Latinx

Listen to the latest audio content in Latinx culture, identity, politics and history. This playlist features Latinx individuals having great conversations on relevant topics through a cultural lens. Sourced from premium podcasts.

How Writer Lesl Honor Knows Poetry Changes Lives

Latina to Latina

04:26 min | Last week

How Writer Lesl Honor Knows Poetry Changes Lives

"I think you for doing this. Thank you for having me. It's just such an honor to be asked and awful. What is the first poem you ever think. The first time. I was something in first grade and i think it was about a bird and my dad helped me practices into it for talent. Show or my very catholics old There was always a good talent shone catholic schools. And was there. Anyone who said who. This girl hasn't my seventh grade teacher was like you're really good writer and i was like that's nice and my mom and dad told me i have to be an attorney or doctor and then high school. I had some really great teachers who were like. This is what you should do. This is really really good. I thought about it from they're like well. Maybe it's something. nba can do this. I could be a writer writers. I love Invented just kind of unfolded. When i got to college And there were so many people that were so supportive of my writing and poetry and just teaching me how to be in that space En- just happened to what i wanted to say authentically in kind of tune out. What a lot of the other influences are other writers. I think growing up in the nineties. I wanted to talk about identity a lot. I mean it wasn't until the late nineties until we even had something in the census that allowed you to be biracial. So i would always get the questions what are you. What are you You know just very rude. Comments often feeling not enough of one of the other affiliate black enough not mexican enough. So i wrote about my identity and how i felt. Your dad is black. His new orleans. Your mom born in mexico immigrated here when she was fifteen had it those cultures. How were they playing out at home. It's lovely. I love my kids. Identify appalachian in that that even have that term to identify with my oldest daughter who is brown and we talk about how we are mirror images of each other's experience where i fought a lot to inform people of my identity as a black woman. She does the opposite to inform people of dot and so we talk about that a lot and she really pushes me to see how the world sees me had well. She's her an how they see her as black. I and how they typically see as the enough i in. What does that mean about how we move in spaces. It's a salvatori household. I think i get that. From both of my cultures. We do often that for the announcement. Those in then we have gumbo. For new year's we are very lucky to be able to tap into so many different parts of us. How would didn't play. Though when you were growing up oh my pearson talk about race. It was not a forward conversation properly until the rodney king riots. Now sophomore in high school and my father at the time was working for the lapd and so we. We did not have a conversation. The way i have with my kids about race ethnicity identity how the world sees you ought to be prepared for and then maybe around my sophomore year in high school right before the rise of doing a lot of reading and read the biography malcolm x. I say that radicalized much split on my activism button that has never been turned off since then it's pretty much in succession than the riots happened. An stuff was bubbling in. La before ride became there was a lot of tension between black and korean communities in los angeles and stuff. It wasn't something that happened out of nowhere. It it definitely was arise that shifted allots. That shifted a conversation. I never knew. My dad was locked in his apartment during the watts riots. We had never had that conversation before.

NBA New Orleans Mexico Rodney King Pearson Malcolm LA Los Angeles
Cuba: a vintage playground

teikirisi

04:35 min | 2 weeks ago

Cuba: a vintage playground

"Type freida. Hey carmen. what's up. I am convinced. Let's go to cuba carmen. Then go to cuba freedom. Yeah have never been as adults. Were both born in cuba. I've went back to cuba. When i was seven and when i was ten with my family but i haven't been back since then. I haven't ever been back ever since i left. So this episode deals with a question that we get asked a law when anyone learns that. We are cuban specifically that we were born there three days. Have you ever been back. Inevitably what we hear the most is. I want to go to cuba changes and this is so low added a lot of the times. I don't really know what to respond to that. I kind of just smile and say oh. Yeah that's that's interesting. And then i turned to subjects. Let's break it down so the first part. I want to go to cuba for some people. You can stop the sentence there and it's already a problem. I want to go to cuba. Those are folks who are typically in the pro embargo anti travel camp. Just saying that to a cuban american. Who's in that camp will cause some tension but saying that you want to go before it changes. I think illicit something even people who feel more comfortable end and actually might even encourage the idea of engagement and interaction between the two countries. The us in cuba. Because it suggests that you don't want cue to change the group of people that are saying this that they want to keep it before it changes those. Those people are not cuban those people are gingas or they're latinos. That are living in the us but this is a very us centric point of view because lots of people have been vacationing cuba for a very long time namely the canadians. People from the uk spaniards even australians. Make that track. Lots of people go to cuba. And it's not so taboo or forbidden. So cuban americans specifically cuban-americans with family in the island have been able to go to cuba for the entirety of time line. Were about to describe. Tourism to cuba can be divided. I think into three different stages. The first one is before nineteen fifty-nine before the revolution where americans were traveling to cuba nonstop. No problems if you've ever been to the keys of florida or key west. It's ninety miles from cuba and to this day if you travel there you see a bunch of old posters from the nineteen fifties and nineteen forty s. I traveled to cuba. Four dollar. cuba was open to americans end. Americans were coming in partying beautiful island and it was easy and cheap from key us then came the revolution and things changed entirely. Cuba didn't even think about tourism until almost the fall of the soviet union because it was out there in the middle of the caribbean trying to build entirely new indifferent economy who has time for tourism. After the fall of the soviet union cuba started to rebuild its tourist economy restrictions for americans. Traveling to cuba have existed since the embargo. Which has been in place since nineteen sixty two so the embargo the set of sanctions placed by the united states on cuba. The intention of the embargo. According to the united states is to encourage via sanctions for the cuban government and not be communist and potentially become democratic. Some of the restrictions include other countries not being able to trade with cuba for fear of consequences placed by the united states. Americans have not really been able to travel to cuba unless you're going for a very coordinated trip for example. A student trip or church trip in two thousand sixteen obama came out and said that americans be able to travel to cuba. I do not believe we can keep doing the same thing for over five decades and expect a different result. Moreover does not serve america's interests or the cuban people to try to push cuba towards collapse rushed to go. That's when people decided that they needed to go if they were going to go before. It changes recording this. In february of twenty twenty one trump reversed obama's policies travel restrictions returned for americans and right before trump leaves office. Cuba was placed back on the list of state. Sponsors of terrorism

Cuba Hey Carmen America Soviet Union Cuban Government UK Florida Caribbean Barack Obama
Sexy is Timeless With Luisa Diaz

Cafe con Pam Podcast

05:10 min | Last week

Sexy is Timeless With Luisa Diaz

"Luisa the welcome to come see us fan Saddest On people well-meant went guantanamo's kenneth lisa. What's your heritage come from who kansas louisa. Well kidneys louisa is trying to figure it out. But i i tell you what i am and what i've been doing what doing so i am not enough from venezuela in i grew up in venezuelan with my grandparents with i adore magnum weather. I grew up in small town in venezuela though what the super super state and they have the opportunity to come to the united states. And then some i came here to study. I went to the university to four business when i came here. Didn't know how to speak english at all in a hear about that. You didn't either an idea exactly what you may show one of your blood. 'cause i wanted to learn so bad so i wanted to surround myself with people that only speak english because i wanted to ask so. It wasn't very hard challenged. Because when i went to college didn't know how to speak english at all i so i knew in. Ibm it goes. I guess he'll was in noise Yes so but i didn't give up. I finished my education which was So so so happy and telling you a little bit about me from venezuela combing In had done so many other. Great things that you're going to be asking reward about it but you want me to answer the specific questions seven steps news. Okay good question. i can't him. I got married my first mary. I and my sick of marriage. Now when i met my hus- every though so i will have because my husband used to work for the american embassy in meeting in my country when i was ecstatic in one of the university concert that that was administered. Minnesota was beautiful lone That you here panda venezuela unfortunately very very sad contouring. Now people that really hungry that is not venezuela i grow up the minnesota eyebrow was a beautiful country has beautiful memories of my country. Anees very sad to see the country. The people desperate this matter saying is not the same by that is not when you are hungry on the is doing nothing for you. You know people lose the dignity people whose fact people lose who they are is like you said different things is that the footing is likely john gordon. My concert right now on his breaks my heart by amid my husband there in move here in continue with my education so that was the freeze tonight. Came him so you met him there and then he was like it's time to move back home anthems banana. Who does yes. We got married in my country and then via allows magnon. No noise is so funny but cook when the when i met my husband ex husband you know. He wasn't typical american told Blue is very hansel. I guess he has the most beautiful blue eyes is like. I was saying lowest. Lou is by didn't know how to speak spanish in. I didn't know how to speak english so when we met. He says ola senior double nita us like okay. So we went out a few timelines for launch. He used to pick me out for launch in. We launched and we'll look each other and we couldn't speak with assist mile. It was so cute in. We need that like a couple. Moore's acrimony guests at the ultra takeover. Nicotiana kimmy get it. I see it knows or he does he hope one day i said to hindu nowak. Don't call me don't call me anymore. I need to speak to you. I need to talk to you. Glad continual and so he was very sad in three months. He called me back. He was speaking spanish separately. Sap cohe layer is finding by himself. She in the newspaper bowl. So classes i Three mosey call me and louisa. Komo is task unit seat on more. Saudi yo who is there who is this. So yeah and how our love story star mary. Yeah

Venezuela Kenneth Lisa Luisa Louisa Guantanamo Kansas American Embassy IBM John Gordon United States Minnesota Nicotiana Kimmy OLA LOU Nowak Moore SAP Komo Saudi
Portrait Of Jose Feliciano

Latino USA

04:51 min | Last week

Portrait Of Jose Feliciano

"What i first met jose feliciano it was the year nineteen eighty six. It was a concert of his in california. And i was doing my first ever interviewed him now at that time was leon was one of the most famous latinos that i had ever met and what i remember the most was that he wasn't afraid to be himself. He was eccentric and a true bohemian artist. That was truly one incredible guitarist who couldn't get much padma five separate night. All oh and that air of confidence translates musically to everything hosts it touches. And if this is the first time you've heard of jose feliciano and you're not sure you know him. Well listen to this. Bobby bobby doc. That's what set feliciano's mega nineteen seventy. Christmas hit police one of the all time most famous christmas songs in the world but with a career that spans almost six decades ho says major milestones have come from him putting his own personal stamp a mix of soul folk latin and blues on well known songs whether that's of the past visa goddess. Zing zing on saying were classic rock songs three monks and even star spangled banner. Here's his iconic performance from a world series game in one thousand nine hundred sixty eight. Oh a that may sound like an average game day performance but it was a risk that then three year old. Jose took during the height of the vietnam. War with his soulful rendition. Jose open the door for other artists to perform the national anthem in their own unique ways there was born in nineteen forty five in lettuce puerto rico and has been blind since birth. He was five years old when he and his family migrated to spanish harlem and it was in new york city for. He developed his love for music and crafted his skills on the guitar. In the nineteen sixties or say went on to become an international sensation especially in latin america. And since then he's performed on themed stages around the world. He's recorded over sixty albums and has won multiple. Grammy awards was. If any see now in seventies join me in the studio to talk about how humor is one way. He has coping about his almost sixteen year career and to talk about one of his favourite relationships. The one he has with his guitar. I'm wondering ho said. When was the first time that you remember hearing the sound of the guitar and was in an instant was it. Just like Yes it was. You hit the nail on the head. How how did you did. You live with me have you. What are you just like. You just like telling jokes all the time. Is that where. I'm sorry to say that has been my way of accepting the fact that i was blind that i wasn't normal A what at least people around me thought normal should be because in latin family if you have some kind of disability they start thinking oh my god. What's going to happen which happened to me. I remember hearing my parents discussing my future. All poor jose. what are we gonna do about. 'em eat canned. Seize blind and. I heard that i made up my mind right then in there that i was going to be different.

Jose Feliciano Bobby Bobby Doc Feliciano Jose HO Leon California Puerto Rico Vietnam Grammy Awards Latin America New York City
Explorando el Instante con Camila Ibarra

Cafe con Pam Podcast

05:19 min | 2 weeks ago

Explorando el Instante con Camila Ibarra

"Let me like. Oh my staff human trafficking from alabama's. Yes we need the dmv n. o. J. except for learning list twins getting blisters. What's your heritage dive. Amelia's go was out those took on a separate Have asset one of your grammy gonna separate the Here is more useful elegance thousand years when he was Hoan as soon as i've ever lay story is pay scale. Get super porno instances lemire. They'll is presented scare you key. The is the joe. Go they alimony. You ain't got it's at been announced. Ucla overnight he gonna berto hamblur key. Less prisoners am doesn't the latin america unofficial said which was issue the most and believe that ian in the biens and thumbs. His nose is go acrimonious. You and he therrien russillo or is he in bigalow. Alert secret can make Geeky lucas that sioux city and the mutual is colonie said. Donald visit goes independent amid the to the question. Those is colonie semyon. Though be an exploration they have gannett is no porchet woman which Erasure sybil wrong lays the low sixty s fulfillment you to learn new jersey amusement. As course those the is is is lebron. look at percents. K alita is komo is muslim. Acela columnist mass mental pocket system. Paseo in every way bnb system muzzle celebration municipal expenses. Who program blake. Join me and explore under the semi and see as lucas as como que argument that ms must be an algebra. Neither is komo mail buddy mall. How do i address myself by son does say an low system operas us conspiracy though and thune says boorda hemp illiteracy. They don't have is opening. Meet a man. Oh it means is that they don't send. Peter is on a never known as if communication commission progressive limited colonie cello until Wisconsin than either eating here. We should christiane in three mahyco. In san jose california themselves stella me just Product style out of flick cinemas. Already give a distinct will not take to maintain meet unloading will not precipitating e of manal. Tatham makeable reverential. He our position luciano to limit the the that whole in salsa music. Don't go with people. He recommended real. Sarcoma is a component. This extreme wow it's surprenant that was on the border gate of blood you go. You're news alerts. You have done this. I forgot that you make the. So isn't this young. Little green ghanem into borough bar see less anger and thumbs his eye on them per se is exponential Make the give me. He was bobble premium pastas and which isn't spectacles spectrum. Your level or hemlock jingle mochis amigos de ultra spices. they're latin america hamblur. Mamiya where may i may. I is run swollen on. Wbz which he go. E which are the spaghetti said. It's kissy your rail coma. He supreme you out to the pasta seniors. That different this mandate is in manila's which is quintas ghalib's seon gone lows. Maria's gone alkaloids meet lessees mock exist and where he cook as as can him which simple does better we via name which are the was established. Those particular graphic does doesn't necessarily as much and does this glenda abbas lane. Guess it shut respect though who's just a witness Literal alcohol but still look in the radio. I'm gonna win in the industry in california that Sat on how it is toga. Promise on experience como que a head on commerce you your quake-hit has indicated quicker hip.

Berto Hamblur Russillo Geeky Lucas Colonie Semyon Erasure Sybil Hoan Lemire Boorda Colonie Latin America Amelia Sioux City Alita Manal Tatham Gannett Ucla Alabama Thune IAN
How to Liberate From Diet Culture With Virgie Tovar

Tamarindo

05:41 min | 2 weeks ago

How to Liberate From Diet Culture With Virgie Tovar

"Yes i would have. Maybe you could start with sharon with our listeners. How do you describe what you do in this world in in your mission and how you help us you know. Seek liberation in a way. Yeah i mean. I think of my work as primarily focused on ending fat phobia and for people who maybe don't know that word. It's form of discrimination. That says that fat people are inferior intellectually physically healthwise you know and in every kind of category and there's a long history of where that comes from that attitude comes from the things that you name checked are very central to that history. I think of myself as kind of like a creative someone who just really loves to be able to share that message in whatever medium bills right like if it's writing if it's video if it's photographs. It's if it's like you know my like on the go performance. Art of eating doughnuts in public. And i think i think the other thing. That really is very intuitive to me. But i've noticed other people have commented on this is like i think of the revolution and justice in the world that we're working towards as fun and beautiful and i think i bring that ethos into my work right and i think there's like different like activism politics. Justice work has different tones. I think all of them are really important right. You've got like the tone of sobriety. Got the tone of urgency. You've got all these different beautiful spectrum of human towns and and the tolman ignoring is like really unadulterated joy an effervescence. And i gotta think of it as like you know. I'm like we do justice. The world adjust world. The go world with more justice is a woman as joyful and so like. I love being able to almost like forecast that vibe like i'm like i'm like i'm channeling that vibe of that world that i think that we can we can create together. You know i love that so much and that's something that we try to sort of bring into tomorrow as well as we can bring in joy the work of justice social justice and revolution an essential right. Yeah there's this myth that you can kind of control your body indefinitely right and that is about colonialism and when people of color next colonialism on their own bodies they get rewarded not just from society but but from that internalized sense that were subjugated that internal sense of subjugation gives us that emotional thumbs up right. And so there's this amazing scholar named judith butler. And i'm like many people have heard of her but she kind of talks about like she talks about getting that nod from society and like how that that's so important to the spirit. Even if you know society is trash or even if you know the rules are garbage and you know the game is rigged like society is still really important to all of us because it's like it's like an extension of family and so when you're getting that nod out like that pat on the back like oh you know you're doing your role the right way. And that's what that nod is about and like when people of color enact that colonial act on ourselves we get that nod from society right. Oh my god. I feel like my brain just like exploded right now. It's totally. i loved thinking of society is an extension of family. That's so real. i mean. Use the metaphor of sorry. I don't mean to like railroad. The whole conversation but i often am like sake of society rather than thinking of something. That's outside of you. That you're like icu. Europe garbage. i'm interested like think of it. More as like recognizing that you have a toxic family does because you know you have a toxic family. Does it mean that you stop caring about what they think of you. It doesn't mean you stop like having a connection to them. It's just a recognition of a layer. You know a that's such an excellent metaphor and it's like how can i redefine my relationship in. how can i create my boundaries with this family ice. Yes can you. Can you speak about how you define diet culture and what it represents. Yeah i mean like dia. Culture is kind of a formal definition. That i use them. I think it's useful to kind of walk. It back and and talk about the characteristics of a diet. Culture is just kind of like the ubiquitous reality that we cannot escape messaging that says that losing weight and being thin at pretty much. Any cost is a really positive thing. Obviously it's characterized by a multibillion dollar industry like a diet industry but it's also represented in. I think the inescapable nature of it is what makes it a culture because i mean what literally if you kind of tune in. You can't even go a day without seeing or hearing messaging that shames bigger bodies and applauds weight loss and thin bodies. I mean it's even like the like literally. I love bubbly water and like lacroix like probably the most popular bubbly water in the country at this point in has the word innocent written on every single can like this idea. It's like zero calories zero sweeteners innocent

Phobia Tolman Sharon Judith Butler Europe Lacroix
Break the Stigma with Founder of Consent Parenting!

Latinx Therapy

06:16 min | 3 weeks ago

Break the Stigma with Founder of Consent Parenting!

"Back with another segment but this is one of our special segments that we haven't done in many many months. This segment is a break. The stigma episode and in these episodes. We talk with amazing professionals. Amazing people out in the community globally. Who are doing things differently. Who are doing things to advocate and empower our community with education through the use of their voice and story so for today. I want to introduce you to our guests. Her name israel saliha ribeira. She is a consent. Educator abuse prevention specialist sexual literacy advocate speaker change agent and founder of consent parenting which will hear all about in a moment. She's the host of about consent podcast and creator of consent. Wear both of those are trademarked. By the way rosalia teaches parents particularly child sexual abuse survivors out to educate their children on body safety boundaries and consent so that they can empower their families to prevent abuse and break intergenerational cycles russell liaison mission to end child sexual abuse dismantle shame and help survivors heal and become drivers rosalia certified through the canadian centre for child. Protection's omit two kids program and darkness to light stewards of child program as well as the human trafficking prevention training program auld on watch safehouse project although leah was born in el salvador grew up in new york and now she resides in northern canada with her parents and three young children welcomed leah inc. You so much for having me excited to be here. Yes i've known you now. Maybe for a couple of years more so in the digital realm space though i was also a guest in your amazing podcast. That was probably maybe like nine months ago. I think so yeah. It was one of my favorite episodes because it was about very much the same breaking down the taboos dismantling those taboos that are so hard for people to talk about but some necessary so rosalia can tell us what is consent parenting. Yes so consent. Parenting is my online platform. Where i teach as i said child sexual abuse survivors who are parents. How to empower their families and they do that through workshops courses a membership in. This is really to help them. Have those conversations that they find. Maybe they didn't have that. Nobody taught them and of course because of their own traumatic experiences they may feel triggered by the content of of how to teach this so i helped walk them through that process of educating them so that they can educate their kids and dramatically lower the risk of those children being abused and being able to break those cycles. And what motivated you to create all your programs so when my oldest at the time was five sos about four years ago. I realized that i hadn't done enough at that point. They were starting to go into kindergarten. And i had like panic attack because as a survivor myself. I did not want them to obviously have that experience. I wanted to make sure that they were staying safe and realized that i had waited too long so i started educating myself about how they teach children abuse prevention because it was not something that my mom taught me. Unfortunately she's also survivor but she didn't. It's not that she didn't teach me because it wants to. She just didn't know. And i didn't want to be in that same position so i started educating myself and i had actually a lot of suppressed memories which i didn't even know about until i started learning about abuse prevention and these memory started to surface and i was getting triggered because diving into this kind of education. When it comes to your own kids you become brittle thanks. -iety and panic that. How are you going to keep them safe. So i would do the training myself. I would try to teach my child. I'd get triggered. I'd stop for a while and i realized that i really needed to step into my own healing journey. If i was going to do this and if i was going to do it right so i started doing some of that and as i was learning about the things that i needed to teach i realized that most programs were teaching you why it was important and what you needed to teach. But they didn't show you how to teach it like and there was no one that was even speaking to the survivor. Experience to say this might be really triggering. And here's how to navigate that so that you keep going so that you teach this comprehensively and so that's when i realized you know all of the stuff that i was learning in the healing that i was going through in the therapy that i was seeking out had all helps me to learn how to do this really effectively. And i saw the transformation my children and i started to realize that it was actually part of my healing being able to empower children. And then i realized like nobody was teaching this and nobody was talking about this from the perspective of survivor to talk to other survivors because unfortunately children of survivors are actually five times. More likely to be abused because their parents shy away from teaching this or altogether. Don't realize what the other risks are because they don't talk to other survivors about it. So i ended up deciding two years ago now to embark on doing this myself so i got certified and i got all the trainings that i needed to do. And then started actually innovating some of the products that i create myself for those two pieces like i would always hear create a safety network and it's like okay. How do i do that though you know so. I started creating that like exact process for parents to make it easier. My mission has been like. How can we make the easiest possible for parents to do it and also to be able to reach the spanish speaking community so i started also creating products in spanish which are all free all of the products that i create in

Rosalia Saliha Ribeira Canadian Centre For Child Leah Inc. El Salvador Leah Israel Canada New York
Selena And Abraham

Latino USA

04:23 min | 3 weeks ago

Selena And Abraham

"In early march twenty twenty. I was on a plane on my way from boston. to corpus. christi. Texas selena's hometown. It was the early days of twenty twenty the before the country was still flying. People were still out in the street. I'd gone dancing the night before albeit a hand sanitizer on every ten minutes so i was tired on the plane but i couldn't sleep. I was ansi. My stomach was in knots and it wasn't just because of the impending pandemic. I was on my way to a month long reporting trip in texas interviewing scholars fans and all kinds of people for this podcast. Accept this podcast. Of course didn't exist yet and that's because the whole theme hinged on the first leg of this trip this is when i hope to meet with abraham gained nia salinas fall who's notoriously protective of her image and music. I'd hope to land an interview with him and also ask him to let us license some of selena's songs for the podcast. My is thinking was no music rights. No podcast before this plane right to texas. Our producers have been working on securing those music rights for a few months. We'd had to wrangle all these parties songwriters record labels small publishers and convinced them that the project was worthy of selena's music. But i knew that the final deciding yes or no would come from. Selena's family manage to reach selena's father abraham on the phone a couple of times before he wasn't really interested in interviews said too many reporters had asked him to many foolish questions. I told him. Oh this podcast. It's an oh to selena. It's rooted in love. I wanna show her legacies true impact and he was like everyone wants to do that when he heard disappointment in my voice. He told me not to feel bad. He rejected journalists every day. Meanwhile i heard from the record label. They said selena's family would not approve our request to license her music. I tried reaching abraham again. I emailed him left two messages. Nothing so back on the plane. I wondered how things would go down. Abraham knew when i'd be in corpus christi but he'd stopped short of setting an official meeting with me either way. I felt like i had to at least try to talk to him. But i felt this apprehension. This like skittish feeling. I've been a journalist for fifteen years. I've met plenty of people who make me nervous but this fell like there was so much more at stake yes to some degree because of the music rights to some degree because of his famous temper but really it was because abraham felt like such a big part of selena's story a foundational part. He wasn't just her father. He was her manager. Her mentor and selena. Talked about him all the time. My influences were. I would say oh my father. My father used to have a ban the way back. When and i guess it's where we get the musical talent brahmin and i don't really remember seeing or hearing about salina's mom allah growing up. But i remember knowing. About abraham. I was eleven. In nineteen ninety seven when the selena bio pic came out edward james olmos portrays abraham opposite of a young jennifer lopez. Selena

Selena Abraham Nia Salinas Christi Texas Corpus Boston Salina Edward James Olmos Jennifer Lopez
How I Made It: Futuro Conjunto

Latino USA

01:52 min | 12 hrs ago

How I Made It: Futuro Conjunto

"Though tomorrow. We'll probably very little like one day or of the past and so we wanted to pass fun imagining what that could possibly be in sound like and what are the things that they could be talking about in the future ood from little media it's let usa. I might gain a horsa today. Our how i made series looks at food off a musical project that takes us into texas rio grande valley centuries into the future. The year is twenty two hundred. The place is the rio grande valley in texas though in this future imagined by artists. Charlie villa and jonathan. It's now known as leo crystal. That's the fictional world of food content on a multimedia science-fiction made in collaboration with local artists and activists together. They imagine what the texas valley would sound and looked like in a hundred years. Futher hondo opens with a man who stumbles across this damaged bootleg recording of an underground concert from the year. Two thousand one twenty. That's about eight years in the past for him. This recording tells the story of the flickering century the period between what is for us today and the year twenty one twenty records indicate that notable local developments within the flickering century include the uprisings a twenty twenty nevada. Twenty twenty eight to the mars mission of twenty three. It's a eventful time.

Texas Rio Grande Valley Charlie Villa Leo Crystal Texas Valley Rio Grande Valley USA Hondo Jonathan Texas Nevada
Episodio 1 de LA BREGA: Qu es la brega?

Latino Rebels Radio

01:24 min | 3 d ago

Episodio 1 de LA BREGA: Qu es la brega?

"I'm talking in a different type of show voice because it's the bonus podcast show voice. That's right we're gonna give you a treat over the next several weeks. We will be featuring. The spanish versions of labora- podcasts. Which is stories of the puerto rican experience a co production from wnyc studios fudo studios of which. I'm a part of part of food. As a seven part podcast series that uses narrative storytelling an investigative journalism to reflect and reveal. How laboulaye guy has defined so many aspects of life in puerto. Rico like i said. The episodes are available in english and spanish reality desperate. Look doris move this booty. Guus in leisler ian la diaspora but i sent teleport. Alana casanova burgess media so she is the host to collective of puerto rican journalists producers musicians and artists from the island in diaspora s-. I'm one of those reporters. We're gonna drop spanish version of nebraska. So episode one in spanish is called gays la brea. What is the

Wnyc Studios Fudo Studios Laboulaye Ian La Alana Casanova Burgess Rico Puerto Doris Diaspora Nebraska La Brea
Gustavo Dudamels Harmony In Times Of Crisis

Latino USA

01:37 min | 4 d ago

Gustavo Dudamels Harmony In Times Of Crisis

"This and now on apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to podcasts. Food I believe something shocking that these bidding meal seek muncy play. I ipad important into recovery from the media kits. usa imogene today. who stumbled through the mail. The prolific menace willing conductor talks about how he's weathering the pandemic and how he stays connected with his roots. Minute maestro gustavo do. The male is one of the world's most celebrated conductors. He's currently the music and artistic director of the los angeles philharmonic a post. He's held since he was just twenty seven years old he's been at the l. a. Phil for over a decade and will continue their at least through the twenty twenty five season. But that's just the latest entry into mel's already legendary career. He's the most famous graduate of system. The national children's music program of his home country of venezuela

Gustavo Apple Los Angeles Philharmonic USA Phil MEL Venezuela
The Indie Locatoras

Latino Rebels Radio

06:32 min | 5 d ago

The Indie Locatoras

"I started as an independent broadcaster. And even though we're part of who little media right now. Latino rebels radio has deep roots in the independent lat next podcast base. We were starting in two thousand fourteen on blog. Talk radio over the phone and here. We are seven years later so one of the things that we want to try to do more. This year is to recognize other independent podcasters. And i'm so excited that the first two independent podcasters are from la. They have a fabulous show called local radio fan blowing. This can you say hello and introduce each one of your cells. Hello hi thank you so much for having us. I'm alan yaas. Hi everyone. I'm the also fem. You're both in la. Welcome to latino rebels radio. I am so excited to have the both view on because people might not think that i am a fan of radio but i am so there you go. I'm probably not your demographic lat next suburban dad in the massachusetts area puerto rican by love. Yeah so i do enjoy because like i said we started as an independent podcast. A lot of people don't know that about latino rebels talk to me about look at data and so the that are here and they're going. What is this what are you doing. How do you describe radio to new listeners. Yeah so look. I thought our radio is a radio novella. Which is an extra way of saying a podcast. And we archive the legacies union says and brilliance of women and femmes of color pitch. Yeah we've been podcasting independently since two thousand sixteen here in los angeles. We started out just as friends who followed each other on instagram and twitter before we ever met in real life in once we finally hung out we started partying all over l. a. and one day also hit me up and asked if i wanted to start a podcast with her. I said yes. We did it for fun. It was a hobby and next thing. you know. it's four years later. We're on the verge of establishing ourselves as fully-fledged production house. We have shot. short films. Were nearing our hundred podcast episode. We've been in forbes we've been in the l. a. times we have our little fan base. We have merged we have a website. So it's exciting. The podcast has grown a lot in the past four years. Wow that's amazing good for you all. I love the fact that you are just like f. it we're just going to create our own shit because that's exactly what more of us should be doing guys afraid. We're you like what the fuck did i get to talk to me about that. Because it is a leap of faith. It is a leap of faith. You know there was of course intention behind it but there wasn't really a fear to produce it to make it happen at the time it felt like a pretty accessible thing to kind of learn as you go and it was you know we did learn as we went through the project and i edited the podcast for almost four seasons. Did it by myself ma. When we were in the recording studio she managed the soundboard. So it was really. Diy down to like everything you know fan. You know i credit that we've been very successful because we didn't set out with the intention of wanting to be a brand now that we see podcast becoming more and more popular. I see a lot of attention with creating a brand. And i think that's great but i think that we've been so successful because we didn't start out with trying to be this huge podcasts. At super successful that you know has all these ads sales and press and all of that. We just started out as to home girls wanting to start a passion project you know working in the social justice space and thinking like down. We need to vent about some real shit. Truly exhausted broke annoyed. Frustrated hungover we podcast it. And it's how we got through our twenties and we're still doing it. we love it. This is actually one of the common threads that i love about this space that we don't talk a lot about my life when you know when i started rebels with a group of friends. We were just like. Let's just have fun. I love hanging out with you. We're all over the country. Let's just connect and share stories and see what happens. And that's what happened ten years ago. No expectations now. There we have had to back into it right ma and so starting with authenticity. As much as that. It's an overused word to me is the only way to take off in a lot of ways. Do you feel that way. Or it's an interesting question because when we started podcasting and still now right like we didn't have a network we were working with. We didn't have funders or seed money like there was no expectation from anyone on the outside. For what the project needed to sound like or what it needed to include all the raw material for the podcast came from us and it was very internal and just from our day to day lives and lived experiences and so there was no other way to create the show other than to do it authentically. 'cause we're just pulling from our own lives so you know it's like when you start off with yourself as the primary source material it can take you in a lot of different directions and we started to open ourselves up to doing interviews with members of our community who are artists were activists who are poets. Yesica salgado we've interviewed her every one of her published books in her trilogy. She's the best and that's been super exciting because she's now part of the look. I thought story and trajectory just as much as we are a part of her is in. We can go down the list of other. Latin acts and artists and creatives and it's similar because these are other indie folks in the la area or other parts of the country who are no funders. No seed money. No institutions doing indy menu building online and drawing from their specific lives in lived experiences to create their bodies of work. So i think it creates a really nice. Three sixty feels local and feels friendly. at least. That's what we're told by our listeners.

Alan Yaas LA Instagram Massachusetts Los Angeles Twitter Yesica Salgado
La Brega, Episode 1: What Is La Brega?

Latino USA

00:49 sec | 6 d ago

La Brega, Episode 1: What Is La Brega?

"The back of the truck the water was pouring out of the hose into the depths of the whole. It turns out that it was on. Its way to a neighborhood that had been without water for two weeks and a broken water. Pipe was responsible for the sinkhole. There's a lot happening here. Truck filled with water tried to reach a community that had been without it. Then that truck get swallowed by a hole in the road that was caused by a broken water pipe and lastly as adding insult to injury. The water in the truck was lost to the pothole. If thus unlock osaka. These are the things that happen to

Osaka
Yesika Salgado On Love, Lust, And Being A Hopeless Romantic

Latino USA

00:59 sec | Last week

Yesika Salgado On Love, Lust, And Being A Hopeless Romantic

"Yes. I'm meeting up with poet. Yesica sal outside of the hunts point produce market in the south bronx anywhere laws. It's a frigid winter. Day and were all bundled up. Yes he is visiting from her home in los angeles to be talking about love somewhere that is in home kind of makes it even that much richer for me. Hunts point is the largest wholesale fruit and vegetable market in the world. And we've brought jessica here because we're on a kind of a quest. We're here to find the sexiest most romantic fruit from fudo media. It's latino usa. I maria hinojosa today. Conversation with

Yesica Sal South Bronx Los Angeles Jessica Fudo Media Maria Hinojosa USA
Portrait Of: Jos Feliciano

Latino USA

01:28 min | Last week

Portrait Of: Jos Feliciano

"From through media. It's latino usa money hosa today a portrait of say feliciano what i first met jose feliciano it was the year nineteen eighty six. It was a concert of his in california. And i was doing my first ever interviewed him now at that time was leon was one of the most famous latinos that i had ever met and what i remember the most was that he wasn't afraid to be himself. He was eccentric and a true bohemian artist. That was truly one incredible guitarist who couldn't get much padma five separate night. All oh and that air of confidence translates musically to everything hosts it touches. And if this is the first time you've heard of jose feliciano and you're not sure you know him. Well listen to this. Bobby bobby doc. That's

Jose Feliciano Feliciano USA Leon California Bobby Bobby Doc
Immigration Moves

Latino Rebels Radio

08:08 min | Last week

Immigration Moves

"Immigration is back on track in a lot of ways. I wanted to talk about it this week because the immigration bill from president joe biden is formerly now happening. Like it's like a congress thing but before that shoutout all our homeys in texas Thinking about you all we ask have some producers in several contributors infiltrate media down there. Everyone's fine but damn things are just not looking good right now but anyway we're going to keep up with that. We actually your cross posting stories from the texas tribune about that on latino rebels so check that out and since this is Remote quarantine life and we do everything on the internet. Anyway you might hear some Sounds of remote life as we record. But i want to talk about immigration and biden and i have a very fabulous guest who is calling in from dc wicked smart as they say. Do you wanna say hi in who you are i. I'm sabrina. rodriguez in immigration correspondent at politico. So thanks for flatter me with that intro much. has this on the record. This is your third appearance on little media podcasts. So you're one of those. Rare gases been on in the thick latino usa now latino rebels. I feel honored. Believe me so. Listen let's talk about what's happening this week about biden's immigration bill. Take it away. Yeah well you know. The biden administration on day. One he put out his big proposal on what he wanted his immigration reform bill. To look like and it would include a pathway to citizenship for the country's undocumented immigrants it would include and i quote smart border controls which would be in the form of technology instead of you know border wall trump wanted and would kind of tackle you know a lot of the backlog issues and just chronic issues that we've seen with like legal migration kind of all those issues along the borders. Well finally. it's being introduced in congress. That's kind of the news of the week is now the big question will be. Does it pass. What does that even look like. We know congresses reputation for getting done. So it's kind of an open question how this will go in talking to people. Is this going to be a piece meal thing. Let me just say this. When i hear comprehensive immigration reform like it triggers me like i shudder right among. So what are your sources saying. What are people saying on the hill about the strategy to get this passed or part of it pass. Yeah i think you know. The energy is kind of different. This time though with everyone. I talked to saying you know this is a twenty thirteen. This is anything before. This isn't the obama administration from administration. An immigrant advocates have changed. Time has passed and they've discovered okay pulling a single track and pushing specifically for comprehensive immigration. Reform didn't work out. You know pushing the people that just pushed for the dream act or just push for one thing realize okay. That didn't work so now it's things working on multiple tracks. Nobody saying outright. Okay this is never gonna pass okay. This isn't going to happen. But they're saying okay cool. We're going to put this. But at the same time we're gonna push for whatever we can get if we can get some pathway to and some legal status in a copa relief. Bill we will if we can get you know dreamers and tps don and then have to focus on the rest will do that. It seems that there's a lot of open mindedness about how to get it done. It's a question of just they have to do it. It's no longer okay. This is the bill it's we can break it up. And the biden administration is receptive to that. I mean they're under no illusion as -sarily that bill is the bill and the only way to get this done they'll need republicans what you've been getting a sense of. Oh yes you know in the house. It's not as challenging per se but on the senate the reality is that biden's big bill would require sixty votes and that's ten republicans you know at this point in time. We've seen how impeachment has gone. We've seen how you know. The republican party has been. It's really doubtful to picture. Ten people voting for it. Let's talk a little bit about some of your recent reporting as well since this is your new beat right so the new beat music we should bring in in terms of what you've been covering i mean you wrote you know about the Remain in mexico program you know how asylum seekers are going to start getting their cases heard right starting on friday on the nineteenth. What are the logistics of that. From what i understand. There hasn't been a location at least revealed and people literally have to go to these places. So what is biden doing exactly. Yes so the announcement i mean. They're really emphasizing. This point of they're gonna gradually ramp it up. It's not that in on friday. They're going to process everyone at the same time or welcome everyone at the border. It's about twenty five thousand people. They didn't really give a timeline for how quickly they can do it. But they're starting off. Processing people at three locations with to kind of taking the forefront of it the biden administration didn't publicly announce it but we have seen the reporting that a one of the locations will be in brownsville. Another one will be sunny seattle. And you know it's a question of how quickly they can do it by the process as it stands right now is that they're working with the mexican government with ngos over there to you know figure out who are the high priority people who have been in remained in mexico for example the longest. Who were you know the most vulnerable populations and they're reaching out to them or they're having these people register and then get told. Okay go to this port of entry and we will process so it's not a you walk up to a port of entry and say. Hey i'm in the program living in you know you have to register. And then they have to do a cova tasked and then you would be brought in a while you wait for your case to be processed so it's not a free pass of okay cool. Your cases processed in you can live in the united states. But it's okay. We're gonna let you in and you can live in the united states while you wait for your case to be processed so we don't know like it's just literally starting on friday so yeah and the biden administration i mean officials. They had a call us week or they made really clear. You know the reason. We're starting out smallest because we wanna get this right and we want to be able to actually process these people in quickly ramp up the program if it's working well right and then another story that you filed which intrigued us. My producer myself was how house. Democrats are trying to push. Dhs to stop working with local police on immigration. What can you share about that about the two eighty seven g program. We're seeing you know. Naturally it's more progressive democrats that are pushing this and have the pushing this for some time. You know they put together this letter that was sent to biden and into d. h. Saying you know this is. The worst is one of the worst things. I'm not going to say the worst because there's a long list of them but one of the worst things that d. h. s does that ice does is this. you know working with local police on immigration enforcement. Local and state police officers shouldn't be part of you know immigration enforcement that saw their job and it creates a a distrustful relationship with immigrant communities. You know they sent a letter and they want to end the two eighty seven g program which allows dhs to enter into agreements with these police departments. You know they outlined different programs like the secure communities one that was ended by obama than trump restarted. Him and they want to stop using ice detainers which are essentially requests better issued by local enforcement agencies to get information or hold a person while ice plans their So they urged for those practices to end. The reality is that the biden administration has not weighed in

Biden Administration Biden Texas Tribune Obama Administration Congress Joe Biden Politico Sabrina Rodriguez United States Mexican Government Texas Mexico Republican Party Senate Brownsville Bill Seattle DHS
Episode 191: P.C. White-inos

Latinos Who Lunch

04:54 min | Last week

Episode 191: P.C. White-inos

"Hi this is five. Eighty five and this little and we are latinos. Who lunch the podcast. We talk about important things like he. This louis almost obsessive pinch. Hello hello hello show show show. Good morning bob alito. Be like we've ever recorded in our whole fucking light bro. Are we professionals. Or what he might see someone allowed or procrastinators to the max and we're like oh fuck. We have an episode tomorrow dental commune. I'm halfway through banana. Oh my god everybody get that visual in your head. And so how many cups of cappuccino have you had. You had I'm halfway one. I'm trying to master the art of latte art. Okay okay. it'll. I've been watching youtube videos and stuff you know when in rome fuck it so i suck at it. The results are either litter bleach or more or less. What like my two weeks for can point but little harles all. Like the visual art and willis. I don't like to just let's think a to maybe should partner up with a dentist started cafe. That'd be night after cleaning. Done a couple. Chino bye-bye bellido so yes. Yes state anthem brennan girl not. Are you kidding me. My body can digest who this early in the morning. I got a warm it up. Honey what the hell. i don't. yeah. I'm the same way you know how people sometimes wake up. And they're like okay. Let's go for like a big ass breakfast. I can't i have to have a banana piece of cake or something. Like the sugar flow in led the fat from the half-and-half in my coffee like to my brain. And then i can start thinking about you. Know bubbas shed that normally do yeah. It's because i think it's because i eat too late like 'cause i am now that i'm on this project Now that i'm back on my same bullshit. I basically work like twelve hours a day from ten ten pm and so i eat dinner when i get home at like ten thirty eleven you know and so does not hungry when i wake up because hello i just ate which is great for you because it takes me longer to fall asleep. But i'm hungry when i get home. You know nacho. Oh last night. I just had a bunch of leftovers. Oh let me tell you. It's pretty white. You're going to enjoy this I had some leftover rice. That i made and i also made a have been rob brussels sprouts salad. I tried it. Maybe once but i don't remember the flavor so i'm gonna say no so you. You basically like shave. The brussels sprouts really really thin chop them really really thin. And then on my god. I'm sorry they're doing landscaping my Neighborhood and you might hear a leaf blower but the show must go on people you you wanted us here. We are leaf floors. All okay So where was i. Oh it's basically just like really thinned out. Brussels sprouts and And then you put up a bunch of lemon juice on it because the acid of the lemon juice cooks it a little softens it up you know and then you just out a bunch of shit and you know you can go. Like full tilt caucasian. And add. Like cranberries and you know like shaved almonds slices or whatever the fuck ya thai flavored almonds and added how tie flavor almond. Yeah you. Are they different than regular almonds. Yeah they're like flavored with thai chili and lime. And and then. I added I added some shredded cheese and i added I do live two caucasians.

Bob Alito Willis Rob Brussels Brennan Rome Youtube Nacho Brussels
99: Captulo 099: Faketinas

Locatora Radio

01:39 min | 8 hrs ago

99: Captulo 099: Faketinas

"Yes shout out. I also just love how this question is phrased like are we getting new. Merge i love it i love it. Thank you cracking as like being a look more and like feeling like you're a part of a community because you are so thank you next question will. This is like you know now that we've experienced but talk about it so any advice for look as graduating the university. Our undergrad in a pandemic. Oh man this is. This is tough. I mean i would say. Find some way to celebrate your accomplishment. 'cause rule leads to be able to get through your studies and graduate in the circumstances that we're in like that's a major accomplishment so even though we might not be seeing big graduation parties or the traditional methods of celebrating. You know find a way to celebrate yourself because it's a big deal and congratulations. And i'm sorry 'cause this shitty. Yeah i second that i wanna say like second everything said and i also wanna add like i know it's typical or customary to like have a photo shoot for graduates. I didn't have one. That's something i regret. I regret But i definitely say like bookish shoot work with photographer that you like or like if that's not in your budget like a have your friend take photos of you make it q. Make it fun. Make it festive. So that you can commemorate and share photos with your friends and family Since you won't be able to have an in person graduation so yeah

Pan Dulce Cures Covid (w/ Frankie Quiones)

Spanish Aquí Presents

06:23 min | 18 hrs ago

Pan Dulce Cures Covid (w/ Frankie Quiones)

"So it seems like does want to go into it to work just going to hop for that. But hop february march. You do support black history month. That's another girl. That's what sorry. I'm sorry to my black friends listeners. Like it has nothing to do with black people black people. It's the same celebrating. But i also feel like when it comes to these months like even like black history month. I also like in the same like again. I'm not black. But i i'm in the same Feeling of how we when we talk Next month you know how they heritage month. Whatever how. I don't like it's great but it's a month but also like fucking celebrate us all year long. I don't know laughing at me. Very funny all the things i mean. I do agree with you but yeah the march so it's now march madness right some some like some sports thing. That's happened okay. Ziegler and more importantly women's history month women's history in glory. Yes we employ the women and the females to just. I want everybody like once a day when march starts to just like say something like like. You're female ish. Whatever the up like. I want you to like just wake up and like lucy right okay. Gaza a wake up and be like nipples well. This has certainly turned x. Rated one of those words is gendered. I'm going to say the other or could could be. I mean i'm not a police person. I mean that's ver. That's why i'm saying like i'm like your pussy but also lake both the okay. That's not a women's history at cannon. Okay wait just just just so. We walk into women's history month. Can we all just give shot up to one. Latte nex female in the community that we admire. Look up to and i'll start. Okay i wanna give shot out to my friend danny fernandez who is someone who is incredible. She works in the voiceover world also. She's a big dork Not door but like a nerd very much until like the video game culture the culture and yeah shut up to someone who is first of all hot as fuck highs like the sexiest person in the world. I mean she's incredible highly icon for the ages. But also someone that. I look up to very much because i also live in the geek. Lat next space and You know truly she. Someone that i look up to. And i'm like. I want to navigate the world like danny navigates the world so shout out today. This love that. Tony you'll go neck. Sure i like this idea. Aminu shadow of a close friend of ours. Friend of the show has done our show. I think you know who. I'm gonna say danny lorenzo creator elena might mean like talk about someone who who pushes it to the max everything she does. Yeah oscar when she did our podcast. I think you described as let. Let's carol burnett and like to me that's of acts as hell. Those are facts. Doesn't mind stove okay. While so i had both of those in my head for real Yeah no. I'm actually. I'm gonna say i would like to. I mean there's so many. So many inada. I love the night tags on ice off to I have a double one. I have someone that is already a name that we know and somebody that is not a name that we know yet but we will okay sort of cheating now but i am. But i'm i'm taking one for carlos since he's not oh that's good and it is women's history month so true. Take the so my My i'm going to say Chelsea dawn aw. We love her. We know her to the pod. And you know just Has become a very good friend with me of like all things in its. She's just someone that i love and i can tax and talk to and she answers replies and really like gives genuine like feedback rat adviser. You know we. I don't know. I just think she's so talented and like when it comes to business stuff. She's so great to like top to have another ear off and she's just a bad ass woman continuously supporting and lifting up women like every time we talk we also talk about other females that we love and that's important to know and then the other person is gonna be danny at least loved her one of my best out here. She's the same. I mean the same thing that i said like about tells me like to someone that i love to talk about like business stuff like acting stuff And just like all around anything because she also is always uplifting females and lights were just always like helping each other and other women in the community and latinos and. I think that's really important. I've been really noticing that especially in the pandemic. It's really nice to like. Have these women to like talk to invent to about things but also like celebrate their. They're like Just anything that. They're they have going on. I guess booking there there were like everything able to have like super cool thing. I don't ya i just love women especially my latinos. Oh well women. I think that's a natural segue into our okay hope which oscar before we start recording with the most enthusiastic this okay. Thank an astute. Listener would have picked up on our titled at the top of this episode. Porsche keep presents oscar. Would you you latest into our peak at okay tony. You had to pick up.

Danny Fernandez Aminu Danny Lorenzo Ziegler Inada Gaza Lucy Danny Carol Burnett Elena Oscar Tony Carlos Porsche
195 - Amplify Your Voice with Ronsley Vaz

Cafe con Pam Podcast

07:45 min | 1 d ago

195 - Amplify Your Voice with Ronsley Vaz

"Use your voice and he does everything he can to make sure everyone knows how listeners on my gosh. Runcie is one of my favorite people because of hispanic asian for leg. You heard in the intro. His passion for helping others user voice raise their voice and be heard and he's one of the people that has pushed me lately to use my voice more and more in direct and indirect ways. And i think more so in ways that he doesn't even now because he aside from me being in his mastermind for podcasting we are podcast. He also indirectly pushes me. Because you'll hear him he pushes boundaries he he challenges opinions and he's truly not afraid to to be who he is and also he has a fascinating story on top of the end truly fearless and that's super admire. Well i use my ears for living. You always hear me on this show. Interviewing people and i'm constantly listening to client carlos via vehicles some literally always using eight years. I had a huge limiting belief around buying expensive headphones. The root of the matter is that. I didn't feel worthy of spending so much on something so small for me after i tapped about it. I uncovered the belief. I was caring for so long. Which was that. I didn't feel worthy of headphones. Accosted a lot of money. And this is why i created a thirty day tabby challenge because i know like me you have lived beliefs holding back and sometimes they are so hidden. You don't even realize it and these police hold you back. Prevent you from moving to the next level and getting what you want the money stories that reminders. You're not worthy of expensive headphones the race. You really want or making the money that you know you deserve. I hope you join me. Let's tap for thirty days on these beliefs. Head over to tapping challenge with pam dot com. This conversation was super fun. We can go in conversations and come back around and talk about one thing integra three things at the same time. Which makes it a lot of fun. I'm hyper aware because at liquid that my whole life and so when i encounter people that that can keep up with me asking questions in then going around topics coming back to the previous one in like non linear. It's let's because we can explore in really cool ways so for those of you who are linear thinkers and already think that. I am a lover the police. This one's going to be a fun one. There's a lot of nuggets that runcie drops for us and historial on. You're going to be so inspired to keep going. Because the story that he's gonna share about his business his first business and how things happened for him. It's really going to hopefully make you be like whoa aright. If he did it. I definitely do it too. So seen mass. Here's my conversation with mitterrand's lee welcome to govern on. Bam bam awesome so broadly. This is the second go round when he tried to do this once and here we are again. You're later just about a year later. I think if not maybe a little bit more members from the first one. I remember we did yours. End mind like in the same recording musically and so we talked a lot about representation. We talked about your experience with being a person of color and having not really realized it until. And why don't we dive in. So tell us who you are. What's your heritage. Which is i'm in the us over everyone else. Rhonda's in australia and also you're in the future. We're talking about this before the recording Way the features eight thirty a m in the future. Now's ahead so when i leave australia night. Arriving in la. I arrived four hours before i left. Scottish has of his is amazing features. Spent a good day to be alive icicle yet. I mean i'm looking forward to thursday. Who's rawnsley what's your heritage. Well i. it's interesting. I've always struggled with identity and i still. I think i'm on that journey. All figuring out exacting by bennie. So it's a constantly evolving. Question alonso. I suppose to the questions constantly. Ask myself that. But my mom on a portuguese possible at my dad's in indian possible fire was spreading office. The only possible and osborne bearing in the middle east by mom was born in mombasa in kenya. So i've actually never thought of myself as a minority. I think is the would that i like. I never thought of myself as a minority. And i think that's the conversation he had maybe time because i was in an entrepreneur events where there was a session on minorities and someone asked me on going to that session and i'm like no. I'm not a minority minority and then bay said in hindi because i still understand riot out. He said it in job excellent but it's very similar thing like connie see the color of skin now's life. Us should stick with that so that was fascinating when that happened. What all that changed often. Black lives matter off the some conversations about representation about somew- conversations that i'm having so i'm just a citizen of the load totally when i find interesting is that it wasn't until adulthood. That was pointed up to you which it even much more complex and layered because i grew up in mexico city came to the. Us and the united states is notorious for wanting to put you in boxes. When you arrive into the us is like oh you. Are this whatever we decide. That box is and most of my audiences in the us but habitat people like it all over the world. And so your experience makes the answer even more layered because not everyone exists within the constraint. You didn't you. Iran's lead for a long time and i didn't fit him anywhere right so that was the familiar part of everything. Like i never fitting. Why didn't fit in need. Even i spoke in the with an english accent sauce incidents the ride and i come to failure. I have an indian accent and my indian turret still acts up. Don't get me wrong. But i had changed the way i spoke primarily because i think that when someone didn't understand me they didn't know how to ask again to the only way than you ought to ask again was to make like i wasn't saying correctly in the first place and i gotta john's to like you know break that down really until now this year even in the last few months so then now more and more i'm encouraging people to pull and that's why i think clubhouses amazing and obviously i'm one of my a lot but I love clubhouse primarily because you feel all these different voices and really listen because you know in cobb. Got to listen before you speak right. It's like a token stick. So you have to listen to this person and you realize that if you pay attention just because they sound different in the english is different does not mean that they're not smart or they're not intelligent in the points that they're making bright my whole life now when i think about it until recently when now when i speak outside australia people are like ozzy's you and then they look at me ethical. We'd imagine you have a browns.

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Episode Fifty-One // [Redacted] It All DOWN!!!

Bitter Brown Femmes

05:19 min | 2 d ago

Episode Fifty-One // [Redacted] It All DOWN!!!

"Its little as much as you can and every tear hazar award so even if you donate a dollar you get shot out from us on our social media if you donate like five bucks get early access to episodes as well as an extended version of the episodes so yeah consider joining a again. The link is an our description. And i would specifically like to give a shoutout to dare. C. t. niimi kathleen. Daly are elizabeth. Oh cynthia p monica am while the lupu. F christiane eveline p. and louder are thank y'all so much these are all the folks in our bb f a bff tier. So thank you so much much left. Your let's start the show bob three. Hello hello hello and welcome to another episode of bitter browns fans. I am one of your host driven. And i'm coming to you from los angeles and this is your other. Hosts cassandra coming to you from el paso texas winter state. The winter state with the best. The best senators the best governor and he could ask for. Yeah straight up. I too wish that my senator was zodiac killer but we cannot and kevin from the office of the same the luck. Yeah the luck. yeah. I love it. How have you been. And he's and he's a great father and he's been educated letting others are educating the ways in which ted cruz. I just want to add pictures of ted cruz to the educated latina target. He's so great. I love him Sarcasm i can't believe people at one point thought. It was a tinkerer. Those people are like Anna trump supporter. And on that. I believe in the national anthem. And that. I'm a man posing as a woman on instagram and so on and so forth or did she knows that like the name chickens once upon a time. And they're like oh. This is a very serious page for me. Hint cassandra peraza. I know of humor. They have no understanding of sarcasm like comedy to them as george lopez on his comedy specials like them. Yeah yeah bet. How are you better today than i have been for like the last year. I mean know that since the beginning of the year this year this year. Yeah does he has been broth But yeah no. I'm okay i am. I walk up before two pm today. So please clap thank you. I'm gonna find clapping effect and add it as well we fx. I know that must step a bar game anyway. What are we talking about. how have you been. I have been Good i've been in a good mood. Actually i know. I think they said that last time and it was still query season so i think all season was really good to me and i'm still in a good mood Despite it being pisces season. Which i don't really care for Even though i have been like emotional. So i'm like damn you pisces but I was gonna make a joke about season but then people just take my jokes too seriously and pisces already sensitive and so i was like. Whoa astrologers astrology. The new frontier oppression like. Let's just put that out there if you made fun of a group that is being leo. Yeah pisces slow. Big yeah yeah You know capricorn monistic. Or whatever like you're antequera. Sentiment is not accepted here like yeah no. I've been good. I've been i've been in a good mood like a beat. I guess and then all the should happen last week. That was just like and no obviously not not good vibes at all. But i don't know if you're ready to get into that. I guess if you're done talking about how you've been we can get into it. I mean because like i haven't really. I've been good. That's i mean you've been snowed and technically having you know no so okay. So last week on valentine's day

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ITT Sound Off: Back to Normal

In The Thick

08:14 min | 4 d ago

ITT Sound Off: Back to Normal

"Hello my dear listener. Welcome to in the thick. I'm jana horse. Itt sound off. I so need this. We're going to start first of all by just taking a moment so this week. It's literally just a little bit over a year into the pandemic we have surpassed half a million deaths from the corona virus in the united states. Half a million people who have lost their lives. Who should be here. And i'm just you know there are so many of us are still in a state of shock. Because it's like wait. How could it be that. This person has gone so me. Good assan me. Almost stay this. I send my heart to you. Both hulu and i and our team and we're gonna be dedicating an entire show tomorrow the one year of the quarantine and the pandemic. That's coming up but we're just thinking about this moment and it's been a tough week because this week. The biden administration announced it was going to continue the detention of migrant. Children refugee children. Many of them. We're going to about that. We wake up to hear that. There was a bombing of syria. Early friday middle eastern time. Yeah i mean. I just said to the team. I was like you know four years ago. I knew i was being gassed. Left by the trump administration. I don't want to compare the biden administration to the trump administration. It is a very different thing. Yeah but i also will not allow myself to be guest lytton in this moment. Are you feeling about this. The pentagon just said you know they were used by iranian backed militias in retaliation for rocket attacks on us targets in neighboring iraq. That's according to nbc news. But that's just a claim by the pentagon right now. I just wanna share this tweet squad. Member representative ilhan omar. Chico's great question to a tweet by jen. Psaki was now the white house press secretary and this is what jen psaki tweeted in two thousand seventeen. What is the legal authority for strikes. Assad is a brutal dictator but syria is a sovereign nation. That was four years ago. There was another phenomenal tweet. I dunno somebody named at newer underscores. Saudi sounds familiar. One of our producers. Yeah it's a brilliant tweet deportations check cages check. No minimum wage check. More troops deployed check airstrikes on syria. Another check and then return to normalcy. Thank you for that tweet. Because it's right like what's going on here. I'll take some performative should at this point. Could you just like go someplace and say we're going to open this ten million dollar public school right here in the middle of the rio grande valley or in south central. La or going you in montana some place you know instead. You're doing all of this and not giving us any of the frigging cheetos. Like i mean okay but anyways when we got the quick reaction so let's get into our first topic. We're going to be continuing to follow the latest on immigration from the biden white house. Because you kind of have to so on tuesday white house press secretary jen psaki who we just mentioned was asked a question about a facility. In at the biden administration was reopening for unaccompanied children and she basically said because a covert h h s needed more space so they opened an emergency facility to add capacity and keep the children quote safe and space doubt. Then peter do see who is actually a fox news reporter push-back. Let's see listen suggesting that. Kala harris said this facility putting on this facility was a human rights abuses committed the united states government and jill biden said under trump. There have been horrifying scenes of order at the border of kids being trapping cages. Now it's not under trump under. This is not kids being kept in cages. This is this kid. Visit a facility. That was opened. That's going to follow the same standards as other. hhs facilities it is not a replication. Certainly not the. That's that is never our intention of replicating the immigration policies of the past administration. But we are in a circumstance where we are not going to expel unaccompanied minors at the border. That would be inhumane. That is not what we're going to do here. As an administration we need to find places that are safe under covid protocols for kids to be where they can have access to education health and mental services consistent with their best interests. Our goal is for them to then be transferred to families or sponsors and also part of that clip out. She's looking at our notes and reading for you know what i mean. It was very awkward. Let's just be real before. Get your reaction monday because there's a lot to unpack here. It's important to note that this is meant opening locations that were in use or shutdown during the trump administration like homestead in miami florida which had reports of sexual abuse and overcrowding two thousand and nineteen with kids. Okay and this particular detention center is the one that vice president kamla harris visited last summer when she was on the campaign trail as a presidential candidate. And here's what she said then and so we are here to stand up and say that we are not going to allow this to happen. Not on our watch. I will tell you when elected the first thing i'm gonna do one of the first things is this shutdown these private detention. Just shut him down That was just in two thousand and nineteen less than two years ago and so while sacchi and others have insisted that these are not cages but facilities or shelters led by different agencies. We're just missing the point here okay. Let's stop with the damn semantics. There's a bigger issue here. Why have we criminalize migration in this way from the global south in the first place for decades. And there you go. I went off on twitter on friday morning. But basically when i'm hearing from advocates yeah listen to this line to tweet that greg sargent of the washington post and this is in the short term. We need to scrutinize whether the administration makes good on. Its promise to make the conditions under which are are holes. Children including at such warehouse facilities genuinely more humane see. No you're saying right there we're gonna make the conditions in a warehouse facility more humane. No you actually can't do that because if you have ever driven by the way i did and you look at an empty walmart and you looked at that and you thought in your mind please hold children. Yeah then you're thinking that you could look at that and you can see. Well how can we do it more. Humanely yeah the you to have been sucked into the dynamic. Yeah this is so personal so personal for you. I had a student who wrote an essay for me last week. This is a student who's in my class and he lives blocks from that walmart that was converted into a detention facility. Camp for kids. He used to go to that walmart for fun. And then all of a sudden he was like what happened here and he's reading that and i breakdown in my class because people can save these things like well. It's just a facility cages. You're exactly right who you're you're missing. The point fowler most came in dropped in on my barnard class yesterday. She was right there. She's been a guest over show and she's a reporter for vice and she's reporting gb right down. In brown's what we're the first remain in mexico folks were finally allowed in. Do you think there was someone. From the biden administration welcoming. This would have been a perfect moment for them to say. We are changing the narrative. These are families. These are friends we are welcoming them. Come in we love you but yeah instead we are being told to calm down to be patient to wait to

Biden Administration Jen Psaki Jana Horse Syria Assan Ilhan Omar Psaki Pentagon Kala Harris White House Lytton Nbc News Hulu Assad Rio Grande Valley Chico Jill Biden United States Kamla Harris
Reproductive Justice for All

Tamarindo

07:37 min | 6 d ago

Reproductive Justice for All

"When when stylist the listeners. From wherever you're listening to us we are in international podcast based on based on the data but in that goal maestas. I'm so happy to be with you. See you yes. I'm excited that we're actually not seeing each other through zoom screen. We are in the flesh talking to each other because those visiting right now. We're doing this podcast safely from our studio. Which is my bedroom yes. don't worry y'all i'm cohen. Negative as well. I'm doing okay. I mean i think everyone is got a lot on their minds. I've been thinking a lot about the folks in texas because they are on top of being incredibly impacted by covid nineteen. They also are impacted by incompetent government and have their pipes bursting without power. Freezing is just. That's been really weighing on me but other than that. I'm very grateful to this. Podcast how are you doing. I'm doing overall well like you know like you said we've got so much going on and there's always bookie forget the way notebook it though not so winnow. But yeah i'm staying. I'm staying grateful. Yeah and my heart goes out to everybody in texas and all over the southeast. Yeah i'll go right into my math raca. one thing i'm really focusing on is staying connected to my inner child so i'm giving them my mouth got to that like what do you want to call that philosophy leg no success over there so i just recently moved in with my girlfriends as long as we live together here go i know look off friends and so i'm really state. Can i say that because just thinking about this is like playing like having that sense of play because i think moving in and the furnishing It can be stressful. A lot of new things come up. But i'm trying to go into it with an energy of like sort of like playing. We're building a home. Like a komo have a little bit more komo a different kind of energy to seeing komo the beauty of it and seeing it a little bit as as a playing and so that's kind of one of the hardest things i find with moving in with a loved. One is having negotiate your space. Do y'all align in aesthetics for is that been like a like what are you learning to aligning. What is it clicky phillies. Yes yes we overall do. And i'm also giving him more power and i'm okay giving her more power like that's more for her aesthetics. Maybe more to her than you or that. You're that she yeah that she might feel strong more strongly and so and what's really cool. Is we have our own bathrooms now. Being able to have your own bathroom game changer. So just i know things can so many things are difficult for so many of us but really trying to still be able to find ways to play and see things go mcconaughey like wonder and i think that's why sometimes when people have kids they sort of feel like they have a new life in a way because they sort of see life like the way their kids do and the kids are seeing things for the first time. So just finding ways to sycamore. When you see the trees are a little tree or flowers or birds not just taking them for granted but trying to see the miracle in them so. That's something that. I'm really trying to embody more embrace more. So that's nice. Yeah let's go back to you. Let's go back to you so give me your. Give me your best suda okay. We'll i kind of started to talk a little bit about it. But i would say. Oh my gosh. This stuff writes itself is the time you hear. This is the memes have probably been multiplied quadruple. I don't even know if that's a word about ted cruz. And just thinking that it's appropriate that when his folks that he represents are literally literally dying to travel and go resort and to then think he could get away with it and then have to turn his ass around. I love the fact that he had to throw turn his ass around so the best pseudo goes to him. He is in every way shape or form but i am very energize validated. Overjoyed by the justice that happened by getting his ass on the plane. Ride right the and you know what. I'm gonna talk about this here in this podcast but one of these days. I wanna give the space necessary to the feeling of pettiness. Because i fucking love being petty. And i feel so virginal at that. I feel that his ashes back. So if you can relate if pettiness as a joy that motivates you that empowers you the way it fucking empowers me. You're my people and love. And i love the pettiness and how it manifests itself in your amazing tweets. Postal away saw. In specifically your your. I think it was a tweet. I hope he gets gets you feeling. I absolutely loved it and i'm so grateful that you would. I would also through that post get credit as the league. Even though that was definitely you came up with that. But i thought it was amazing and i wish he did say long enough to get because i just recently here on the mexican mexican children and i wish ted cruz got that too. And i usually don't wish ill things on people tell us alot medicine like he deserves that shit like were you thinking. What was he thinking. Oh and like think about. And i and i also saw like really great memes. About how like the fact that he has the privilege to be able to take his his family to safety. Go to cross a border to safety. What an ask what about you. So my saddam and get philosophy philosophical philosophical bum get deep. I'm putting the american dream in sudan. Down is still. But i want. I'm linking aunt specifically to the outrageous cost of higher education and the subsequent debt crisis that so many of us are experiencing disproportionately impacting borrowers communities of color. Yeah so you know. In the past. You could just work my way through college. We can't do that shit anymore. No sep way like that's impossible so when people old people mentioned that like that's not actually possible right like it's we can't. It's hard for so many of us really imagine a future where we're creating wealth and have actual financial freedom when we are so burdened by debt. And so i you know i know. This is a complex issue. And i'm not pretending. Like i know the right answer because obviously so many policy makers are trying to figure this out but i do think that it's some kind of mix of like can we address the cost of higher education or are there different paths to careers that where we don't have to enforce like people spending so much money on on going to college right so i think it's a mix of figuring out some kind of loan forgiveness and looking at interest interest rates and more doubling down on equitable payment plans for people in different income. Thank you excellent. I i agree with that sort of the american dream and this notion that you only made it when you bought that house that none of us can afford right and the fact that wages are not keeping up of going to school. We will talk about this depth because this is

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An Anthology of Puerto Rico

In The Thick

07:03 min | Last week

An Anthology of Puerto Rico

"This is one of the strangest things about the moment about la area that we're in right now is that people are leaving the island because they can't make life work. Hey what's up. Welcome to the podcast about politics. Rates and culture from a poc perspective. I'm madonna horsa. And i'm julia lorena. Joining us from new york. City is alana casanova burgess. She's a reporter and producer for wnyc's program it's called on the media. Hail ana hi. How are you good and joining us. My god i wish i was there. Montreal canada is steam keillor's report for the center for investigative journalism centre the value these investigative. Oh welcome greece deny montreal. Thank you so today. We're talking about puerto rico and we're talking about berea which okay once i found out. Has you know. I'm mexican. So like once i was like kissel and then when you figure out you're like okay cool so you're going to figure that out we're gonna talk about because you guys are like what is lebanon. Well it's a new podcast series co produced by wnyc studios and yes our very own studios. That's right we're dropping yet. Another podcast gonna drop this wednesday in both english and spanish seriously so be sure to subscribe labra. This is really fabulous to be in this company because alana not only did you host the podcast but can you and my dear friend. Yes and my co host. Julio ricardo eddie you both reported and produced your own episode for this series but i really just want to talk a little bit about the inspiration for the podcast. You call it a collection of narrative an investigative stories that a different piece of puerto rican history and experience in each of these different stories and in the opener. Alana you call libra gun. An analogy of puerto rico. Because they're really so many things that make up this little island. I mean elway is the recos. Complete gallo knows super. Super complete. Are as i say that as an outsider. Right facebook relationship. Yes it's complicated. You know the history of colonialism economic issues and inequality like an extraordinary art scene the diaspora that has changed. You know the united states mainland for ever and it goes on and on so. Just listen to how you describe it. There's an imbalance of power when you're but again the whether it's against your boss or some larger injustice it's an underdogs word abut implies a challenge. We can't really solve so you have to hustle to get around it. An import rico. There are a lot of challenges that seem unsolvable. Puerto ricans are constantly but again though with the jobs that don't pay enough the electricity that comes and goes their kids schools. That are closed the broken traffic lights. That never get fixed the hospital. That doesn't get built the government's debts that aren't paid the frustration over status austerity. Colonialism and lebanon is a word that came to the states with the diaspora who have had to find a way to deal with a new language to navigate somehow being immigrants and citizens at the same time to struggle with displacement and discrimination so the series looks at this notion of labrada. You also talk about resilience. This concept that came to define puerto ricans especially after hurricane. Maria devastated the island in two thousand seventeen so alana when thinking about lebedeva what is the main takeaway the have in terms of understanding this really complicated. Puerto rican experience. What we really wanted to do was to bring the same kind of thoughtful storytelling and reporting that comes from produced audio journalism but also recognize that. There's so much talent. There's so many different people who can really add to an understanding of puerto rico. So i didn't want to just host this myself. So right away. merlin bishop from doodo and i started thinking about you know how we could assemble some kind of avengers squad of the best adventures of journalists down. You know coming together right. So we know that could eastern keillor's who's with us right now. She's been reporting on reconstruction for an. I put that in komi yesterday. Like in quotation marks after media. And you know. We have loose valentine on our team as well. I think nobody knows the debt crisis better than he does. And you know yeti matt bonier. Who's a political anthropologist. And a writer. She joined us. Chris gregory riveta. Who's a photo journalist. Who's been working on a project about lescott betas for like six years. He doesn't episode about that so we just we wanted to really open up a space. Where a lot of the stories that inform the current context but haven't really been told where we could serve make space for for those stories to be told him both languages and then thinking about you know this is an anthology. So what pulls all these stories together. There's a sense of the you know the individual bodega and also the collective data right like when we're inevitable data and so hard to translate but it's like you're dealing with something but you don't really like you can't solve a problem it also depends on how you say it right. If someone says like gone with us you can say like hockey onoda. You know like here just dealing with it. I'm coping you know making it work and there's a hopefulness in that sometimes right like like you. Just lie down in front of traffic. If you weren't going to get more like lebanon is kind of like a hopeful. Like i'm still here. Yeah i'm trying to make it. Work is like and i think especially in this last year you know. When like non spanish speakers like non puerto ricans have asked me like you know how are you doing. I want to say. I got you know like i haven't given up. I'm holding it together but also sometimes you don't even want to say like how you really doing because it's just It's a lot. But you know like being puerto rican is really great so it's not like a one no kind of series and his julio's piece particularly is really like a celebration and thank you for bringing that sense of joy to it i try. He tries our charter. Bring joyce she's know what about you. we know. we're asking the big question in very little time. But you know camo to the phoenix look as la brea experience

Puerto Rico Madonna Horsa Julia Lorena Alana Casanova Burgess Center For Investigative Journ Wnyc Studios Julio Ricardo Eddie Keillor Alana Lebanon Wnyc Kissel Labrada Berea Lebedeva Elway Merlin Bishop Montreal
Episode 270: Keeping It Real with the Super Mams - Post-Pandemic Dreams and Acknowledging Personal Growth

SuperMamas

06:15 min | Last week

Episode 270: Keeping It Real with the Super Mams - Post-Pandemic Dreams and Acknowledging Personal Growth

"And for two four three two six three seven zero seven also. Don't forget to stay tuned at the end of the show. Four or tip our pick of the week hashtag add to cart. 'cause we being selling a women selling it'd been buying a lot of crap lately and once a month to record what we call a keeping up with the super mass where we just catch up and talk and chat so officer you know being me doing weekend activities You know being a mom been excited to begin may vaccine soon Who just feel like. I don't know if it started getting better david mid to me. Here's arm double-dose me for those of you who don't believe night actually were essential food. Workers were in. The restaurant industry worked. So we're up next They said i. So i by the time you are probably not by the time. You're listening to his but very soon shortly after some so excited i know finally get this. I know things are changing very rapidly. I can't believe well i. I can't believe we're almost a year into this year. right remember. one day we went to pick up the kids from school and then they never went back. it's going to be a whole year and it looks like things are getting better of sober excited about being on. Just whatever that's gonna look like. I'm not let me tell you i'm let me tell you i'm getting mad like seen on a plane and i'm out of this. I am added this way without kids in a women. Hasn't i talked about it. We had an extensive conversation in. We are taking the kids with us. Or you're going. I i don't know yet. We have we book him because having booked it yet. But you're traveling with a baby. Yea tonight. I think we're still going to do a weekend. Him and i but you know for like the week for nights and leave Yeah i'm definitely taking with school with school with the kids in like. Let's let's get outta here. They disturb it for sure for sure for sure might have been also cannot wait to leave. But i think the first group that we're gonna do is actually to bissett family to visit his family in mexico because he hasn't seen them in the pandemic and you know he really wants to go in and see them. Nine stone is what a wonderful son he. I'm like nope not that. The kids know. I mean we wanted to go see family anyway. So we're just like. I think the first one we're going to do but after that we are we are going somewhere. I don't know where but we're going to on with the kids who can't wait. We're going with the kids and the dog. We're reading the dog to whatever we go. So what did you do this weekend. Oh my god. I did a it was a great weekend. It was a wonderful weekend weather weekend. Okay so you know how the week before. I went with my husband to our little mini. Get away and we were so excited about the canal. I mean we talked about last last week and it was like so i told them los angeles venice venice canals so i told them we should see the kids. And we're like we take. You haven't been out really anywhere so we're like we're going to go to this place we're gonna walk we're gonna go. We got them already all hyped up and they were like give us a clue gives the closer we were giving them clues throughout the throughout the way we got there. We started walking. And we're like we're almost like going to be. I'm like no no. No we get there. Were like ok guys were here. We turned around and when we get there. There's no water on the canals okay. I know they train them like randomly and canals. No idea but they were drained. A look really like totally they were like. How do we have to be here for old. It was like mont law. You know like you were like yeah. We're going to go. He said like an amusement park is at you know. We're like because there's canoe than we weren't telling them you know we were hyping it up so much and then we got there there. Were like what. what is this place. Why did you bring me here. Why did you bring here. But then you know. We walked around after and They they they enjoyed it and We actually went to a restaurant for the first time and the whole year it a whole year with the kids and it was it was good. I mean i was like you know but it was like an outdoor place in us big. They have sand in the restaurant so it was like you know they were the sand. Nobody not around anyone And then at some point they were getting really loud and at first i was a kate. come out and then also my husband what they haven't been out in a year they have not been none of the year. They haven't been any like anywhere so let him be and they were just like they were the bill below like little puppies. When you open the door you let him out like they. Yeah they were really. That's about it. Yes i was fun and then We actually had the opportunity to watch tom and jerry the movie i watched it too. It's so you and so funny. It's so funny they really really really take. I love thrown away in such a good movie. I really enjoyed it. They re i think it's not just. I think it's the first movie i've ever watched that hassle. Sort of graphics. Well like marine

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