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Listen to the latest audio content in Latinx culture, identity, politics and history. This playlist features Latinx individuals having great conversations on relevant topics through a cultural lens. Sourced from premium podcasts.

How Rolling Stones Suzy Exposito Made History with Her Bad Bunny Cover Story

Latina to Latina

5:51 listening | 1 d ago

How Rolling Stones Suzy Exposito Made History with Her Bad Bunny Cover Story

"Makes a good celebrity profile? Great when I don't like about some celebrity profiles is like the ones that that come off like being a little too. There's a word for it. Like ingratiating or like defying people in a way. That's is so smarmy to me for me. I broke my own rule in this story. Actually because I usually don't talk about myself at all and profiles. I think that that can kill the buzz a lot of time. I don't like when people start reflecting on their own lives in the middle of somebody else's profile I usually find it distracting. I think the point where I broke. That rule was when I talked about disclosing to him like my sexuality and I could you identify as bi. I do identify as bisexual. Yeah and I have for the last ten years at least openly and so I chose to have this part of the conversation. You know closet because I'm still at my grandmother's house and that's still something. It's like a sore subject for my family. It just is and like but at this point. I'm like thirty years old. I'm like what are y'all GonNa to do ground me like spear also hiding in a closet. Yeah I had to really reckon with the fact that I'm still worried about making my family uncomfortable and I think a lot of US still a lot of us can be like what like forty five sixty instill never be able to really discuss that side of ourselves with families like I have so many people in my family who are also queer. It's just they don't talk about it. You know every once in a while somebody has a roommate. That's like a common thing or somebody like brings their friend to Christmas. You know it's coded and that's just how things are in my family and in so many other families. I waited until I was in a serious relationship with a woman to come out because at that point I was like. I don't know I knew how I felt for many years by. I didn't even take it seriously until I was in a relationship. That's when I came out to my mom. She was super supportive. And like really sweet about it. This would have been ten years ago. An also like anyone who is queer also knows that like coming out is not. It's not like a one and done kind of thing you'll spend like the rest of your life coming out over and over again like I did my article. That's just like one of the many times and I also was so struck by an exchange that you had on twitter because in addition to interviewing buddy you interviewed a home Mulu of celebrities including Ricky Martin and it evoked someone to respond that like there was always a lot of homophobia around Ricky Martin. It wasn't yes just when he came out that he experienced that homophobia that those of us who sort of knew about Ricky Martin were exposed to that like it was always there and it was always a subject of conversation and that that predates the coming out very often. Yes it dies. Link oftentimes like you'll get bullied for being like any kind of queer. You'll kept bullied for many years before you even own up to it. Why did you choose to weave that into this story? It was something that I discussed with my editor because it was like after. I did that you know like when I when I brought my computer in the closet. I was like a like a met my in house lake. I don't want her like listening to this conversation. It's so funny. I love her so much but she like she liked to listen to some of my interviews for one because I was speaking in Spanish. That's kind of rare for my family. They don't they. Don't really speak Spanish with me so I think that she was kind of entertained by hearing me analyst like God. I can't do this but then when I thought about it a little bit more on like it is because I still can't talk about this around my family I just can't and what bad bunny did with his drag video. It was so powerful. Because I really don't think I I mean Ricky Martin is gay. I don't think Ricky Martin would have gotten away with that I really don't he presents as very masculine and if he tried doing that even even this year like if he tried to do that with people really accept it. It's like I think to this day. Like people prefer gay men to be masculine in like street passing or whatever. That's a very real thing so for someone like bad bunny who's in a very secure relationship with a woman. And WHO's the most popular rapper slash singer in Latin America right now and end in the US for someone like him to go out on a limb and dress in drag as like a show of solidarity with Queer People? I was like he's doing this so I don't have to feel this way anymore. And so that's when I decided to set the scene. We stayed in the closet for like an hour and just talked about. We talked about gender and sexuality in like why he started caring about all this because he really doesn't have to care and the fact that he goes out there and says like I'm not okay with this is

Ricky Martin United States Twitter Latin America House Lake Analyst Editor
How Rolling Stones Suzy Exposito Made History with Her Bad Bunny Cover Story

Latina to Latina

6:38 listening | 1 d ago

How Rolling Stones Suzy Exposito Made History with Her Bad Bunny Cover Story

"I feel like I am constantly pitching celebrities and publicists. So let me ask you before we even get into the making of this. How were you able to score and interview with Bad Bunny? Luckily I had interviewed him before I interviewed him at the Latin grammys in two thousand eighteen. And I seem to have caught him at a time where he was definitely. You know making it big in the Latin space but had just you know started to crack the anglophone market and I went to the Latin grammys and figured what this is where I'm going to find him. Generally bad bunny is a bit of an elusive chanteuse. So he to quote Mariah Carey He doesn't like doing very many interviews and at the time I got like maybe fifteen twenty minutes with him honestly. He's just such a freak. I love it. I feel like Latin music has been sorely lacking in legit freaks. And I'm someone who had described myself as a freak by that. I mean people who are not afraid to try new things people who aren't afraid of like breaking ground who aren't afraid of experimenting whether it's like you know like bad bunny. I think it's in both his style like personal style and also in his music and in the ideas that he shares so I kept in touch. With the publicist. Sue Haley. Sola in I told her I was like I really want him on the cover of rolling stone and she was like okay. Let me know how we can make that happen was like well? Let me know the next time. He's putting out an album and we'll start to work on it. I think lake just every time they would talk about the cover. I be like I think bunnies GonNa do something really big soon. We should be ready for it. there's also the Jaylo insecure a super bowl coming up. I didn't know he was going to be performing with them but I suspected because he did that song with Jaylo before He might be one of their surprise guests. And then he appeared. Soi in Swarovski crystals in so I went back to my bosses and I was like look this dude. He's blowing up like he performed for the biggest most mainstream television audience in the United States at this point like come on and they were like. Okay let's talk about it so I talked to sue Haley and I was like I think we need to make an impression and she was like okay. He's going to be on fallon. Why don't we stop by your office? I was like stop by the office. Bring a few of the songs I'm going to invite my editors and then they can hear the music and like chat with him a little bit and so he came to the office and I only invited like maybe six or seven people and within like two songs. The office just filled up with people. Once they realized bad bunny was in. The office went from like ten people to like fifty sixty people crowded into the conference room. Just like listening to his music. He played a few songs and people were super stoked. I mean the energy in the room was just like so. It was just like dynamite. You know like people were dancing. Kinda grooving with it editors for like are a we can. We can see the appeal and he's so charismatic even for people like who don't speak Spanish. He's his charisma. Just like shines through. They were like all right. Let's do a cover like that's how it happened. How did Gabriela Bailing Gary Get to shoot the cover? Oh it was. It was an idea our creative director had. We couldn't fly anybody there. So Katrina was like. Why don't we ask bad? Bunny if there's anyone like within close proximity to him who might be able to take some nice photos and like she'd already taken photos for him a lot of the photos that you saw in his instagram. I mean over the past three years. She's taken those photos. They've been dating for three years and he hadn't gone public with her and I didn't go into this in the story. A lot of people they say nasty things about people's partners especially because she's a civilian. She is not involved in any of this. She's not a celebrity and so he kind of wanted to protect her. But of course in quarantine. It became apparent that he had someone there with him. And who better to photograph him than the Woman? Who's been secretly photographing him this entire time. At least like his assent in so she took amazing photos. She really did and she did it with an iphone which. I love did it. Add an element then to also be able to have the first let the Anna shoot a cover for ruling. Yes absolutely I mean. I think I'm going to get in trouble for saying this. Because it's it's a fact like most of the people who shoot covers and it's not just at rolling stone but it's across the board in print journalism. Most of them are men. I think it's amazing in a way like how this worked out. At first we were so scared we were like. Oh my God. Are we going to make this happen? Are we GONNA have to shoot this cover over zoom like what take I just really love? The gabby like agreed to do this and she knocked it out of a park. I'm like really proud of her. And Benito's really proud of her to. I told him in an interview I was like. Did you know that your girlfriend is going to be the source To cover? He was like he's like. Wow he was so proud of her and he didn't take any credit for it at all. It's not like he was like Oh yes. She could only do it because he was like. She is talented and like He. He wants people to see that he was just like thrilled to kind of like push her into the spotlight

Sue Haley Mariah Carey Bunny United States Jaylo Gabriela Bailing Sola Benito Katrina Director Anna
The South Bronx Restaurant That Ended Its Relationship With World Central Kitchen

Latino Rebels Radio

4:28 listening | 2 d ago

The South Bronx Restaurant That Ended Its Relationship With World Central Kitchen

"Lama rather issued a statement saying that they were breaking relationships with world central kitchen. Wick which that people have followed the wick. The last couple of years the public face of it is a chef whose andress and there was a statement and rather published it. We re published it on Tino rebels. The statement took off it. Basically said the La Mirada had questions about W C K that there were going break the relationships because of things that were promised. We're not promised if you know the history of La Mirada as well and I don't think a lot of people. Outside of the immigrant rights community knows that it is a restaurant owned by an undocumented family. They have been a symbolic restaurant leader in the immigrant rights movement one of the members of the family. Margo Sylvia soviet-era was one of the original members of the Dream Nine. And actually if you watch the film the infiltrators he is one of the main characters in that documentary retelling and people that are in the know know what La Moraleja represents and it's the the reaction was really fascinating because I think people that know the history of morale understood why the restaurant was saying. Hey you know what? Wc Not our cup of tea. We're actually going to go directly community. We've been we've had a soup kitchen. We're going to keep trying to raise money to directly feed people in the South Bronx which by the way one of the hardest hit places in the world is very upfront with its customers. So they issued the statement and it got it got you know like. I said people that know the restaurant where like yes. That's what I'm that's what they do and people that don't know the restaurant where like. Oh my God. You're taking advantage of shifting chef. Jose Andreas and K and shame on you guys and I feel like there was something missing in not hearing with other had to say and all this so I did want to talk to hide. We talked on Friday. They're extremely busy. Like this is a family owned business. And they work all the time so for me to get twenty minutes with her on. The phone during the day wasn't accomplishment because we were trying to schedule this for a couple of days. She was finally able to find time on Friday afternoon. We talked now. We recorded phone conversation so this is not a online interview so there might be times where you have problems hearing but let me just give you the crux of what. She told me the concerns of the relationships of WC cage. She just had questions. She didn't want to hand handover forms. She saw that other restaurants in the South Bronx getting support. There were tied to developers and people that are gentrifying the neighborhood. And if you're following what's going on the South Bronx recently like it's an issue. Gentrification is an issue and I think la rather out of principle was like. We're not going down that route so that was a big thing the other issues that. W C K. According to Laura didn't deliver on their promises to helping parts of the South Bronx that they've decided to go to other restaurants instead of Lemerre which has a deeper history right so that summer to number three once. They did a little bit of looking into it. And the statement that W C K shared with Latino rebels. I believe on Thursday didn't deny that. Wc K in Puerto Rico had government contracts and had DHS employees HSI which is part of ice handing out food in Puerto Rico and Lamoureux others like what's up with that so from a principal standpoint. They're like we don't want to do this. We're breaking this and I think I want you to hear this interview with those points in mind and understand that I wanted to give the restaurant a voice even if it was a voice over the phone that we can get really

South Bronx La Mirada Wick Jose Andreas Puerto Rico La Moraleja Margo Sylvia Soviet-Era Tino Lama DHS Principal Laura
Whipped Coffee With a Little Something Extra

Latinos Who Lunch

2:13 listening | 5 d ago

Whipped Coffee With a Little Something Extra

"With. Coffee is the thing about this. We've tried to let me guess you're selling it on the side. You have a whip coffee. Stand out front everybody. Everybody here's in social media except for my husband and I but they keep us in check of what everything so we've been trying at all. Okay so I so. My cousin wanted to try with by the way update. My cousin is quarantining with me Since last week because she needed a place to live and I helped her out. So that's why I mentioned cousin now so now I have a roommate until my solitary bliss went out the door. Now pincher perils so. But it's been nice. It's been nice having somebody to not talk to okay so we're both very private person. I love her so we get each other. It's wonderful all right. So let's try and making that web coffee. We're trying to think of like something fun to do together. And so we made with coffee and I thought it was just fine. Basically what you do is you just take instant coffee. And you whisk it with milk and cream or whatever and sugar and and and make it into a like a whipped cream with coffee in it and then put it in some milk. We have almond milk here because Avirgan House so we did it. Almond meal does it. I have all been creamer so get into it and so it does it works and so we did that. And I'm like I like this but I want a little something in if you know what I mean so. We had some no put peanut butter in it bitch. I made a whipped peanut butter. Coffee Iced drink and it was delicious so I recommend putting some peanut butter in it but you might have to heat up the peanut butter like water it down with some cream and like make it more Viscous so that you can actually whip it with the rest of the ingredients. So that's what I've been

Coffee Avirgan House
Fighting COVID-19 From the Frontlines of NYC's Immigrant Neighborhoods

Latino Rebels Radio

6:02 listening | Last week

Fighting COVID-19 From the Frontlines of NYC's Immigrant Neighborhoods

"You know? He's being Donna. Ready we are the most people who die now. The the picture is different now but this sunny taty crash. We're going you gotta crises but did you. Let's talk for the beginning soon by a team. We've talked testing people with eating. My ourself and quiz area would find seventy percent of the people were positive which has been alarming. Sensing happened two days after when we went to the Bronx Sixty five to seventy percent positive. And they have to come back. Those buildings apartments small crowded woody international and resources. What we've seen today but dot day so many people seek now. We got different faces knowing that through so much pain now leaving now in the position that people had no money to like food doing pro. Two thousand meals a day in different areas to seeking the congestion with Were sent to teaching Our company nightstalkers because we know now fifty percent our people how the only there are less in their pocket derived. That's gone long ago now. We're GONNA do help we all today now. Jobs people lost fifty percent does agents. Yano joins US your job to Gatien. You're gone plus you act to other people without insurance and without papers circumstance. Afraid they had a lot of the with speeding difficult to find their family member. Who die because freight something could happen today. Where was the disconnect in terms of the testing? Why did the did the city miss? I mean how when you say a month ago you were. Testing would not be expecting this given the conditions. And giving the fact that if you were in a multigenerational house if you were an essential worker if you might have more health conditions of pre existing conditions it just seems that everything that was aimed at. Latino community was happening with this so where was the disconnect they nick was already disconnection that we have to stop paying attention on the socially health or their people live in crowded buildings with Russia. You Sam by the person was sick to the building worse than that those you know within minority note and then nobody was prepared for these. Because who has bundy we said life. Nobody deporting arouse went after we know because we knew people were were crying for giving us good. We bets. You May and building anywhere with Alone Hotel Room because we knew we were sending by millions invisible killer buyers. Plus building knows why this happened. So what did you do besides testing? What what did people you. What we're we're some of the people who are getting tested where we're told me some of the stories of the last month that you heard or your fellow doctors have heard or people in your organization of her for so many ways. But let's start with my pommie. How might keep who say's Saudi got Arresting and when when he got sick he was alone leaving apartment. He was long. He bustled hole. Fifteen days buddy They went back to work do market later. Now that's privilege. Let's go in different direction. Somebody call you. We put tele-medicine from the beginning. That medicine by the end of variety was pulling in Muslims. We plus three three songs and Y to educate our people dialing low. We doctors taking ghetto. Anybody who called even. Where did you. Summer's on the Summer Spacey Betty Portent. That's we knew what was going on right now. You has started like a lady who can out after liberty combat home to hold on is dead John No way whereas it wasn't that she even how the way to have a very often favor baber commission if you find your body and you have to make a seventeen donate. He changed now. He's getting better. But at some point with seventy twenty days cremation you. How the money? So it has the city I mean so where we talk about where we are now. What how is this improved? I mean besides the situation of people with the economic situation has this. Has the health situation improved it in in the community or are there still challenges Geno? I called allergy matching POCAR. What we're sending people city to the billing. Does Ron Koch it. Because what they do every day to work beginning in today the subway on they wouldn't papa. Papa Auditing Kidding that he sees inside those building her but up still coming out just two days ago. What am I secretary? Sister DIE evolving into aided by. Nali what he knows now. Ninety percent of the people going to endorse you die. I mean there is a very difficult thing game. Nobody knew well. Now we know now. We know what happened there? Now we're not to find solutions together. Find a way to test. That's what I've been saying is nine sixteen. That would best. Everybody does we do our you know. We went ahead of the game. Also when we decide to why are they meet a March Test immunological tests for whatever in the world? You these are the time this is

United States Bundy Ron Koch Donna Betty Portent Nightstalkers Alone Hotel Room Yano Russia Gatien SAM Nick Baber Commission Secretary Geno John
How Writer Karla Cornejo Villavicencio Maintains Control of Her Narrative

Latina to Latina

7:58 listening | Last week

How Writer Karla Cornejo Villavicencio Maintains Control of Her Narrative

"This book was a longtime coming. Why right now? Well it wasn't a long time coming because it didn't WANNA write it. It was like a My parents came to this country to for me to have a better life Not to dwell in the migrants of my life like I wouldn't have been an immigration lawyer. You know that's that didn't feel like the proper repayment for my parents sacrifices. It was in far enough away from their migration and I felt like a proper repayment. And that's how I thought of my life that's why I still think of my life for their migration was something so far enough from their migration that it would make gum them not remember the trauma and so writing about immigration was not it and so just wrote about music for a long time and I wanted to be the guy in high fidelity in I was like this is me. I started writing this book in Two Thousand Sixteen because because trump happened and I thought I was the best person to do it. Because I didn't have someone like me to guide me as a teenager when I was undocumented in college I knew stuff was going to get really bad. I had no idea how bad it was. Get but I just was troubled by the idea that there is just. This was all going to go down and there was nobody like me who is going to say like the things that. I ended up saying my book because there was a lot of writing about immigrants would. We were expected to be patriotic. And we were were expected to be apologetic and we were expected to prove that we were good citizens and where we were expected to be grateful and that made me sick and I was like we are not like I'm not GonNa let the stand you right in the introduction to the undocumented Americans that you wanna give the reader permission to be punk. When was the first time you gave yourself permission to be punk? I've always been punk. I never accepted the have never accepted the title of a dreamer even when before Daca existed even before I could be like. I just don't feel comfortable with you. Know the way villain is as my parents and discharge transacts in like a narrative of innocence. I was just like Mike. I don't actually like Thought it was cheesy. I'M NOT GONNA call myself at people would invite me to things like where I would have to show a cap and gown and I was like I'm not GonNa fucking do that like Kurt. Cobaine with not to unlike bunk and a lot of ways but the way I define like being punked myself. Is that you understand that your accomplishments are not just your accomplishments. You understand that you belong to a community you understand that the world is a system you understand that the food on your table came from somewhere and you can envision the last hands that touched the food before they enter the package that you just open and that it's kind of like your haunted like you're haunted by your relationship to all of the people in this In this world and You Act accordingly and it also means like not giving shit about what people expect you to act like in order to fulfill a political or corporate goal or something so one thing that like has always kind of disturbed me has been like the Portmanteau that has the prefix undock you like undocumented. Roy or like on you something because that seems like branding and I just want like undocumented kids suggest like just be individuals like understand that they can be a part of a community but understanding. They also don't need to perform anything for anybody that they don't need to be consumed and at the same time you say. The dreamers have taken up a disproportionate amount of space in the immigration discourse. Well that's the media's fault that's not the dreamers felt talk to me about that well the media has been obsessed with them like I understand that that like I'm not bill nizing anyone but any specific person or anything but like you know of course it makes sense that you know kids doing sins in caps and gowns and showing their diplomas showing their grades. And that's for her sympathy for White Middle America when I was undocumented and I was a kid I remember being in like Eighth Grade A. Medallion bit was was like the Dream Act is going to pass. He was so sure of it. Now is thirteen years old. I'm thirty now. And the reason why he told me. The Dream Act was going to pass is because Americans love children and Americans love academically achieving minorities and I remember in two thousand sixteen when we had those marches for comprehensive immigration reform. My Dad and I walked with all those immigrants and people didn't go to work. People were risks. They're losing their jobs. And we all in white because we thought that would make us look not menacing. That's just branded in my brain. Just all of us marching down like just down lower Manhattan like all of these crowds and we were not afraid and people had like Mexican flags and then there were like. Don't your Mexican flags because people are going to be think that you like? You're not patriotic. My Dad made these t shirts that he had bought in bulk in Chinatown that had like the American flag on them. In the back he wrote we are the American Drina distributed them to his his undocumented co workers at the restaurant where he worked at and we wore those t shirts. And it's like we are not the american dream because it doesn't exist and i feel like the media's enraptured with dreamers because dreamers suggest that the american dream does exist that come here. You assimilate he go to college. You join the military and you know the American dream happens. But the camera doesn't stop filming. You know like after that. It's like well what happens. That guy is a temporary solution even if there was a dream. Act like what would happen. Is that these kids. We have to take care of our parents. We have to take care of her elderly who are sick who have been doing manual labor. Many cases for decades with absolutely zero safety net even though they've been paying taxes And we have to pay for them out of pocket and you know this idea that lake the possibility of inherited wealth which really is the American dream is unattainable for us because we have to take care of our

Kurt Daca Manhattan Mike ROY Chinatown
Behind The Scenes With Documented

Latino USA

8:55 listening | Last week

Behind The Scenes With Documented

"Magazine. Welcome to let USA thank you. It's nice to be here. Thanks for having us all right. So tell me how you get started with this idea to basically observe every single minute of the immigration court system so people would say that they would never let you in but you guys actually did it. So what was your aim? And why did you do it Max so we had been covering immigration courts since we started publishing which was in the summer of twenty eighteen and we had watched since Jeff sessions was attorney general back then and we had watched him issue policy decision after policy decision that had serious detrimental impact to the people who are passing through the Court System? And we knew this through data and we knew it anecdotally generally harder to ask for asylum and just being the court system. So what we didn't know is what it looked like and immigration court is very different from federal or state courts. You know. It's very closed off their court records accessible to the public. Even court hearings are hard to get into. So there's no real way of sort of opening up the hood and looking inside so we knew what happened and a statistical level but what we didn't know is what it looked looked like and what it felt like and what it was just like to be a person passing through and when you can take us back to that first week and that first day was there something that surprised you that first day. Muslim while the funny actually the first day the immigration calls were closed because of a snowstorm so they we showed up and there were dozens of people waiting outside with no idea why the costs have been closed. What is meant for their hearings People some people you know travel from Long Island and all over the state to come to these hearings to be there eight. Am You know sometimes waking up at four in the morning only so arrive and find out that the the hearing that they've been waiting for for years it's been rescheduled so that was a very good indication of the kind of chaos that The the reports were about. We're going to see over the coming weeks. So this is a pretty massive process right and there are in fact hearings hundreds of hearings a day. So what were the specific things that your reporters were looking for tracking tracking so we would tracking a number of different things For each hearing the court reporters collected the basic information. Yeah the name date of birth. The judge's name Damn Immigration Chinese name the Ice Attorney's name but then they are other factors like did they even have in. Its know we witness a number of immigrants who on represented in the hearings. And we know that that can have huge ramifications for their cases for detained hearings. We also wanted a monitor what it was like for Immigrants who are being video teleconference then one of the things that the trump administration's us a lot more than previous administrations is video teleconferencing of immigrants. Who are in jail and that technology causes a number of issues And there's been a law of malfunctions often leads immigrants spending longer in detention and then we mark the number of the major decisions attorney. General Jeff sessions made during that time making it so the People who are victims of gang violence and domestic violence could no longer use as grounds for asylum. You know changing the ways in which judges could manage their courtrooms preventing them from delaying hearings or terminating hearings or closing hearings. They thought were going on necessarily so we try to track all of those different things and see how they were coming together. Talk to us about how you figured out the issue of access and I'm wondering were there challenges from court officials. When they saw that you were in their courtroom Max. Yes so if the person whose case it is says you're allowed to be in there then it's okay but from the beginning they face just an immense amount of pushback from everyone from immigration judges to ice attorneys. People would do things like the ice attorneys would say to the immigrants. Are you really sure you want all the details of your case broadcast on the Internet and just sort of hammer at that point over and over and over until the person was just like no actually? I don't want you in here. Sometimes some of our reporters would get singled out by ice attorneys by specific ones. You know there was one who would follow our reporters out into the hallway and sort of like a cost them outside of the courtroom but all of our reporters were extremely tough and they just kept going back so all of this work. All of this reporting all of these collection of data and stories It's a lot to sum up. But what would you say are some of the main takeaways that you had when you entered the project? Yeah I just say the New York court historically was was a lot friendlier the immigration call system as a whole. Maybe not but the New York going particular. The judges the work that the system in place. You Know New York because one of the only cities in the country that has a public defender system for immigrants. This is unprecedented. Pretty much all around the country But that system and so many other systems that are in place neil to make them more equitable and and More similar guests the kind of due process rights that you might get an a criminal call which just piece by piece dismantled over the course of three years And it was pretty stunning to see that play out. And and the impact of that hat on on a number of immigrants cases in lives. And this didn't just happen overnight. You know it was a very concerted effort on the behalf of the Department of Justice to make all of these little incremental changes in policy and legal decisions that have amounted to this and now with cove nineteen and this pandemic and New York being the epicenter. The immigration system and the asylum system in many ways has just grown to a complete and total halt. The Department of Justice has halted all hearings for non detained immigrants. They continue to have hearings for those who are currently detained. So can you tell us what about those hearings and our courts able to make this happen with concerns about Cova nineteen spreading? Yeah it's It's a really fascinating time What's happening right now in the immigration calls because this unprecedented alliance is formed between three groups. That rally together on anything so immigration judges immigration lawyers and prosecutors. Who WORKED FOR ICE? Have all come together in this unified front to call on the Justice Department which oversees the immigration courts to shut them down during the pandemic And they've all come together because quite frankly they're scared for their lives. I don't think there's ever been a moment where they worked closely despite this the DOJ insisted on keeping immigration court hearings as you said going for immigrants who are in detention. You know that even includes children who are in shelters as while they also have to pay for their gracious hearings you know. I spoke to in a tiny. He said that she represents children. She went into twenty-six Federal Plaza during the pandemic With a group of children who had the hearing that day and the cost office literally spraying clorox into the air and some sort of way to try and disinfects the environment you know there is not really adequate protections or safety is put in place for the staff that have worked there and a number of course. Staffers have contracted covered nineteen. You know they've been caught closures because courts office have tested positive for the virus the DOJ has now taken up the policy of tweeting out eleven pm the night before to let people know that the court will be closed because somebody has tested positive and then reopening at a few days later with very little

Justice Department Attorney Jeff New York Department Of Justice USA Ice Attorney Long Island Federal Plaza Clorox Cova Neil
At The Mercy Of The Courts

Latino USA

1:59 listening | Last week

At The Mercy Of The Courts

"For most of his twenty S. Elvis ran and Internet cafe in a small town in the mountains outside Guatemala City and one day in two thousand fourteen. He noticed this girl. She kept coming around to print out homework. Assignments to the girl's name was Wendy. An ELVIS SAYS. He started noticing that she was printing out the same assignment over and over again. So he teaser. He'd say I just printed this for you yesterday and when you would say well printed again which Elvis took a sign that they liked each other. Eventually they started dating. This is Wendy. Endless name MORLA. Coming out committed Lilo. They'd go to the movies they'd want around the mall eating ice cream. Tho- won't those pretty soon? They were inseparable a year after they started dating. They got married. Elvis was twenty eight when he was twenty one game. The though still at most Wendy says it was an unforgettable day she especially loved her dress. It was a fairytale wedding dress with cuvee skirt and pearls all over the bust and glittery Tiara with avail. Fearful they moved into an apartment on the lower level of Wendy's parents home. Wendy was in nursing school. Elvis worked at his Internet cafe. It was a sweet quiet life but less than a year after their wedding. This was a fall of two thousand eighteen. Wendy's mom got an anonymous call. The voice on the phone sounds cheerful. But this is not a friendly call. This is an extortion comedian company. The caller asks for twenty thousand. Get

Wendy S. Elvis Guatemala City Extortion
Venezuela's Ongoing Political Saga

Latino Rebels Radio

5:32 listening | 2 weeks ago

Venezuela's Ongoing Political Saga

"Venezuela is in the news again. There's a failed raid. Actually two of the advisors of one guy lull have resigned. They resigned Monday so I wanted to talk about Venezuela a little bit third rail topic of Latin America so over the weekend. I had the opportunity to connect with Gabriel Hetland Assistant Professor of Latin American Caribbean and US. Latino studies at the University of Albany and here is the conversation. Hey Gabriel thank you so much for being on Latino rebels radio great to be here. Venezuela seems to be doesn't seem to go away before we get into the deeper issues regarding Venezuela. I would love to get your reaction about what has happened over the last Last week in continuing this whole notion of this ex green beret with a raid. That was going to go after. Nicholas model can you begin to breakdown your reaction or or give your take on all this. I'll do my best. I'm shaking my head as you say. This almost makes me chuckle. And I've heard so many accurate ways to describe it tragedy meets farce handler with Alaska historian at nyu said someone else. From the Obama X. Obama said described it as keystone cops meets failed Bay of Pigs invasion someone else a bad rambo movie. I mean it's almost absurd if it weren't tragic at the same time so you know the sort of short story is that there's a a ex green beret Jordan gaudreau based in Florida. He's apparently guarded trump at a rally at some point in the last couple of years He seems to be described as totally out of touch with reality by everyone. Who's met him over the last several years he got involved into that. Anna's Waylon really randomly was last February at this concert. That March I guess when Richard Branson people was having a concert in Kuku Columbia on the border blah to raise for humanitarian aid and basically for an armed invasion of Venezuela by the opposition at failed utterly but from that point on Goo throw with his Sort OF SECURITY OPS Company in Florida Silver Corp got interested in Venezuela and the money that might be involved with toppling meadow and it as more and more of the details. Come out it's truly scandalous and Lurid and it's GonNa Impact Venezuela for a long time to come but There was a armed invasion. Which happened just over week ago on Sunday. and You know about little less than two dozen Folks got got off a boat An eight of them were killed and another fifteen or so were captured by the Venezuelan army. Apparently fisherman actually are the ones who initially captured them and their plan was to sort of invade Venezuela's through the ocean. You Know Landa boat make their way to cut off us. Topple them Dodo administration free Venezuela goto warehouses filled with cash. Us dollars take the cash leave and be treated as heroes Total absurd but what really makes it know scandalous as the main opposition leader. One Guy Dough is involved in this And there's more and more evidence coming out that he knew something about what was going to happen. It's not entirely clear how much he now and how much he knew and it appears that he didn't know a whole lot but in over last year he had a series of meetings. I think by phone basically with Guerrero and there's recordings with his voice and he's been invited to save. These are not true and he hasn't done so to my knowledge so far where he you know says it will support the agreement and one of his deputies apparently gave fifty thousand dollars as an initial payment which was supposed to go up to two hundred some million dollars And other Guido officials apparently had some level of knowledge the trump administration has denied it but in very interesting terms where Secretary Pompeo has said the US was not directly involved and so his use of the word directly suggests that they were somehow involved. That's what I mean exactly. And here's the thing that I would say about all this. Given how third rail of an issue Venezuela is there because it's so damn partisan this topic you could literally make a case that each party involved could have been involved. You know what I'm saying. I'm not trying to be like that's how messed up. Venezuela's right now in terms of the understanding because I'm sure that there are people who are saying well. This is his mother will conspiracy. You know he just created all this because you know the opposition and goes like I don't know anything about it the US. I feel like it was being taken from like amateur hour so it Kinda to me speaks to how Venezuela is often misunderstood misrepresented because it is being seen through a very hyper partisan lens that is so complex that I don't think it's reality right now in this is sort of an example of this absurd story that this sort of like bad. Hollywood

Venezuela United States Guy Dough Gabriel Hetland Assistant Prof Gabriel University Of Albany Latin America Venezuelan Army Barack Obama Florida Alaska Guerrero NYU Richard Branson Lurid Keystone Nicholas Landa Hollywood
A Mother's Day Tribute to You, Your Mom, and All the Mams

Latina to Latina

5:21 listening | 2 weeks ago

A Mother's Day Tribute to You, Your Mom, and All the Mams

"Would you say to someone who's like but you're laying out the problem? How will I be at the anchor desk and having a baby? How do you just at one point? Say Okay. That's an undue it it can be done. You just have to respect your own priorities and you have to understand that And this is gonNA sound like family. I initially I family should be. That doesn't mean that yet to leave your job that this means that sometimes you might have to miss an important event from your family to cover story. That's important to your career or or for yourself. You can't win them all. You can't win all you battles you have to learn how to pick the battles are important to you and in the book that you mention. I write a letter to my daughters and I do say how they are. Some women professional women who decide to leave motherhood for later while they build up their careers but to me working was something. I was doing what I waited for them to come. Would you say because I have? There's some people that do plan to live sound and it comes out exactly with plan them. I haven't met the person yet but that must be lovely. What do you say to someone who is having trouble getting pregnant? Because I think that that is. It's a real truth. It's a truth for us as we get older and I think it's particular choice for professional women because we do put that choice off and the longer he put it off the harder comes it. Does you know I had my first daughter a month before he turned forty second garnered forty two at lost to add to miscarriages before the first one and one in between my two daughters and of course the first miscarriage had said. Oh my God that said I will never be a mother. I was thirty seven so being pregnant. Thirty seven for the first time. Of course you think my biological clock has run out. Its course and and it's not GonNa be a happen and especially because I had my first two miscarriages during a work trip so I one of a mouse. Mexico and the other one Alison Chicago at an HD conference. Yep I remember that so I mean it can't be done especially now with the advance of there's so many medical advances that there's so many ways that you can have treatment for Acquittals toss yielded. We talk because I think that's the thing we don't talk about. Which is this is the crazy thing about how we talk about pregnancy. Which is like you're working. How do people around you even know that you were pregnant when you had those very few and so just the? We reminds me that you never know what someone's going through. You never know because that was a happy secret that then all of a sudden become very sad secret and I think as women we carry these secret turn and we go to work and we'll show up in spite of it. Yeah how did you after having the two first miscarriages keep going so that you would eventually get pregnant and Google that I really focused on. I really wanted to have a child. They really wanted to get pregnant. And I did go to a specialist fertility specialist to do all the analysis possible to make sure that I could get pregnant again and that I would not loose the child in remember when on the trip it was it was nineteen ninety four and there was some mini revolution in Mexico. In Chiapas the the revolution the story had just broke and they're Bantam. Articles was coming down to to the city and for the first time we're GONNA see him mask and all but we were going to see him for the first time so the day before my trip I went to the doctor and he told me. You're pregnant You can travel. I said I have a trip to warrants an important trip. It's a very important trip if you're gonNA do this trip. You have to be careful. We have to inject suggestion every day. He gave me the syringes and I said well what I'm going to do. I had to tell the producer that I was with. She was petrol prices. What do you mean? I'm going to have to inject talking about not in the job when we got to? When we got to Mexico. I remember calling. We had to call in a nurse into the into the room and because we were going to be on the road she taught her how to inject me and one of the most important things said. Make sure that you get the air out of the Syringe otherwise you'll kill her and she was like no pressure suit practice. She wasted a lot of inches because she would practice on annoying objected the orange to make sure that she was doing it correctly and the photographer. They carried my purse. They carried everything for me. They tweet Naika Queen. I said I kinda like this but thank God. Julia came out of it. We the trip and there was a lot of support at the time. But it's it's it's information that's hard to share because you have that doubt on. I need to show that it's the woman that can do the job just as well as a man can do it. There are certain things in a woman's life like motherhood like pregnancy that you have to deal with sometimes taking care of your parents of elderly parents menu. Don't do that women do that. But I think that it's a family affair. You need support group. You can't do it on your own. Some people might not like me to say this but husbands and boyfriends come and go with your children are your children and they'll be there forever forever. Your parents and your children are the one thing that will never go away. They will always always be there

Mexico Google Chiapas Acquittals Producer Alison Chicago Naika Queen Julia
The Fight Against the 'Sheriff Joe' of Massachusetts

Latino Rebels Radio

5:50 listening | 2 weeks ago

The Fight Against the 'Sheriff Joe' of Massachusetts

"Listen I wanted to talk to you. Because of the current case attack happening in Bristol County and the lawsuit that you guys have filed before we get into the recent developments. Can you explain exactly sort of history of this lawsuit? And who you're representing so people get the context. Yes we filed a corona virus class action against immigration and we focused specifically on the detention facility in Bristol County Massachusetts of which is run by the Sheriff Thomas Hodgson who is a a poster child for right wing anti immigrant policies and practices He fashioned self Under mold of Sheriff or Pyo from Morocco County Arizona Who was notorious for his anti immigrant in inhumane practices at who eventually was sued very successfully for discriminating against Latino community Not a first time. Suing the lawless sheriff at here in Bristol County. We have sued them repeatedly And it always pivots on extreme practices against Latinos one of our earlier lawsuit against Bristol County. It's because they were refusing to release Individuals who qualified for sale even though they had no legal basis for keeping them. They were not allowing them to post bail because they were immigration immigrants. Just based on Durham Immigration Status and so we successfully sued the sheriff over those practices of Bristol. County fast forward to this pandemic were seeing the same problems. essentially an institution where immigration trump's public health and that cannot provide any type of support for people who are at risk of Corbin nineteen infection and the conditions in Bristol. County are life threatening. They are unconstitutional. And that's why we sued. We sued because we knew that it was just a matter of time that the Bristol County facility becomes lit with Dacoven nineteen and just lights up like a tinderbox and so our lawsuit is based on the humanitarian release of immigrants who cannot be safely capped in immigration custody. It's what's happened so far from what I understand you. You had a decision that allow for a full out. You know several immigrants to be released. Let's talk there. Let's just keep time. Let's keep tick talking this and when you talk about it when you mean unconstitutional constitutional and conditions. What does that mean exactly in the context of the law? Well the the law is very clear. That detention cannot have cruel or inhumane aspects and so we're talking about exposure to Kovac nine teen and the failure to provide adequate and protections as an added punishment to people right you. You're not taking precautions to prevent the spread of disease and in so doing. You're subjecting. These immigration detainees to illness infection and potentially even death that is not a part of the punishment that is not a part of the detention. And so that's what I mean by unconstitutional conditions. It is that risk very serious risk of infection because the facility has not done enough or or anything really to meaningfully and materially. Protect the immigrants. And so were really happy to see that over. The course of this corona virus class action that we filed in Bristol County we have secured the release of fifty immigrants from the facility. Which is incredible. So tell me about what happened on Friday. At least what you you understand happened. Delegation has been contentious The federal government refuses to release the individuals. And it's really happened through court order. One by one through court order up to fifty now But the situation has been tense and Bristol County. Sheriff Has Gone Fox News and done other media programs to express public enter About the lawsuit to express anger at at me at my legal team at the judge. calling activists Saying that we are

Bristol County Bristol County Massachusetts Bristol Morocco County Arizona Thomas Hodgson Kovac Dacoven Corbin
We Are The Chosen Ones (w/ Patty Rodriguez)

Spanish Aquí Presents

6:53 listening | Last month

We Are The Chosen Ones (w/ Patty Rodriguez)

"Patty you you know we were just start talking about. Leeann how we love her and I know you love her to You you do like so many things like you are one of these lake. Just like that as women. Like look and follow on g and I'm just like Patty doesn't stop light from not only normally not even from being like a mom which is already like a twenty four seven job. Like I'm like he is hustling and you know like do you want to maybe tell the audience like a bunch of you do on my goodness? Okay I started and I still am part of the Ryan Secrets. Radio show. I've been with him for a this year. Any Oh my gosh today today. Today's making bring it out with them. What you're celebrating Kingston Yeta speaking says. Yes Patty we would've brought some Ryan's roses for you right. This moment I i. I don't know why I'm thinking in my head. It was January. But it's April yes so team two thousand and five uh-huh. I started working with him as an intern And I never left and then long that Through those fifteen years I became a music writer for a magazine became a mom and then after I became a mom I was like you know my kid needs to grow up loving who. He is being proud of who he is. Because I remember acid child I carried the shame of being a Latina in my own country ended in one of my children to grow up feeling or carrying that heavy load because it's heavy in books To me books mean so much they are the that was a vehicle for me to learn English And I've always just loved books especially children's books and I was looking for children's books for my now nine year old that celebrated who we are and what we do in our contributions and I couldn't find any so Just to make this shorter I decided to start my own company with a friend of mine and we call it a little league does and we now have our own publishing company and then somewhere in between I started a jewelry line that was like being rocked. Riana Demi Levato Katy Perry you ideal and Just incredible women in and then what else. Oh and then somewhere in between A friend of mine in me Have been writing just writing down in trying to create something that can live forever And just recently we've Kind of connected with a production company that saw this and believes in us and I think that's just the beginning of the beginning. What's next for you to call a month and then it had a second child. Now come more within those fifteen years. Yeah Yeah Oh. Wow You I consider yard real like a listens to bugging Cuba. Books are so cue thank you you have one of Lena. Which was the one that I ever like had saw like in person. I saw like a little local bookshop in by the way that book is d. I mean children's picture book on her life really. Wow that's crazy. That just says a lot about the publishing industry you know. Yeah Yeah I was that one published that was on my gosh. What twenty two thousand eighteen have you have you ever? Do you watch the show or have you watched the show younger? No it's about it's IT'S A. It's Hillary Duff and the Gospel turning Mexico her name. Yes thank you. Yes sees me a Tony Award winner? I know I know. I'm sorry but I know but it's about it's about seeing it's about publishing and writing and stuff in it. It's so interesting because you just said that. And you know it's mostly white women in charge in this or white. I mean Yeah. I think Hollywood is bad yeah The publishing industry is a trillion times worse. Yeah it's so white straight it's like it's honestly it's it's just food with American dirt a novel that isn't you know. Oh Yeah But Yeah so. I think that's really that's like that's so cool that you you did like you've made these landmarks and like you are showing not only You know our people are able to read these. Obviously unlike you know Lakers Read read these books like to our children. I buy one for my knees for her birthday or whatever that is but I think it's cool because like we just Like I have friends babysit and sometimes like I cover for them and Babysat for one of my friends. And I remember telling the family I was like I was really happy because they had free to Kalo. They had like you know a Selena. They held all types of like different colored like females that in books me through the and they had lake so many different hourn even. Just let the Asians Bunch and then I was like this was like a mixed race couple but still like I. I love it when I walk into something. Yes you have books of other people than just like little cartoon just like white people think you educate you really important especially because you know. Those books are for children and If you know. We're talking about changing the narrative and in any in any creative industry that you know that we there were part of on in and I always say this the the one that we should really invest in. Because it's the first form of media that our children you know are are connected to our books. Yeah and if we really want to change the the overall landscape of the way Hollywood looks We honest need to start with books and It's very challenging to Get people on board with that because they you know a lot of people don't see books are so powerful yet we don't we don't consciously see it

Patty Ryan Secrets Hollywood Demi Levato Katy Perry Hillary Duff Tony Award Kingston Yeta Cuba Selena Intern Writer
Elisa Villanueva Beard's Path to Teach for America

Latina to Latina

5:51 listening | Last month

Elisa Villanueva Beard's Path to Teach for America

"It is such a hard transition into story. We hear again and again top of your class. Big Fish in. What you don't realize is a small pond. You went all the way to Indiana for college. You continue to play basketball. Show up a campus by yourself. I mean you must have felt so overwhelmed like a fish out of water. I can't even imagine being that far from home and sorting through all of that. Yeah it was. It was pretty extraordinary when I look back in. What gave me the guts to do that to like show up to college by my. That's it right like I never braver than when I was eighteen. That's probably true. An important part of that story as though Mr Joe disc who was who was an incredible mentor in essence passed away but he and his wife are truly. She was my biology teacher. Ms Karen disc there why I ended up at depauw university She went there and he sort of just took this interest in me. And he's from Indiana originally went to purdue and U. Law and got to know my family starting my junior year and just He just kept saying a Lisa. Your extraordinary you can do anything. I want you to get out of your comfort zone. And that's how I ended up at DAPA. He did show up that first day of school with me. I didn't know who's going to be there but as I pulled up a van that had picked me up from the airport. He was there waiting for me. And so he. He was my parent that day and it was pretty extraordinary. I felt like I had. I was at a different country altogether. Most stunning about it. I will say is that I thought. Wow getting used to just a community that was predominantly white middle upper middle class white and three percent five percent black. At the time I I was a bit intimidated by that and thought this is going to be really hard and just felt like really hard to relate to each other's lives culturally in every way but I quickly realized that that was quite energizing for me. I learned that I'm very adaptable person and conservative. Connect with different groups of people which is become a I think of a strengthened and has served me well in my career. But I didn't expect was that I would be under prepared for the rigors of college because of all you just heard me say and that was the most traumatizing thing and even when I reflect on it. I sort of get emotional because it was so hard. At least it'd be like I'm ready. I checked every box. Everyone told me I was ready. I worked really hard and then you feel completely light to. You're like Oh my God. Did everyone know this is going to happen to me? And what was like the toughest part about it was because I was quote unquote minority on campus. And you're not doing well and I'm the kid that like work. I work really hard. That's what I learned from my parents like -cation and hard work. You don't quit that's me so I'm like getting up at four. Am to study on. Saturdays and Sundays like for fourteen hours. And I'm still getting CS and C. minuses. And so you're like oh my gosh. I'm not smart enough. I can't hang with these people like maybe it's true. Maybe why people are smarter than me and when you start to internalize that. It's so dangerous in so traumatizing so I called my mom three months in and said mom. I'm not GonNa make it like truly. There's nothing more I can do. I've never been more focused. I've never been more doing everything right And I'm I'M NOT PULLING IT OFF. And my mom listened and then she she said me he. I'm so sorry that it's it's so hard for you but I said I think I'm going to have to come home. And she said you're not welcome home until you complete your degree at Depa University. That's where you said you're going. That's where you are and that's where you're going to do it. You can do this so I can't help you with that but you should maybe get off the phone and go back to studied. So how did you turn that corner? There was something about The fact that I just knew there was another option as so even the energy when you know at night. You're you're laying there and you're like maybe I should just go home. Maybe I just can't do it. That was now out of my head. I'm like there's no going home I just have to. Just keep keep doing it. I think some of the moves I started to make as I started to ask for help which was another good leadership lesson. I learned early on. I just went to my professor and finally said I am doing everything I know to do. Can you help me like who? Who SHOULD I ask? Here's what I'm doing. What am I doing wrong so I started to get different kinds of help? My professors became invested in me. I did find one. Let up professor. Who's not even my teacher. But I met her at a thing inside when made an appointment with her and she was able to tell her this like what I was really going to do and she leaned in and helped me which was extraordinary and was really helpful for me and mattered a lot in in that trajectory. And so that's what I did. I did terribly my first semester. I did better my second semester and then I was flying then I was like on the Dean's list then I was like. Oh I'm I can do this better than a lot of the kids accidentally. That was what ended up started. You'll buy deep passion and outrage for educational inequity. Because I started to understand like our did I grow up. I we place core members where I went to school. I had no idea and you know and I. I realize like wow. My Dad was the only college graduate in my whole neighborhood where we lived. I didn't understand the context in which I was growing up. I grew up in a very rich community in so many ways that have kept me grounded and I think it's why I am who I am today but hadn't realized the lack of access and opportunities so That's what set me on the path to teach for America and here we are more than twenty years later

Professor Indiana Basketball Depauw University Mr Joe America Dean Purdue Depa University Lisa U. Law
How Hola Papi's Advice Column Stared

Latino USA

2:22 listening | Last month

How Hola Papi's Advice Column Stared

"Or let me get either. It's good to talk to you in quarantine in quarantine here. We are so dude. I need to know a little bit about this. Okay how is it that you end up writing an advice column? Was this something that you dreamed of. It's completely by accident. The way it happened is I was a freelancer living in Brooklyn at the time working as a journalist for NBC News. And I was really struggling to make it as a writer you know. It doesn't pay a whole lot especially when you're just starting out and grinder of all places had just launched a new outlet and they were looking for columnists to rights new things. Get readers excited so I'm broke at the time and I'm like okay. I want to write something every single week so that I can make more checks basically nine. Oh wait a second. That is an equal. They may get on this kind of thing to do that. You're just like okay. I got I gotta get paid. Oh my God I love this okay and then what happened and then I was like okay but the problem is I can't think of a new thing to write about every single week. I don't trust myself to find a new subject. I don't WanNa think that hard. What do I do and then I was like wait. There's a kind of column out there where people bring the problem to you and they bring the subject to you. It's called an advice column and I was like cool. People write me letters. The gays never run out of drama. Always have something to write about. It will be fine and it originally started out as a spoof invest. I really thought I was going to be making a dear. Abby parody and I was like it's going to be really funny. It's going to be crazy blah blah blah blah blah named Ola puppy. Because that was something that guys on Grindr said to me a lot? Oh no seriously yes seriously. So like the second men would find out and realize that you're Latino they would suddenly start saying all poppy. Oh my gosh. That's what they would open with us. They would just be like all up happy. It's very common on Grindr. It's this very like fetish. Losing Weird thing to say but it all the time and I was like this is kind of funny this is the way to reclaim that title. Little Bit. I'm going to have people call me PAPI but it's to ask me for advice not nude pictures. This'll be fun. I can't wait and then a couple of weeks go by and I get

Grindr Brooklyn Writer Nbc News Abby
Internet Voting Won't Help a Democracy, Even During a Pandemic

Latino Rebels Radio

6:28 listening | Last month

Internet Voting Won't Help a Democracy, Even During a Pandemic

"Let's talk about elections and I'll start with you Kevin because obviously cove it has transformed everything right and I think we can talk about. What were the Rico's doing with online? But could you provide sort of a like an overview about discussions happening about voting and the time of Corona virus? Like what's being discussed. What are the challenges? What are the advantages? Were the challenges. How before really get into sort of the dangers of online voting and look at the Puerto Rico situations specifically absolutely so. There's sort of two things one is that there was already a Senate bill in progress Senate. Bill Thirteen fourteen. Right which would allow Internet Voting Puerto Rico. And that happened even before. All of this virus stuff happened now. Though of course everyone is concerned about having in person voting in polling places and it's also quite challenging to get poll workers to commit to show up at a polling place and interact with dozens and dozens of people over the course of a day and potentially put their health risks so that has really been asserted second conversation on this in a sort of crisis that that has happened with our elections. We've seen lots of elections being postponed. The Puerto Rico elections were postponed once and then postponed a second time. Yeah the primary the Democratic Primary Right. They presidential primary exactly. And that's that's because of this so I think there's a general feeling of you know we need some option immediately for the current situation and then there's also a desire to think about the future and the way we hold elections in general and everyone has a smartphone in their pocket. Everyone does online banking and things so easily. It's very seductive to think that we could just do our elections from our cell phones. Wouldn't that be easy? Wouldn't that be great? Why can't we do that and it's deceptive because it's really not that easy. It's very difficult. And when we look at something like you know online ecommerce or credit card usage. There's a tremendous amount of fraud. A tremendous amount of problems. There that are acceptable in business as part of the losses that they take but are not acceptable in our elections. And we just don't have the technology yet to be able to conduct elections securely over the Internet. Maybe in ten or twenty years we will but we aren't there yet. That's interesting the way you framed in. I really appreciate it because I want to talk a little bit from the Puerto Rico context because you know when you hear it. It's like what Kevin says and like I think any person now like when they hear online voting they're like Oh yeah I do like online polls whatever and then you and then in the context of Cova D-. You're like yeah. We should do this and we'll talk a little bit about mail-in ballots after this. Because I want to kind of give some other solutions but but this bill was happening before it was gaining traction in Puerto Rico and then covert happened. Obviously that changed but to me when I hear online voting. Dorigo me being Puerto Rican. Just don't trust the government. I I mean I mean. Let's start there. I mean there's been a history of information being manipulated but you know what I mean. There's not A. There's not a trust to think that I mean Puerto Rico. Couldn't even do certain things during the hurricane reporting that that all of a sudden you have an election system that is online and perfect it just to me like like Kevin said it sounded appealing. But then when you start looking under the hood it wasn't why wasn't it appealing and what? What were the problems and so in terms? There's there's two two main arguments to this. We have the technological arguments we have the constitutional arguments and the practical arguments referring to what you're saying specifically intern impractical terms. If we look at the last four years of Puerto Rico which is two thousand. Nine Elections Happened Two Thousand Sixteen. January two thousand seventeen. This government starts were hit with Maria Hurricane Maria and there was widespread coverage of the devastation. We didn't have power. The electrical grid problems were exposed there. Since then we've seen different People Different government officers get arrested for corruption in different agents for FEMA and whatnot for mishandling government funds as to necessities in aid. That was needed. We've seen protests and having a governor have to Leave because of these protests because of animals. Now we have a governor who is constitutional government governor because of how the law is and since November of two thousand nineteen. We have this reform. They're calling it. The electoral reform of twenty twenty originally started as the electoral reform of two thousand nineteen. And what they're proposing is that we be at the forefront of technology for the Regal should be at the forefront of technology and the objective and I can maybe later right now kind of giving you a run through. I don't want to speak for too long and take up all your very smart. I Kevin Iro enjoying this so continue. This is very good. We're faced with a bill that had it was it was filed by the President of the Senate which is important on June tenth. Two Thousand Nineteen they only s held one day of hearings with only political parties. Have as the as the proponents of their positions on this bill. The ACLU wasn't allowed to to provide any testimony on the

Puerto Rico Kevin Iro Senate Bill Thirteen Maria Hurricane Maria Aclu Fraud Fema President Trump Intern
Isabella Gomez's Experience When 'One Day at a Time' Got Canceled

Latina to Latina

5:39 listening | Last month

Isabella Gomez's Experience When 'One Day at a Time' Got Canceled

"One day at a time deals with some really heavy topics that deals with immigration deals with consent deals with sexual orientation. How has being on the show impacted you? I am exponentially better person because of the show. I I think I grew up very annot where and very ignorant of the world you. I like switched cultures when I was ten. I was completely new to this country and then I lived in Florida so I was just unaware of a lot of stuff. I didn't even know that I was unaware. I didn't realize there were more to learn and then move to la which is super liberal and super hippy. Dippy and super whatever and I get on a show like one day at a time where we're talking about these things that I know nothing about and it's just made me so much more aware it's made me so much more empathetic. It's made me realize that I am not the center of the universe. Which for a long time growing up as an only child and especially as an immigrant where it like. You only have your core family you think. Oh everything's kind of about me and how I'm transitioning through this and then I realized that that couldn't be further from the truth and is just it's Tommy so much about artistry in humanity and how much talking about these things actually means to people. 'cause I also grew up. There's all the talk of a presentation but I am white passing and Columbia. Everything was dubbed into Spanish. And so I grew up thinking that Hannah Montana and wizards to waverly place. Where about people like me because those girls looked like me and they were speaking Spanish and so it's just made me so much more aware. We interviewed a Gloria Feltler. Wrong Kellet out for one of our way back in the day Love her such a powerhouse. What have you learned from working with her? That anything is possible and that anything is possible on. You can still be nice. She is a powerhouse and she is taking over Hollywood and she is so nice and she can I curse and she gives a shit man like she gives a shit about everything that she does and everybody that's involved in her projects. And I think that is so powerful and meaningful especially in. I feel like our culture is so much about productivity. And and how much can you do? And how much can you like? Churn out and do whatever it takes to be that way like. I feel like you're in a few years ago. There was such an emphasis of like you can sleep when you're dead in like Hustle Hustle and you don't have to be nice if you just have to get it done and Gloria as the penny me of you can rest in have a balanced life and of course she still struggles with that but you can have a balanced life and be nice end still rise to the top. I think that is such a good lesson to learn this early on one day at a time originally on netflix loyal following dedicated following very vocal on social media and never more vocal than when. Netflix canceled the show. Where were you when you find out that they weren't going to pick it up for another season? I was in Vancouver and Mike and Gloria called me on the back and it's both of them and they don't. They're not screaming so I can tell something's wrong and Gloria says. Hey they're not picking our little show up and I felt like I get teary eyed. Just thinking about it. I felt my soul like unhinged like I just immediately started sobbing. It was really really rough and then I remember getting to the hotel room and calling my parents and crying in such a manner that they were like who died. Don't like what's happening. And it was like Monty family died and they were like you've been in this industry for fifteen years. You know this happens get it together and then when it got picked up again. I had been texting Mike and Gloria for a couple of days because I could feel it in the air that something was shifting and I remember Mike had told me will know by tomorrow and then I got on a flight to Spain so all of the time things were different and I had been on this flight for freaking like twelve hours whatever long and I got off on immigration and my parents had come with name and I opened my texts and I it was something like at Glory on Mike and Gloria said. Gomez you there and Gloria said Mike Gomez. They're glorious Ed. It's done we're doing the show or something like that and I didn't know how to handle myself I. I'm in an immigration. And he didn't I one of the trouble of my parents at the same time so I just like squealed to myself. I text my boyfriend at the time. It was like frigging like one. Am here to am here. And like I woke him up and he's like what's happening here okay and I was like shop. We got the show back and he was like. Oh my God and then I got to go the next day to a convention and I had a QNA schedule or a panel so there was what felt like millions of people in this frigging audience. And I got to tell them and we all got to just scream and cry together and it was just the most surreal. Couldn't make it up. Should be in a movie kind of moment. I've ever

Gloria Feltler Mike Gomez Hannah Montana Netflix Florida Tommy LA Columbia Hollywood Spain Vancouver
The Head of Puerto Rico's Public Media Station Responds to Allegations of Press Suppression

Latino Rebels Radio

2:10 listening | Last month

The Head of Puerto Rico's Public Media Station Responds to Allegations of Press Suppression

"I wanted to share. What Mr WWL had to say so here? It is so my first question. I'm seeing a lot about jury in the US. I saw the one with David. And I've also seen a lot of interviews on the press so I don't WanNa get into the questions that have already asked but one of the big questions from me when you talk about a public service that you're providing How do you balance the public service that you're doing with the fact that journalism is public service for people like they're providing voice public so what flight it's on its way balanced? We actually have on newscast station and we also powered all those news like anybody else that a little deeper you know in public service to Show the annual fee Chilean news. Piece in You know commercial station Will last from one fifteen to maybe up to two minutes here in Public Service News News. We go longer because we have to give a chance for everyone to say the position and So we lose has been yes. I mean to have a specific time slots on there right. You don't so on so and and this is why what I'm doing. It was informative shows. So why is it a show? That's the thing that I'm I'm having a question about politics. Outta show when you have government officials like it gets. I smell part that I'm struggling with isn't that reaching. Isn't that a public briefing and not a public event that you know? They're not they're they're they're not breachings actually wearing a briefings on those show what he's We're covering every little detail regarding what it's needed for the people to know and and take better use of the information short as

Mr Wwl David United States
Interview With Vivian Nava-Schellinger

Cafe con Pam Podcast

8:59 listening | Last month

Interview With Vivian Nava-Schellinger

"You grew up in Texas yet. Groping Al Paso Borden Rave and educated. Most of my life in El Paso. And you're an attorney right. Yeah I'm a non practicing. What do they call it? Here's the a recovering attorney guests Sosa? Oh turning bed definitely were trained attorney but then decided to do something else live took them in another direction or they changed the direction. But yeah interesting but you have an interesting story because you're Atlanta so you had the trajectory F- like where you wanted to be. When did you decide that you wanted to become a lawyer? Oh my God you know. It's funny because I when I hear people say oh I you know I was in college and I didn't know what I wanted to do or a dotted and I totally can kind of picture what that feels like but for me my earliest memory of thinking what I wanted to do with my life was to be an attorney. My mom went to law school. I Inner Family College. Grad first-generation scholarships all of the beautiful academic story. I do think that a lot of Latinos do have that we may be you know. We highlight but just not enough sometime. She really lead that example for me and showed me that law school was going to be a place that wouldn't necessarily teach me how to be a lawyer but would teach me how to think like one and I think for me even at a really really early age I wanted to know what it would like to think critically about things and not just accepting that they were and kind of go along with your day. Maybe that came a lot from my parents. My Dad was in federal law enforcement. You know there was always like the other layer of why people did what they did and there was also that layer of I get there was all around me always to not only immerse yourself in your community but to protect it so I think at a at a really young age again like I said I don't I can't put it like a like an age on it because I don't remember not wanting to do that for you an only child. I have a sister. She's about five years over five years younger than me. But I will say that I think Mike variances as an only child for the first five years of my life I think they were enrich in a way because my parents did wait a very long time actually to have meet my parents. Mary fifteen years before they had the right. And then that's unheard of now in a sense. Maybe maybe a little bit more right but even then right nineteen eighty six. When I was born my parents had already been married for fifteen years. They had traveled the world. I guide was in the FBI. He was one of the first Chicanos you know Mexican American to get into the academy among the first and actually got into the FBI Academy with J. Edgar Hoover was retiring. So I mean that how far back back goes then you know I think that whole experience in and of itself was really again be too like parents. That were pillared for me. Guide me in this direction and so also say that I think as an only child for the first five years of my life. I had a real great sense of duty to what I needed to be doing with my life so I almost feel like. I grew up kind of quick in terms of knowing that there had to be something bigger than yourself and so having a little sister and I don't WanNa get choked up because you know we can kind of go into a little bit about. She's just kind of warrior to me but having a little sister for me became a sense of duty so yeah I think those are things that the kind of circle around my story if you're sharing and I think your story is awesome because a lot of times what is Brown people that had different generations. What generation third third. I'm second generation Alpaca win on my mom by Third Generation. On my dad that we've been Pessoa longtime were crosstalk rate do Mexico This lake right there. Yeah what it is right there so we haven't been in a while but we used to go every Sunday. You know we Goethe's Mikhaylo. I guess my parents will now know that I went on a much earlier. Age or other reasons like yeah I mean you know. If they're sisters idiot are truly just a pair and it's a beautiful beautiful beautiful experience. I think to grow up in such a place and yeah I mean I grew up going. We go eat on Sunday. We go get groceries. We'd go you know we needed to get something framed. We need cowboy boots. I mean that's just what you did and for me as a child again being third generation it was never a fear or or an oddity right like some people who are really far removed. It's like Oh you know. I went to Mexico holder world and I feel like for me. My parents made a conscious effort. And one thing I've been mentioned. Is that my mom? My mom the first before my sister was born. I can remember her speaking to me. Entirely exclusively in Spanish and then my father spoke meaningless so we would be in the car or sitting at the dinner table and my parents were talking to me and both languages and I was responding in in bold thirty sometimes singlish finish though the code switching with like lit was happening And then I would go to school and you know in English and coming home and seeking Balto. It was always again living in a border community. You learn really quickly that or you know. At least that the border is a lot more fluid than what people want to make it Because that's how we you know growing up in a border town how you live your life. You're always weaving in and out language Culture Food Flavors. Balkan totally and one thing that I see that is it's beautiful I love it. Is that even though? You're third generation. You're still letting you're still proud of your culture in. I think we begin. Give that back to your parents and grandparents. They kept that in you because I've met a lot of people especially in Texas. Actually that they just went opposite direction because of all the hardship that their parents and grandparents went through soup could us your parents grandparents for instilling that culture and to keep you close to it. Yeah yeah all added that you know my two grandparents so one was a citizen in one with not and both of them though are were World War. Two veteran and the one who was yeah and one was in Japan and one was in Europe. So my mother's father my GRANDPA Korol. He actually obtained his citizenship because of his service in World War. Two you know. He was seventeen years old he was living in in quoted and he saw that they were signing young men up to go to war and he had a job in El Paso but lived in wanted like many people and he signed up and he wanted to protect the country that he felt gave him a lot. He met my grandmother who was a US citizen in with born and raised in El Paso met her at a party and wrote her throughout his entire time away. Furthermore and when he came back he married her in. He obtained citizenship. And I will say this. Is The true story. Anybody who's part of the family really knows this story but I think it's really it resonated with me especially now and and just in the time that we're in what he. She laminated his paper so that he could carry them with him at all Because even after his service than even after he became at that ascend I mean he probably couldn't count the years and the Times in which he was stopped and asked for his papers. My Mom clearly remembers the time she was probably in college where he asked where he could. Laminate something and when my mom Helped him do that to realize quickly? It was his papers so bad to me just really when you need a reason to believe in. Why the American dream as as much a part of our dream as let the nose first generation pregnant bird one hundred may be. I always think about that among other story. 'cause for me that was that that's a really powerful thing to be both proud and beautiful right and I think that that you know that hasn't changed for a lot of people. Oh my gosh so powerful quote you there because we live in this were proud of gooey are and because many people here have not explore their country they were brought young and so they especially we still have a lot of people living in the. Us times we live in living that fear and at the same time. Loving the place that you your end. It's it's a hard copy to exist

Third Generation Attorney El Paso The Times Texas Al Paso Borden Atlanta FBI Sosa I Inner Family College J. Edgar Hoover Fbi Academy Mike Pessoa Mary Grandpa Korol
When Linda Yvette Chvez Realized She Couldn't Quit

Latina to Latina

2:30 listening | Last month

When Linda Yvette Chvez Realized She Couldn't Quit

"I think our insecurities that have come from many traumas at work through therapy in the thing with this particular moment for me by said this. Is it like you have to dedicate yourself to the thing that you want to do? Which is writing. It's now or never you can't give up on this industry because the reality is you haven't really tried in the one area you know you want it and they you know you could do it so. I said if I can't make this happen within a couple of years then that's it then you can. You can move on with your life and say did everything I could and it just didn't work out for me but you gotta give it everything. Linda is a toy. So you gotta give you gotTa leave this feeling like I gave it everything I could and I'm at peace because I always ask myself. How will you feel at the end of your life? If you didn't do that so I gave it my. I give it everything and within a few months ago. Hint defied and right away within those two year is we were pitching or TV. Show and and I had put out around that time My family and I were very cute or a very cute little immigrant family Mexican family but we would do these dream meetings where we would talk about our dreams and like what we wanted to to achieve him and we would you know manifest there talk about things we wanted and my sister kept saying she wants to be a mother and I kept saying I I WANNA BE I WANNA create my own TV. Show and I didn't know how it was going to happen. Because any OS and going through it the traditional way in television and knew there was a traditional way I had so much experience. Managing my skill level was not at a staff writer level. Like I knew that I my writing that I could do way more than that and I didn't WanNa come into television at that level because so much experience in different areas and skill sets that transferred so I was like God. I don't know how you're going to do it. This is what I WANNA do. And within two years I had sold me and Marmon had sold the show to net flix and now about a year later year and a half later we just released it and give it my all. I can't sit you know. A cancer really proved to me that like the truth is when you feel a calling your men to do it and it's just a really the only thing between you and that calling is will you choose to give it like if you choose to go after it because there was countless obstacles but at the end of the day you'll get there if that's that's truly what you want.

Linda Marmon Staff Writer
One of the Boston Area's Latino Immigrant Cities Is the Epicenter of the COVID-19 Crisis in Massachusetts

Latino Rebels Radio

8:22 listening | Last month

One of the Boston Area's Latino Immigrant Cities Is the Epicenter of the COVID-19 Crisis in Massachusetts

"I I. You know I'm a journalist. I cover a lot of national issues but I'm also you know house live in the Boston Metro area on the south side of the city. You're up on the north side. Chelsea is the for me for a lot of laughing. Estonians Lead Latino Immigrants Section of Metro Boston in a lot of ways I looking at the statistics and seeing happening Can you explain the situation to people that don't under? You know our our our listening to this. The first time outside of Boston and put it into the context. Because I it's the numbers are just startling. They are they are really got it all and unfortunately for those folks who are joining to me and Chelsea a one point eight Square Mile Community. And as you stated it's done in that community that is just north of Boston and he had been an officially declared as having the worst outweighs a whole the nineteen cases the entire state so the numbers that we're looking at is as of the site and again the information. It's teaching still constantly by the time that speaking. I'm pretty sure he's number. Got Even higher but as a black knight part infections late is that a hundred and six per every ten thousand and the so and just to put that into perspective. The member I mentioned we're one eight hundred blasting. The are the second third largest city in the state to just imagine coupling the fact that we have working families that are living in apartments just up to fifteen people in three bedrooms treatment and on top of that we have families that in the fast economic signs have to three jobs just to make an and one of those jobs are either virtually gone so the folks are unemployed and on and on the other end of the also have other guys it in fourteen essential employees. These are folks who are in the front lines. They are working at Dunkin donuts. They're looking at market basket. Starch working at the services area so you have for that are essential workers who it's impossible for them to physically defense and the people that are trying to ask everyone to follow but you follow the physical distance so they stack you You can find it the and then you have other fault somehow completely knocked your job no income and on top of that you know we have been for. Decades has experienced environmental injustice shoes So wearing industrial city that has a high volume of chuck traffic and We're have coastal cities in the air force. So you couple of all of this and later on off and you have the perfect time for a five thousand of of this Epidemic what are your constituents saying. What are you hearing the story before because I do? WanNa talk about the state response in the federal response but I also wanted here with the voices of the community of the same cause. I do feel like for me being here in Boston. You know covering what's happening in the Boston area. I'm not hearing those voices. So what are those voices telling you? And what can you share? Because I think that's the numbers that you reach like those comparible your city. I mean this is I. Just. I'm just. It's mind boggling to think about this so sure from what you're telling you first before we get into sort of the response so let's see now the the experience there's been fighting there's a lot of exciting from my residents. I cannot tell you how many folks call me and me and to me. Facebook packages telling me of how they have been confirmed with survivor. They have been unemployed for over a year. I'm sorry for over a month. They've been unemployed for over a month. They have confirmed that the case they do not have any money to go shopping even before John for their children. She has no idea how they're going to get money. And that's one of the biggest concerns here you know. And not and not only my family's on the ensuing destroy them the trauma and shrimp farm our dispatchers who are taking these calls and taking these cases are also go into emotional breakdown when they hear The Need for money for the The the need for some families can't see them doing their chiefs. Get Emergencies Actors. They their kids. Which is true of freight is only out and spreading the virus. So again like it's heartbreaking and doing the best that we check on our end but we need more veteran wild and the city is under voluntary. Twenty four seven lockdown right now. Is that correct? That's our people Our understanding the the I mean are people you know following it or I mean I I feel Zaidi and then getting that. It's kind of like Whoa. I mean I feel like bishop happens like it literally happened. You know and you know people are falling Massachusetts. Although I think you're right I think when you have more people that are essential workers that are working in industries. That are feeding us in our. You know doing other things and taking public transportation and coming back to dense population. All the ingredients were there and it seemed like no one you know. We shouldn't have been surprised as as people in Boston that this is. What's happening People now you know I I think taking it seriously put tyrod or their language issues. Are Their immigration. Now is like what what did give me a more of a picture because I know there's a response. I never thought about the response that I I also think people don't understand can there? Yeah you know. There's y'all yeah people Boston. So a little bit more the for their cellular energy so and then you go back to that The leasing why city manager trump and see no decided. She's making twenty four seven because don't WanNa be political. Be and fog maybe blowing up all their population right. So that's one of the key things right so I know that other things they're doing is that they see waking the curfew. They are giving them a ticket for two hundred dollars is. Here's the penalty for chased. But again you're getting community that is real incomes who barely has money to afford luxuries is they're out of their jobs for listing want. It should be picketing folks three hundred dollars penalty for being outside and not falling curfew hours. So what we're focusing on is coming in. He emphasizing that and and I thank you for stage to continue this important dialogue which is getting very serious and as much as we are. Afraid to be alarming. The numbers are alarming. People are dying I last night because nothing that and we want that number to stop but he then you know my mom personally. She's a factory worker. My mom works. I think we'll hop factory and she has to go to work every day. Actually thirty in and you know she. One example of the other example appear in in Chelsea family has to choose between. You might go to work so I can get money and food on the table and and save a little bit team. Nice Munch or stay and a lot of folks who have to work as mentioned the happy. The public transportation is virtually honestly suitable to be physically spent in the

Boston Chelsea Dunkin Donuts Chelsea Family Facebook Epidemic Zaidi Massachusetts John
Cecilia Muoz: Why People of Color are Always "More Than Ready"

Latina to Latina

3:51 listening | Last month

Cecilia Muoz: Why People of Color are Always "More Than Ready"

"Have section of the book subtitled when people assume you're only there for a little color. When has that assumption made about you? Oh probably most of my career. I think so. They're definitely people who think that that's why am occur. I'm a macarthur fellow. I've heard people say the words I heard people say that One of the stories. I recount in the book. Is that one of the chiefs chiefs of staff that I served under told a couple people who wrote books about the first term of the Obama Administration that he gave them the impression that I was an affirmative action. Hire for the domestic policy job Which cost me a couple of years of self doubt and I did really spend a fair amount of energy wondering whether the people I was sitting at the table with whether that's what they thought But I took comfort from what Sonia Sotomayor says in her book. Her wonderful book stocks about getting to Princeton through -firmative action and she describes it as getting to the starting line of a race. And so so there. You are at the starting line but you still have to run it. And so and the I talked to seven other women I was this book and they all said the same thing happened to them all the time too and they all said their own equivalent of so. You're there at the table so you got to do the job You have to rise to the occasion you have to run the race And there are people who will assume that about you but it matters less if you know that you're crushing it and so that's your job when I ask other women. In my life other people in my life people caller. It's a pretty common experience and it can mess with your head. It certainly must with mine so I thought it was worth writing down some strategies for all right you have self doubt and you also have the doubts of people around you and here's some strategies for confronting that investing. What do you think is the most effective strategy? This book is called more than ready right. It's it's about the fact that the world is more than ready for what we bring to it but also everybody. I talked to that. Has these moments of self doubt. Says they deal with it by over preparing right by making sure that when they walk into the room that they know their stuff were more than ready because we work at it and we overcome our doubts and other people's doubts by working harder being good at it. The one thing I thought was missing from the book. And perhaps it's because it doesn't exist is the moment because it seems you're still grappling with some of these things even as you are encouraging me and other. Latina's to go for it. There's still a part of you. That has some of that inside voice them. That was there a moment that crystallized for you yes. It is the moment when my elder daughter Tina and I were talking about the two thousand sixteen election and I said to her. You know it's not like I haven't been around the block and I don't know from sexism but even still I am stunned by the misogyny that I'm seeing and she said mom. I'm not stunned. She said the difference between me and you is that you've been at it for so long that you're used to it and I thought Oh she's right. I come to accept a certain amount of self doubt a certain amount of misogyny a certain amount of racism because it's just my reality and she's younger and she can see it in a way that that is fresher and more vivid and it gives her a better capacity to fight against it into Kabul's yet on it so that was my moment.

Sonia Sotomayor Tina Obama Administration Macarthur Princeton Kabul
Political Power Player Cecilia Muoz Reminds Us That We Are More Than Ready

Latina to Latina

8:47 listening | Last month

Political Power Player Cecilia Muoz Reminds Us That We Are More Than Ready

"How Did you stumble into advocacy? I was very sure that I was going into what I think of his direct service like that was my thing. I was aiming towards it. I I could picture myself in an office. Like seeing clients of some sort and helping them with the stuff. That's why I volunteered at the legal clinic. When I was in graduate school I found myself a job with archdiocese at Chicago right after graduate school and that was just very sure that that was my path and I ended up until literally got intervened got actually kind of way intervened. It's a very strange story. So I'm I'm working as an organizer for It's called Perez Community Services and the sizes of Chicago and an immigration law passes and because I have been working as a lowly volunteer in a legal clinic in graduate school. I knew a tiny bit about this law and my boss's boss was the guy responsible for building up the legalization operation to help. Undocumented people become legal residents so I was asking him questions just because I was curious about like how you GonNa do this because there was a way that law worked the application period started by law on May Fifth Congress decided to open it on Cinco de Mayo. You know for symbolic reasons and so they had to be ready to start on that date weather. The regulations were ready whether the agency was ready so I had questions for him in this poor man had the cardinal breathing down his neck. Saying we have to do this. Half of the Catholics in Chicago are are Hispanic and this is our moment to show our flock that we are with them and he so he called me into his office and said the Lord sent me a dream and I want you to lead this legalization effort. I was twenty four hours of my first job out of graduate. School did not have illegal immoral. No I've been like a paralegal way in the bowels of this little organization. I'm very good at collating papers. You'll right And I have no management experience at all and I also don't have mentors so like an idiot. I take this job because I cared about what I cared about. What was happening. I don't believe the Lord spoke to Father Ruby. I think he was desperate But I threw myself into it and it was an amazing challenging experience and we crushed it but I learned a lot about myself. I learned a lot about the Catholic church. Some of which I wish I didn't know and I learned I suck at direct service. I mean my program did really well there were. There was a universe of people who qualified under the law in a lot of people who didn't qualify under the law. And the thing that I couldn't do is like go of the people that we had to say no to because they didn't qualify. I lost sleep. I agonized and I realized people who are good at this are able to live with the reality of what they can and can't do and they were able to test themselves often. Get up every morning and do it. I wasn't so I this thing. I thought I was supposed to be good at that. I believed in. I discovered. I wasn't good at it. I wasn't cut out for it. Turns out on an advocate and I'm a structural reform and I just didn't know until I tried to do what I thought I was meant to do and failed and I I tell that story all the time because I think it's important for people to know it's okay to try something discover. It's not what you cut out for it. That's how you one of the ways that you land where you're supposed to let you have this realization. You also realize it requires you to move to Washington. Dc to really do you want. Do I love the fact that part of your resistance to moving. Dc was just that you're introverted and didn't WANNA make new friend turned not be more sympathetic to that but then you end up NCR for two decades when you first get there. Lobbying is the type of loving you. Reduce very much defined by men totally. Yes I was the only woman in the room all the time. And so how did you have to personally adapt to meet that moment? So there is a section. The book called Sharp Elbows and other tools and it refers to the fact. I'm not actually sharp elbows person but there was literally a point at which the group of men that I was working with that were sort of coalition partners we were at congressional markup where they literally mark up a piece of legislation. And when it's over everybody stands up. In the guys stood in a circle they formed a little huddle to like compare notes. And do all the things you do afterwards which are important and I couldn't get in the huddle and I was frustrated. Went back to my boss and complained and he said he who is my height. Said you just gotTa just elbow you weigh-in that's like it's not personal. He said they're not but you're short. You're a woman you're Kinda knew so elbow one of them and say could you let me in here and be fine and I I did. I had to do that the next time. And I only had to do it once But that kind of stuff happened all the time. I was in a board meeting where I was ten years younger than everybody. The only woman the only let the And they're making decisions about board officers and the head of the organization pipes up and says up secretary while. I guess that Cecilia should do that job. And my first thought was oh come on. Are you kidding me so but what I remember about those things from thirty years ago now is that I didn't feel I could I am now I think? Why did I feel like I couldn't do that? I thought the thought that somebody else said. If I were giving advice to my younger self now it would be you can say it. Of course you can say it And to you know give yourself the confidence to recognize that I like. I didn't have a voice in my head saying you. This is a group working on immigration. And you're the only Hispanic person in this room. A vet gives you standing. You can either say I'm the only Latin and that gives me twice as much room to say what I need to say or the only one here so I have no cover. And that's what makes us nervous exactly and over and over again from that point all the way through my timer. The White House. It's not just the I might not have cover. It's also the and I don't WanNa be the gadfly that is always pushing everybody so much that the next time I when my mouth? They're all gonna just roll their eyes and not listen. That's the other thing that I feel like my you know. My radar is always going for because hall point of being in those places to be effective and so I also feel like I was aware of not overstating my case so as not to get to the place where nobody. Here's you anymore because they've turned you out blackness isn't just about race. I'm Denise Milner and I'm a New York Times bestselling author on my podcast. Speaking with Dean I dive into the beauty and humanity a blackness with people like writer tyree Jones journalist Dmitry Lucas and rapper. Killer Mike Listen to speak easy with Deneen from Georgia public broadcasting subscribe for free at GP Dot Org Slash podcasts or on your favorite podcast APP when you look at AMC or Jessica. She's nettles whose primary Democrat Texas. It feels like we are in a moment where they're more. Latina's saying I'm ready. Yep I deserve to be a part of this conversation and I'm not going to apologize for attempting to take my seat at the table. Would he make I have this combination of great pride l? Bit of fear for them and a little bit of worry especially in the case of. Afc that the spotlight is so shining on her and And she's she I think she's amazing. But but I think it is hard to live your life in that spotlight especially when you're so young so I have this combination of like super-duper proud of these women and I feel like I know a little bit about what might be coming for them. I I have confidence in their ability to to endure it but there is the I guess the mom part of me feels like there's there's going to be some some challenges. I had maybe some pain and the envy no no Grande Magin though if you would have started if you the point now if you could have been at that point in your mid twenty s can you imagine if you knew that you were more than ready in your mid twenties. Yes and in some ways. That's why are written. The book is because I want all of us to know

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Detainees in US immigration jails living in fear as coronavirus spreads

Latino Rebels Radio

8:42 listening | 2 months ago

Detainees in US immigration jails living in fear as coronavirus spreads

"I wanted to get this show out today because I just got off the phone with Lorena Qudos out of Mississippi who is an immigrant rights activists. We recently published some news coming out of Louisiana Private Immigration Detention Center that Laurynas Organization called attention to and I wanted to connect with her the Afon to check in on what is happening in Mississippi and Louisiana during the nineteen crisis. If you're in the thick fan Lorena was on the show with us live from Mississippi in February and so I just gave her a ring. And here's what we talked about. Hey thank you so much for being unlucky. No rebels radio with me. Thank you for having me so I wanted to reach out to you. Know we just connected like even like less than a month ago. Right in the thick in Jackson so Spin on you've quickly Yeah but in the middle of all this before we talk a little bit about the work that you're doing Right now how is Mississippi? In general How the mood out there during the during the global pandemic well right now with. What's your feeling is a lot of concern We're in Jackson Mississippi And It we are excited that the mayor's taking action to but the rest of Mississippi is pretty much running Normal especially the Gulf coast with many restaurants open and Being so close to the water we hearing exploding daily so concerned Yeah and our the our immigrant communities that you you serve in In Mississippi how are they? Are they getting the information or they? How's that going? Yeah so he feels some sort of infrastructure we have communications and have the comedian's going strong and has been able to really provide information. I've seen as as we were able to to to define what was going on. So we're trying to interpret translate whatever we get from the CDC. Try to clear each easier to understand. And when I don't share that social media we've created looks Different message services over the phone that we're trying we do here sometimes. People don't realize if I it's as the gravity of the situation But we're trying and right now we're working on developing sound videos in shoe and Imam That have more than interfaces so that people can pay attention to what's going on but there is a lot of concern because they've already depleted and resources so our families could not stuck up right. They have anything to with. No they're just GONNA. I'm very very small amount of resources. And we're trying to create a different fun to be able to Helping your also focusing on the other side of this crisis. That is to be honest with you. It's not getting as much attention. And then it has to do with immigrants attention centers particularly in Louisiana. Where it's now great safe to say that we've unit GONNA be another you know not if it's not already so can you tell me a little bit of the context of what happened this this week. in why we're talking right now Yeah so we so we Have a call to action to them. All the united other Southern organizations and Louisiana particularly working with immigrant community Lisa out oppression me the mandate that I Free are people that were in detention and also United with the movement here in just fifty two free Folks in the jails so we sent out a press release. We both reached out to congressman. Benny Thompson who was the chant. Home Security Committee or asking him to publicly. Ask for these folks so he has agreed to a conversation with us. So that's tending for Lundy Terrible. There's particular one that we share the recording of s Beliefs on one of the male detainees in Louisiana upper corner. You Cleveland Apple Towel again. Even through the veto if you take it again going on though while the woman kindly wannabe panel this. You need big game on to winter. They won't believe me. That's about all the topic on way down the alley in downtown Seattle media buying them. I don't you come home. And then not only Audi that a major Yom Lucchino. Thanks for the help. My Album Light Reno Navy to gay big data can only get thirty dollars. A good idea to pay quitting loosely. Kamal can lead equiment even only monkey and won't get get older woman. I go see them on Sola. It'll be Audi dark. You think the last thing they will get into the Marine. Go get him waking. You only think that believe. Showman Noah Anthony Quainton. What you're saying what keying into. Saint Blind Mehta. Can you hear a little bit more about what you're hearing from these From these individuals who are are incarcerated right now and immigrant detention centers and just want the private facility. Correct from what I can share more about what you're hearing the stories Because I know it was so powerful to hear There's a humanity going on here and then and back to me is just be missed in this crisis And so I have visited essential myself when you first come in. And you know it's a brand new looking space but when you And of course we accept patients We certainly Here from Folks that are in detention center is how horrible. The conditions are The fact that they are already mistreated by the officers. But very unsanitary conditions They don't have soap They have to beg for Wendy. Do out of Asia You know the soap shampoo They actually have organized a time for them to clean themselves and they are not because tendency there. Several people that actually have Chronic lung problems and Heart problems and they are terrified. You know because you have people that are coming in from outside constantly and then they'll also transferred people from other detention centres. Dan You know the movement in and out and it's about to happen and time bomb right now and that's that's what people are worried. They're terrified now. We have a hunger strike. Because they're they feel desperate feeling. This is the only way that able get some

Mississippi Louisiana Louisiana Private Immigration Lorena Qudos Audi Dan You Jackson Mississippi Noah Anthony Quainton Chronic Lung Jackson Congressman Lundy Terrible Seattle CDC Imam Benny Thompson Home Security Committee Saint Blind Mehta
Quarantine Confidential

Locatora Radio

8:39 listening | 2 months ago

Quarantine Confidential

"Is our first piece of audio bat. We're going to be putting out since really this whole thing blew up. Yeah episode that we put. I don't think we had any idea that we would wish no. It's it's been a very interesting time to save the lease like so many things have changed and like so. Many things have gone on our last episode. We chatted with yes means about her campaign running for Council district three of Whittier Young. We were in a very different mindset. I was preparing for my trip to do like. It was a very very different time. And well you know life Congress you fast right and not even like life has to be put on pause because we're still living and we're still doing things like your plans are definitely being postponed you have to like very very much rewire your your own programming right now right because it's really not business as usual and there's no way for it to be business as usual in every in every like meaning of that phrase right like yard is different. Your social life is different. Your family life may be different. It's were in very interesting times right now. It's really wild. I mean So I don't even know where to begin to talk about. You mentioned Peru like skirt there. Okay okay so I left forbid who on February twenty nine so it's been almost a month now and the day before I left. There was the very first reported case of current virus in medical and I had a layover in Mexico so immediately. My mother texts me and his like. Cancel your trip your phone it. You have to go the later time you cannot go and I was very much like re like following the hype of like at the time we were still talking about it like the flu right at that time period in February. It was very much like the flu is worse like the flu. Kills More People. So that's very much where. I was basing my my opinions. My facts on about Kobe. Nineteen so and also at the time there were no cases in Beddoe so I felt like it's it was appropriate to continue my trip so I did and my last few days there was when the very first few cases of the current virus started appearing or being confirmed in bed. Do so definitely feeling the energy shift while I was there. Not only for myself. But I wasn't here for the initial like hoarding and panic. Buying you know so marketing would call me and was like there's no water here. There's no this there's no that and I didn't really believe her and like I would talk to my mom and she was like no. There's stuff here like I just went to the grocery store today. Things are fine right so I didn't really know what to believe. And then my last couple of days. They're like the last two days I saw. I started to see people panic buying there as well and then I was like. Oh Shit what the fuck is happening and then I was like anxious to get back home because I was like what if I had already thought? Like what if I get stuck like somewhere was leaving on Thursday and then I had a layover in Mexico so I was like what if somewhere along the way like I get stuck and then I'm back on a Friday and I come back around midnight and it was really interesting to see how international arrivals were being handled at LAX. So handled right. I saw absolutely no sign. `age like no signs anywhere for if you're sick if you're feeling these symptoms contact you know whatever number if you're sick head over to this website. I saw nothing like that and in many where I was at both of those airports there were signs everywhere. Sure sure sure gets LAX. And there's none and I go through customs and there's absolutely no questions about like. Are you feeling ill? Did you come into contact with anyone? That was ill nothing like that. So it was very confusing to go through that process and then a couple days later bid who actually close their borders so ins and outs so I literally like you narrowly escaped. Y'All truly truly. I left on a Thursday and by Monday the borders recalls. And it's like a so. The President of Peru has been criticized a lot by foreign travelers and just like. I'm assuming embassies. Because he reported like our he made that announcement on a Sunday like in the evening and was like midnight. You can't leave so if you had a flight on Monday. Like the holiest day. That's it you know so I was and I kind of thought about that so like a day or two before like I kept checking the news in like following the announcement because I was like. What are you literally? There's a lockdown and then I can go on and sure enough knocked down. People get to go home girl. You got out of there not one minute like now I know. And now there's like four hundred cases or hundred confirmed cases. Folks are literally on lockdown quarantine. You are there's a curfew like after eight PM. You cannot go anywhere. There's like military takes likes so that people don't go exit their homes. It's serious serious so y'all grow. I'm back thank rain. Catis goddess. Think everything think everyone. That's in my experience. I coming back. And then entering like the beginning of social distancing and now we're in a safe at home here in L. A. So like what has your experience through all of this. Yeah it was funny because you know you were over there but you had gotten like your international texting plan and everything so we still do you know giving each other updates back and forth and checking in and you asking us what's going on over here and over there and We sent to each other. You sent to me an article about like now with the US is charging folks to be like helped out of Peru right. Now you're asking me okay. There you go. That's the United States. Government is like. Yeah we'll get you out of Peru but we're going to charge you nine hundred dollars nine hundred dollars. Yeah that's wild dude Mike. Experience has been. I'm mostly centered around work because I work at a school so schools are small communities with tons of people close proximity to each other. And you know the kids are always touching each other and sharing drinks and food and everything. Yes there's such thing as social distancing in school small children so it started at school and they were really getting the faculty prepared and saying look. We don't really know what to expect. We're just listening to the CDC. We're listening to the health department locally and Basically prepping to teach online for an extended period of time. That was step one. Hey like some trips. Some field trips and things might get canceled because we wanNA stop community spread and it hasn't gotten to us yet but we want to participate in prevention and we're just following guidelines so it went from. Let's start getting ready to teach online to programming across the board getting cancelled to literally from one night to the next day like sentence in emergency tax. They emailed US. They called us and they let us know like it was like eight nine. Pm On a week and they were like campus is closed. Do not come back tomorrow. Basically don't come back ever on standby And that's what it's been so we're getting ready to just take and it's the thing is there are online schools but you can't just create an online school over ninety right. That's not how that works and so it's GonNa be really interesting. Come Monday of next week. Which is our first day back to see how it all

Peru FLU United States Mexico Congress Council District Beddoe Whittier Young LAX President Trump Catis CDC Mike
COVID-19 Q & A

In The Thick

6:42 listening | 2 months ago

COVID-19 Q & A

"You guys. This is such a treat his. You'll know our all star. Washer hot a leak you know. He's like with us from the beginning. Right you guys know that. He's like contributing op ED writer. He's a CNN commentator. It's a big deal to have him calling us from his car. So welcome wash minivan respect and the Dad Boston okay. Here's the amazing thing dear listener. We are joined by his wife. She's a brilliant physician. Her name is Dr Sarah. She's a physician at Georgetown Family Medicine. And Hey you're married to watch you've done this for a while you're the euro. Welcome to the doctor. I thank you so much for having me and I'm calling from the cars. Yes so watches in the fan in our driveway. And I'm in the car in the driveway and they're watching the children from six feet away. This is about as social distancing as you can get this is the most socially responsible podcast in the world amazing amazing and I just love. What was just told me that he wants to do which is to wrap me up in bubble wrap so that. I stay healthy. Thank God I am healthy. In fact I just tweeted out today. I was just like how I'm going to be grateful for having a roof over my head husband. Who LOVES ME? My kids at home. home job. So we're GONNA start podcast on a note of gratitude and I'm just so thankful that was and Sarah are joining. Hulu me because this is a big deal. It's our first time to have a married couple. It's also our first time living through a pandemic so here we are. We're surviving there are now over three hundred thousand cases worldwide with over thirty five thousand Kovic in nineteen cases in the United States making this the country with the third most cases after China and Italy. We're actually just eleven days behind Italy in terms of trajectory. So keep that in. Mind as you guys know. It's putting such a strain on our healthcare system The CDC is telling healthcare workers to improvise when they have a shortage of masks. What we have several states multiple states that have you know basically placed some form of shelter in place or lockdown protocol. I have to say I'm surprised that not all fifty have done it so Sunday night. The president of the United States his name is president trump. You know he said this and it was really it was really It was a moment because he said that the National Guard is going to be deployed to New York California and Washington State. That made a lot of people of color really uncomfortable. Yeah and then also on Tuesday the Prime Minister of Japan. Avi Shinzo he said. The International Olympic Committee will postpone the Summer Olympics. They were supposed to be held in Tokyo this summer. Now they'll take place no later than summer of twenty twenty one so I just want to back up for a moment to understand. And we're we're laughing through this because we're we're releasing and because we're with people care about right now on this past but Every single day it's just like Oh my God. No joke like no joke. How serious diseases and why? We should have taken these measures back in February but Sarah Update us. What what we've learned so far about cove in nineteen you know. I just have to agree with you. I've just say we are already weeks late and doing everything. Normally when you're late to do things it's like. Oh the toll measured in something. That might not be that relevant right now. The the tragedies toes measured in lives loss. So every day that there's a misstep or delay it's going to be measured and more lives lost absolutely horrifying so where we're at right now. I mean at least in the US like you said we actually don't even know the two cases. Those are reported cases when you don't know the real official number because we've been under testing and we haven't been testing and we haven't been tracing and just like the World Health Organization said it took a think about sixty seventy s from the first reported case to reach the first one hundred thousand cases and then after that it took just eleven to reach the second one hundred thousand cases and then just four days to reach a third one hundred thousand cases so this is a horrible buyers exponentially affecting people all over. So this is scary and we are not overreacting or under reacting and as public health professionals. We always say if we do our job right then. People will say that we overreacted. And that's okay because then that means we're all okay but unfortunately that's not the case right now so sir one of the things that we did for this show because we have a real community of people who listen to us right so we're familiar even though we're not touching each other the ask our our listeners to send questions and one of our listeners on twitter reverberate wire asked if it is spreading through for example gas pumps and how long it lasts on surfaces. I mean sometimes when you're seeing this information it's its terrifying how long the virus can last on different surfaces. What do we know is is fact about this question? So we're always finding out new information. This is a new virus. Things are always changing but what we know as of now is it's highly effective so are not is the rate of infectivity of any virus and if it's greater than one then that means the virus is going to keep spreading and if it's less than one that means you're gonNA see decrease in number infections And when it's greater than one what that means is so far the SARS coronavirus two are not is. It's around three so for every one person infected you're likely in fact three other people And this is without without social distancing and all those measures so one of the reasons it's so infectious again. The flu is like one one point five so this is almost doubled infectivity rate of the flu. 'em Is because it does last on surfaces right now. What we're finding is akin lost on cardboard boxes or paper for anywhere up to twenty four hours and it can last on plastic or steel for two three days. Whoa WHOA Yikes. Yeah I want to say based on what I've been reading. The literature shows that that's not the highest rate of transmission can get transmitted that way but the highest rate is droplets through a person to person contact. And there's a small number fecal oral also ooh K. All right good to

United States Dr Sarah FLU CNN President Trump Italy Hulu Writer Boston Georgetown Family Medicine International Olympic Committe Avi Shinzo Twitter Prime Minister Of Japan Tokyo World Health Organization Olympics National Guard