Welch

"Four. While you're at it, we'll give you access to all of our virtual libraries that cover several leadership related topics. So click the link in the show notes or simply visit leading saints dot org slash 14th. President Tim Welch welcome to the leading saints podcast. Thank you, Kurt. Nice to be here with you today. Nice. Well, and you've had the opportunity to have that title president through a variety of callings in your time. But right now, maybe tell us what, how do you end up with the title of president? Well, I've been serving here the MTC for a while, service of branch president here when we came home from our full-time mission experience in Ohio. And then about 5 months ago was called the serve as a counselor here in the empty seat presidency alongside of president Benson Porter who's here. So it's been a good experience my wife serves as a counselor in the empty sea release study presidency. So we're kind of both back into this full time at the MTC. We see senior missionaries arrive on Monday and we'll get a new group tomorrow at the MTC of young missionaries. So it's a vibrant pace and a fun experience to see wonderful dedicated missionaries. Yeah, and this is the Provo MTC, right? You have all the numbers and standards that comes with that, right? Yes, we do. It's kind of a slow season right now. We have maybe 500 missionaries right now. We get another 140 tomorrow. So we're kind of gearing up for the surge that will happen after high school graduation late June and July. So right now it's not quiet, but it feels like only relatively speaking. And you recently served as the mission president of the Cincinnati Ohio Michigan. Is that right? Animation from 2016 to 2019. We had 553 young missionaries and in addition to that, we had just over a hundred senior missions. As we had a large family history centered up in Fort Wayne, Indiana. So we had a lot of senior missionaries that have been just a remarkable experience. Just turning life-changing for us. So being familiar with how the just from your experience serving in a mission presidency in Ohio, how is it different serving in a mission presidency for an empty seat? Oh, it's dramatically different. I think the empty seat is more like a multinational organization. The NTC is a large operation here with a large campus of buildings that you may be familiar with, but also involves the large group of 700 missionaries returned missionaries that are training. We have security. We have the cafeteria. Plus we have the ecclesiastical side, which is our primary stewardship is with ecclesiastical leaders in missionaries, their experience on Sundays and Tuesday evenings in the welcoming sun Thursday. So it's quite a bit different. There's such a wide range of responsibilities that the empty sea, and it goes much beyond just the day to today work of helping and training and assisting missionaries. So it has a much broader reach. Yeah. And so one of your responsibilities you say is over the ecclesiastical portion of the MTC? That's primarily the focus of the MTC presidency. Now we also have response, there's always a kind of tie us to the professional side of the MTC. I have training responsibilities, so I work with the training team here at the MTC. But our focus primarily is from an ecclesiastical perspective with a 120 ecclesiastical leaders that are here, and then all the missionaries that we have branches on Sunday, devotional Sunday nights, and during the week on Tuesday night, we always have a visiting authority who's here with us. We have dinner with them at 5, and then the devotional at 7. And then we welcome missionaries with our branch presence in their counselors and branch missionaries on Thursday evening. So it's a fun, fast paced, engaging experience. Yeah. And then so you have roughly 500 missionaries there now. Okay, that's a very similar to your Ohio mission. That's roughly the same as what we had for the whole time that we were in Ohio. So yeah, we have 500 now, which is kind of a relatively low number, but we have in addition to that, we have about 75 senior missionaries that are here a week ago, we welcomed a 120 senior missionaries. That's the largest group we want to see here with the MTC. Nice. And do you have any idea what the capacity is as far as like pre COVID numbers, the Provo MTC? What we're calculating right now is that it's about 30% less than the pre COVID numbers because missionaries who are speaking English do one week at home and those are speaking languages for languages. They do two weeks at home. So if we had

MTC President Tim Welch President Benson Porter Ohio Provo Kurt Saints Fort Wayne NTC Cincinnati Michigan Indiana Covid
A highlight from What Exactly is Local Search for Your Business with Greg Gifford

"You're In Charge: Conversation that Spark Change" with Glenn Pasch

04:18 min | Last week

A highlight from What Exactly is Local Search for Your Business with Greg Gifford

"Today, I have Greg Gifford along. He is an expert on SEO and search marketing and he is a speaker who travels around. The world talking about this as well as helping his agency search lab marketing deliver great results to their customers. So he's going to jump in. He is a phenomenally funny, articulate, but more important, really, really, truly an expert who can make these types of concepts very simple for you to understand. So I'm really excited for our conversation today. So let's dive into today's episode of you're in charge. Now what? With Greg Gifford. All right, great. Greg, thanks so much for joining me. I've been waiting for a while for this one. This one's going to be a good one, fun one. The pressure, right? Well, no, because I really like your take on things. Not just as a presenter, you're known for your presentations, but what I really like about chatting with you is the fact that you try to keep things simple for people more actionable than getting caught up in these concepts and word soup and word salads and make ourselves feel so so important. So starting from that, one of the things that you've been talking about for a while and we both work in the agency side of things. But this idea of local search. I think companies, people get confused what that really means, so in your words, talk to me. What is local search today for businesses? So local search is really what most businesses need, but most businesses don't know about it. So the way that I always kind of like to approach it is to explain and again, most people don't realize Google has more than one algorithm running. So when somebody types something into the search engine, Google is going to attempt to assess the intent of that particular search query and then choose the right algorithm to return those search results. So for certain verticals, certain types of businesses, even if the person searching doesn't enter a city a neighborhood or a phrase like near me or nearby, Google's still going to use the local algorithm to constrain the search results to the immediate area. You know, great example that I always use is pizza delivery because regardless of the vertical people understand if you type pizza delivery and that's it into Google, you're going to get a list of all the pizza spots right by you. Not the pizza place in Chicago that has the best SEO in the entire world. That's the local algorithm at play. You only have to worry about being the best in the local area because that's realistically where you're as a business where your customers are coming from. So local search or local SEO is the strategy and tactics that you use to target that local algorithm because while a lot of the signals are the same, you know, the content on your site and how it's optimized. The links point to your site, local has additional signals that traditional SEO doesn't have to worry about. You've got your Google business profile formally Google my business. You've got all your directory listings, which are commonly called citations. So anytime another website mentions name address phone number, you've got customer reviews. So you've got a lot of things that hold weight in the local algorithm that don't matter in the traditional algorithm. So that's why I always try to get out to as many places as possible and educate people on that difference so that businesses know, oh, okay, this is probably what we should be doing. Okay, so that's a great explanation. And it makes complete sense, especially if you're local. Now, to your point, then someone who's sitting who's listening to this, who's in charge of the marketing, be it a small business and I'm the owner and doing marketing or a have a team in that person sitting there going great, Greg, that sounds great. What are some of the things?

Greg Gifford Google Greg Chicago
A highlight from Girls Camp, Grace, and the Bishops Office | An Interview with Emily Belle Freeman

Leading Saints Podcast

04:55 min | Last week

A highlight from Girls Camp, Grace, and the Bishops Office | An Interview with Emily Belle Freeman

"And when all the girls drove up, that next day, I gathered all the leaders and said, we have been challenged by our state president to not speak in a leadership role the entire time we're at girls camp. So if you have anything you want to add, it either has to be at the night meeting or the morning meeting, or you could come to this place of counsel. But otherwise, we're just going to let the girls do it. And it was seriously one of the most amazing weeks of my life. And I led, but I led a group of 5 young women. I did not lead 40 young women that week. I led a group of 5 young women who kept coming and then would go back and whether it was explaining the schedule, whether it was conducting a devotional or whether it was resolving issues in a tent, those girls went out and did that job. And those nighttime around the fire pit marshmallow councils are some of my favorite memories of my life. As we would sit in brainstorm, what was the best part? What was the worst part? What would you have maybe done differently? What trouble do you see brewing for tomorrow, what could we do to make things go better? It was the best girls camp I've ever been to in my life. Just an amazing experience. And that's similar to the encouragement we have in general with the youth of letting them lead and not dominating that process. Which is so hard, right? When you look at it because that didn't mean I wasn't the leader, right? And I think that sometimes we get confused of what is my role, what is their role and do they teach every lesson? Do they plan every activity? Do they do all the shopping? Do they do, we would burn out an entire generation if that's what they were doing. And so learning to find that balance of I will be in this spot and you come to me at any time and tell me whatever you need from me. And I will do it. But then also empowering them and encouraging them to go forward and do their part. And finding the balance of not having two setting and expectation that was unachievable for someone who's in school and working a job and learning that balance of what will actually provide increase in progress and growth and what will overwhelm. And I think the spirit is really good at teaching that balance. And what I appreciate about that example that I think we miss is that you had a clear structure in place of we're going to meet every night and we're going to listen to you, how's it go answer questions, brainstorm, whatever you need, or there's this place you can come if you have an immediate question, right? And it may obviously look different for maybe a preschool adviser or a young young woman leader or whatnot, but say, how can we structure this in a way that they feel like they're leading, but they can still come back and ask questions and regroup and get our guidance if they need it. Yeah, because when you go into the workforce, you realize in every working situation, there's different leaders within the group that are providing allowing for that organization to run. There's never just one leader. There's layers of leadership. And I think part of it is harnessing all of the layers so that everything is working synergistically together. And it's when you can learn how to harness all of the leadership potential in a group that I think miracles happen. Any other girl scout. Girl scout girls camp tips that you'd let me think of there's anything else. I do one of my other favorite rules that I have is the first meeting we ever have with the ICL's. We call it a Disneyland brainstorm. The rule in the olden days Disneyland brainstorms is that nobody could say no. You could build on somebody else's idea, but you never said no. And I love doing one of those at the beginning of the example. Because at the beginning of girls camp, here's what you're planning all the food. Are you having sweatshirts, t-shirts, hats? Are you going to have crafts? Are you going to have devotionals? What are those going to look like? Are there going to be people that you're doing Secret Service projects for whatever, right? And a lot of times you come to those meetings and the girls come with these ideas that if you've ever been before immediately you're like, that's not going to work because this and that's not going to work because this. And that's not going to work because this. And then the creativity just plummets. And then the girls are like, well, we're not really in charge. So why don't you just tell us what you want to do? And I'm always like, let's just write up every single idea for sweatshirts for t-shirts for hats for what, like we're just going to write down everything. And then once everything is on the paper, then we will then go back and be like, okay, realistically, what's our best option in this category?

ICL Secret Service
A highlight from From Leading Marines to Leading Saints | A How I Lead Interview with Bart Sloat

Leading Saints Podcast

07:58 min | Last week

A highlight from From Leading Marines to Leading Saints | A How I Lead Interview with Bart Sloat

"Saints Bart. It's great to be here. Thanks, Kurt. Nice. Now you were just released from serving as stake president because you got a mission call. What's the story behind that? Well, unexpectedly, as I'm sure most of those callings are, but I'd served as a president of the Chesapeake Virginia state. Since 2014 and this last fall was issued a call, my wife and I to serve as mission leaders to been assigned to serve in the Hawaii Honolulu mission. We're excited. So what's that like opening a call to Hawaii, especially you've agreed to three years of your life sort of dedicated to this service and you go anywhere and you've got some military background. So you've probably seen some scary places. You're ready for it all. And then it says, Hawaii. What's that feeling like? Yeah. It was very unexpected. I kind of thought, you know, of course, we received a call in October. And you don't find out your assignment until early in December. And so you go a couple months. And so you look back on the mission openings that you know the missions are going to open up this summer. And so then that went through the family and they all made their guesses as to where we're going to be assigned to serve and no one gets to white. A lot of guesses in the Southwest United States and other places, but yeah, and of course I've had a lot of people ask me why, you know, how did you get assigned to Hawaii? Nice. My answer, my answer is I just said, if maybe if you spend more time in Iraq and Afghanistan, you would have got assigned to Hawaii. That's right. Nice. And did you serve a mission as a young man? I did. Served in the Nevada Las Vegas mission. Okay. All right. Back to 78 to 80. And if I remember, they just announced a new mission in Hawaii, but you're taking over the older one. Is that right? Right. Yep. In January, they created the Hawaii layer mission. It's up around BYU Hawaii and the Polynesian cultural center. So they have about 5 stakes up there where that new mission. And we have the rest of the Hawaiian Islands. So we're excited. We'll do quite a bit of island hopping from for three years. Yeah, I bet I bet. So let's just start with a little bit of a foundation of your background and whatnot, because we're going to explore different leadership opportunities you've had from being a bishop, safe president and other responsibilities as well, especially as a marine. But where does it all was a good introduction for Bart slot here? Well, I think it goes to my parents. It's a classic tale that's going to reminiscent of talking about his wife's family's conversion last floor last door. It was two missionaries in 1961. On the cost of Maine had parked the car on the edge of a small town and tracked it all day. This is in March. So march is a nasty month. Especially in Maine. And the wet and cold and they tracked it all day with no success and come back. And we're just about back to their car and there was this one house that was left that long driveway kind of out in the country and one of the missionaries turned and said, let's just go home. And the other one said, no, let's just go knock on that door so we don't have to come back out here again. And get it over with. And so they knock on the door and my mother answered the door. I was two years old. But she answered the door and asked the missionaries to come back the next night when my later when my father would be home from work and came back and a month later, my parents and older brother and sister were baptized. And. From this perspective now, one of the things that I most marvel at is that my parents, Harley and Clara slope from that day, they were baptized April 8th, 1961, and they never looked back. They were all in. From day one. And that's been one of the great blessings of my life. Nice. And then when did the decision as far as your military service come into was that something you always planned to do? Yes and no, my father was a marine. Served in World War II. As a young man, 17 years old, everyone served. People forget that in December of 1945, there were 12 million Americans on active duty. And then he was called back in for the Korean War. It didn't go to Korea. The war ended before he was shipped over there. And then my brother Greg had gone to BYU for a year and then 67 to 68 and of course the Vietnam War was at the peak of its operations then and he didn't, he just felt a duty and obligation to serve. So he enlisted in the Marine Corps and became a combat correspondent, went to Vietnam in 1970 and was killed in action in February of 1971. Wow. And so when I came back from my mission in 1980, I didn't want to I didn't want to be an obligation to my parents anymore. And so every day when I walked to work, I was saving money to go back to college and when I walked to work, I had to walk past a recruiting office. And so finally, one day I just walked in and see what the opportunities might be. And of course, the only one I talked to was a marine because that was in my DNA. I couldn't walk into any of the other any of the other branches of the service. So yeah, that's what brought me into the Marine Corps and after a couple of years in, I would say able to get into the marine enlisted commissioning education program ended up at the university of Utah. It was commissioned in 85 as an infantry officer and spent 32 years on active duty. Wow. And so it was always planned for that to be your career or early on. I think that when I first went in, it was going to be I was going to do my four years and get out and educational opportunities go back to school. But then I found the educational opportunities in the Marine Corps and essentially they paid me to go to school and that was a good thing. Yeah. So yeah, and then when you finish that obligation, you had ten years in. And when you're at ten, then you're like, okay, it's only another ten to get to 20 years. But it was a unique Marine Corps career because in the sense that I spent essentially 20 years in what I'll call the peacetime Marine Corps. And then 9 11 happened and then I spent the next 12 years in engaged in combat operations both in Iraq and Afghanistan. And I would imagine many leadership opportunities came to you in the military long before

Hawaii Hawaii Honolulu Nevada Las Vegas Bart Hawaii Layer Mission Polynesian Cultural Center Chesapeake Kurt Maine Saints Hawaiian Islands Virginia Marine Corps Afghanistan Iraq United States Vietnam Harley Clara BYU
CEO of X2, Mark French, on How His Product Has Disrupted the Market

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

02:06 min | 8 months ago

CEO of X2, Mark French, on How His Product Has Disrupted the Market

"Now. A couple of questions. I have here for you one. Is you guys are operating this business. And i would say that it is. It is disruptive what you're doing from what i can tell. The brand seems to be disruptive. What do you accredit the the rapid growth to do. What do you attribute the rapid growth to why is it. Being such a disruptive success. I would say there's more people coming to the category now right so there's certain people that would never try an energy drink right that more health conscious consumer really was not interested in putting in other bodies some of these beverages that had you know some you know ingredients that you can't even pronounce so as more people. Are you know looking for energy solutions. Whether it's a coffee drinker. That wants something. A little bit cleaner lighter Or you know somebody that might be drinking other energy drinks but is trying to live a healthier lifestyle. You know. i think that's really where the disruption comes in also. There's never really been a brand that you know was built in the locker room in this energy category right so you know. We're really fortunate that Death net recently featured us as a sports drink. Innovator we're not really a sports drink. We're not a hydration drink or something that you might take Before you want to do some exercise or if you wanna just have a little bit more energy and focus throughout the workday but you wanna have it with clean healthy ingredients and you know the other reason why people might consider us to be somewhat. Disruptors is just because of you know this athlete a model. there really haven't been athletes like saquon. Barkley labonte david kawhi leonard and now kendall tool who's one of the top peleton athletes That are joining a company like ours as shareholders and partners in the business. I think it's just you know shedding some light that there is renovation innovation in the energy category and that's where we could probably be looked at as being somewhat

Barkley Labonte David Kawhi Le Kendall
Grinding Towards Success With Build Your Brand Online Founder Jesse Eker

Gary.club

02:42 min | 8 months ago

Grinding Towards Success With Build Your Brand Online Founder Jesse Eker

"Well off you know your childhood. I grew up in a single wide trailer with a single mom in southern west. Virginia you and i didn't grow up that much. Different the differences at a certain point in time in your life. You know you're blessed enough in your dad. Did something pretty remarkable. Yeah and that's when. I saw the light where i was like. Whoa like this is what making it is like. And it was a quick shift and went pretty fast you know. The atmosphere of our environment completely changed but the values of the like. What made him there. What i saw behind the scenes and how he kind of became this person like what it took to get. There was always ingrained in what i was doing. So even though i had to find my own path and go through ups and downs and challenges of my own habits and procrastination's and fears and normal. Human shit. I did get to embody what he went through to. How the success he had and i got to experience both sides of the spectrum. Now i wasn't necessarily poor what we weren't well off. We were comfortable at the time and went through influxes of money but getting to experience both sides. I knew which side i wanted to be on no matter what and that was. Not on the o k side. It was on the successful and rich side. So that's what i've been grinding for and ostlund for other than you know serving and helping an impacting obviously to solve problems for other people. But i knew that was my got to. My y was not to go back to that life. I wanted to stay in the lifestyle that was created in my second half of my child. You know it makes a lot of sense. What are some of those values that you've stuck with from the first part of that childhood. You know. I think one of the biggest things that most people forget is that nothing worth. It comes easy and everything takes time and energy and i think a lot of us are so used to this immediate gratification world of like press this button. Do these things you're only one funnel away kind of mentality when you have gone through it and you know what it takes to be successful. You understand that. There is a certain amount of time energy and effort required to reach a certain level of success. And i think that value of understanding what it takes to actually get to that level was really you know what i saw an experience from watching my dad constantly in his office like just really going after it now.

Southern West Ostlund Virginia
How to Achieve Your Greatest Purpose With Serial Entrepreneur Michael Koenigs

Entrepreneur on FIRE

02:06 min | 8 months ago

How to Achieve Your Greatest Purpose With Serial Entrepreneur Michael Koenigs

"Let's go through the stages of purpose you broken down into three different stages. What is that all about her right. So think of like this our first stage or what i often call are doing stages imagine when you get paid to do something that you could be flipping burgers working at a gas station or whatever that may happen to be. It's task oriented. Where really you are a meat puppet. You know you're just doing something for the money and also you're trying to just cover your basic needs your maslow's hierarchy of needs in the grand of things and the next level is where you're at your knowing phase and you are maybe getting paid for knowing something's got to be a white collar job But then you go through your next phase in life for your at your being phase and that is where you're paid for who you are not what you know not what you do and i think there's a fourth level to this so this is different than the stages but the force level is being a full human expression. Not just a human being meaning to to express yourself where you're being rewarded for your expressions in life now. What does that mean in terms of the first second and third stages so first stage is the basic needs. The maslow's the second stage is The experiences you're providing in the third stage has to do with true transformation your true purpose in life where you've done the work you know who you are. You know your greatest value. Your unique abilities are what we call your superpowers and you found a way to provide huge transformative value. But here's the big kicker. The highest state is when you help other people find their purpose and you help them. Identify and and In help them achieve and be in that state all the time so that is really usually the final stage of most people's lives is helping people identify find live inside their

Maslow
Lessons I Learned After COVID Killed My Conference

The $100 MBA Show

02:14 min | 8 months ago

Lessons I Learned After COVID Killed My Conference

"The first lesson. I learned is that. Don't use optimism as your guide meaning that you know. We were super optimistic. That we're going to still the conference when we went into lockdown. You know we didn't realize how long lockdown was going to be but It's always good to have a disaster plan. It's funny because i know this in my software company we always have these. What if conversations and Center standard operating procedures. But we need to have the same in the conference we need to think. Hey what if is in happened way before it would give me more time to have options or to Make some changes provide some options to the attendees but basically when i found out we're three weeks out from the conference so i had limited choices to what i can do. Second i learned was. I knew in that moment. The best thing i can do is i need to communicate. I need to communicate with my people. The attendees And i just needed to make sure that they're included in any decision and that i let them know what's going on so they don't feel like they're in the dark. I was very conscious. These people trusted me. They give me their money. I want to make sure that they know that. I got their back and that you know there are some options. I'm looking at when we actually had a discussion on that call before the cancellation was confirmed. Because the accession of lockdown of what are some options. And what. I was pleasantly surprised by how open people were there were like. Hey we totally get it. I understand they're all entrepreneurs zeno how these things happen and They presented some ideas from creative ideas. I didn't think of as alternatives creative ideas in terms of different dates. Different locations Because it became clear that this is not going to happen This oscar will not happen in the winter at least this year because The lockdown will extend past the winter season. So the idea of going skiing together is just not going to happen so by having open communication. Just putting your cards on the table. Hey these are options. This is will happen. This were our monies deposited. What's going on. this is what's happening. It makes it super clear to people to understand all right. These are options. Let's work with

Zeno Oscar Skiing
Whenever You Fall Down, Pick Something Up

Inside the Spa Business | Spa

01:15 min | 9 months ago

Whenever You Fall Down, Pick Something Up

"Familiar with the idea of whenever you fall down you've just got to pick yourself back up again. But what about this one from famed canadian. American medical researcher and physician also bold theodore avery. Whenever you fall down peak something up. What i love about. It is the idea that when you are up here you sometimes forget how things operate down the and so if you happen to fall down spend a bit of time down there understanding what's going on down there understanding what is happening that relates to this upper world. That you've come from you fell down. Pick something up. That can help you on that journey as you grow. Gather some more information gathered some more data some more research the more insights and there's even another dimension to it if you wanna flip it just a little bit pick someone else up so the idea that when you fall down you not only have to pick yourself up you not only have to pick up other things around you but pick someone else pick someone else up. That has that is down. They maybe they've fallen down to or maybe they just haven't been able to get up but when you fall down just pick yourself up have a look around. See what's the pick something up and see if you can pick someone else up as well. Great

Theodore Avery
One Minute Leadership Thought of the Day 09.08.21 - burst 2

Leadership Lifestyle Podcast

00:47 sec | 9 months ago

One Minute Leadership Thought of the Day 09.08.21 - burst 2

"Today's hold us back in our own mind for a number of reasons. Anxiety era failure the term. I hate the most imposter syndrome. We don't think we can do it. We don't think we deserve it. Who am i all those things creep in into not thinking. You're probably better than you think you are. And you certainly don't want to go to the other side of the tracks where you're full yourself either. But you just gotta start doing things you want to do right now somewhere. Somebody is doing something that you wanna do. Simply because they're doing it and they got over that hump they got over that fear in really take a hard look in the mirror and it's okay to save yourself. I'm probably a little better than i think. I am and i could always get better than if you're focused on those two things you can start to accomplish the things you want to do but you gotta start there in.

Nike CEO John Donahoe's Lessons on Servant Leadership

Venture Stories

01:56 min | 9 months ago

Nike CEO John Donahoe's Lessons on Servant Leadership

"What star. John rains that i am most associate with you. Which is servant leadership. And i'd love if you could describe your philosophy on servant leadership especially try to conceptualize it for much smaller organizations. What does it mean to serve leader as a ceo of a bunch of ceo's around the table how should they think about how that philosophy conform away they run their business so when i talk about servant leadership. It's frankly the the way. I learned to lead because i actually learned the lead in partnership a ban where you aren't really empowered to do anything to you have to earn the respect and the followership of others. You guys don't have that as founders. But i do think you'll find that. Many of the best leaders exhibited the principles servant leadership. And i just say how do i serve serve. The purpose of the organization serve the customers served. The employees serve the communities in which we operate in a jim collins called at level five leadership other people call from things. But it's when someone it's not about the leader it's about what it is. We are trying to accomplish right and some of the antithesis of what's hot silicon valley at different times the narrative. Always around the all-powerful founder. They're all powerful leader. And i think there's actually very few examples where that actually great sustainable companies come out of that my leadership role model for large parts of my career with phil jackson of the chicago bulls. Now it'd be steve kerr for your younger and would always struck me. He was able to do is get people who actually were better than he was klay. Together he got michael jordan. Scottie pippen dennis. Rodman caster characters to win six championships. It got shack kobe to play together. You look at you. Look at steve kerr the warriors right. Now he's getting. Somehow he's getting steph curry klay thompson and kevin durant andrew mongering all vying to something greater and they win i view with how do you build high performance teams of top talent to win and servant leadership is part of it.

Jim Collins Steve Kerr John Phil Jackson Chicago Bulls Scottie Pippen Michael Jordan Rodman Steph Curry Kevin Durant Andrew Dennis Klay Thompson Warriors
Bill Gates on the Important Choices He Made in His Tenure at Microsoft

Venture Stories

02:46 min | 9 months ago

Bill Gates on the Important Choices He Made in His Tenure at Microsoft

"As the founder and operating ceo for twenty five years of one of the most prolific invaluable startups. I wanted to start with your perspective on the important choices that you made during your tenure microsoft and how you view those choices as they've related to the long-term growth story at the company well microsoft was very lucky in that we're not a capital intensive business. You know it was financed by money. I made in high school. And i did the school gasoline and there was all sorts of things you can do and make money fairly easily in those days. 'cause i'm people who knew how to do. Software things was was very small. We did take an investment. We sold five percent of the company and by the way from twenty million to win a million dollars from venture firm dave mark carts venture them just because we wanted to have him actually. It was more senior people but it ended up being him. Advise us about various choices we had to make and those early days we were because we knew that software was this magical thing and it was enabled because the chip was magical and weirdly. People didn't understand that. Moore's law essentially said that computing power would be infinite and so the best way to think about it was to say okay. Software would be the limiting factor towards any sort of digitally assisted activity and we thought of ourselves as a software company. We ended up competing with companies that were single product companies. so like. I wonder if anybody's here's ever heard like ashton tape or has anybody ever heard ashton. Okay good was a great article where i gave a hardcore speech about our database in it. Said gate says ashton-tate never existed. But i did actually say that. I said that they might cease to exist at some point anyway very competitive. There was a spreadsheet called one-two-three a word processor called wordperfect so these were single product companies and in terms of really building your engineering tools. You're international distribution sales consulting. How you work with corporate tells forced you thought of yourself as a software company and a platform company was very different than saying okay. I have one two three. Which was a lotus spreadsheet products. So we didn't feel for ambition but then the intensity of executing on it was super super

Dave Mark Carts Microsoft Ashton Moore Tate
Maximizing Productivity and Efficiency Through Delegating With Tech Entrepreneur Aaron Kemmer

Entrepreneur on FIRE

02:23 min | 9 months ago

Maximizing Productivity and Efficiency Through Delegating With Tech Entrepreneur Aaron Kemmer

"Aaron all we have is time and how we use our time. Is everything so. Break it down for us. How do you know when it's time to delegate projects. He i love that. You know one thing. I often quip about time. As you only get like twenty eight thousand days in line you want to really optimize us when eight thousand days in behind me on my wall. I have a piece of paper that has you know a a little circle for each of those days showing that you could fit each day on one sheet of paper not a lot of time and it really goes by quick and you know i think there's that famous quip like you know you and bill gates have the same amount of time right But the one thing that you can do is maybe buy more time by by delegating. You know and i think a really good time to to start doing that is before you before you think you should or before you kind of get kind of overloaded Because when you delegate you need to make sure you have the time to train. Somebody coached them. Build out a little bit of a process And that's hard to do. If you're completely swamped working. Eighty to one hundred hours a week. You know for instance which many many entrepreneurs kind of have so one of my entrepreneurial goals is usually like get the ball rolling. I loved like kick start something and then try to hand off to someone who's like even better than me at least at that specific kind of project or skill said One thing magic right now get like a few hundred people A few other companies have kind of reached. This this is is well usually when you get to a certain size. Say way before that it's You know maybe out. If it's a half a dozen or a dozen you if you really important aspect of the business you wanna have at least one person focused on that one singular goal that you kind of want to accomplish So it's a really good time to start delegating so it's like i don't know if you're trying to grow the top of funnel of your business you probably don't want If you've got like a dozen people in the company you know your admin exact focus on top the final scheduling emails. You know calendering all that kind of stuff like one person. Kind of focused on

Aaron Bill Gates
Purely Elizabeth's Elizabeth Stein on the Beginnings of Her Entrepreneurial Journey

Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

02:27 min | 9 months ago

Purely Elizabeth's Elizabeth Stein on the Beginnings of Her Entrepreneurial Journey

"Love to hear maybe just start out telling a little bit about your story and how why you decided to take the leap. Yes so i started officially in two thousand nine but before that really. I was living in new york city i was. You know it might twenty trying to figure out life. And at the time i was working for a handbag company doing doing sales and marketing and i met my boyfriend at the time who was a triathlete and he really got me into this kind of whole new sense of health and wellness. I would say. I was always a healthy person but starting to do marathons biathlons certainly a two point. Oh version of that. And i think you started competing with them i did. I got up to doing a half. Ironman was along. Just were the person who would hide in the woods during the cross practice in high school. Because i hated to run them. I know really what he taught me. Was that an so much more mental than physical. And i think that art became super intriguing. Jimmy a really holistic health and that is so much more than just what you put into your body and so i started searching for another career option and ended up finding institute for integrative nutrition on i did bear program in two thousand seven and really what that taught me was food medicine. You know kind of everything that's coming to the forefront of health and wellness today in that program really learned that there is not many options for healthy gluten free products and i had started to eat. That way really was working with a lot of clients sewer eating that way suggesting and then they end up feeling better. Products on the shelf were few and barbara. I really saw an opportunity for healthier better tasting and initially started as something in the background of my mind. I ended up going to a local. Triathlon exploded participate in the race but really to promote my nutrition practice. I had a booth at the expo and figuring any thing to entice people to come in shop with me. So i've made this batch of blueberry muffins to get people to talk to me at of course not one person sign up for my nutrition practice. Everyone just wanted to know where they could buy these not fence and that became the moment and took off from

New York City Jimmy Barbara
Theres Always Room For More Than One Leader In A Market

Inside the Spa Business | Spa

01:23 min | 9 months ago

Theres Always Room For More Than One Leader In A Market

"Interview last night with a guy called peter. Murray who is the ceo of the pf l. the professional fighters league now the pf l. claims to be the number two mixed martial arts business after the ufc and the comment that he made. When asked about you know considering even taking on the ufc because the ufc really owns the market. They are the number one player he said. Yeah but there's always room for more than one leader in the market. Sure they can only be one number one but how many markets do you really know where there's only one brand that represents that market. Not many you know. I mean the only one i can probably think of is maybe google i guess. Even something like amazon is amazon a giant. Yes do they rule the markets. I go to usually but are they multiple online shopping platforms. That brands. that succeed. Yeah there are so. I think the lesson for anyone who's thinking about taking on an industry incumbent which is the gorilla in the in the room is the big company it is possible to take on that guerrilla possible to go into that market because they can be multiple leaders in a market. Might not be easy to take on google. It might not be easy to take on amazon for example but certainly in most markets. I think there is always room for more than one leader.

UFC Professional Fighters League Murray Amazon Peter Google
How to Set Yourself for Abundance This Week

Activate Your Wealth Show

02:17 min | 9 months ago

How to Set Yourself for Abundance This Week

"Wanna share a message today with you about how to create more abundance by the end of the week here. It is monday morning and really. This can be applied to any moment any week whether they really helpful that monday morning and probably by the end of the week you'd like to have generated more abundance. Who wouldn't right. Who wouldn't want to do that. And here's the beautiful thing hyme okay time. It is an illusion and at the same time. It is an abundant resource when you have access to time like five days ahead of us seven days ahead of you. It's an so the first thing that you wanna take in. Is you have this week to create an abundance shift. You went out of this week to generate the money the impacts of visibility that you want all those things create abundance or you so one of the things you wanna take in is. Are you showing up each day and each week looking at it as an opportunity of abundance are you doing that. Is that your perspective every day. Or are you living in what i would a default reality where it's like groundhog's day every day and you're like another day another day here. I am with my patterns of limitation in blocks and in my saying money story. If that's the case then you have the opportunity right now to say you know what by the end of this week by friday i am going to a new experience with money going to have a new flow of abundance and money pouring into my life into my business. So that's the first thing to be aware of and this may seem really simple but one of the things. This is one of my secrets you guys like yesterday. It was a sunday arrest as a family day. I use it for that. And i look at it as an opportunity create wealth. So while i'm not. I wasn't on my computer. It wasn't you know doing were when i was focused on. How do i raise my wealth frequency. Right now wait us this day this next hour. How do i use this moment right here. You'll create a shift in my perspective around money. That's my constant intention.

How to Attract, Develop, and Retain Top Nonprofit Talent

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

02:05 min | 9 months ago

How to Attract, Develop, and Retain Top Nonprofit Talent

"Great to have you and thank you so much for all the work. you do. Thanks so much for having me here. I'm a huge fan of your leadership in this field john. Well thank you The feeling is mutual so galley. Clearly you get the challenge in the sector and this is what your organization is about. Why don't you tell folks a little bit about leading edge and its origin story. And i'm also curious about the thinking about your organization being focused specifically on jewish organizations. Sure let me take this in two parts. The first is genesis origin story. So it was a dark and stormy night noticed. it was Twenty thirteen Toward the end in two thousand thirteen when an informal group of ceo's of foundations and major jewish organizations have been meeting informally for some time and The purpose of these meetings was talking about some of the major issues of major challenges facing the community in thinking about collaborative approach or shared warnings. Those types of almost like informal networking kind of conversations and at that time in sort of building up to that time the conversation was all about the leadership pipeline right. There were a lot of folks in those rooms. A lot of leaders who admitted. I'm not sure he's taking over for me when i retire in. Fill in the blank years and joan. You've talked about this gap and so in two thousand thirteen. Just like in the general nonprofit non see jared say general society jewish nonprofit sector was talking about a turnover in the c. suite of seventy five percents ninety percent by some estimates and fuelled by generational. You know what the demographics and and so this group of of really investors in the jewish ecosystem understood that there was essentially exposure to our organizations because we know that the marker of a great organization starts with a leader that that transition was going to be precarious so they wanted to do something about it and what

General Society John Joan
Should You Be Publicly Recognizing Your People on Social Media?

Hacking Your Leadership

02:27 min | 9 months ago

Should You Be Publicly Recognizing Your People on Social Media?

"What i want to talk about is recognition of your people and how public or not public that that needs to be There's been this rising tide of public recognition on places like lincoln. You know like. I know that when i was in my teens and my early twenties the idea of public recognition was like. Oh my leader. Got up on a morning meeting on a saturday and said chris the best salesperson for the month or whatever it is and that was public recognition when when facebook for started lincoln for started. If my leader was doing that i would've thought was kind of weird. It doesn't seem so weird anymore. I don't know what do you think. Yeah no i completely agree. I think that. I've seen it over the last few years here especially on lincoln but other platforms as well. Mostly lincoln though is just this overwhelming element of positive public recognition for for both employees and leaders. I mean at this point right. Now you know linked in his added into their. They're posting where you can like. Welcome welcome somebody to the team. You can give kudos. You can talk about a work anniversary. There's a lot of things that you can do in their. I see some of those kind of defaults pop up and just you know highlighting. Somebody's name saying that. They think that they're a great leader or that celebrating some type of a milestone. but then i've seen a lot more pictures recently. And i think over twenty twenty and so where pictures of people with their families and talking about the value they bring to the organization or to the team and things like that in again. I think people like to receive recognition different ways. But i like this trend. I think it's a great threat. I think it's i think it's Something that that is helping to inspire other leaders of other organizations to think about how and where they recognize. There are people. So i've enjoyed it. Yeah i i think this is happening when it comes to public recognition of close friends and mostly family members too. I've seen a rise in post from people posting a picture of their spouse or their partner or their whole family. Saying you know. Oh this. i got a lot accomplished over twenty twenty and i thought this was going to be a lot more difficult to incorporate work life and home life and personal life and all this stuff. I wouldn't have been able to do it without these people. And it's like a picture of their family and i thought what's that seems normal. That seems like okay. Like a something you'd want to say And there's been a rise of that on lincoln whereas a few years ago you wouldn't have seen a lot of that that would have been considered not work

Lincoln Chris Facebook
Dr. Katie Nielson: Delivering Personalized Needs-Based Learning at Scale with EnGens

IT Visionaries

01:39 min | 9 months ago

Dr. Katie Nielson: Delivering Personalized Needs-Based Learning at Scale with EnGens

"What is engine in. What does it do so engine is a web and mobile platform that i used to teach english learners all over the united states. And what makes it different is that we use real world materials to give language learners the english skills they need to improve their careers to get into nuclear transition programs to continue their academic studies. It's personalized it's it's based on a decades of research on how to use technology for language learning and how we can use mobile technology to deliver effective outcomes at scale so one of the unique things about this is. This tool is not used to teach. There's dual lingo is like many people to learn many different languages. This is for everyone to learn english. Is that accurate. That's accurate. I mean the united states has many many many non native english speakers here who don't have access to instruction you're my mom is one of them is really hard as an adult learner in the us to get english instruction so we meet the needs of only percent of the adults who want to learn english. And the reason why invented this platform. And i've making it available throughout the country. Right now is we need a new model to do this so instead of going to a church basement or a high school at night to take free. Esl classes where everyone learns the words for like what you say at the zoo or the ball is on the table. Like a bunch of stuff. That isn't helpful. This is a platform that learners can access on their phones anytime anywhere to get them the english they need to do their jobs. Better

United States
Shifting From Time Management to Attention Management

How I Built This

01:06 min | 9 months ago

Shifting From Time Management to Attention Management

"Had a love hate relationship with time management on the one hand i wanna use my time as efficiently and productively as possible on the other hand. All the time. I've spent trying to optimize my schedule. Just makes me more aware of how much time i waste and at the end of the day. I do not know how to get more hours in the day. I've tried to sacrifice. Sleep doesn't work. I can't function. So i think that what i've tried to shift to is from time management to attention management to say that the one thing i can really control is what i focus on and i'd like to start every week with the people in projects that matter to me and that way when i'm focused on you meaningful relationships and trying to accomplish something worthwhile. It doesn't really matter how long it takes. And i found that that's much better for my productivity than setting a goal of using my time more efficiently because efficiency serves no one what i'm ultimately after is doing work. That's interesting and important and that means it's got to be intrinsically motivating to me. It has to be beneficial to others. And if i can concentrate on. That doesn't really matter whether it takes two hours or