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Leadership

What makes a good leader? What are the skills, qualities and basic characteristics individuals need to organize, co-ordinate and manage a team's path to success? Listen up for essential info, testimonies, research and theories on the business of management, aired on leading talk radio shows and premium podcasts.

Elevating Yourself & Your Team By Embracing Change

The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

7:13 listening | 1 d ago

Elevating Yourself & Your Team By Embracing Change

"We are in free treat today. Michael chastain now hold on a second I said I wasn't gonNA screw this up and immediately Michael. I messed this up. How bad is got to be for me as a host to screw this up and you know none of this is going to be edited out because we are all about showing genuine mistakes in the in the course of our Michael. Is that okay for us to do that love it? Let's keep rolling all right. So it's it's Michael Dietrich chest pain and I tried to understand exactly why that was all put together. Maybe he'll explain that to us again as we're recording maybe not. He's the CEO of Arc integrated in Organizational Consulting and professional coaching practice. Now let's take a little deeper dive with Michael. He's an author. He's a coach. He's a speaker. We're GonNa talk leadership or especially today going talk about change conflict resolution building a great culture and. I know that this is the time for that right now. Michael and his team focus on Human Development. And we all know the important work is completely related to the bottom line is well. So we're GONNA see how that is so. In addition to talking to Michael Nice Guy Community his writing can be featured and is featured in Time Money Entrepreneur. The Washington Post and his new book changes the busy professional's guide to reducing stress accomplishing goals and mastering adaptability released in two thousand. And Nineteen we're GONNA talk of the importance of the four letter word and it really shouldn't be a four letter word but it is. That word called change. Welcome Michael to the Nice guys on business podcast. Thank you so much. Doug screen to be here with you. Yeah well it was good. I figured my mom writes all intro. So did she do an okay job of writing that one? It was beautiful. She's done mom so she said to me Doug Jr one thing. I gotTa tell you. Just don't screw up on the on his name because if you do that you kind of lose right out of the gate and hoping I didn't lose your right out of the gate repeat People's interest. Maybe maybe so okay so minute. Let's start there because I think this is important you hyphenated because you were afraid to maybe go one side or the other now is through marriage through your parents. How how did that come Asian stir? Yeah my this is. My parents were real progressive. And they gave me each of their last names and You know I'm close with them. Both didn't have the her arc's choose one over the other so just stuck with what they gave me in. So that's where it comes from. Okay all right. That's cool very good so you couldn't side so you went to your mom and your dad and you said I'm just going to do the combination of both of these things. That's that's what they gave me so I stuck with it so let's talk a little bit about that four letter word that change where we are right now in the middle of this whole Cova crisis as we are recording this. So if you are listening back to this and we're four years in the future just know that this was a hell of a time so we're just GONNA dealing with it all now. There are so many different ways that people have to adapt to this change. So why don't we just I talk about how? Maybe you got to be an expert in this change thing maybe share a little bit about how you adapted your own business and then talk about those in our community too. So let's just talk about you becoming the expert in that space first of all. Yeah yeah happy to share that the The reality is I've I've always had an interest in in human development and inhuman change making so when I was in Undergrad I had a vision for going for a PhD or a Master's degree in industrial organizational psychology which sure a lot of listeners know about but for those that don't on it's basically looking at how human systems function in the context of a business and how to how to optimize those systems of people and so did all the course work and the and the prerequisites for that and got a corporate job out of out of school and taught me a lot did a lot of leadership. Coaching a lot of employee employer conflict resolution work some account management. It was really really informative time and it influenced me to WANNA take deeper dive into how and why we do. The things we do is people so I went back and got a masters counts sling and a license as a psychotherapist and I lived in the mental health world for a number of years Really in all sorts of capacities from managing teams of therapists to work in a hospital system. The jail system in the community You know working with conditions that ran the gamut from severe and persistent mental hall off disorder to Life Transition to addiction to really really all you know all spectrums of of mental health and It was really informative experience hugely valuable to the work that I do today. In so after a few years know continued with this interest in business and human systems and so made a pivot back to the corporate world and was in that world again for a couple of years doing training and Account Management and some coaching and it was a lot of fun and then the got inspired me to start my own practice in two thousand fifteen launched out on my own and today we do coaching and training facilitation for teams and leaders of organizations around the country and usually focused around the the elements of leadership. The that we feel are the most important which are things like emotional intelligence stress reduction and communication. And so. That's the that's the short thirty thousand foot story. Doug now that's cool and and we all know that all of those things are really really critical. You know obviously developing leadership. I had was fortunate enough to have John C. Maxwell on the show and you know talks. He spent an entire career dealing in In leadership so we know how important it is for leaders to be able to evolve and change and move and groove with whatever the circumstances. But let's talk about that as as we're all faced with this this big thing right now this you know world changing event with with this virus spreading all over the place. How challenging is it for an organization that doesn't have the skill set to to kind of pivot? How essential is it for them to really start to learn? These skills are and how detrimental is to their organization. If they can't learn to change and pivot I I I see it as a huge game changer. In potential you know You know opportunity to or opportunity unfortunate opportunity that one sees when they do this to potentially go out of business. Yeah absolutely you know it's interesting. I think I think as human beings the biggest opportunity we have is to get more comfortable with change and you know. That's that's really being emphasized right now with the coronavirus forced pivoting change. That goes on but the reality is is that you know whether it's this. You know catastrophe that Rin or something else down the road whether it be smaller Lard. The reality is that you know this this Illusion that we have that things are permanent. I in my opinion. One of the best things we can do is get better at adapting the circumstance. That's an innovating and getting comfortable change and to your point. There's a lot of opportunity when we are able to do that. and I think that right now you're absolutely right. We're GONNA see a lot of businesses reinvent themselves for the better. Maybe even come out of this thing in a way that is more successful than they went into it and then the alternative is is true as well those that really hold onto old paradigm and old methods of operating. I think that there's a strong risk and failure. And it's it's interesting because that parallel is so consistent with the general human condition that unless we change and adapt our growth is stunted and research in that show up in the business world right

Michael Michael Chastain Human Development Doug Jr Michael Dietrich Washington Post Ceo Of Arc Account Management John C. Maxwell RIN
7 Damaging Behaviours of Unsuccessful People

FlashCast By PDB, With Phil Di Bella

8:00 listening | 3 d ago

7 Damaging Behaviours of Unsuccessful People

"Hi this is developed. And you're listening to Flash CAST BY PDB. And today. I want to talk about habits. That make unsuccessful people in something that I get asked a lot is. What are the common findings that you see? People that actually are not successful. Or what makes people not basic says for what traits what commonalities and these questions have been done brought forward to me a few times now and suppose the opposite side of that is by insuring that you conscious of the things. I'm about to talk about that election. We can become very successful. But we're going to hone in on what habits and traits make people unsuccessful and. It's no particular order just a few things that I've absorbed sometimes have had this in my own time where having succeeded in things I can. I can put it down to some of these traits and one is confidence. I find that anytime. I haven't succeeded in something or when people don't succeed is when you get overconfident. It's good to be self-assured it's very important to success that you are self assured but being too confident can mean that You Miss Things you you know you're error of judgement can be put out an I. I learned that in two thousand seventeen where I was some other confidence somebody else's ability in what they can do Ended ended up not working in default. Just paint a little bit more careful and not too confident in this situation than my judgment would have been better but you know it's something that I do find in others and let's face it. Nobody LIKES SOMEBODY. Who's to overconfidence? So one to be aware of you know and and differently Sean. Through and unsuccessful people Another one is ownership as power People are trying to get people to Take ownership of something is important but once if somebody owns too much they believe that it's their power they rot to being control and I find that. This trait doesn't work well because when when people most want people to take ownership of something they need to make sure that in play the power. Kat and I'll see many situations where people have played. The power cod an only resulting in not not achieving success and other one is then we all have people sometimes in our lives that do this but they believe they have all the answers you know. You don't always have the answers. And I find that unsuccessful. People sometimes believe that they have the answers. All the time you know it it normally people would normally habit if something goes really. Well it'll them and if it goes wrong somebody else in and the the tripe that are really hide is when somebody asks you a question then finishes once you give them the answer with. Oh yes I know that I was just checking. Well if you knew it did you asked me believe that you have all the answers and that is Your highway to being unsuccessful and other one is refusing to learn. I voice put myself in. Learning mode are constantly. Say Tomorrow better than today. And that is all about learning of ocean evolving the concept of heading a growth mindset versus a fixed mindset refusing to learn will make you unsuccessful we need to evolve as humans we need to evolve our brains at the more we learn the more we earn. We need to make sure we're constantly in. Growth Mindset are refusing to learn is definitely on that same highway to being unsuccessful. Taint goes with the concept of people that go. It's my way or no way we hit. It was my way of the highway near either with me. Or you're against me against again. This is not growth mindset. This doesn't break any loyalty from people. This does not breed loyalty from friendships from workers from co workers from PS. It's not in anyone's best interest for you to have the the mindset of my way or no way and again it'll put you on that vehicle unsuccess- it will not put the people around you. That need to be there and of course it will shut you down to listening to great ideas and comments even criticism. Which is there to help you become better. So the whole concept of my way or no way is a no go zone. Another one see stardom focused where people get this. You know notoriety that want to be someone they wanna be something gum in today's Day and age with media and all the rest of it. We're told that we need to be a celebrity to be glorified. We need to be somebody we need to be out there. We need to be stopped in that style light. We need to be shining every recognition. You know some more than others run likes to to have that notoriety some more than others but it's got to be authentic you need to heaven will fintech public image if you want to be successful. No-one signed not to put yourself out there. I've done it. It's been part of my brand. It's worked for me. Will it serves me well but it has to be measured. It has to be right up an atomic on this. You put yourself out there too much But again you learn from it and it's all about keeping an authentic it's about keeping the image orthodontic and the last one touch on is people that are going one hundred miles. An hour so unsuccessful people going hundred miles an hour and not bringing people with them. So you must bring your people with you. Find that when people are unsuccessful. It's because not bringing people along on that journey and again you know one person alone can't turn will steer ship. It takes many people you know we orlands. We cannot achieve greatness alone. It is a team work so you need to make sure you bring your people with you so again in particular. There's some of the traits that I find a prevalent in people that being unsuccessful. Some of them. I've I've been guilty of an are trying to stay very conscious of. Its about bad not being that. Stop them focused. I'm not going full steam ahead. In not adopting the attitude of my way or no way constantly learning said refuse to learn have that growth mindset and believe in evolution. Now I don't have all the answers all the time to everything that you ask. No I'M NOT GONNA use ownership as power and don't be overconfident and you'll find that if you address these things you will be on that journey to success because unsuccessful people do show those traits amongst others but In answering you know listeners questions that have asked me what do I believe? Shine in unsuccessful. People will this six or seven traits. That I believe make people unsuccessful when they're not conscious of themselves in and I believe that the best thing that we can ever do as humans is to keep constantly learning and evolving. We're GONNA MAKE MISTAKES WE'RE GONNA slip up. It's part of the journey but we need to be very conscious of who we are where we are and what we're doing. We need to be conscious of why we need to make sure that we're constantly putting ourselves in learning mode surrounding ourselves with the raw people and that success means different things to different people and that's so important for people to understand that the concept of success is different to different people and as I discussing other words you need to write down personally professionally and family. What does success look like to grab three pieces of paper head them with personal professional and family at outline what success in each of those areas looks like for you and then taking some of those topics? We've just discussed those traits on unsuccessful. Make sure that You're not applying them. Make sure that you're conscious that that is not you and that those behaviors. Not Tom Happening within you. And you'll find that you'll be on that journey to success but remember that success is personal. Success is all about you achieving and being you want to be in your personal life in your professional life and in your family live it. It's not what somebody else wants you to achieve. It's not what somebody else needs you to achieve aids you want to be in. It's something that we should be doing with children From a young age. And if you don't have children things you should be sharing with other people with your friends with the appears with your nephews nieces. Cousins share it with anybody that successes personal and a great way to go about this people to identify what success looks like personally professionally and family and understanding that those three areas make up. Somebody's life and to give attention two or three areas.

KAT Sean
Shawna Newsome

Hacking Your Leadership

2:11 listening | 4 d ago

Shawna Newsome

"Hey everyone and welcome to another paid for Friday episode where we highlight people that we feel are doing a great job of Polish leadership content resonates with us. We will include links to their work and tag them on our post to make sure that they know we appreciate them. This is our way to say thanks to other leaders and individuals that are having a positive impact on helping others become better leaders through sharing your thoughts opinions and ideas online for all to see and hear Chris. I have always wanted to use our platform to advocate for other people passionate about leadership and our listeners much content as possible to help sharpen their own skills through different perspectives and approaches. If you like US check out any one specific please tag him in the comments or send us a message with links to their content on this episode. I WANNA recognize Sean. Newsom SEAN is a season retail manager is open to new opportunities with this pandemic. We've seen a lot of people impacted especially in retail now. I could go on for hours about people who lead retail stores in their connection to their people and their loyalty to their companies and their ability to manage. Pnl's present on performance calls deal with HR issues and exceed customer expectations. But that would just be the tip of the iceberg on what most retailers are capable of the reason I wanted to highlight. Shauna is because of how she is handling her current situation. I saw one of her most recent posts and even with the uncertainty of her organization and her job. She was recognizing her team for the hard work they were doing. It was genuine because after checking out her content came across opposed that she shared a wild bag and it read and I quote when I started my new role store manager of a new store at a new company. I not only had to learn an entire new process and new procedures but new employees as well like every new store manager. I began assessing my employees from the beginning. I listen to feedback from the former store manager as well as conducting daily observations one of the quote unquote week performers. I quickly assessed was simply in the wrong role. I moved this young lady to a new role within the store. And she is now flourishing beyond words. The moral of the story is treat your employees like they matter and like their work matters and give them a job that speaks to them and you will be amazed the outcome.

Shauna Newsom Sean Retail Manager Chris PNL
Don't Put Negatives Under a Microscope

The Remarkable Leadership Podcast

3:20 listening | 4 d ago

Don't Put Negatives Under a Microscope

"Aurora northrop from the Great State of Michigan sent us an email saying Kevin. I really would like you to do an episode about avoiding putting negativity under the microscope and I'm glad that she suggested it. Thanks to her here. It is let me start with a very important point here. And that is this what we study and think about grows so if we put negatively negatively on display and under the microscope it's going to grow and that's not likely what we want so you're saying okay that's fine. Kevin but what does that look like in the real world? Here's what it looks like in the real world. It's when we are asking about negativity when we're asking questions about mistake where we're trying to understand all of that and we're asking things from a negative frame of reference that putting negativity under the microscope. What else worrying about negativity. Well what if people are negative will? What if people don't like this idea? All of first of all the worry itself is negative but worrying about how people will respond or how they will react or what they will think isn't helping us either. Is it third focusing on negatively? Mel? Everyone's negative I'm negative. Why don't think we'll ever get there all of that. Listen stop just stop. We don't want to do any of those things. Here's what I want you to do instead. I want you to think about what you do. Want to focus your attention on what it is that you want. I want you to look at solutions problems. Let we okay. Problems are going to occur. Let's focus on the solution to it. I want you to look for lessons. Not Mistakes again. Mistakes are going to occur. And if we're in that negative place we're going to focus on that mistake. I want us to focus on. What can we learn from it? So we can get better and we can move forward. I want us all to prepare for challenges but EXPECT SUCCESS. It would be Pollyanna. It would be silly to say. We're going to win. It's going to be awesome. Isn't this fantastic? We should prepare for the challenges and yet we should expect success. That's not putting negativity under the microscope. So here's the question before I finish up. How will your attitude and results change? If you focus on my last set of suggestions versus the first set will your attitude be better? Of course William Results. Be Better. Almost assuredly right. Now listen if you're a leader. Your team is going to respond to either list. Which one do you want them to be focused on which one will serve them best? Listen let's take the negativity out of the microscope and let's focus on what we want. Focus on solutions. Not problems focused on lessons. Not Mistakes. Focus on what we want. That is how we will reduce negatively and get better results. Let me close with today's tweet. Focus on what you want. Don't put negativity under your microscope.

Aurora Northrop Kevin Michigan MEL William Results
Lindsay Peoples Wagner, Editor-in-Chief of Teen Vogue, on Mentorship and Speaking Up

Skimm'd from The Couch

2:42 listening | 6 d ago

Lindsay Peoples Wagner, Editor-in-Chief of Teen Vogue, on Mentorship and Speaking Up

"I WanNa talk about the concept of mentor ship because it sounds like from your story and from what you've said in the past you didn't necessarily have it earlier in your career or you've talked about the lack of being able to see people and be like. Oh that's someone that looks like me or has the same background as me. How do you think about that? Now that you are in a position to obviously be a mentor. What do you think about the importance of it? I feel like when I learned about mentorship. It was like okay. They're going to take you out to lunch and then you're GonNa do this. And it was a very strict idea and euro idea. I think of what I thought it was going to be but I think over time now I realize it. It really is a two way street in has to be more of a relationship with somebody that really feels like they're also getting something out of it can't just be you asking this person for help recommendations all of those things even though that is very valid. I think it really has to be more of a two way street of that person. Feeling like okay. I'm investing in this for these reasons or this person really adds value. Or you know all those things I think it just it has to make sense and I think they I've been blessed to have really good bosses and those people have become mentors to me because I think the over time in working for them and understanding them them getting understanding of me. We were able to come to a place of okay. I can reach out to this person but I think it's hard like I wouldn't have had that relationship with them from blind emailing them or just damning them like there were reasons and there was a method to Hauer relationships. Developed over time. You obviously work for someone. That's a legend. Now in the business that you worked for Sela be before that you've worked for women that have had huge impacts in careers. You also talk about. How what you. WanNa do requires pushing boundaries? Change there's a certain sense of fearlessness. Just hearing you speak. Would you describe yourself that way? Everyone says that but I don't think of it that way. I just think that if I'm not doing this no one else will do if I don't do this work. Honestly I've looked and searched for other people in it's just not really insight and I think they a lot of people can get to positions like this and just be grateful and super comfortable and not push into see like I got the job or I got access to this network or I was able to make this amount of money. So I'm just GonNa sit here and enjoy it because I've worked hard but that's just not the way that my parents raised me. It's time to work even harder and so I don't really think is fearlessness. I think it's just the way it is

Sela Hauer
A Chat with Lindsay Peoples Wagner, Editor-in-Chief of Teen Vogue

Skimm'd from The Couch

10:57 listening | 6 d ago

A Chat with Lindsay Peoples Wagner, Editor-in-Chief of Teen Vogue

"We are very excited to have Lindsey People's Wagner. Lindsay is the editor in chief of Teen Vogue magazine and is the youngest editor in chief of Conde NAST publication. She's also the only black female editor in chief of A. Us Fashion magazine as a career journalist. Her work focuses on the intersecting world of style identity culture and politics. Lindsey thank you so much for coming on today. We're really excited for the conversation. Thank you so much for having me. So let's start out with our basic question. Skim your resume Flores. I started religious interning into. That's really how I figured out that I even want to publications and teen. Vogue was my first actual internship and my first big internship in general so after doing that in college. It became the first job that I actually got out of college and I worked in the closet basically schlepping and doing running errands. And all the not fun things that wasn't on the hills of for a couple of years and then from there. I went to style DOT COM which merged into vogue dot com eventually. And that's when I really wanted to get into more writing and more of the storytelling and more of the behind the scenes of like how all of these pieces come together to really make a feature. And then I went to New York magazine in the cut for awhile and I mean that was an incredible experience for me because I was able to be at a place where I think you learn so much about your own story and how that plays into everything that you write or edit or that you wanna cover and I think there I was able to really flex love the muscles of things that I wanted to do from styling and producing shoots to working on you know really long. Form pieces like black and fashion. It's been over a year and a half. I would say of being editor-in-chief Teen Vogue so it's been a fun full circle moment to be back now as editor in chief and I think we've really leaned into a lot of the core things what I loved about Teen Vogue but in a modern in fresh and inclusive way that I always wanted to make it. I always love talking to people in fashion when they talk about like. Oh I started off in the closet and it's this thing and for people that aren't in fashion. It's like way that it's an actual real job that requires a lot of organization. And it's how a lot of people start off but I always think that's such a funny face when people see you working in fashion in TV or films. It looks very glamorous and it looks like you're just around town shopping and everything's breezy and their champagne and it's not that at all for those of us who've actually had to work our way out so I think that's an interesting point because you actually have to do a lot to figure out even what it takes to make a magazine come together. What something that people can't find on your linked in or that is in Google about you that you want people to know the only thing you can't really do but it's not like a secret and it's something that I have on my social media how much I love to cook. I grew up in a family. We always had to be at the dinner table. There was no fast food allowed. I find it really just calming and reminds me of home and so that's something that I really enjoy and I think it's interesting because in fashion people tend to not want to talk about food or not food to be the center of any conversation. Because there's always these very stupid pressures and anxieties around body image and how much you consume and even in this time. I think it's been really disappointing for me to see so. Many people in the industry say really insensitive things about you know not wanting to gain weight during this time and it's incredibly insensitive but also just ignorant and I want the industry to move to this place of inclusivity in a real way. I'm so grateful for this body that I have and I'm grateful to be able to make food and to be able to. You know to live this life. And that's really all that I think. Cooking food conversation should be about. Yeah and it's it's especially a very relevant conversation right now as you said thinking about so. Many people that are experiencing unexpected turns poor health that thinking about food and how we think about our bodies and being thankful for it in this moment his very different on that note about covert. You are leading a team a team that is part of Conde nast which is like any major media company has had its its ups and downs. How are you leading through this with the balance of trying to keep people calm? I know from leading our own team that it's not like we have a magic eight ball of being able to see when this ends. How have you handled this environment from a leadership perspective to be honest? I think it's been really tough because it is so open ended. We don't really know what is going to happen in the future and you can make all these plans for life and then you know life happens and I think for me. It's been a lot of just having those conversations with people you know. Do you need a mental health? Day Do you not. Do you feel like you can't do this today. And that's fine and now take on that you know today if I can and I'll figure out a way that we can move forward. That feels good for everyone. I've been having so many conversations of bandwidth and what people can just emotionally and mentally handle right now as journalists in like someone who's always overly ambitious. There's so many ideas and things that I always WANNA do. But I've been very transparent with my staff of like this is a great idea and I think this would be cool but I'm not trying to pressure anyone in ad anyone's workload of this is a cool idea but like I can't emotionally handle anymore worker. I can't spend any more time on this right now and I think we all have to be understanding of that and you know so many people have had family issues and I had a family member pass away from Kovin so I'm so sorry I'm very sorry for your family. No it's okay. It's just it's emotional roller coaster for everyone. I think just trying to be understanding in that. Is You know an empathy is everything. Yeah speaking about empathy is studies and more information is coming out that shows Cova nineteen infecting and killing people of color at a disproportionately higher rates. I think that there's been a lot of conversation about how this can reveal inequalities and disparities in our society that sometimes people don't spend time or don't WanNa think about as someone that has written about the overlap between culture and politics. I'm just curious to talk about how you're thinking through this moment and the type of data that we're seeing it just sucks to see that people of color going to be affected even more in the situation because you know people have covered just disproportionately don't have access to healthcare. And I mean really what this. Kobe situation is put so much light on his problems with class. And how we treat certain people in how we give you know other people privileges and I think it's it's been really upsetting to see a lot of popular influencers. You know be able to get tested really quickly and be able to have access to be able to get any medical advice and to be able to just hop in their RV and go to some house and be able to just escape and this is a reality for a lot of people have colored. They can't get the help that they need and I think for us. It's a constant conversation that we're having of. How do we amplify the voices of people of Color this because it just spans to so many things like even in my hometown from Wisconsin and the Wisconsin primary was like Sony? My family members were saying people of color are going to be directly affected by this election. And they're not being you know comforted in this at all. The polling stations are actually safe. And there's no hand sanitizer. They're they're not able to wash their hands in the bathroom. But they're told you know you need to just wait in line here for three hours. It affects so many different things and I think the economics of it and you know this class war is just. It's crazy and I think the it makes me really upset because it's going to have such a lasting effects on people colors communities that won't even have the resources to make it better and I mean we're going to continue to figure out ways that we can help in ways that we can make those communities feel like we're at least here for them because there are a lot of people in situations that won't be able to get out of this speaking of how you grow up. You grew up in Wisconsin. Tell us a little bit about what your family was like. Oh I have a really loving family. it's weird interview. My family is the best people planet. And it's just been really hard for us but I think that I grew up in a family just has really strong faith and I think that that has been a big point in my life. My Dad is a pastor. My husband's status pastor. And I think in these times you really kind of on your faith to help you through this and so I'm regardless of you know nervous being sick and this just being a really crazy time. I think that's really stuck with me and I think that the older I've gotten the more that I'm grateful of the ways that my parents have grounded me. I'm not any of these things that people may think in fashion. That isn't really my identity and my identity is really who I am in the integrity that I have as a human being. I think that you know we are trying to just walk through this with as much grace in humility that. They've instilled in me that I can. Do you think your family than like looking back on who? You are would be surprised at what you've become today. Yes no I mean. I was always very opinionated on a lot of artistic things like my mom always jokes you know they like allowed my sister and I to pick out colors for our bedroom and my sisters chose really you know. Pale floral wallpaper very basic in my opinion and I was like this. None of this will work for me. I need a custom color and my mom was like. Who Do you think you are? Yeah I can see that being such a pain in the ass for a mob like just pick a fucking color. Your that was me. She saved like all of my art projects and she was. She's that mom and so she always has like we were really upset when the glitter spill and we. We always had to have talks with you about things. Aren't going to go your way and I mean I was always definitely into creative. Things of his incenting Lessons Piano Violin. I like to dry like those. Are I love to do all of those things but I think it? The fashion stuff didn't come 'til lot later for sure just because the nature of growing out in the Midwest. You don't know anybody really who works at a publication and so it took a while for me to figure out really how. I wanted to use all those creative

Editor In Chief Teen Vogue Lindsey People Wisconsin Conde Nast A. Us Fashion Magazine Midwest Lindsay Google Kovin New York Cova Kobe Sony
Leading the Gates Foundation Fight Against Coronavirus

The Strategerist

6:10 listening | Last week

Leading the Gates Foundation Fight Against Coronavirus

"We have a really exciting opportunity today to talk to someone. That's helping lead the charge against the crow virus. Mark Suzman is CEO of the bill and Melinda Gates Foundation who are putting a ton of resources behind looking for solutions right now and we're really grateful to have a few minutes of your time mark. Thank you for doing this. Great detroi- well. The Gates Foundation has a publication called the optimist which we think is exactly the kind of attitude that we need right now and we'll have time to talk about specifics of the virus in treatments soon but I in general terms at a high level. What's keeping optimistic right now? Well we do have publication called the optimistic with inter-regional you're listening to subscribe. It's a great publication that sort of sends out an US on a pretty regular basis actually comes from Bill and Melinda Gates who are like to call themselves impatient optimists we we decided not to call the publication. The impatient optimists and at times like this. It's sometimes challenging to to feel optimistic but on the real plus side one. We're seeing are really unprecedented progress in of the search for a vaccine that still going to be a wild but we're a pretty confident that they will be a successful vaccine you know unlike say with HIV where we struggle to find one up to more than thirty years. And it's going to be the foster. Sfaxien ever successfully developed in human history there already number of candidates in trials but we have a lot of scientists who look at that and feel pretty confidence and the challenge is going to be really about getting them through as quickly as possible getting them into distribution and manufacturing and trying to make sure that they are globally accessible. Because it's something the world's GonNa need so that probably the biggest one on the horizon. The second one is a cautious optimism. But it's also combined with a worry Which is so far. We haven't seen the kind of days in the developing world which we were very worried about probably off the levels we've seen in the US and Europe. We're working very hard and you. These places with very low and weak health resources to try and help with preparation still worries that there may be major outbreaks but again the steps that have been taken by these countries today despite their challenging circumstances have certainly a voted foul outcomes and that's being another bid relatively good news and I know that that global outlook is really important to the Gates Foundation. What are y'all doing to make sure that the work that you're doing is able to be used worldwide. Yes so that's something we do for like when we work extensively across the US obviously and we have carry lodge program. Which of being heavily disrupted and Writing educational opportunities for low income students and kids of Color in K twelve and post-second buck most by workers in global health and global development issues. And everything we do as informed by what he calls global access so we do a lot of research and development Some of that is in helpings like New Treatments. Or vaccines or things that are Diseases like malaria or tobacco. So I do think that disproportionately affect poor people and we have requirement whenever we make grunts that Any results Former global access. You know they need to be accessible and affordable globally and we support directly a number of organizations that help ensure that happens so the Global Fund to fight. Hiv Malaria Which was actually something where President Bush was the inaugural funded from the US and and was the counterpart to the pet. Far -Unding is a huge operation. That actually helps keep many millions of people on anti retrovirals but also that's bednets across the developing world to prevent Larrea to Berkey Laos's treatments. And what it does is it. Cools or sources including from the foundation many governments including the US which is the largest Funda. And then how? Purchase those at bulk because it is a crisis and then distribute them to the needy globally and we have the partnerships that do the same in areas like vaccines. So I know that scenario that we've worked together on before is in is in global health. We had Bill Melinda Gates recently at our form on leadership for them to talk about the work that they've done and Y'all done a lot of work with global epidemics previously like in global health. You've been very active. What did you learn from the worthy done previously? That's helping you today. So some of it is pretty simple stuff right. You need basic functional primary healthcare systems that that may sound and we're kind of used most people can excess at least minimal basic healthcare in the US effectively but You in very poor countries. That means often. There's barely a clinic with basic equipment or tools. But we need that. We make a lot of investments in trying to support those kind of experts if you have accessible primary care that's able to take early action than that helps prevent a whole lot of the health outcomes and then the car. Koga crisis where you're trying to Provide community engagement or involvement to help support challenges. Where you're often working in situations like crowded urban slums where it's very difficult to sort of isolate if you have symptoms we've seen countries like South Outta go for example which have extensive networks that have been set up to deal with HIV crisis actually being able to mobilize those network to help support Kobe or simply one of the talents we have. We are the largest. Funders globally the. Us is also very generous support of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative that unfortunately it had to be put on pause for why because we can't currently vaccinate children because it's the opposite of social distancing malaria polio vaccine. Excuse me drops that needs to be put in the mouth of a baby. That's held by their parents but we had big infrastructure that we've developed Without the partners over the years including Eunice and the World Health Organization Rotary that is very expert at surveillance and tracking and tracing Things which can now again be used in that Jacobin. So we've had a lot of those kinds of blessedness Which we wish. We didn't have to have them to help. But there certainly are helping with the current crisis

United States Gates Foundation Melinda Gates Melinda Gates Foundation Global Polio Eradication Initi Global Fund Malaria Mark Suzman Polio Vaccine CEO World Health Organization Europe Sfaxien Bill President Bush Eunice Jacobin HIV
The Power of Trust

The Remarkable Leadership Podcast

2:39 listening | Last week

The Power of Trust

"I could say trust is powerful and you will not your heads. But that's too general of the statement. What I WANNA do. Today is get more specific. You three specific things that make trust so powerful right here. They are the first one is that trust is an accelerate. Trust helps things go faster. Trust speeds up projects. Think about it there. Been on a project where there's a lot of trust among the members things went faster. Didn't they ever been on a project where there wasn't a lot of trust didn't go so fast? So trust speeds up projects it speeds up processes it speeds up communication right. Think about the situations where there's not a lot of trust is communication slowed down. Does it take longer? There are people that want to send an email because they want to cover themselves. Because there's not a lot of trust supposed to having a conversation. Trust is an accelerate. Trust is also a lubricant. Trust is a lubricant. Trust makes things easier. Trust reduces conflict the more trust that exists the less likely we will get in conflict or the easier it will be for us to UN. Do it or resolve it more quickly before it becomes a big deal. Trust is a lubricant because it makes things flow and when you think about a lubricant is something that that smooths things things out that that because creates less friction and I think that that's true. Think about trust in an organization if there's more of it there's less friction. Trust is a lubricant. Now you can put those two things together and it leads to something else. That maybe is the most important of the three factors that I'm sharing with you from an organizational perspective and that is that trust is a business imperative. When I started this video and you thought about trust you may have been thinking. Well that's kind of Nice. It'd be really nice if there were more trust. I would like to trust my boss but this is not a nice to have. Our Organizations. Need things to go faster organizations. Need things to be easier. This is not a nice to have. This is not a soft skill. This is not something we can do if we have time. This is not something that we try to do because we have a Christmas party and because we have we do a couple of fun events a year trust is a business imperative and when we realized that we will work on it we will make it better we will get the acceleration. We will get the lubrication. We'll get better results. Let me close with today's tweet. Trust is an accelerate to success and a lubricant for results.

UN
Coaching Through a Crisis

The LEADx Show

6:02 listening | Last week

Coaching Through a Crisis

"So welcome to coaching through adversity. And I'm ruth key predictor and I'm the managing director and also the founder of Champs as already introduced and here is a little about me and my expertise to why I'm here with you today so I've had a long corporate career spanning eighteen years business improvement projects in change management recruitment and talent and inclusion. So there's always been a threat of people in every role I've ever done. And I set up a sham SAI global mental wealth people consulted say back in. Twenty fifteen through my own lived experience of mental ill health and being diagnosed with several anxiety disorders due to burn out and a breakdown at that point and to to really understand more about my my background around why was. I was wanting to work with corporates on. I stood it my. Msa and apply Pasta pastas psychology and coaching psychology and applied positive. Psychology is a fairly new field of research. It's been around for around twenty years. Twenty to thirty years of research there so I in terms of psychology. It is a fairly new field as coaches psychology. Which I'm going to talk to you and little bit about today and when I completed my MSA at the end all twenty thousand nineteen. I focused my dissertation. My research on Post Traumatic Growth and coaching and that is the topic of today's Webinar. I'm also coaching practitioner. So I work with clients on an current into going accreditation with the European Mentoring Coaching Council. And I have a corporate clients. So Champs itself works with predominantly large global clients so many of my coaching clients do come from that space from all levels of Seniority Tae. I'm also a mental health. First Aid Instructor so have they instructor knowledge to be able to train mental health status. And I'm a patron of the U. K. Yanks is he Charity no panic again. My expertise is around the mental health condition of anxiety disorders and as I mentioned at the stocks of this slide hair. I was talking about my reason full starting champs and what I discovered when I was on my eighteen months. Msa was. I'd had been through this journey of post traumatic growth. Although I did not know what that was all at the time. I didn't understand that was why was going through. And as we start to cover these topics you will perhaps into Stein. A little bit of why the May Champs was the the best thing to come out of such dark tie and also the fact. That's I I'm grateful in in cases to have had the experience and this is definitely put me on a life path on a journey. I was not expecting to be on five years ago and for me. The fascination around trauma particularly and the human resilience and adversity TAE skills that we possess is is really fascinating for me to understand and to understand how this phenomenon has impacted others and finally to think about why people saw coaching as a way to move three pain and trauma because often people do seek out coaching rather than perhaps mental health professional support. And this is really a gain some of the topics. I'm going to be kind of covering as we work through through this weapon. So my my reason for starting Champs Wall Street Post Matic Growth and the research. I want to focus on was to understand how that coaching practice could help. Facilitate Post traumatic growth in a client. And what I found was she. Limited research between the two fields as post traumatic growth is fairly new area of research as in line with positive. Psychology and coaches psychology. Again is a fairly new area of research is well so this was very much a a reason for wanting to explore these areas in more detail. So what doesn't kill us? I'm sure you may have heard this phrase before and post traumatic growth. Is the phenomenon off. People experiencing positive change following adversity and it starts to be studied in around the nineteen nineties. looking at people who experience positive change following a period of trauma only a stressful life. Event and niche came up with the The ad age of what doesn't kill US makes stronger and paraphrase but that kind of gives you an indicator that the human spirit The human condition if we if we can get through very difficult dark times we can Survive and become stronger through it and potential growth in human struggle in crisis. Suffering has been recounted really since ancient times. It's only been since around the nineteen thousand. Nine hundred. Research is really started to happen within this failed

MSA European Mentoring Coaching Co United States Managing Director Stein Aid Instructor Founder Instructor
Pick a Plan and GET AFTER IT

Jocko Podcast

8:09 listening | Last week

Pick a Plan and GET AFTER IT

"Leadership means firmness not harshness or bullying understanding not weakness justice erase the freedom humaneness not intolerance generosity not selfishness pride. Not Egotism so little quote for you kick things off. This is coming very I ran across it the other day and as I ran across it I saw some of little bit of the dichotomy leadership in there and it just caught my attention. And it's a quote General Omar Bradley General with a good amount of name recognition but a general who kind of flew under the radar sometimes because he was competing with some some big names. You know he's competing with General Patton. He's compete with General Eisenhower. He's competing with General Montgomery so he kind of flew under the radar sometimes even though he does have the Bradley fighting vehicle named after him which is a awesome machine but he absolutely was a well regarded general in his own right born in eighteen. Ninety three in Randolph County Missouri worked as a boilermaker figured out he could get a free education by going to west point so he went to West Point graduated in Nineteen fifteen same years. Eisenhower by the way he was a really good athlete. Baseball Star could've played pro ball but chose to be in. The army chose to go and do his commitment to the army. One thousand nine hundred fifteen. You're probably thinking World War. One W W well. He actually didn't go to World War One and World War One. There were mining disputes in the unions in the in the minds up in Montana and they had to activate some army units to send them up there to guard the minds. And that's what he did. He did that for a little while. And then he did go to unit that was getting ready to deploy to World War One. The Spanish flu came which everyone seems to know about the Spanish flu. Now and there then there was the armistice and he didn't deploy so he didn't get any combat action in World War. One thought that that might hurt his career but he stayed in anyways ended up teaching tactics at the infantry school fast forward through the peace years may general in one thousand nine hundred forty two assigned the eighty second division the Twenty Eighth National Guard division eventually worked under General Patton as the deputy in charge of Second Corps and then took it over himself led the campaigns in Tunisia and Sicily. Ike Eisenhower selected Bradley to command the First Army during Operation Overlord D Day Command. He commanded the most troops of any general. Us General in history when he took command of the twelfth on weaker. One point three million troops to little decentralized command. Better come into play right there. Continue with all those troops to push through Europe until the fall Germany. We covered Ernie. Pyle on this podcast. Podcast number thirty nine. His book brave men. It was the heavies for my favor. Lines Ernie pyle nicknamed him the G. I. General because he was kind of a laid back down to Earth Guy didn't make a spectacle of himself. After the war he ran the VA for a while. The Veterans Administration I ever chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. During the Korean War retired in nineteen fifty-three after thirty eight years of service I found day. The Internet is amazing. I found any evaluation. You know we talk about the evaluations evaluation in the Marine Corps evaluation the navy evaluation. I found an evaluation of Bradley written by General Patent. Pretty cool because it shows it shows what type of a person patent was just in the way he wrote this thing so it says subject efficiency report through commanding general NATO USA APO five thirty four to add adjutant General War Department Washington DC name and grade of General Officer reported on Omar F Bradley Lieutenant General Period covered one July nineteen forty three to eight September nineteen forty two months in eight days duties performed commanding general to core one July nineteen forty three to eight September nineteen something unclear manner of performance superior F- Physical Activity Superior Physical Endurance Superior Knowledge of his profession superior for what command or duty would you specifically recommend him and army and then what opportunities have you had for observing him during period covered intimate daily contact. Does he rendered a willing and generous support to plans of superiors regardless of personal views. In the matter yes which is a very interesting topic to cover mean you think about what they've got in their physical duty not knowledge of his profession. What job would you recommend? Does he give generous supports to plans of superiors regardless of his personal views. No matter so this guy's going to back you up. The answer is yes and ten of all general officers of his grade. Personally known to you. What number would you give him on this list? And how many comprise your list and patterns answer is number one. I know all of them. Further remarks deemed necessary. None signed G. S. junior lieutenant general. Us Army commanded. So that's pretty awesome review. The interesting thing is if you know anything about the history of Bradley and Patton. There's some interesting dynamics. They first of all had very different personalities. Patent was you know flashy and go ego driven in a lot of ways and and Bradley was not and there's some quotes I pulled from patents journal Journals About Bradley. So it's interesting that he can have these right in that glowing like evaluation about him to try and get him promoted but at the same time here are some things he said about him. Bradley's to Conservative. He wants to wait until we can all jump into the fight together. By which time half our men will be. We'll have the flu trench foot. I wish he had a little more daring. Another one. Bradley is a good offer. Buddy utterly lacks it too bad. The IT Factor Echo Charles. Next one brag is a man of great mediocrity on the other hand. He has many attributes which are considered desirable. In general. He wears glasses which I have no idea I have no idea why. That's cool to be a general glasses. He has a strong jaw. He talks profoundly and says little and he is a shooting companion of our present chief of Staff. General Marshall also. He is a loyal man. I consider him to be among our better generals

Bradley General Eisenhower General Patton General Omar Bradley Us Army General Officer General Montgomery General Marshall Ernie Pyle Adjutant General United States Omar F Bradley First Army West Point Randolph County Missouri Europe Montana
Better Communication Through Letters

The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

9:00 listening | Last week

Better Communication Through Letters

"Debbie Ronca is President of Sequoia coaching a Certified Life Coach. Speaker and disc profile trainer with John Maxwell team she is also the author of the family letter how to intentionally develop a culture of honor encouragement and value with your loved ones a bestseller in nine relationship in Harrington Categories Ronco wants start a global movement. So other families also benefit on the family wetter. We're going to talk about this today with Debbie. Debbie welcome to the show. Thank you so much for coming on. You are locked them. And thank you for having me of course so debbie for a lot of our listeners. That might not know what a family letter is. Could you go ahead and tell them what the impact of a family letter is and really what they could get out of it? That's a great question. Read on the family letter was basically something that we started as a tradition in our family years ago when our kids were growing up we had the intention of teaching them how to use their words To be encouraged others to be able to use the words to bless another person. And you know. Sometimes it's really hard for kids especially to verbalize. They feel a little embarrassed or uncomfortable. So we've found that using a letter was the safe way to go. That's great So I myself actually have done something like a family letter before in my family. It's not quite what you do But it really helped teach me how to express myself to my family in a healthy way and really be able to communicate and open wider doors. Is that the same hope that you are looking for with your letter. Absolutely the whole intent really is to let the other person know why their loved valued in celebrated and when you hear that from other family members it really just builds wonderful foundation of trust and connection and a bond and read what we did specifically is. We made it a tradition on our birthdays. We thought why not birthdays the day. Everyone is celebrated right so why not let that be the day that we received this letter and so we taught our children from the time they were young and of course we made the what the intent that had to be in the letter? Simple so they could do it and you know when I speak at women's events I always tell the moms don't worry about the grammar. Don't worry about the punctuation year teaching them how you used the words and you don't ever want to make them feel it has to be perfect because it's coming from their heart and of course as our family grew and I say read. We've been doing this now for over thirty years and after thirty years our children thirty eight thirty seven and thirty five. They still want their letters. I mean it is a big tradition in our house. Love that I love that. That's fantastic. Could you dive a little deeper into the content of these family letters absolutely well like in the beginning we make it really simple for the kids because we want them to right so it really? You need to not just tell the person you love them but why because when you specifically say why it goes deeper you know. It's just not the Cliche I love you but when you hear why and then you want to celebrate their gifts and talents you wanNA recognize Any celebrations in their life and of course as we got older we expanded that. So Ah Chris. Reflecting on the past year of this person's life were on their birthday. And you know everybody walks through a dark time trial a difficulty and we write about that in the letter like Geez. Jonathan I remember when you were going through that difficult relationship and the way that you handle bit really made us proud of you. You showed a lot of kindness and compassion and so we actually recognize encourage. The person helping walk through difficult times as well. That's really nice to hear. I think a struggle that a lot of families go through not just with something like this but milestones for any of their children is. When do we start you know? When do we put him on a bike? When do we teach them how to do this? When would you say is a good time to get your children to start being engaged in this? When we started the letter read. Our children were five and seven while and then we had an remind you that the letters were short but they were learning how to communicate and we had our third child when he turned five. We would always do this moment of re writing letters and reading the letters at our dining room table so he grew up here in his father received letters his mother his brother and sister so when he turned five he said. I WANNA DO LETTERS. I want in and so he actually turned from the Observer to the writer so he started as early as five and I believe the power in at read is the consistency like we chose birthdays. And so we know every birthday we're gonNA gather and have letters and of course being a mother and a father. We've added the mother and father's day letter in there too. Oh of course you have to make sure that you've got a little extra recognition for all the hard work you do for raising your children It's the best gift. Jerry Seib really love those letters absolutely so I think like anybody else. Not all of our lives are rainbows and lollipops. Right kind of goes through a hard time and sometimes that hard time is reflected onto our family. How can the letter be used as a catalyst for accomplishing forgiveness? Or even reconciling some things in the past one of the best ways that I think he can open up. The line of Communications is through the power of a letter. I would think that you would agree with me read. Don't you feel that when a relationship is broken? One of the most difficult things is to be able to come back and talk face to face because there's so much hurt and there's so much wounding and you still wind up fighting and you don't reconcile but I feel when you can write in a letter. What you like about that person. What you love about that person that you've missed the relationship that you're sorry that they disagreed you know. Can we start again? I believe you can maybe crack a door open. That has been slammed shut for years and that could be the beginning of the communication. Because it's a safe place to see if you can open that door again and we have a great story with our children. They were seven and five at the time at that time. We were doing Christmas letters as well. And you know how children are they. Can they argue? They fight and they wrote their letters and nobody knows what's written in the letter to you. Read it and my daughter wrote a letter to her brother saying that she was so sorry that he was mean to her and he she wished that he could be a nicer brother and my son and in his letter to his sister wrote. I know I haven't been a great brother and I know I've been hard on you. I'm really sorry. When they both read their letters. They looked at each other and they ran over and they hugged each other and Oracle. The letter gave the voice to the prop room. And so I know children can do that. I really believe adults can do that. And you know in this crisis time read. I'm really thinking hearts are being tender is D- A lot of people are klaren teen. A lot of people are thinking about really what is important in life now. This may be a great time to write that letter to that broken relationship and try to restore it absolutely. I think as many people would agree with me. A family is very important especially during these times. That's really who you're GONNA hold dear. You have close. I know I personally have been talking to my mother way more than I have before during this little walk down. I'm sure this letter can go even further pass. Your family can not absolutely you know. I believe everybody in life should receive a letter from someone so I really think if you sat down and thought about it you may have that teacher that mentor that business partner that neighbor that Fran and somebody who's impacted your life that you could just take time and write them a letter to let them know how they impacted your life. It would mean the world to them

Debbie Ronca Harrington Categories Ronco John Maxwell Certified Life Coach President Of Sequoia Jerry Seib Jonathan Partner Writer Fran
Managing Emotional Side of Setbacks

Leadership Biz Café

5:52 listening | 2 weeks ago

Managing Emotional Side of Setbacks

"One of the constants of being a leader is knowing how to manage setbacks. Which is something. Many of us are certainly grappling with as a result of the current global pandemic of course the typical response to any kind of setback is to assess both what went wrong to ensure. It doesn't happen again as well as the most expedient route that will allow us to resolve it and get back on track and yet what's become clear thanks to the Kovic. Nineteen pandemic is how. There's another element to managing setbacks. That leaders need to be more aware of and that is managing the emotional context around a given setback to apple is straight what I mean. I'd like to share a personal story of something that happened to my wife and I years ago so like most married couples. My wife and I set time aside to go out on date nights much like we used to do before we became parents on one of these date nights. My wife and I were driving back from one of our favorite restaurants and just as we turned onto the access ramp for the highway. The car dashboards suddenly went dark. The gas pedal stopped responding and our car was just rolling on its own momentum. I guided the car onto the side of the ramp and then tried to restart the car after several tries to restart our car. It became clear to my wife and I that it wasn't going to work and we'd have to call for tow-truck now given how we decided to go to one of these local restaurants we like that's further out from where we live. And where our local garages? We knew this was going to be a pricey towing charge when my wife called for the tow truck. She was told that given how was late at night on a week day it was gonNA take some time to get truck out to location after that. Call my wife and I were basically left sitting in our car filling up with dread and fear over how much all of this was going to cost us all of the fun and enjoyment. We'd had an ornate date. Night was fast evaporating. Thanks to this unexpected financial stress and worry but then something curious happened as we sat in our car waiting for the tow truck to arrive the first few cars that turned onto the access ramps slow down and the people inside roll down their windows to ask if we were okay and if we needed any help in each case we let the other drivers know that a tow truck was on the way and how we appreciated their assistance as the night went on and we continue to wait for that tow truck more and more people were stopping to inquire if we were okay and if we needed to call someone for help and something unexpected started to happen. The mood my wife and I were in started change from Dour and irritable to one of appreciation and reassurance in fact my wife and I even started joking with drivers who stopped to check in on us that we had decided to cap off our date night by hanging out on the highway on ramp and basking under the highway. Streetlamps eventually a police cruiser came by and the police officer guy out to make sure we were safe and added some flares around our car to make sure that the other drivers steered clear of us. The officer even stayed with us for a good couple of minutes to make sure we were comfortable being alone along this stretch of road. Before he continued off on his patrol. By the time the tow truck arrived. Our mood had noticeably shifted from one of stress and anxiety to reassurance that we'd get through it and that our car would be repaired and made as good as before in the end. The problem turned out to be a minor electoral issue. That only took a data repair. Though it was still an unwanted expense that we had to contend with now while my wife and I understand we wish we had ended our date night that way. The interesting thing is that every time either of US share the story with family and friends. The focus wasn't on this unexpected car repair. We had to pay for instead. We talk about how good it felt to see so many complete strangers going about their lives. Who took time to check in on us to see if we were okay and if there was anything they could do in other words. This event changed from this terrible thing that happened to us to a feel good story about experiencing the kindness of strangers and how we can still experience that general goodness of people and I share this story in my leadership. Keynotes and workshops to illustrate how our emotions can alter and transform our perceptions of whether an event is positive or negative and consequently how what we see inexperience is far more malleable than we might think. And there's been several studies that have been done that back. This idea up in fact. A number of psychology studies have shown that it takes three positive events for us to overcome the effects of a single negative event and this is due to our brains bias for survival. In other words our brain is more likely to hold onto the impact of a negative event than a positive one in order to remind us of what we need to avoid naturally when we read about such studies. It's easy to draw the conclusion that if we don't have three good things happening to us during our day we won't be able to compensate for that one bad moment. And this is certainly reflective of what most of US experienced at work where one bad encounter. One piece of negative feedback sends us into a tailspin of doubt and uncertainty. But let's consider this story just shared on the surface. This should certainly fall into the negative column as we all know how expensive car repairs can be not to mention the fact that this happened at the end of my date night with my wife and yet notice how my focusing more on the kindness demonstrated by others on those drivers who took the time to make sure we were. Ok transformed the story and experience into a positive one

United States Officer Kovic Apple Streetlamps
Anne Chow On  Keeping People Connected

The Strategerist

5:51 listening | 2 weeks ago

Anne Chow On Keeping People Connected

"We've been talking recently with several nonprofit leaders about how their organizations are pivoting adjusting to all the changes in the world because of in nineteen today. Though we're talking to a business sector leader to hear about their side of the world and Chow has been at. At and T. Business for thirty years and in Twenty nineteen was named CEO. The first woman and the first woman of color to hold the position of the company and welcome to the strategic. Thank you for doing this. Thanks so much. Appreciate you having me so next week. We're launching our latest issue. The catalyst that Bush Institute's Journal of Ideas and we're focusing on America at its best and the things that are making us optimistic. So and what are you seeing right now? That's giving you hope. Yeah interesting question and I think that there's you know there's nothing like a crisis of epic proportion to US. Great clarity about what's important in our lives. And that is both are professionalize in our personal lives holistically and I would say that the thing that really I find so inspiring is how important the power of connection is you know what this pandemic has shown us is that You know the world works whether it's You know in our communities whether it's across any business of any size the world works on connection and that connection is You know is manifested both in the sense of technology and kind of networks and the business that. At and T. You know eighteen business are responsible for but also the power of connection between people and the fact that we We as humanity have rallied together in a way That we never have on a scale that we never have in common enemy and that is the virus. So that that I find incredibly inspiring is how we have come together as a business community as they philanthropic community as humanity and society at large and how were rallying together In a common mission. Yeah it really is amazing to see everybody has a little bit different set of resources available to them and everyone is using their resources to the best of their abilities to try and bite this thing and I know just in terms of tying a little bit eighteen is trying to imagine what this last what these last few months would have been like without Internet access. This had happened even fifteen years earlier where we didn't have video conferencing and we didn't have high speed internet or thirty years ago when very few people had what would have looked like. Is that something you've thought at all about is how incredible the timing of this? Yeah for sure. Yeah I I have fought long and hard about that. I've actually spoken about it as well. You know when You know as really kind of leading teams and serving clients. It's it's always easier to do. So when you see a very clear purpose right when you see a very clear mission about what has to get done and there's no question that our communication and our our reliance on communication which is enabled by Mobile Technologies. Internet technologies. There's just no way that we could have even survived right whether that's You know in any of these aspects of the fights on the front line You know whether whether you think about some of the pivots From a small business perspective about how you know restaurants have now had the ability to go online right and focus on delivery. I mean there's there's no aspect of our lives or the economy or society. We can envision what this would have been like us the golf right whether it's ten years ago twenty years ago thirty years ago Of what that could have been like. And so now for sure this pandemic and in nineteen has really brought to life the power and the importance of communication. You know even beyond Internet our access to data but even just voice right and how true acted we are and how important it is to have that connection whether it's through video through voice right because we cannot for the time being largely have that physical connection in that physical proximity that That we all thrive on you mentioned small businesses which are just critical to our country. What are y'all doing to make sure that That those needs are supported. Yeah Yeah thanks for that question. You know an and eighteen business. We are so fortunate to have an opportunity to serve businesses and organizations and sectors of the economy You know across the world and businesses of all sizes whether it ranges from healthcare providers to first responders to education and otherwise specifically is really small business. I have great passion for small businesses. I I have Been inspired by the fact that you know if you're a small business owner or if you're an entrepreneur you are in business because you have passion for Your Business I And so for us. Small Business represents a key clients for all over the country support of them have ranged from a providing them with a with unique offers to support them. You know whether it's You know call forwarding services Mobile Hotspot Services but importantly we've also joined You're very consistent with FCC Chairman Pies. Keep Americans connected pledge? We continue to support them through June thirtieth for both residential and small business customers. Who Tell us that. They're having issues with paying their bills or having issues Asteroids to the pandemic We have a commitment to them to not disrupt their service and we're waiting all late. Payments Fees You know we're we're also joined up with American Express in their Stanford Small Coalition Where we're supporting small businesses through various programs services offers tools we have encouraged our employees to donate and actively contribute to small businesses as well. And you know we've got the unique offers around the different president services that enable small businesses to operate whether it's in a remote work environment or otherwise and so we've really worked hard to run the gamut of what is it that are small business customers. Need you to navigate through this crisis and move onto the next as which I like to characterize as kind of return and recovery

Small Business T. Business Business Owner Chow United States Bush Institute CEO American Express Journal Of Ideas Mobile Technologies Mobile Hotspot Services President Trump America Stanford FCC Chairman
4 Steps To Brand Yourself As A Leader, And The 5 Top Leadership Skills

FlashCast By PDB, With Phil Di Bella

9:50 listening | 2 weeks ago

4 Steps To Brand Yourself As A Leader, And The 5 Top Leadership Skills

"You're listening to fill the Bella and this is flash by TDB. Today's question we're going to answer. Comes from to kneel at News Ltd Brisbane thank you. Question is all around heavy brain yourself as a leader About personal leadership identity in branding. Thanks a Christian in them. You know second branding before but let's tackle this from a lot more direct results penalty ship. Let's start with what actual. What do we mean what is meant by Pestle leadership entity to me? It's a little bit unique combination of qualities and talents that making unique and different as an individual in order to enhance leadership that to me is what personal leadership identity. It's it's what are the unique qualities and talents that you have so unique qualities and talents that distinctive as an individual that tomase what a personal ladyship identities because his different types of ladyship so I did I wanted to demystify what the whole personal leadership identity mates and again say to him because it's the foundation of the rest of the fleshpots. He's at ease the combination of qualities and talents. That make you. Unique and distinctive as individuals keywords qualities and talents unique distinctive an individual and that enhances your leadership style Let me flow on that Intensive trainings ahead. You brains yourself as a leader. Well I've covered this before but I'll explore again in. The context of Of ANONYMITY ENDED UP PERSONAL LEADERSHIP. And that is the next full step. Step one explore your voice. Make sure that you have that. Inner Voice your great communicator. At whether it's one on one situations whether it's stages to a lot of people and that's a key point because a lot of people in leadership think that it's just good one on one discussions one on one communication skills all. I think it's just able to communicate too many people at once to me. Great latest what they really have that When the building a personal brand is they're able to school. The voice spoke one on one. But in a situation where it's one too many so that's one connecting east obscure yourself and then upscale your team that's what Personal you know the branding yourself as a leader is all about. That's a great strategy to have strategy number two is all about upstream yourself but also being able to US upskill attained. Because you don't want to build too much of a gap between self team so you not only going to be able to obscure be and be pestle development but you need to be a good damn good Developing your team as well number three is all about focusing on your expertise different expectations when you building attain leadership meetings that conducts. Think of yourself. You know when you're branding yourself as a leader. You'll that conduct a standing in front of the ban and you have a certain expertise to spotlight. Highlight what your expertise. But then also know what the expectation of the taints and by highlighting expertise of yourself in the team. You will ensure that you are branding. you're branding the team and again that makes you a leader in the number four. They're important is to always ask for feedback member. It was in the people business. Where the whistling product or service and it's all about connecting person to a product or service in different than when leading teams. So when you're working on the strategy to build your existing brand you have to have a brand is known to ask for feedback. Re Temperate. In order is to adopt strategies. That will help you amplify your personal brain. One explore your boys number two obscure yourself and your team number three highlight put a spotlight on your expertise and those of your teams and number four. Ask for feedback now in. What is a good personal leadership? Model well Ship is the ability to develop and utilize positive leadership traits. So you WanNa really highlight your leadership traits and then you want to guide the direction of your loss instead of letting others guard you now. That's what leadership is all about. It's the guy again coming back to the conductor. Great leaders others conductors in every conductor. You think if you research conductors of bans conduct on orchestra and you watch the videos youtube some you see that all of them have a very unique and distinctive different style. All mariah to get the band the follows to play to the bait of music and play the music that needs to happen so when not talk about leadership and leading teams by always love using the example them conductors and concert fans because everyone has different stops. I'm a more animated. Some listen but they will get the results and coming back to the beginning where we talked about uniqueness coming back to where we talked about you know focusing on different skills and they you have as an individual this is what makes you'll you'll build your personal leadership traits. What do I find the top five leadership skills and the people have someone? I've seen good leaders mid again. This is the leader of the constant pain. The leader of politics a lot of work around politics are CD's common skills. That I say that is honesty and integrity and sat dental fantasy. Always bill antic deliver bad news in pathetically but honestly and deliver good news with energy and passion and honesty. But it's always honesty integrity or fantasy number one number two inspire others. You have to have the ability as a leader to inspire everyone in the world wants. Inspirational seeks inspiration. We gotta have this tribe. It's very important if you want to build your brain as leader number three is be committed and passionate and if you're not committed and passionate things off until Quebec commitment and passion is the common denominator of resilience so if you were. The resilience is a common denominator of Gum. Commitment and passion. If you have commitment a passion you are resilient and as a leader unique to have that Resonance Nick. One is good communicator. You need to be an amazing Communica days. This is another gosh. If you can't communicate ECON late you'd go to get people to be able to march to the bait of your drum. This is something that needs to happen and number five is accountability. You need to have accountability and you need to demand can ability from your team so if you do these things these are what are fun of Obama. The skills set up the right lane is honesty and integrity. Which again is open to city number to inspire? Abbas number three commitment and resilience number four is a good communicator and number five is accountability. And I think if you look at anyone that you admire is a leader in any field whether it's sports whether it's in work whether it's easy whether Seattle whatever leave should whether it's a a Fatah great leaders people that have people followed them all have these five traits from and it's important because one of the three most important roles of leader to me. Well latest have to do different things. Depending on the year's activities we discussed because leadership is he personal bomb professional family life all asked to be ladies in different roles. Different responsibilities so that the three opinion a very common and to me. It's all about being able to envision it's all about the number correct follows and it's all about being able to execute so the three tasks of a later Matt whether it's leading at home at one co leading self is that you have to have a vision. You have to be able to get follow as to see that vision and you need to be able to and if you can do those three things combined with what I've covered in this flash costs than you will build your personal brain identity and remember that brain is what people say about you when you leave the room so if you really WanNa know what people think that your brain will think about you and I do this in in groups. It's a great exercise to. It's what people have to say that you when you leave the room. What is your your your emotional engagement your affect your impact on paper. What did I say about you when you the room? I mean a great way to look at it as eulogies. You can tell if you read people's eulogies you can tell what that personal brand of that fascinating back from the eulogy that the here but attacked people talk about them. How I relate the bathroom with I remember about what stands out about them. That actually creates the brand of that person so everybody that wants to create a brand and we all need to mush apple phone but in particular as Neal's asked in terms of leadership Minnesota important to go back makes about what we just spoke about and done an really align it to yourself. I remember that it's all about being unique. It's all about the different till about keeping it real to yourself keeping an authentic. These are the things that happen because you know we often talk about a latest night will born well to me it. Spotter you Latest can be made at any time. If there's a will so there's a will there's a way but it's all about surrounding trump with throughout paper and of course some people are naturally boom out of talents that others don't have however it's not one or the other you don't need to be born. Alita to become a leader. I think that people need to understand that leadership is all about having the ability to get people to follow you around and personal ladyship been able to really brain yourself as a leader comes down to understanding your self understanding your audience and attributing all the things that we've spoken about in this flash cast until next time gumby the Bishops Bay. You've been listening to fill up the Bella in this cast by

Pestle News Ltd Bella United States Barack Obama Seattle Bishops Bay Fatah Alita Mariah Abbas Apple Quebec Minnesota Matt Neal
Dan Cockerell

Hacking Your Leadership

2:05 listening | 2 weeks ago

Dan Cockerell

"Hey everyone and welcome to another paid for Friday episode. Will we highlight people that we filler? Do a great job of publishing leadership content that resonates with us will include links to their work and tagged him on our post to make sure they know we appreciate them. This is our way to say. Thanks to other leaders and individuals that are having a positive impact on helping others become better leaders sharing their thoughts opinions and ideas online for all to seeing here. Chris and I have always wanted to use our platform to advocate for other people passionate about leadership and our listeners as much content as possible to help sharpen their own skills. Different perspectives and approaches. If you would like us to check out any one specific please tag them in the comments or send us a message with links to their content. Also please keep the Lincoln the bio to take a quick seven question survey about leadership. Chris Narrow writing our next book and we greatly appreciate your opinion on this episode. I WanNA recognize Dan Cockrell. Dan Is founder of cockrel Consulting Group in author and retired from Disney as the vice president of Disney's magic kingdom. Dan offers a ton of content in hosts own. Podcast called come rain or shine which I subscribed to in a line with tremendously as a leader on one of my favorite podcast episodes. Dan was speaking about decision making standards and said and I quote start with a standardized process and as you start teaching people the right behaviors. You slowly take away the process part of this and it will become your culture. He was explaining how it's important to create processes where people can bring their ideas and have their voices heard in space where it's expected and not judged and then how over time it just becomes part of what people do. It's so simple. But so true and I agree with his assessment. That many leaders do not take the time to make sure that it's actually happening. I mentioned earlier the Dan author and he has an upcoming book release called. How's the culture in your kingdom in it? He will be discussing a four step. Roadmap for enhancing your effectiveness. I'LL BE PRIORI in this book and I would definitely suggest checking it out as usual links will be in the episode notes. Great Job Dan and thanks for helping others to Hashtag be a better leader. Thanks for listening and let us know who else deserves kudos.

Dan Cockrell Chris Narrow Disney Vice President Cockrel Consulting Group Founder
Leadership Development at Groupon with  Dr. Eliza Wicher

The LEADx Show

7:23 listening | 2 weeks ago

Leadership Development at Groupon with Dr. Eliza Wicher

"I met our guest today at the Chief Learning Officer Exchange in Austin Texas earlier this year in fact it was the last business. I went to before sheltering in place. Cool event put on by the people at Iq now our guest has a PhD. In I o psychology and over a decade of experience in the real world doing talent management. Today she's the global head of talent development at groupon. Our guest is Dr Elisa. Witcher Liza welcome to the lead X. Leadership show much glad to be here now. I mentioned in the in the introduction that we met earlier this year At at a CEELO event where you're presenting your approach to leadership development at groupon and I was really blown away by that at a lot of levels so I'm just grateful that you're willing to come on and share some of your wisdom with us. Oh Yeah I'm so glad to be here It's been a really really refined so I'm happy to to share anything that maybe might be helpful to else out there now. I don't know if you're going to even remember this but I thought One of your very first for slides. It was so simple but sometimes the simple stuff so important it was called build great managers and there were like four step starting with setting expectations. Do you remember presenting that Walk us through that. Yeah absolutely you know really this was all about. I think as a lot of people in in my role or roles similar to mine you approach by either folks in the business or even a colleague in hr who a lot of times come to you with we need training on X Y and Z and it was pretty clear to us that we really have an opportunity to just continuously equip our managers to be great at managing their teams. Other reason for that. Is We have a lot of really young employees in the company. We've got a lot of first time. Managers do a lot of promoting from within and so recognizing as we know that this is just a really high impact group of people that if we can get them really good at managing their teams. That's going to lead to high engagement high-performance and really just kind of high performing teams that we need to do what we do. Really well So with that in mind you know. It's something that we all know. We need to just be really good at building that capability but getting back to your point about the four pieces. I think a lot of times. We hear these requests for the training piece right or the capability building piece but My perspective on this is you know it's always more than training People need to people need almost a whole ecology around adopting a new set of behavior. So you need an environment that sending you really consistent signals in a lot of ways about a ways that that you're expected to behave in just do your job so really what we tried to do was approached this With with four different pieces to the I is just clear expectations than I think. A Lotta people intuitively know what it means to manage a team pretty well like we all know got to do things like set clear. Goals give clear feedback. That kind of stuff but for a lot of our folks. We know that either. They don't know the full picture or maybe heard conflicting things in either case. We need to just get on the same page as a company. What exactly is it that we want our managers to be doing in the course of managing their teams so we set off with the set of expectations that we just called the group manager expectations. They're aligned to these higher level leader habits that we have but they're just a lot more day to day practical of. How do you just manage your team behavioral right so very very much the kind of thing you can you can see so? We paired that with some feedback and metrics we included in our employee survey a new section specifically on those manager expectation so managers are now getting that direct feedback from their team of how they're doing it meeting each of those expectations. So we set the expectation. We give clear feedback through that that survey as well as a few other mechanisms as well. The third piece of it is the capability building. So that's the training piece right and that's You know the the leader journey that we put together all of these different kind of programs and tools that we put out there. Managers the final piece of these. Four buckets is than accountability. And that's the thing that a lot of times you know. We know we send people to training but it's unclear they actually doing the things we want them to do back on the job so we wove into our performance review process that all of our people managers get a people management assessment that is factored into their overall performance evaluation. And there's a couple other accountability pieces as well but that's the big one so really just to summarize. We set clear. Expectations give people feedback on how they're doing against the expectations. We give them lots of opportunity to learn and build their capability and then finally we hold them accountable to really exhibiting those behaviors. Day to day now Elisa so much in there and you you summarized it so well and I just want a really for for our listeners. Because it sounds. I'm sure there's a lot of listeners. Might be thinking well of course. That's obvious. Why wouldn't you do it that approach? But as I talked to many Folks involved a leadership development every week. This is actually pretty rare. So what a concept I mean. The first is like the expectations in too often. There'll someone will say. Oh Yeah we have that leadership competency model but then the model doesn't tie to what they're being measured on the engagement survey and the engagement survey items aren't being trained on or even if you're setting the expectations measuring at training to it. The accountability pieces missing. Were when it comes to the you know. Y- performance reviews bonuses or whatever if your bonus for sales quota and not at all for people management. You know what you're going to care more about and so those are like the four cornerstones for I think any great Leadership Development Program. And then of course there's tons of variety in each because what might be a critical habit at groupon might not be as important somewhere else. It might have something else. Does that make sense absolutely absolutely and yeah? That's the thing I don't. I'm not really sure why why people wouldn't do more of the things outside the training piece for us. I mean we we really seek to keep things really simple. So none of this. Like Complex rocket science kind of stock. It's just you know just logical and trying to keep it really consistent so people are getting the same messages everywhere they look and they're getting those messages clearly they're getting them consistently and I think that's best way to really drive behavior change or a really learning something new So so yeah I think. We've we've seen some pretty good success with it in the sense that like everybody's on the same page and it's not just something you hear about in your workshop. It's something that you're hearing about in the pulse survey at Performance Review Time throughout all these other touch points.

Groupon Dr Elisa Austin Texas Chief Learning Officer Global Head Group Manager
Learn Pivoting Strategies To Help Grow Your Business

The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

7:44 listening | 2 weeks ago

Learn Pivoting Strategies To Help Grow Your Business

"Lauren is a bestselling author and a regular podcast. And today she's one of the Nice Guys Lauren. Welcome to the Nice guys on business. Podcast thank you. I like being one of the Nice guy especially as a lawyer. It's not often with guys. That's that's a reputation that doesn't proceed you because you actually are a very nice person very patient in the beginning stages here while we worked through some technology challenges and you actually not only. Do you know what you're doing but you did it in Nice fashion so thank you for participating in that part of it. Thank you for helping me now. I know better for next time. I didn't even realize that I wasn't didn't you? Think my microphone properly That's okay. I'm podcasting Hammer. Everything looks like a podcasting nailed to me so whenever I look at. Here's somebody that might have qualities standards that Of of sound quality. That might not be quite up to snuff like hey. Do you know that this is what's going on right now? So pardon me for putting my two cents in where I probably wasn't deserve so Larne. Your timing is perfect to come on the show today because one of the things that you do which is your specialty is really that pivoting strategy idea. So why don't you share a little bit about how you fit into? Today's really confusing world with everything you know. People being behind the scenes people shuddered So why don't you share a little bit about why you privy pivoting strategies are so timely right now sure thanks a lot. Doug so first of all. I'm glad you can't see me because I'm making funny expressions so I'm glad you can't see them but so I'm a international legal expert and business continuity strategist and when all of this started happening. I realized that I needed to pivot my business lightly and what that means is I have a system that I created called. Scale up checkup. Seven point inspection of a business at cover. Seven areas and one of the seven areas is funding capitalization another one being legal and compliance in another one being Business Planning and then of course there's a whole range of others but the point is that those three kind of Mesh together into this whole mess and I call it a Bala Gun Guide in Hebrew and Polish and Russian. For that matter means a big mess. And all of what's going on right now both personally and professionally in our world is a big bowl gun and we have to wade through it and so I realized that there was a need for me to step up. And take one of my seven Elements my seven essentials foundational elements and FIND SOLUTIONS FOR BUSINESS OWNERS. That were struggling and most of us are struggling. Maybe not those of us in online world but even in the online world people like like like us for example we have to pivot to speak to business owners differently. We have to pivot to know how to network differently. We have to pivot ourselves and our businesses to restructure and reorganize. And as we're doing not. I realized that there was a need not only for funding but to help companies that where it struggling with figuring out how to pivot. Here's an example. Yesterday photographer join my facebook group and she wanted to post and of course. I'm reviewing all the posts because there's a lot of promotion going on and she wanted to post about how she's struggling. And how can she keep her photography studio open so I said to her? Have you considered doing virtual sessions to help people learn how to do photography at home? Have you considered creating courses? Have you know I gave her four or five? Opportu oppor options. And she's like I don't want any of that. I'm like okay. Well I didn't even really know what to say. I said I'm really sorry. Like I felt terribly because she's just a closed book and she wants her photography studio with people coming another guy a hypnotist. I said to him. Have you considered doing? Obviously everything's about virtual sessions right now. Have you considered doing virtual sessions? I said have you considered a group? Have you considered? He said my client. Just WanNa see me in person. I'm like okay that those are those are closed closed minded people that aren't really going to be successful a pivoting because they're not even open to it however people like you and I realize that there is demand for services. It's just changed. It's a new normal whatever that might be when this is over and if we can successfully pivot our businesses and support our clients through those permits than our clients can be successful and we can as well and I think that that's really important to understand so a lot of people are struggling with financial issues and how to support and capitalize. The business part of why being well-capitalized is so important when you're setting up a business and it's just a crazy crazy time and I think that if we support ourselves in our clients we can help them build success which in turn translates to our own success so pivoting they call me the princess a pivot and I really love finding solutions. Every single business has a solution available to it. Whether you're willing to listen or not. It is another story. I can control that. It's like the twelve step program. We can't control what other people do. We can only control ourselves right totally so and you strike upon a really interesting chord because you know there are some. We've all been you know inside for the last month or six weeks or so in trying to yeah trying to figure out how our business actually pivots and I look at our space in the podcasting space and just think man things have been busy. I mean people have been calling people very interested in hearing and the idea of somebody just saying my clients want to meet with me face to face. Yes I know that and I would like to have a million and a half dollars in the bank and the reality of it is right now. We're just don't so. We have to work within the environment that we work with. What do you say to somebody that? Or maybe don't know what is the expression to the teacher will appear when the student is ready. What do you say to somebody that that just for the sake of? Just this is the way I want it. This is how it's always been. I'M NOT GONNA change. What do you say to those people because they have to wake up become conscious at some point? Don't they well they do or they're going to perish and that's why getting my group or Perish. The don't mean them physically. I mean they're businesses. Okay so I'm immigration corporate expert so I specialize in helping businesses come into the US and expand from the US but from all over the world so we have an added dimension to the challenge because the people are clients immigration lawyers. And I work with tons of them. I'm I'm an adviser to other immigration lawyers because a lot of immigration lawyers don't completely understand or one understand the business side of things so the these clients are here there on business visas right. They have not only is their business at risk their whole visa and ability to stay in the. Us is at risk and some of them are still not willing to pivot and you talk to them. And you're like what if your business goes marginal. You're dying okay. You're done and they just are not open to listening and unfortunately I wish that I had a dialogue to have them but the reality is it's kind of like when somebody doesn't realize the value that you're offering to them and choose to work with you in a sales environment or in a in a network environment or whatever that they are very closed off and now those are the people you just can't help you can lead a horse to water but you can't make it drink and I can only we can only do so much to open doors and at the end of the day if people are not willing to go through them. There's there's really not a lot we can do and I think I finally realized that I kind of have to back-off walkaway in order to to let them figure out what they want figure out. Maybe they'll come back when they realize. Hey I've got no choice. Because at the end of the day they really don't

United States Business Planning Lauren Larne Facebook Doug
Building Strong Relationships

FlashCast By PDB, With Phil Di Bella

10:11 listening | 3 weeks ago

Building Strong Relationships

"You're listening to the Beller. And this is Flash Casa. Pdb and the top. I'm going to tackle. Today is all about building strong relationships so being honest by many of our listeners on the importance of relationships in especially in the business load as start to build what will be the next phase of my business which will be the coffee. Commun- more bet that next time but building business from Nina transitioning from the exit inside completely of coffee to my new project called the coffee. Commune WITH COFFEE. Community comes to collaborate It's been more evident to me. The importance of relationships is obviously of transition from the old business and creating the new business and tell so many people have been supportive and already WanNa be on board and the rest of it and the common denominator is relationships and so I want to tackle that today. Many listeners asking questions around the concept of relationships. What do they mean some tips and head? What build better business relationships and the importance of it? So that's what I'm gonNA tackle today in the next ten minutes in this flash cast so you know in the concept to building better business relationships within two city to me is always number one so Talk about authenticity. You want to build strong authentic relationships because anything that's not based on authenticity is going to fall over at some point in dump the concept of a relationship to me is with them. What's in it for me and what's in it for you. So it's their strong marketing term. we talk about but some the importance of a relationship is got to be beneficial outcomes for both parties any relationship that relies on beneficial for just one party is already starting on the wrong foot and would become slanted so any relationship and that's whether it's business personal professional needs to be on the level of. Witham of what's in it for me and what's in it for you and the people that operate best in this constantly not so much looking at it. What's in it for them? I they looking in what's in it for the other person and if you've working with people that are constantly working on what they can do for you. This is what they can take from you. This is a great way to measure the strength of a relationship. That's something that I do often. Is I stop looking say? Is this person more interested in taking something from me with doing something for me And I do the same for myself that I know. It's always a measure that are like doing things for people are just looking to get something from this person because when you're in a relationship where it's all about what's in it for me and what's in it for them You've got this beautiful waltz happening and balance And then from there it's the basis of it is fantasy You you know. In order to operate clearly in that space she needs to be authentic so a few little stepped on building a business. Number one is set. A positive time everything operates better when it's positively A negative so. It could be a positive turn. It's come from us. The intention of a good spice number two is know what your value proposition is. What have you got to offer that is of value what the other person got to offer. That is a venue number. Three's you've got an understand. There's going to be gained for both parties and then gain doesn't mean always financial gain can be relationships gain is any resource A deep meaningful relationship Sometimes you win. Sometimes you lose. But he losing gaining. You've got to remember that concept of gain is not just about money. Number four is understand humility There's GonNa be times where You know humility is going to be a basis. You've got to be humble. You've gotta be you've got to have that ability ya on your errors on your mistakes And make sure that you operating in the spice of humility Next one is make sure that embracing your own personality and this again. All of these sit under the concept of authenticity. Embrace you personality. Remember that everybody's unique. Not Everybody's saying the concept is about being the best. You can be not the best that you want somebody else for all the over eating. Somebody else wants you to pay. It's all about keeping that authentic. Good space you know so embrace your personality next one is and this is is really really strong on where people get themselves in trouble. Many your expectation you know. I always say I'm not going to promise something I can't deliver and I don't want somebody promising something that they can't deliver so it's always about managing expectation from. He could come from a place of. Okay what's the worst case scenario? This is what's the best case scenario? You know we need to make sure that we're sitting. Expectations unmanageable level. And I said people. Don't promise what you can't deliver set an expectation or understand your expectation and it's in the other party's expectation because if you do that you'll always make sure that you disappoint and making sure that obviously in leading onto the last one is always communicating. Poor communication is the common denominator of failure asset at time and time again. The things file when people don't communicate and unfortunately a lot of times what happens is when things are going wrong. Well things are in a difficult spot. People start to freeze up. They actually start to hibernate. They start to sort of pull away from that upon reflection in your own life. You'll see that Tom's things they're all start to get difficult. A lot of people stop communicating. You don't hear from them and what happens. There is actually start to wonder what's going on. How is that? We're in this space where we are right now. What do I need to do better? How can I be better? So it's quite the opposite when things go wrong where they're not going to plan then. That is the time that you have to over communicate communicate more and actually keeping people across things says they understand what's going on so is seven points to me of ahead get build a better business relationship. But you know it's very important to keep things authentic to keep things open to to sit manageable expectation but all of these seven things fall under the line of an authentic relationship and authentic relationship. Coming back to the start of it is all about understanding the wisdom. What's in it for me and what's in it for you. What can we do for each other? Not what can we take from each other the next panel WanNa touch on building a Nutri Probably a better way to say is once you built those relationships teddy. You actually nurture the relationships in your network heady and nurture those professional relationships amongst up's amongst your clients because this is important. One thing that I always do is I make sure that our congratulate people when it's needed whether it's a birthday Whether it's a promotion. Or whether they've had a win whether they've had a baby born in new pet whatever. It is the opportunity to understand builds the engagement. So let me start sorry by Mustang. The white nurture your relationship with your with your network is to build emotion engagement and great ways to build emotion engagement. One is congratulate them congratulate people. When things happen. You know again. It doesn't matter how big or small the winnings. But if there's a win then congratulate them because this starts to build engagement nicks one is being in service to somebody so one of the great ways to be in service to someone and I love doing. This is providing professional leads whether it's connecting us. Apply it to a cafe. A roast or roasted to a cafe or a Barista for job to a cafe provide leads to people. Help them build their business. I talk about helping people accelerate potential. So if you're in service to somebody you do these things you start to build emotional engagement. Which interns nurtures your relationship number? Three's the out of giving you know there's a great book bobber could the go giver and it's a fantastic book talks about giving giving can be giving time it can be something small a little flair a chocolate on the desk out of giving is also another way to emotionally connect in relationship and sometimes it's he's giving a handwritten note sending a text and emojis. Sometimes it's like I said buying them a bottle of wine to say. Thank you very often when I started my business when somebody helped me get a new client. I would take him a bottle of scotch or a bottle of wine to say. Thank you and it's not the item that met is you'll find. It's the fought in the behind it. Mix value their opinion. Make sure that you're constantly asking questions. And what they think and what they believe in what you're doing and how you're going about something again. This builds emotional engagement. This nurtures relationships show them that their opinion counts. And that U K what they have to say and other one is in the world of technology to ensure that we're meeting in person the art of what a Lotta people forgotten. I've always made sure to bury people down in email so I send a lot of videos of myself. Unfortunately I got to look at my face but it connects a lot more emotionally which nurtures my network rather than sending an email us into thirty second video with the message on in this just provides a bit of a different level of communication engagement or I try and catch up with people for coffee or a drink in person because nothing beats that face to face interaction. Another one is making sure that you stay in constant contact. Now that doesn't mean not every day every minute but it's relevant to the relationship immature you checking in with each other. You're checking making sure that you're seeing how people are going. You know that they are kyw being in service to them because again these shows k. And the number. One thing that I learned from the days is that our clients loved K. It was the number one thing that meant to them. So there's some tips. Today's been all about neutering building relationships. I hope that this helps you. Go and be the best you can be and build amazing strong bonds with people until next time you've been listening to the Bella and this is flash cards by PD

Flash Casa Commun Beller Bella TOM
PG&E to purge most of its board in fallout from bankruptcy

Dan Proft

0:35 listening | 3 weeks ago

PG&E to purge most of its board in fallout from bankruptcy

"So the gas electrical purge most of its board in a fallout from bankruptcy genie will sweep down three fourths of its board of directors in an attempt to start with the mostly clean slate after the nation's largest utility emerges from bankruptcy the decision will leave just three of the company's fourteen current board members in place the San Francisco companies trying to win court approval for its bankruptcy plan by June thirtieth P. Jeannie went bankrupt after years of neglect culminated in its Frank electrical grid igniting a series of deadly northern California wildfires governor Gavin Newsom in PG's chief regulator the public utilities commission one of the whole board

P. Jeannie Gavin Newsom PG San Francisco California
What Confidence Can Do

The Remarkable Leadership Podcast

3:36 listening | 3 weeks ago

What Confidence Can Do

"During last week's remarkable T. We talked about confidence from the perspective of our own experience with our own confidence today. I'm taking a different approach. I'm asking you to put on a different hat. I don't want you to put on your personal hat. I want you to put on your leader or your parent hat or your friend hat in other words. I want you to think about others and yourself and so the question this week. Is this when you are confident in someone else? What happens lots of great question when you are confident in someone else what happens? We'll chances are number one. They can feel your confidence right and if they can feel your confidence it. It changes things for them. It incur place of encouragement for them. It's a place of trust for them as a place of them wanting to do better right and so get this. Your confidence builds their confidence. Maybe not immediately and maybe not to the level that you feel confident in them but it does build it. If when we feel someone else's confidence in us it bolsters our own. It changes our direction. It changes our outlook in our perspective in a positive way and so get this their confidence. Plus your confidence equals better results. That is really good news. Because if I've got my leader head on I've got my friend had on I've got my parent hat on. I WANNA help people be more successful then. One of the things that I can do is be confident in them. And in many cases you probably already are right. So the question isn't are you confident in them? Because I'm guessing in many cases you are the question is do they really know it now? I said that when we are confident they can feel it but not always. We have to make sure that they can sense it. They can see it. They know it and so we can show that to them and we can tell that to them and when we do it starts this wonderful thing. So are you confident in someone? All these good things can happen now. Of course if we're not confident in them the same things are true in the opposite direction. So I'm asking this as an aspirational question. What can our confidence do? It can help other people build their confidence and get better results. Of course if we don't have confidence in them if we are doubting them and they know that we are whether we know it or not whether we intended or not we can be hurting or hindering their development their growth and their results. So here's the thing. If you are confident in others let them know it? If you're not how can you work to build your confidence so that you can support them and help them grow as opposed to the opposite because people will tend to live up or down to our belief in them in our confidence in them? So if you're confident when you're confident let them know and then when you do that everybody wins. That person wins. Your team wins. You Win customers win. Everybody wins so when you see it when you feel it let them know it helped them grow. Good things happen for everybody. Let me close with today's tweet. Let others see the confidence you have in them? It will build theirs and improve their results.

Grace Lanni Is All About That Brand

Extraordinary Women Radio with Kami Guildner

9:16 listening | 3 weeks ago

Grace Lanni Is All About That Brand

"My extraordinary women friends today. I am honored to bring you a twenty twenty Colorado Women's hall of fame duckie Guadalupe Brazelle.

Guadalupe Brazelle Colorado
Best Practices For Managing Remote Teams | Hassan Osman

The LEADx Show

6:56 listening | 3 weeks ago

Best Practices For Managing Remote Teams | Hassan Osman

"Welcome to managing remote scenes. My Name's John Osmond and today we're GONNA be talking about six best practices for success. So here's what I'm going to be covering today. I'll start with a little bit of a bio background about myself will then cover some virtual team statistics and then we'll talk about the number one reason. Why virtual teams fail and then we'll cover six best practices that can that you can Use and help In terms of helping you manage your your team all right so. Let me start with a quick speaker by our backgrounds. My name is Hassan Osman. I'm currently a PM. Oh detector at CISCO SYSTEMS PMO's stands for Program Management Office. And I lead a team of senior program managers who are all remotes on delivering complex. It programs. I do have to mention that views are my own. Not THOSE OF CISCO'S I don't represent Cisco's business in anyway. I'm also the author of a few books about remote work including influencing virtual teams and don't reply all and I've been fortunate that Their number one Amazon best-sellers also an instructor on About courses regarding remote work delivered online Parts of the Youth Emmy for Business Instructor Pool which is selection of courses delivered for Fortune. One thousand companies and. I teach everything from had to manage your remote team To how to have better. Virtual meetings The liquid ven diagram. I have shared here Shows the circles that intersect virtual teams project management and productivity and. I usually kind of show that when I wanNA give a little bit of information about my background And areas of interest so with the project management circle. I've been in project management for most of my career work at E. Y. Analysing why projects fail and

John Osmond Cisco Hassan Osman Program Management Office Business Instructor Pool Instructor Amazon Fortune
Learning What Stories To Tell To Drive Success With Paul Smith

Leadership Biz Café

8:16 listening | Last month

Learning What Stories To Tell To Drive Success With Paul Smith

"There's been a growing interest around the USA storytelling in leadership. Over the last few years in fact I've talked about storytelling leadership here on this show. And past episodes and how leaders can utilize this communication tool to increase engagement and productivity amongst their employees however just as we see in TV shows and movies when it comes to the storytelling in leadership. It's important for us to recognize that there's many different types of stories leader should have in their leadership toolkit to help inspire motivate and form and provide guidance and direction to those under their care and to help us better understand what those different types of stories are. Is this episode guest. Paul Smith follow is one of the world's leading experts in business storytelling. In fact Paul has personally interviewed over two hundred fifty CEOS executives leaders and sales people in twenty five countries documenting over two thousand individuals stories there which he's identified the components of effective storytelling.

Paul Smith USA
Learning What Stories To Tell To Drive Success

Leadership Biz Café

6:58 listening | Last month

Learning What Stories To Tell To Drive Success

"Hi Paul Welcome to the show. Hey thanks for having me on them. I'm happy to be here so Paul I have to tell you. I was very intrigued by the premise of your book. Which I'm sure comes as no surprise to my listeners. As I've not only used storytelling in some of my episodes to help illustrate an idea or insight but in episode forty six my show. I shared three keys to effective storytelling. And for those interested. I'll be sure to include links to those past episodes in the show notes but in the title of Your Book. You point out how there are in fact ten stories that every leader should be ready to us and tell if they want to be successful so before we explore a few of them a great place to start here would be if you could share a brief overview of what these. Ted Different stories are. Paul Yeah Shera. And I'm certainly not claiming these are the only ten stories in fact I hope I make a point somewhere in there that in fact just the opposite you need a lot more stories in these in an in my previous books. I think I'd covered hundreds of different types of stories That my my goal here was an attempt for people who are just getting started in the storytelling space or wanting to use storytelling You know where should I start? What are the most important ten stories franny leader to tell so? Certainly not the only but I think these are probably a good list of the most important ones So yes for the ten. The first four go together because they're about setting direction for the organization so here those are where we came from. So that's our founding story why we can't stay there so that's a case for change story where we're going which is a vision story and how we're GONNA get there which is a strategy store because strategies about how you're going to get from where you are now to where you want to be so if you can tell those stories well. I think you've got a much better chance of getting the organization to go where you want them to go case the next forego together as well but they're more about who we are as an organization. So that's what we believe. The corporate values story who we serve set a customer story a story about the customer so that everyone at the organization can have a personal visceral understanding of of WHO. You're working for what we do for our customers. So that's a classical sales story or customer success story and then number eight is how we're different from our competitors so I call that a marketing story because marketings generally about differentiating yourself from your competitors and then the that leads to more and they kind of go together as well but there are more personal to you the leader. So that's why I lead the way I do. That's a personal leadership philosophy story and why you should want to work here so like not not you. But whoever you're talking to right so I caught a recruiting story. So you'll notice a number of different kind of functional type stories here but these are definitely not just stories for those functional leaders. I think every leader Regardless of function needs to be able to tell this at least this Saturday ten stories now Paul would like to do is explore a few of these types of stories that you just described of course some of them. I've already explored in past episodes for example episode thirty one which was the first edition of Leadership Espresso shot explored this idea of using stories to communicate a larger vision. So what I'd like to do with you. Today is discussed some of these types of stories that many of us probably haven't even thought about in terms of how we lead and the first one is the story type. You call why I lead the way. I do which is essentially using a story that helps illustrate our leadership philosophy or approach her style now. Unlike a story we create to help us explain the change initiative or an ambitious vision or long-term plan. This one might not seem as a parent in terms of Bove when we needed or even how we use it so when in our work week Paul does this kind of story come into play and how does it help us improve the way we lead. Yeah great question. So this story would be used or not This type of story. I should say because I think most leaders need more than one leadership philosophy story you need at least one but probably several and the most frequent Or commonplace you would use this. Anti uses is when you're on boarding new direct report. Where whether so? That's whether you've got a new employees working for you and you just need to introduce them to your leadership philosophy in your leadership style or you are new. You've taken a new job and then everybody who works for you of course is new to you And those are the situations where you need to set expectations of the organization or the people of what leadership to expect from you and also what kind of leadership you expect from them. And the way I've seen most people do this in the past which is really frustrating as they they have this list you know they they lay on you as if it some profound You know list that says something like my leadership. Philosophy has got a bunch of buzzwords on it and much of bullet points and the kind of thing that most of us could probably say about ourselves or anybody else. I I prefer to focus on. Value added You leadership exercises and I prefer to be disciplined in my approach and in a whatever but it's the kind of thing that anybody could say about themselves. These stories are going to be very unique though. They're basically going to be examples of times in your career where you've either made leadership mistake or or made a great leadership decision or exhibited great leadership behavior or saw someone else exhibit. Great Leadership Behavior or leadership mistake. That just changed your thinking about what great leadership is and made you the leader that you are today. So those types of stories are far more meaningful to people in helping set expectations of what kind of leadership to expect from you and and to give them a concrete idea of what that might look like. It's interesting how as you were just described Paul particularly about how it's clarifying expectations. Both in terms of what we expect from others and what employees should expect from us as it got me thinking about some of the stories. I've shared a pass leaders worked with and how in many ways these stories were a perfect vehicle to illustrate their leadership. Style or philosophy that in sharing this story about how these leaders operated it was as much a teachable lesson on leadership as it was a glimpse into how they viewed leadership and what made them so good about it. Yeah I think so so. You're not only telling them what to expect from you. You're teaching them a leadership lesson Presumably you've the store you choose to share would be an example that would teach somebody a good leadership style right so Yeah it helps them learn how to be a better leader as well

Paul Ted Different Franny Bove
What sets great HR leaders apart from good HR leaders?

Hacking Your Leadership

4:46 listening | Last month

What sets great HR leaders apart from good HR leaders?

"Welcome to hacking your leadership. I'm Chris and Mrs Talent Tuesday. This short weekly segment is dedicated to all things talent related. I A couple of housekeeping items. This Thursday marks the two year anniversary of the publication of the Wren's book. Vision CLARITY SUPPORT. A leadership crash. Course on the three pillars of success to mark the anniversary. We put the audiobook up on hacking or leadership dot com and you can download it and listen for free also started writing our second book and we'll be asking for your insight on a very short multiple choice survey. That'll help us in the process. So expect that available later on in the week all right for this talent Tuesday episode. I WanNa talk about human resources and human resource managers if you want more on. This topic listened episode 167 from November Twenty Fifth on how company Culture impacts the role of HR leaders last week. I spent about forty five minutes video conferencing with a law hopkins for our guest interview segment. It's fantastic interviewing and it'll publish a few weeks. During part of our conversation he spoke about how we're living out the legacy of the industrial age and how the first leaders of people outside the military were engineers and factories. This means a lot of the terminology we use today can tie back to that time. An example he gave was the term human resources and how it makes awesome. Like a bunch of spare parts or consumable items and for many decades it still kinda worked given the scope of the average human resource employee from nineteen twenty all the way up to about two thousand but as we know our language shifts over time in order to better reflect reality. The top human resource employee on virtually all org charts up until recently was simply the chief human resource officer or CHR. Oh but that title has been all but replaced in less than a decade by various names like chief people officer head of people and culture and a few others. The trend started as a way to attract younger talent. By implying that the employee experience was high on the priority list essentially replacing the mechanistic language of the past with more humanistic language of the future and at some companies actually happened. There was a concerted effort to improve upon the employee experience. But that wasn't the case at every organization. Today the language has been hijacked by virtually everyone and this means companies do more than just us cool titles for their executives in order to attract talent. The role of the human resource leader has evolved substantially in the twenty five years. I've been working as business. Needs Objectives. The rules that support those needs much change along with them but the really great successful human resource leaders. I've known over the years all have two things in common one. They don't wait for the business needs to change so they can react an attempt to add value in a different way instead they embed themselves in the daily business objectives of every one of their close co workers and it becomes strategic business partners to those co workers so that they get to be involved in the conversations that happen when business needs and objectives must change. They get to help. Orchestrate whatever changes happen and this means that never have to risk being perceived as reactionary and two they never let the job description assigned to them dictate who they can reach out to who they can form relationships with or who they can support with the tools and specialized skills they have. Let's explore those for a minute. I said that becomes strategic business partners to their coworkers. That phrase has been used to describe great human resource leaders so often in the last decade. It's almost cliche. Everyone can say it less people can define it and even less still can execute it. What does it mean to be a strategic business partner? Immed- you dive in and learn everything you can about another person's role what parts are easy. What parts are difficult for everyone while especially difficult for them? You then help them solve one of their problems or pain points by bringing a new perspective to the table. One that considers the employee experience without sacrificing anything that might be a business objective to that person. This is how the relationship starts by understanding that your objectives as human resource leader are not on some hierarchical list that also has their business objectives rather you and they have the same business objectives and you just happen to have unique skills in perspective when it comes to accomplishing them and when I say they don't allow their official job description to dictate who they get to have a relationship with what means that. There's no way anyone can get an accurate feel for company. Culture employee engagement or overall health of the people business and let's have conversations with employees at every level of the organization conversations not as your human resource leader but conversations just as a colleague who cares someone who wants to see them succeed even though their success doesn't directly impact your own success. These are real relationships. The ones that form even though nothing and no one says they have to. If you're already a human resource leader at your organization or if you WanNa be one these are the things you should start doing immediately. As companies realize more and more that the employee experience might actually be the most important element of their business. Those who successfully navigate these waters are being looked at and groomed for positions at the top of their org chart. Thanks for listening and have a great day.

Partner Mrs Talent Chief People Officer Wren Chris Officer Official