LGBTQ

Infuse your ears with inclusivity and listen to the latest from the LGBTQ world. No matter where you fall in the rainbow, our playlist has you covered. Aired from premium podcasts.

A highlight from 154: Ruth Coker Burks | Part 1

Homo Sapiens

07:21 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from 154: Ruth Coker Burks | Part 1

"Apparently. So the roads just freeze, and then what happens is if the roads are snowy and then people will drive over it, it gets slippery and slippery. I am not a good driver at the best of times. I'm going to say that I should probably not go out and drive. So it's strict milk rationing in this house because I love my husband dearly. I love him to death. But boy does he blitz the milk on his cereal. It's like, hello, this other people who want the milk. Now then, it was world aids day yesterday, so we have got such a special episode for you. I am going to be chatting too. Real life angel is what I'm going to call her. Ruth coker Burks. She wrote a book called all the young men about her time caring for men dying of aids in Arkansas in America. At the beginning of the crisis. It is the most incredible story of compassion and love, which is so relevant today because I do feel like if we look at the news, how low on compassion we are running for members of the trans community, gender nonconforming community. The vitriol that they are getting right now that used to be directed at gay men, lesbians, and particularly people with aids and still people with aids, by the way. Basically to cut a long story short with Ruth she was living in our Kansas in America, not known for its liberalists, and she noticed a boy who was dying of aids in a hospital room where no one would even go into the room to go near him because they thought they could catch it. She defied them all she went in there she looked after that boy, she then buried him on her family's land, and went on to care for thousands of other men who were dying of aids, burying them on her family's land, said they could have the dignity of a burial when no one else in the world would give it to them. They were ostracized. They were treated like pariahs. They were abandoned by their families and all they had was Ruth. Ruth is the most amazing person. She's incredibly funny as well, so it's a really fun chat about an amazing person who did an incredible thing. She is an angel, and I'm not religious, by the way. Quite interesting because she is religious, although she sort of then talks about how she's not. So interesting how faith, but she certainly came up against the church a lot in what she was doing. It's very, very interesting. And we're going to have that chat in a moment, but first of all, are you caught up on your recent homo sapiens episodes last week we had a absolute superstar on the podcast where she Murphy, I just loved her and so many of you wrote in lovely messages Jen practiced with journal Instagram she wrote in saying how much she loves Rachel. So many of you just wrote, oh my God, I can't believe you've got her. She speaks to the LGBTQ+ community. She's very queer in her way, isn't she she's defiant and she's such a deep emotional side to her music that connects with LGBTQ+ people I find all the time. Very, very interesting. If you haven't catch up on Apple podcasts, also tell us what you thought of it. Hello, homo sapiens, podcast dot com or at homo sapiens. And Instagram also this is your weekly reminder to rate and review on Apple podcasts. And then if you review, you could win a T-shirt, the much coveted homo sapiens T-shirt, new design coming soon, keep trailing that probably should do something about it in real life. Me and Katie, Katie is one of the producers of homo sapiens. She has all the samples. So we're getting there. But you know, like all great creatives, it takes a while. God, I've got a lot of coffee mugs on my table. Look at that. Three of them. Three. All with slightly cold coffee and two very cool because the days old. I actually had a bit of a clearer in my office here and I found a bottle of water that had gone moldy. How does that even happen? What was in there? Now then. City desk. That's what my dad always used so many odds. So do you disk? I don't know what it means. That was my Tapping because it's time to look at some emails. We've had some lovely messages as always. Jasmine has been in touch, Jasmine is not Jasmine's real name, she says at the bottom. Hi, you lovely people. Thank you for helping me feel part of an amazing LGBT family. I am a by female and I feel so alone. When I listen to podcasts, I'm part of a wonderful community. Thank you darlings. Jasmine, that's really cute. And I got to say, you are part of the family, and I'm thrilled that this feels like home for you. Oh my God, by the way, such an exciting piece of news re Christmas special. I can't say anymore. But boy, if we got a good guest. Another email from someone called Chris, what a great name. Hello, it's been a while since I've written in, but two things really struck a chord recently good, tick tick, Chris. Do you think this is me writing to myself? Firstly, the interview with dino fetcher was great, although I now live abroad. I grew up in South Wales and I'm roughly the same age as dino. Quite a few of the thing few of the things he said resonated and when he said that he remembers not knowing what being gay meant but knowing he was ashamed of it felt like he was reading my mind from when I was a kid. It's a shame I can't go to London to see the play, but I have to make do with streaming the film. Great, great second option there, quiz. Secondly, the interview with your term ottolenghi is still available on the feed, was also really interesting. When he talked about PE lessons, I distinctly recalled exactly the same experience of being sent out to play football. Actually, the experience wasn't exactly the same because as this was South Wales, the weather was usually wet cold windy or all of the above. The same in southfields in London, I tell you, Chris, sometimes the teacher would give the whistle to a boy who couldn't participate for some reason and they would referee and we would only see the teacher when it was time to go back into change. That's so funny. I used to, yeah, they used to let me do things like refereeing. They actually used to let me bring a book to cricket. What does that tell you about their hopes for my sporting prowess? But yeah, I remember once we had this huge organized football match for the school year. I don't know why this happened, but it did. I went to know boys school, so everyone in a year decided they were going to play some big match against each other and I was always trying to stick myself in the center of things. So I said I would refer reeks of second play. Okay, I had not ever. I don't think I'd ever be much more than two seconds of football. So one I didn't know the rules, slight challenge. Do have you ever tried telling a boy that they're offside when perhaps they're not, or have you ever tried telling a man that they are in the wrong when they don't create everyone just kept shouting me down and going nuts at me. Every time I made a decision, a pretty ill informed decision, and then I did a terrible thing, which is I changed my mind on the pitch in front of them all, so then I backed down. It was an absolute cataclysm. I don't know how I got through the 90 minutes. Do you play for 90 minutes as a child without a profession? Anyway, hell on earth. So funny quit. I remember those sorts of things as well. Back to his email. Thank you for continuing to make the podcast. I look forward to listening to the new episodes each week on my commute. Chris, we aim to please.

Aids Ruth Ruth Coker Burks Jasmine America Katie Apple Arkansas Dino Fetcher Chris Kansas Instagram JEN Murphy South Wales Rachel Football Dino London Cricket
A highlight from 154: Ruth Coker Burks | Part 2

Homo Sapiens

08:08 min | 6 d ago

A highlight from 154: Ruth Coker Burks | Part 2

"We really solved murder cases because nobody else is doing it. Oxygen knows that in the world of true crime, some women uphold the law. We want to see justice done. Some women break the law. And others just snap. I was angry, I wanted to hurt him. Oxygen has the best criminal investigators. Nice. Taking on the toughest cases. Women are pretty badass detectives. And we're just getting started. Oxygen. We live and breathe, true crime. Welcome to part two of our chat with Ruth coker burns to mark world aids day. She is an incredible person. If you haven't heard part one, go get it in the feed. If not his butt to and with straight off we're talking about food. There's a lot of food going on. You did amazing things with food and as the crowd of people you're looking after grew bigger and bigger. You were suddenly having to cater for huge amounts of people, right? I was. And I was even dumpster diving. I mean, I never thought I'd be dumpster diving. But I thought, you know, I had seen what they put in the dumpsters. And the bread is all wrapped up and tied, you know, and the vegetables, a lot of them were in plastic or bags of potatoes. And cartons of milk and cottage cheese and butter and all these wonderful things to gain make them gain weight. And so I would go and make my run of the I'd take my daughter to school and I'd go check I had three dumpsters that I really liked and I knew what day they, you know, put things out. And after a while, they started leaving everything outside the dumpster. Could they knew you were coming? Yeah. Yeah. Wow. There were people who sort of silently helped you weren't there throughout this. And there was a doctor. I'd love you to tell me more about who kind of because words sort of got out. Locally that you were doing this, and people were not impressed. Because well, one thing that a lot of people said to you is that you were endangering other people because you were going near you know near people with aids and then you were going to spread it because no one knew where it was coming from at that point. We were actually at a funeral. And I realized that chip, I knew somebody was coming in and bathing chip and shaving him in the mornings and I didn't know who it was and he never said and I would mention like, wow, you look really good today and you shaved and he goes, yeah, I did. And I knew he didn't. Oh, so tell me who chip was again. Chip was my guy that he was, he was raised in this little tiny sawmill town. And if working at the sawmill was good enough for your daddy, it was good enough for you. And you didn't have to learn to read to work at the sawmill. But chip got out and he went to college and he made it to Washington D.C. as the president of the young Democrats. He was going places. He was good-looking. He was everything. And then he came home with aids. And he was buried in a cardboard casket, and if I had known they were going to bury his family did it. And if I had known his family rejected him, his mother said leave this town, I don't want you here. You know, when I sent you away the first time I didn't expect you to come back. Well, he didn't either trust me. And they just had a cloth covered cardboard casket and down and I carried his casket to his grave. So down started, he was a pediatrician in Pam. And there was always rumors about him being gay and a lot of the parents who wouldn't let their sons get their football physicals from him. He had a beautiful wife and 5 beautiful children, but he was seeing chip on the side. And I think they had been friends for a long time. And so he started doing my testing for me. So he's the one who came up to you at the funeral and said, I'll test people don't tell anyone. Bring them after hours. That was it. I would take the clinic would open at 9 o'clock at night for me to start bringing in people through the back door. And the Arkansas legislature because you know they're so smart, they made it against the law to do anonymous testing. But they didn't put a penalty on it. So we had this director of the aids program for the state health department under doctor Jocelyn elders and he was paying to keep his back then we called him lovers instead of husbands or companions or anything. To keep his lover at home to play house and cook for him and clean and plan these big parties. And he was spending aids money that we didn't have. On his boyfriend instead of buying AZT for the people it was meant to go to. I had a bunch of people come in and test, and I had like Ronald Reagan and Nancy Reagan and Minnie mouse and Mickey Mouse. And so he called me and he said, I don't want to see any more of these fake names come through here. I'd better see a real name in a real social security number. And I said, okay, Henry, whatever you want. So I got those same people to come back the next week. And I tested everybody and they were in on this whole thing. I knew what I was doing. So I tested them and I put down my name and social security number about 20 times. And Henry called one note, what the hell are you trying to do? I said, well, Henry, I didn't feel well last week. And I just felt a little virus. He said, I had better not say your name and social security number come through my office one more time. Okay, Henry. So the next week, I put Henry's name in social security down for everybody. And I said, how do you want to play this game, Henry? Because I think I'm winning. No matter what they threw at you, you just came up with a better plan and a way to get round it. I love it. Yeah. Then you started stockpiling medicine, didn't you? I did. And you would ask different patients for bits of AZ, which was the only one who doesn't know one of the first treatments for aids that was it was a very, very cracking a nut with the sledgehammers because all it did is it turned their fingernails black, but it gave them hope. And hope is all they needed. They just needed a little bit of hope because I knew that day after tomorrow, there'd be a vaccine or something would come out to cure this. And do you, when you see what's happened with COVID and I'm sure you've been asked this question a lot, but do you ever feel cross about COVID? And how it's been dealt with. Compared to oh yeah, I do. Yeah, I do. You know, people were running through people with COVID to take care of them. And they were putting on the mask. And they were putting on these big spacesuits. And they had things across their scars. And I admire the people that were doing it, and the nurses that were in doctors that were taking care of them, but where were they when aids was there? And 8 wasn't nearly as contagious as COVID. And you know they just couldn't get to the people fast enough or get enough of them in the hospital to take care of everybody. And there was

Aids Ruth Coker Washington D.C. Henry Arkansas Legislature Jocelyn Elders Mark State Health Department PAM Nancy Reagan Minnie Mouse Mickey Mouse Ronald Reagan Football Covid
A highlight from Angela Chen: What Asexuality Reveals About Desire, Society, and the Meaning of Sex

LGBTQ&A

05:52 min | Last week

A highlight from Angela Chen: What Asexuality Reveals About Desire, Society, and the Meaning of Sex

"But as today's guest Angela Chen talks about asexuality is complex, and encompasses a rather broad range of experiences. Asexuals also known as ace or aces can feel repulsed by sex, they can feel indifferent to it and they can also enjoy sex. Now I'll be completely honest. These are all things I did not know until getting introduced to Angela in her work. She is the author of ace, what asexuality reveals about desire society and the meaning of sex. We originally spoke last year when her book came out, and it really expanded how I think not only about sex, but what it means to be queer. So I hope you enjoy our conversation as much as I did and from the advocate magazine in partnership with glad I'm Jeffrey masters and this is LGBTQ and a with Angela Chen. I think for me, my biggest takeaway, and it sounds obvious in hindsight, but my biggest takeaway is how many different ways there are to be asexual and I hate to say it, but I did not know that it was this umbrella term that encompasses such a broad range of experiences. Do you find that that is a common misconception? It is so common. And you know, there's part of me that's like, come on, everyone. Like, you know, it's been a while. We should be caught up, but there's this other part of me that is so so sympathetic. And I think some of it has to do with language, right? Because asexual, it's not a word someone made up. You know, people already have associations with it. So it's just not intuitive that you would call someone who maybe has positive sexual experiences asexual, right? Just honest semantic level, people are like, what does that mean? So I totally understand why people would not understand it's an umbrella term would not intuitively know that there's such a diverse range of experiences under that, but also I feel like it is time for us to be having that conversation and moving away from that one image of asexuality. Even for people who think they know what it means, they think it means like, oh, you just don't like sex. So you repulse by sex, but it's so much more than that. That's such a great point before reading the book, I would have told you that asexual people do not have any desire for sex or romantic relationships. And that is the case for some, but in no means the entire community. Do you mind just like giving us like the definition that we should be thinking of for a sexuality? Absolutely. So the official definition is asexuality means you don't experience sexual attraction, which seems simple enough, right? But then you have to be like, okay, what is sexual attraction? And most people think it means, oh, you just are repulsed by sex. You don't want to have sex, but sexual attraction is not the only reason to have sex. You know, the example I always use, which I don't love this metaphor, but I was just a food metaphor. It's like there's foods that you love, and you're like attracted to quote unquote. There's food to repulse by. And then there's some foods that they taste fine, but because you associate them with your best friends in college and like that social thing, you're like, there's like an emotional reason. Well, I won't speak for you. I'm an emotional eater. So I feel like there's all these nuances there. To make it really simple, it's possible to not experience sexual attraction without being repulsed by sex to be basically sex and different, but because there's so many other reasons to have sex emotional reasons like you might be bored or you really love someone or you want to feel attractive and desired and sexy back and hide for many people their own asexuality. And that's where it gets into all of these nuances and all of these complexities. I think for so many people in the queer community, we first began to discover and understand our sexual orientation through sexual attraction only. To oversimplify it, right? I'm sexually attracted to men I must be gay. Without that component, can you talk about how you experience attraction and what you base those feelings on? Yeah, and that's something that's really complicated. So one thing with asexuality is that in some ways the orientation is based on what you don't experience. So then you have to kind of explain what is it you don't experience, which is a weird philosophical question, right? So for me, when I feel attracted to someone this romantic sense, it's basically like having a crush on them, right? Like I want to date them. I could see it's being romantic partners. And I even have an aesthetic type, you know? I always say, do not get me wrong. I have a type. It's not like everyone looks the same to me. Some people are hot. Some people are less hot. You know, don't get me wrong. But there's not like a sexual motivation for it. And I think that can be really, really hard for people to feel out and understand because there can be so many nuances. And I also want to make clear that being asexual is not the same as being a romantic. Because sex and romance aren't the same, right? I think most people would agree. So many people are asexual and they are say hetero romantic or they are pan romantic or biromantic. And there are some people who are sexual who are a romantic meaning that they just don't experience dramatic attraction to others. Though, of course, they might love their friends or their family very much. It's so interesting compared to non a sexual people to have to come out of the closet because we can discuss our sexuality by talking about broader terms like dating and relationships. And yet you coming out as a sexual have to discuss sex, sex has to be in the conversation. Does that pose challenges like say parents when you don't want to talk about sex with them? Yeah, absolutely. So the funny thing is, my parents just don't know the book is about. It's funny because if you Google my name like the books and come up within two second jewel, it'll stay on the jacket copy, you know, in her own experience as an asexual journalist. But I'm just not out to my parents in part because it really feels like I'd be talking to them about my sex life in a way that I don't think it would be the case if I were asexual or bisexual, for example.

Angela Chen Jeffrey Masters Angela Google
A highlight from Introducing: The Log Books: "Please Be Gentle"

Making Gay History

08:06 min | Last week

A highlight from Introducing: The Log Books: "Please Be Gentle"

"Going to be such a big part of the logbooks podcast. We realized that we had to basically spread it over three episodes. Yeah, definitely. Of course, HIV and aids is still very much around today and pervades the entirety of this period of time that we're talking about. But we really want to specifically dedicate those three episodes to HIV and aids directly. It's not going to be chronological or definitive either. Yeah, I guess we should tell listeners that there are some difficult material coming. But there's also stories of life and living and strength and finding power and community through this time. Yeah, definitely. And that's one thing that's really jumped out to us about the stories that we've collected. So you're going to hear some voices from people who talk about their experience of being infected with HIV in the early years of the epidemic, including those who called switchboard for help, we're going to hear from a nurse and a doctor and of course former switchboard volunteers who heard about it all before anyone else. So let's start as always by listening to the stories of those who lived at. Pay yourself in Matthew shoes, a young guy just going out for the first time. I'm Matthew Hudson. I plus went to a gay club in 1983 when I was 15. And I was still 6 years below the age of consent for gay men at that point. So I lied about my age and told people I was 16. I thought that was a bit better. And I went in and they were playing this incredible music. It was high energy music and I'd never heard anything like it. And I had almost anticipated the place to be full of people who were like John inland or people wearing long overcoats or something like that. Flash on max, but instead it was full of gorgeous men with mustaches and check shirts and tight jeans, dancing to this incredible pounding rhythmic music and it was the sexiest thing I'd ever seen. And I met this guy, he was 32. He was American. He was a photographer. He was working on an assignment in London. And we got chatting in the investment back to his hotel. And we did what we did. And that was fine. And I thought, okay, tick I've done that now. I was living in a little village near strapped upon a vern. I was at home at my parents. Hello, my name's Lee chislet. It was a program on the tally called killer in the village. It was like horizon or panorama, one of those. And it was showing, I think it was San Francisco and New York, showing these gay men coming in with these purple lesions, these couples sarcomas, and their bodies had lost so much weight and difficulties breathing. And again, I remember feeling very, very impacted by it and sort of scared, but also intrigued. Little 16th century daughter. How long have you had those stomach pains all together? Actually, I started we could go Winston. I see. The doctor suspects that John has an unusual form of pneumonia. This horizon documentary was really good at reflecting the confusion about what was going on. John is the latest victim of a widespread epidemic of bizarre infections, all connected with aids. Are they high fevers? 102. In fact, it was this rare pneumonia that first alerted the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta, Georgia that something very odd was going on. I even think I might have watched it with my mom being there. And of course, I wasn't out as gay at the time, or didn't really know about that. So I remember slightly feeling as you do at that age slightly and comfortable because I knew they were talking about people like me and so yeah, so I remember being slightly aware of it, but I just, I don't know that there was something about watching that documentary that really one I was intrigued, but even then I thought, you know, something's got to be done. This was just, yeah, so that was what it was like. And you put in this, you know, this was 1983 84. Things were different times of countries. And in America, this new disease has already become an epidemic. Watching this intriguing documentary today, we can experience something of the fear that viewers like Lee must have felt. In New York, this is Greenwich Village. Centered in and around Christopher street on the west side of this traditionally bohemian district of Manhattan is a vast community of gay men, said to be hundreds of thousands. Here, the killer disease has taken its greatest toll of death. And of fear among those who walk in its shadow. So the same week that I went to heaven the same week that I first had consensus sex with a man. One evening, that same week, there was a documentary on horizon documentary called kilo in the village. And it was the first documentary as far as I'm aware that was broadcast on British television about HIV. And it said it was a disease, which for which there was no treatment, which there was no cure. Which was fatal. And it was something which you could catch from having sex with an American. And I've just had sex with an American. And I thought. Just so many people, you know, young people, people of all different ages coming out coming out onto the scene and immediately facing aids. Yeah, it must have been so difficult and confusing. And then also having those stories in the media, like the killer in the village, documentary, the BBC horizon thing that we played a little clip from, which made this correlation with what was going on in America and especially New York. Didn't you say there was another story that you wanted to tell me about Lee? Yeah, so he also told me that he remembers being in a bar, basically a village pub, and he overheard these two older gay guys, I guess Lee was only like 16 or 17 at this point anyway, so basically anyone was older. And they were talking about that they had heard of this disease, and they thought that it was an American thing, and they were just like, oh, it's going to be an American thing. We don't need to worry about it. It's just not sleep with any Americans. Basically. It's really interesting to hear Lee tell that story from the early 80s and the very, very early days of the epidemic because that was actually something that was really, really pervasive as the documentary killer in the village shows. It was perceived from the British point of view at the time to be this American thing, and then as you can hear in this next logbook entry, that was actually a wider perception as well, this fear of Americans. This is a logbook entry from January 15th, 1986. The volunteer who took the call was David. Man phone to say he had an American friend over. Aged 23 years, who was refused at the golden Lion and asked to leave by the landlord. It wasn't because he was thought to be younger, and therefore under age, he had drunk only half a pint, then asked just for a Coke. Person who found, feared it was an anti American aids fear. Can't be verified as such, but it might be worth bearing in mind for U.S. visitors. Well, it was definitely 1984. I saw my very first copy of gay times lying around the house of a guy who was publishing my computer games. And the headline at the time was gay plague overtakes America or words to that effect. John gott aids through homosexual contact in America.

HIV Aids Matthew Hudson John Inland Lee Chislet Pneumonia New York LEE John Matthew Winston Centers For Disease Control Greenwich Village San Francisco Confusion America London Atlanta Georgia Manhattan
A highlight from Jwan Yosef (Re-Release)

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

02:04 min | Last week

A highlight from Jwan Yosef (Re-Release)

"A father of two gorgeous little babies and a stepfather of two beautiful twin boys. I'm also an immigrant from Syria and in a way I've been an immigrant throughout my whole kind of grown-up life. My art practice also kind of circles around the kind of exploring of the idea of belonging and not belonging and in a way what that kind of means when you don't necessarily fit in one box. I think pretty much true. It is a beautiful intro. I think I want to start by asking you when you emigrated to the U.S.. So I was two years old when we, when my family left for Syria, I have two older siblings, and it was actually a pretty crazy story for my parents perspective. I mean, my parents come from two very different backgrounds. My mother was a Christian Armenian woman, my father was a Kurdish Muslim man. And they came from to kind of well known families up in northern northeastern Syria. And they well known how. Well, they were, you know, I think for generations just no, I mean, my grandfather was a big landowner in Syria and my grandmother came from in a way maybe more like in more influential family from the same town they met in military school when they were young and they fell in love. Which was also like a huge taboo back in the 60s. I mean, this is like our version of interracial kind of affair. It was completely super frowned upon. And meeting in military school would it have been standard for them to be in military school? It wasn't standard. It was like a mixed school

Syria U.S.
A highlight from 153: Roisin Murphy | Part 2

Homo Sapiens

05:31 min | Last week

A highlight from 153: Roisin Murphy | Part 2

"Father had lived there as a young man for a while. So there was a great connection with Manchester anyway so I really thrived from that move. I was ripe to be go from a small town to a city I think at that moment in your life. It was much more difficult for my my brother. Then your family went back to Ireland, but you stuck around. I did, yeah. I got a flash and it was a lovely flat fantastic of Victorian house and big garden that I could walk straight out onto. And I continued my studies through a levels. And then when I went to Sheffield. I must have been scary, age 16 or did you just think you knew it all and could do it all? It was the best time in your life. Really? It was extremely happy time. And I can count that, that sort of level of happiness on one hand at times I felt like and it was an extremely freeing time and I was, you know, absolutely safe. The way that I was the background I'd had and then the fact that I was being supported by how has it benefited and I was getting money every week and I was surrounded by friends. It was great. It was just great. And you had quite a lot of good clubbing experiences around then. It feels like it was slightly your beginnings and access into queer culture. Lisa, I tell you what happened to me. I was really into at alternative music in that time when I first got me flat. I was only 16, you know? And I was going around with all of these like Jesus married to chain type fellas, you know? And going every gate, going to every gig go and go into the weirdo Pope's going to sound systems. Going to anything we could get into because we were still very young, you know? And then I kind of moved away from that. And I started to go into a more kind of like black globes in Manchester, I started going out with the girls black girl from my college to precinct 13 and then to my side to like PSV and even to kind of like blues and things in my side. And I really got into that. And that's where I really got into dancing, you know? Besides, I have a system. Then I start to go rave and a little bit to actual waves, 17 raising. When I moved to Sheffield, really 19, 1819, was what I started to be kind of educated as to what had created everything that was going on. So, you know, the DJs that I was listening to were playing a kind of seamless thing of disco through to house or you know, or they would play hip hop and street. So and then we started going back to Manchester to go to gay clothes. Right. And so I was always told by all these kind of elders if you like fed as pirate in America and that in Sheffield, that this was where that music came from. Probably blank, you know. So then we start to we all start to go. We get a post over the share of the Manchester and go to gay clubs in Manchester. There wasn't that kind of scene in Sheffield. There was one club called trash that came. And that was really good, and it was really amazing, actually. Fantastic amount of fashion going on for someone like Sheffield. Also the airiest experience I had was going to London from Manchester, I think I was 16. On the bus. And staying with a friend down there as a little bit older who was staying in a flash, their dad owned a Liverpool street. And then we went to trade around the block like three times to get into trade. Get kept getting turned down. Went into trade, got in the end, went in. Upstairs looked down. See of men with low tops on pants. Lasers pinging everywhere, smoke on everywhere. Banging techno, you know, and I said to myself. I am actually home, I'm home. This is it Babylon. Come on. So trade was for anyone listening who doesn't know it's a trade was correct me if I'm wrong, was it on a Sunday Night at turn mills or am I dreaming? Oh, I think it might have been on two nights for three nights over the week. I don't know, but anyway, it could have been someday. It was right through the night, though. They went to the morning. Yes. It was always. Oh, it was. It was bad a lot for a young girl at that age, let me tell you that was an eye opener. But so many people were so sweet to us. And yeah, it was fantastic. I loved it. And I couldn't get enough after that. Well, it's interesting on two counts really, but one being that you were mentioning people like parrott and Mark Mark bryden who you set up a loco with sort of educating you on where this house and disco came from and that sort of started on the queer scene, right? Absolutely. I was told that

Manchester Sheffield PSV Ireland Lisa America Liverpool London Mark Mark Bryden Parrott
Coming of Age During the AIDS Crisis

Making Gay History

02:03 min | 3 months ago

Coming of Age During the AIDS Crisis

"The friday before gay pride day in june of nineteen eighty six and i'm sitting in a hospital room with our friend mark the bow-tie-wearing graphics designer from work. I'm suited up in a mask. Gloves and protective gown is to protect him not me. His immune system has been decimated and he's battling new mississippi pneumonia. His breathing isn't great his chest heaving he sips air through an oxygen mask. I've brought him some watercolors so he can paint. We're talking about what he's going to do when he gets out of the hospital like going back to work and maybe a summer getaway to the countryside for the four of us. These are as much plans as they are daydreams. We've all become familiar with the hospital. Admission and discharge dance one infection. Suppressed live to fight the next one two days later barry just home from the pride march. The light on the answering machines blinking. barry presses. Play while i take off my shoes. I hear marks partners voice. Not the words his voice. I tried to block it out. I don't want to hear the rest of his message. It's too late. Mark is dead and then bury and i Planned his memorial service at the vassar club which was located in the lotus club which is a fancy private club on the upper east side which had never seen an aids memorial before berry came up with the idea of We called it the balloon benediction. We've got all these helium balloons that we brought with us to the to the lowest club and each one had a little plastic bowtie attached to it and after the service we went out to central park and we release the balloons with these little bow ties on them. That for us was we. Couldn't we couldn't say that it wasn't people like us. At that point.

Barry Pneumonia Vassar Club Lotus Club Mark Berry Aids
Navigating Hormone Replacement Therapy as a Trans Person

Short Wave

01:43 min | 3 months ago

Navigating Hormone Replacement Therapy as a Trans Person

"The us healthcare system can be extremely difficult for trans folks. A lot of transpeople face medical discrimination. A lot of trans people can live in places where they don't have access to affirming providers or might not have insurance. Some trans people might have insurance. But it's might not be able to get procedures covered even if they have quote unquote good insurance. And that's an unfortunate reality. Even finding information about trans healthcare can be a challenge. You know just a lot of reporting on trans stuff. Tends to be by says people and this isn't always the case but a lot of the times that means like from the get go. It's kind of being portrayed in this light. That isn't actually geared towards transpeople. But is really more about centering. Says people that's james factoria a trance journalist who covers queer and trans news culture and health and they recently wrote a piece for vice called a beginner's guide to hormone replacement therapy gender affirming hormone therapy or hormone replacement therapy or each. Rt is basically just when you take hormones by any variety of delivery methods that can mean a shot or like a pill or a gel for example to align what you look like what you sound like to be more aligned with who you already know. You are and More colloquially a lot of trans people refer to it as a second.

James Factoria United States
Interview With Musician, K.D. Lang | Part 2

Homo Sapiens

01:27 min | 3 months ago

Interview With Musician, K.D. Lang | Part 2

"Was deliberately not deliberately. Those weren't your words but you like it didn't sell as well. Yeah it was like a great leveler but then years later i realized that the way the system works. If you sell a million records two million records than in the system of record companies and marketing you sell two million records but then you put a terrible record out new cell thirty eight copies than marketing and everything sees that you sell thirty eight copies. So you're only as good as your last sales it sabotage ice managed to sabotage things pretty well without record. Do you regret that. I mean i regret but what do you think that was what had happened at the time i regret. Not having all the information or having the comprehension. That i needed to have but i certainly don't regret they. Artistic decision to work with gus fans end and uma thurman and rain phoenix making. Or you're talking all you can eat. 'cause actually followed it up with even cowgirls get the blues. Right is at the record. Yes you can eat so there's a couple there couple of stinkers. They're they really. What stinkers no. I don't think so. I don't think so but in terms of public You know success. It was they were big old stinkers. You don't need to hit us for me. But

Uma Thurman GUS Phoenix
Interview With Tennis Legend, Billie Jean King

LGBTQ&A

01:58 min | 4 months ago

Interview With Tennis Legend, Billie Jean King

"So just as we often say how much has changed for queer people in the last fifty years your bookers reminder that that statement is also true for women and your case being a woman and a professional tennis player wasn't even a career path that existed. So when you were starting out how are you thinking about what was possible for a career in tennis. I played team sports as child. I in a lot of people may or may not know my younger brother. Randy moffett moderates are birth. Name became a major league baseball player. So sports is in our blood. I dad was a good athlete. My mother was good athlete. So susan williams in fifth grade asked me. If i wanted to play tennis and i said what's tennis i thought i would probably wouldn't play because she played the country. Calm and my dad's a firefighter. Aside well this is an my realm of thinking. I've also played on the softball team and she told the coach. She'd taking me out to play tennis and she said oh they give free instruction here on tuesdays applied walker. And it's free coaching. While i go out to have my first session with clyde and at the end of it i knew i wanted to be the number one tessler in the world but then was amateur and i didn't like that because i grew up around pro sports pro met. You're really good at what you did and amateur. Music was a hobby so one of the first things. I wanted to change sport. As far as being a professional sport it were none really no options as a child for girls and today there's still many more options for boys. What really happened though. What really changed my life. My epiphany was when i was twelve. I was just daydream. One day and realize that everybody who played tennis for white shoes and white clothes play with white balls and everybody who played was white. And i asked myself whereas everybody else. Where is everyone else. So that was my moment that i dedicate the rest of my life to fighting for equality for everyone everything i've done. We'll go back to that moment. That epiphany twelve years old.

Tennis Randy Moffett Susan Williams Tessler Baseball Softball Clyde Walker
Virginia School Board Approves Controversial Transgender Policy

Orlando's Morning News

00:22 sec | 4 months ago

Virginia School Board Approves Controversial Transgender Policy

"Being called the Victory for L G B T Q. Advocates in Virginia, the Loudon County School board approving the controversial transgender pull up. Policy by a 7 to 2 vote. That policy requires teachers to use preferred pronouns that allows gender expansive students and gender. Transgender students participate in sports other activities in a manner consistent with the students. Gender

Loudon County School Board Virginia
Coming of Age During the AIDS Crisis

Making Gay History

01:50 min | 4 months ago

Coming of Age During the AIDS Crisis

"On our second afternoon. Just back from a swim in the marine water. Santeuil bay berry yells for me from the bathroom. He turns from the mirror and says look he sticks out his tongue. We always joked. About what a big tongue had. But that's not what he was asking me to look at. Berries tongue is coated with a whitish film. Especially in the back. Maybe it's nothing i say. But my attempted reassurance evaporates. When i burst into tears we knew that thrush a kind of mouth. Fungus was an early symptom of as. We've both read the alarming studies suggesting that aids could have a long incubation period. Not just months but years and in october nineteen eighty-four. The new york times had reported new scientific evidence that suggested aids might be transmissible through saliva. Barron i curl up together on the bed. Hold each other and saab if you could contract aids through saliva. Could you get infected from tears. The daft we get home. I sit nervously flipping through people magazine in the waiting room while berry his in with the doctor the doctor asks barrier to stick out his tongue takes a close look walks over the mirror in the examination room and sticks out his own tongue he turns to berry and says yep. That's what it looks like berry tells me the story on the way home and we wind up standing on a street corner laughing. It wasn't funny but you had to laugh mostly from relief but also over our hyper-vigilance gone wrong that study about saliva an aids wouldn't be debunked for another

Aids Berry Barron The New York Times
Andrew Rannells: From Book of Mormon to Modern Love

LGBTQ&A

01:42 min | 4 months ago

Andrew Rannells: From Book of Mormon to Modern Love

"So like many people remember seeing seeing the tonys in two thousand eleven and soon after you popped up on girls. Hbo and have gone onto this largely tv and film career. Was that the plan all along. Did you want to transition eventually to tv while you were doing theater and doing the show. No not exactly. I mean i had wanted to be on broadway since i was a kid. And my dream had always been beyond broadway and to be a leading man on broadway and i the opportunity to replace a couple of shows than when i did that a couple times. I was like really like to do a new one. That would be nice. So i took some some time to focus on just trying to find new musicals that that i could come into to new york with and debut on broadway and it happened that it was the book of mormon every few years. There's a broadway show. That sort of attracts the attention of the west coast. It happened with rent in. It happened with certainly with hamilton and the book of mormon was also one of their shows. And if i'm being totally honest. I'd film two seasons of girls and then had done a pilot with ryan murphy for show called the new normal that was picked up and was going to be on. Nbc and i was still doing the book of mormon. While i was doing all of that i was still in the show. I didn't know that. Yeah and i was able to continue to do it. And then it got picked up. And then i had to move. I had to move to los angeles and it was an opportunity. That was too good to not pass up and it was not necessarily. The tv stuff was not necessarily always on my radar. I really just wanted to do theater

HBO Ryan Murphy West Coast Hamilton New York NBC Los Angeles
Interview With Actor, Designer, Jonathan Bennett and Jaymes Vaughan

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

01:33 min | 4 months ago

Interview With Actor, Designer, Jonathan Bennett and Jaymes Vaughan

"I always have guessed introduce themselves. Would you introduce yourselves sure. I'm jonathan bennett. And this is my fiance. Say your name baby on that. Say out breathing out so they can hear your name. What is your name. Babe james von there. We go so far. It's going great. Yeah it is going great. This is ideal. Because i'm really feel like i'm really capturing something of your dynamic in the the reality between two you are engaged. You're engaged. we are engaged thing. Love that joke. 'cause we're gay and we're engaged sure yet so we're get. Let me explain the joke for you. In case you didn't get i so good good do guy nail i follow. Nailed it very. Yeah jonathan you had kind of a big year. It feels like to me. I'm just an outsider. Looking at your life does that feel true to you. Yeah i mean this is ben. it's not only a big year but super special year like it's just been there so many groundbreaking things that have happened in the past year with us and with just clear visibility in the media and it's been such a. It's almost like when it rains. It pours like we didn't set out to do any of these things but all of a sudden things started happening. And it's kinda snowballed into this movement that we're just so proud of

Jonathan Bennett Babe James Von Jonathan BEN
A Love Letter to Anyone Who's Ever Felt Despair

LGBTQ&A

02:04 min | 4 months ago

A Love Letter to Anyone Who's Ever Felt Despair

"So you emigrated from uruguay while your mom was pregnant with you you lived in england switzerland than california and in much of your work. You keep returning to in a writing about uruguay. I feel like it is a simple question you know. Why do you keep returning to your writing and yet not. Every immigrant does feel compelled to write about their homeland. So i do want to start off by asking. What is it about this place that keeps calling you to it. I have felt pulled for you. Know my first five books. Back to the y. And to the neighboring country of argentina whose destinies have been interwoven throughout their histories. And i think there's various layers to that one of them for me is that i have this peculiar experience of remembering immigration to this country at ten years old so i'm not a daughter of immigrants who was born here unlike other people who sort of have this experience of having been fully formed in the united states but i also didn't grow up in or wasn't born in my country of origin. I have this distance of not having been shaped within the country of origin as immigrants who come directly from their country to the united states. Have that sort of memory and that proximity to the culture. So i was living in different countries where i always felt like. I had this country inside of my skin. That wasn't visible to me outside my skin. So i think there's that kind of pull and fascination born of distance in a sense of there being a rudeness that is elsewhere. I also think my journey was very much shaped by the fact that you know. Uruguayans were very small diaspora. It's a country of three and a half million people and so it's very common to not have a big uruguay and community in the place that you emigrate to so my parents were really the cultural gatekeepers. They're the ones who passed down what it meant to be uruguayan. And so when they disowned me. In my mid twenties due to various things including familial homophobia combined with this idea that i couldn't be uruguayan and my parents explicitly said that to me at one point. You can't be uruguayan anymore. Because you're gay that doesn't exist in our country

Uruguay Switzerland Argentina England United States California
Lesbian Love and Coded Diaries: The Remarkable Story of Anne Lister

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:03 min | 4 months ago

Lesbian Love and Coded Diaries: The Remarkable Story of Anne Lister

"Seventeen. Ninety one in halifax england. Her family was part of the minor gentry and parents believed and should be formerly educated. An unusual thing for women at the time so an was sent to boarding school and was both intelligent and rebellious. While at school and began keeping a diary it was a habit. She would maintain for the rest of her life at school. She also had her first sexual experience with another female student named elisa rain when writing about their relationship and began using code to ensure hurt lesbianism would remain a secret even in the pages of her journal though she started with a simple code to censor explicitly. Romantic actions and cypher would soon evolve to use zodiac symbols random letters and calligraphy to shroud her entries in secrecy from a young age and refused to dress or act. According to society's rules for girls like her account say she wore so called masculine clothes and she engaged in activities usually reserved for men including traveling and managing her own estate. in nineteenth century. Britain homosexual acts were illegal sexual relationships between women were seemingly not part of the conversation and were not called out in the legislation. Barring men from sexual acts with other men it was common for unmarried. Wealthy white women like ann to be close with other women. These relationships were called romantic friendships. And were even encouraged as a way for young women to prevent premarital scandal with men as long as they weren't explicitly sexual and relationships with women were considered perfectly normal but according to her diaries and wasn't exactly secretive about her intentions with these women ends diaries into picture of tumultuous love life. After

Halifax Elisa Cypher England Britain ANN
Kate Bornstein: Still a Gender Outlaw (7/27/21)

LGBTQ&A

01:55 min | 4 months ago

Kate Bornstein: Still a Gender Outlaw (7/27/21)

"Begin with in the last few years. We have really up to you in your work when it comes to gender been talking about in writing about living outside the gender binary for over thirty years at this point and now we're able to point to people like you and your work as one example of things we can turn to to read and learn but early on thirty years ago. What if any resources did you have. Were their books. You're reading or people you were talking to anything at all. There was no internet and there was nothing to look at if you could look up transexual but then you would get christine jorgensen and you would get very conservative. People people who were born men grew up were living as conservative men and transitioned into conservative women and the freaks. Their voice wasn't published. It was coming out through warhol's films at first. That's where that's where the real first non binary presence was felt in the country. Jackie curtis was calling themselves. I'm not a man. I'm not a woman i went. Whoa okay. Let's talk about that in for so long early work. That was how you described your gender not man not woman. Was that how it was commonly being discussed or is that like your individual way to describe it. That was my individual way to describe it. I didn't know many people personally who were also looking at themselves in that way but as more and more people started defining as trans and as we had the internet than i was hooking with people who did that defined that way.

Christine Jorgensen Jackie Curtis Warhol
Edafe Okporo: Seeking Asylum in the U.S.

LGBTQ&A

02:34 min | 5 months ago

Edafe Okporo: Seeking Asylum in the U.S.

"Law that passed into doesn't fourteen in nigeria. That made same sex relationships illegal. I want definitely get to that but before while you were growing up. But was the general feeling attitude toward gay people. generally jerry's predominantly pit rocky so like men. I supposed to be man. We met a supposed to steer to them. Just like united st sixty years ago but the was put that was done by amnesty international into sanity that shows their ninety. Eight percent of nigerians believed that gay people added costs of the country problem but green up really really young. I was kind of a firm units but because of the kind of violence. I is key that people. Why do you like that. You should play soccer things like that made me kind of change. Our ib to become on the airstream rights to be very very much. And i grew up in a predominantly christina varmints and the christian religion. Don't believe that's should be like if you're gay you are possessed by demonic spirits or something like that says really long way for me to fight true or this kind of towards and really say that i am gay is hard to grow in such kind of cities and things that you're gay while so. When did you start to feel comfortable telling people so people were in closets all his know that it is hard to come out of your closet. It is very difficult. I forward myself almost three years. I did a go. I joined charged seminary. I became a political surpassed like augustine's. You're like i knew him key but i just don't want to believe our gay but one the i was reading on the internet is a quote from make that dr bernard out we give our oppressors biden align ourselves to be ourselves so i ran out undefeated on a was seen to myself. Am i really key things like that. So one day. I went on the internet and i discovered a gated uppercut manager is football in like our earned some parts of africa by the. What's it called. Menachem man jam. Gotcha i emit a guy who to me. If you have feelings florida guys. you'll be. And as i said only g.

Nigeria Jerry Soccer Dr Bernard Augustine Biden Menachem Football Africa Florida
Bob Taylor Remembers Rene's Disco, Tracks [Tampa],

GayBarchives Podcast

01:46 min | 5 months ago

Bob Taylor Remembers Rene's Disco, Tracks [Tampa],

"Today we're talking to bob taylor who has a long history with gay bars in florida as well as georgia welcome mob. Hey art thank you proud to be here excited to be here. Thank you for what you're doing to. We're appreciative our community deserves this. Well thank you. And i learning so much. I understand that your your career with the gay bar scene started in tampa at a long lost club known as rene disco is true so i was in college in eighteen. Maybe nineteen and was dancing on the dance floor rene and a person who would eventually become a mentor. My drag mother. One of two of my mother's the other one being intended ivorian atlanta tiffany middlesex. At reneged fingered me over with her little. Come over here come over here and then we talk to you and she told me that i had rhythm and stay needed a dancer. She had a guy who broke his leg or his ankle. Something and would. I be interested in course out with sort of gag and i'm like well. Yeah but i didn't know what that meant. Winter rehearsal i danced for her backed up that weekend and backup for lakisha lucky that weekend and they asked me to come back following weekend and it went over really good again so they offered me a job on cast and asked if i knew how to perform like as an entertainer on my own at told him no but they quickly taught me how we pick some away on music and dead or alive. I think in some things we make some costumes. And the next thing you know i'm show on the cast and that was for three years before i headed to atlanta

Rene Disco Bob Taylor Georgia Rene Tampa Lakisha Florida Middlesex Atlanta
Environmentalist Drag Queen Says the Outdoors Belongs to Everyone

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 5 months ago

Environmentalist Drag Queen Says the Outdoors Belongs to Everyone

"High heels may not be practical footwear for hiking but when patagonia pulls on her six inch the leto destroyed across a mountaintop the environmentalist drag. Queen is not trying to rack up miles. She's working to build a more inclusive climate movement. She says it starts by reclaiming the outdoors as a place where everyone belongs whether that's queer people whether that's people of color whether that's disabled people. I think for the longest time we've been told that that's not for us. That's not where we find. People like ourselves so patty uses her social media platform to share pictures and videos of herself hiking camping and speaking up about environmental issues. She posed next to an oil rig to push for fossil fuel divestment and she created a gown made of actual trash to raise awareness of plastic pollution. She wants to redefine what an environmentalist looks like and invite everyone to bring their full self to the work of protecting nature and the climate if we can start with our ethnicity our culture our sexuality our values and beliefs as the deepest roots of our climate work and not climate work reflects truly who we are. I think we're going to be even more motivated to do. Climate work in naked a longstanding piece of our lives.

Patagonia Patty
Study Finds More Racial Diversity in LGBTQ Film Characters

Tim Conway Jr.

00:20 sec | 5 months ago

Study Finds More Racial Diversity in LGBTQ Film Characters

"An increase in the diversity of LGBTQ characters in movies. Glad, says the 44 films released by Major studios last year were there were of them. 20 where LG had LGBTQ characters. Eight were characters of color. The advocacy group also says 11 of the characters were women, nine were men. It's the first time they have been more women than men. In LGBTQ rules. Officials in

Major Studios LG
The Sacred Band of Thebes

Queer as Fact

02:35 min | 5 months ago

The Sacred Band of Thebes

"As minor way often discuss houses before we actually start telling you about the thing. We're talking about the infamous. Lit review lit review. Every costs needs one episode. In this instance. Actually not really gonna talk much about us is at the start of the episode. I used a lot of like little sources for all of the different sections so will discuss them as they come up and talk about. What's wrong with them with one exception. being i wanted to talk a little bit about a book called the sacred band by james rome. This book is. I'm fairly confident. In saying the newest scholarship that exists on the sacred band because it came out in early june of this year and we decided to do an episode on the sacred band because the publisher of the book reached out to us at austin advanced review copy. Thank you for that. I must pay for that copy and talking about as the title suggests james rum's the sacred band is about the sacred band of thieves which you'll hear an awful lot about a minute. I'm genuinely very interested to hear about the benefits. I literally but the book also more widely explores the political and social and military context of the roughly four decades in which the band exist in unusually for us. You have also read this book. Alice what did you think of it as someone who didn't then go raid ten other books about the area. I feel like michael two little cloudy. So how did you feel about it as a ruin peasant To a great person. So i deny much background about the second band of thieves or ancient greece. I'm not going into the person who knows nothing. Because i have studied disappeared. But i definitely wasn't being like i. I know this. I wanted to give you an idea of how i went into this book so probably like about where most people pick up. The book would be like if you're interested enough to pick up the bulk. You probably have a vague idea of that was athens. They were at Thieves was also he unite. That's the general context. Obviously a will give you a good version of that later in the episode crest. Where is the do you know what happens. Yes it's north of that Grace it's it's grace. It's quite central to grace. And it's like roughly to the north of athens quite close to athens within like a day's ride will a couple of days walk all right so even like quite course Travel yes this will come Will between these.

James Rome James Rum Austin Alice Greece Athens Michael Grace
Coming of Age During the AIDS Crisis

Making Gay History

01:52 min | 5 months ago

Coming of Age During the AIDS Crisis

"My first time at circus. April thirtieth nineteen eighty three madison square garden. I'm twenty four years old. And i am not a date berry is not my date yet. We haven't fallen in love yet. But we are at the circus together. We're the very first big aids fundraiser. In new york a few early supporters of the gay men's health crisis got together and bought out a performance of the barnum and bailey circus. The greatest show on earth wasn't prepared to officially host an event for his cause. But gmc got around that by reselling the seventeen thousand six hundred seats to raise money and tackle the growing crisis ernest. See of gay men when the ringmaster introduces broadway star patti. Lupone lose it. After meeting speech from patty leonard bernstein walks across the floor of the arena to conduct the orchestra of the star spangled banner mezzo-soprano shirley varez voice feels. The garden joined by thousands of voices in the audience. Patriotism clowns and aids seems improbable now but felt so right in the moment.

Bailey Circus Madison Square Garden Berry Lupone Aids Patty Leonard Bernstein GMC New York Soprano Shirley Varez Patti
Ann Northrop: The Crucial Role of Women in ACT Up

LGBTQ&A

01:50 min | 5 months ago

Ann Northrop: The Crucial Role of Women in ACT Up

"I want to begin with your work and act up in the eighties. When did you first become aware of act up and housing after digit joining almost immediately as the last answer. But i had been a producer for cbs news. I'd quit because i was disgusted by what was happening there. I thought it was empty and offensive. And i ended up taking a job at the hedrick martin institute for lesbian and gay youth becoming an aids educator to teenagers in the schools all over new york city as i got educated about what i had to educate people about. It became clear to me that the epidemic was a political event that it was very much like the vietnam war that i had marched against that it was about people in power not caring about anyone else and being perfectly happy to send people off to die so i could see. The thread was clear. And then i went to something called the war conference in the beginning of nineteen eighty eight and that was a meeting of about two hundred. Lgbt activists from around the country and i begged to be invited to the war conference. And i got there and people started talking about act up. And i thought oh my god. This sounds like something. I really should check out. As soon as i got back. There was a monday night meeting. I went to the monday night meeting. And i walked in and i thought oh my god. These are my people. These are the cranky individualists. Who are really too weird to be part of normal society. And they're here doing civil disobedience and direct action. I can go out in the streets and yell and say what i want and do what i did during the vietnam war in the feminist movement and it all just felt like home

Hedrick Martin Institute For L Cbs News Aids New York City Vietnam
Interview With Jessamyn Stanley, Author of 'Yoke: My Yoga of Self-Acceptance'

PM Mood

01:59 min | 5 months ago

Interview With Jessamyn Stanley, Author of 'Yoke: My Yoga of Self-Acceptance'

"How do you explain what yoke means. Right what is it like to practice that love and acceptance every day like. How do you start your day so that you are grounded in the right space night. Goodness well okay. Thank you so much for him. And what i will say in response to. What is yoke yoke is like my american millennial translation of the word yoga yoga meaning union bringing together. And yoke is that. It's just a union. It's bringing together all the different pieces of yourself earned whether that be good or bad or really i think more specifically and more necessarily the ugly seeing every single piece of yourself and not trying to fix it or make it or try to be good or not trying to categorize anything religious. Saying this is who i am. And i'm going to accept every single piece of myself and that is what i have felt that my yoga practice honestly has always been but i think that yoga going it's talking about in the mainstream is always categorized as minutes at this point in whenever we talk about it. It's always like yoga poses in sequences. It's not about this connection to the truth of yourself and relate needing to accept every single facet of yourself and i think of joking as a moment by moment journey that is always evolving in that will it's time just becomes more complex and more decadent honestly but just becomes more journey becomes more intense

Eureka O'Hara: The Drag Race All Stars Season 6 Winner

LGBTQ&A

02:43 min | 5 months ago

Eureka O'Hara: The Drag Race All Stars Season 6 Winner

"So you've talked before. About how before drag race you lived as a trans woman for five years and then you decided that that's or you realize that's not actually who you are. Can you just talk about your early experience gender and what led you to think that you might be a trans woman. Oh yeah of. Course why i to reiterate into the versus me figuring out that i'm not. I think it was more of like discovering that. I'm like all of these things you know what i'm saying. Expansion the weirdly. Like i think the trans person that i was is a huge part of who i am now. It's just like a more elevated self perception and then also like some description as far as like gender goes that's where gender neutrality i think comes in right. I just remember growing up. Well i i grew up with all women. So four women I remember being younger. And like the little gameboy and we always like wanted to be a girl. Because it'd be easier. I think we'll have those thoughts a little bit at some point in our life like oh like dealing with the persecution of it or likes negatively or like the self inflicted ideas that we put on ourselves because of other people's opinions we automatically assume that it's a bad thing and how much easier beats like. Just be a girl so then you could wear pretty and for things and you could like boys and you know all these things that you want. Do play with barbies etc. So that was kind of a star. I think and then i met a guy when i was like eighteen. Who was really interested in eureka and i clicked with him really well so then like i was already doing drag and i was living with a trans woman at the time so it just seems like so many factors of my mind mike. My thought process was adding up to this like okay. You're not leaving your authentic self. Maybe this is something you should discover and then the boy comes in. Because and i call him a boy because he turned out not to be a man. Okay reading like in allegra boswell sands so the boy was also there for like that. Validation i guess my having someone to support me through it because he was more interested in eureka. So that's why. I kind of brought that up because the thought process was more from like growing up and then living with the transvaal man and just having those ideas kind of for a long time anyway dating him he he really isn't do eureka. Your drag character and so it's like you're getting all the validation about the feminine side of noon that an interesting. It was interesting but it was like. I really liked him. You know and he was like the first time i ever had like had a guy that could consider like a real interested in mike relationship type situation and saddam was just like you know fell head over heels really quickly so i would have done just about anything but i was already thinking these things. I can't really say like. Oh well i did it. Because i met this guy no i had the quote unquote balls. Elevate or the lack thereof to push myself to do it. Because i had like this validation from the opposite sex or however you want to describe the gender of that situation. I don't know how would talk about that.

Eureka Allegra Boswell Mike Saddam
Gwendolyn Stegall on NYC's Lesbian Bars Since 1910

GayBarchives Podcast

02:24 min | 5 months ago

Gwendolyn Stegall on NYC's Lesbian Bars Since 1910

"The show wendelin. Thank you for having me. I understand that you have a kind of unique background being an architect and the in the field of architecture and yet your master's thesis was based on the history of lesbian gathering spaces in new york city That seemed like a little bit of an unusual bland. It's not something i would expect. The average person with their eyes set on architecture to be doing as a master's thesis just to clarify the master's thesis was for my historic preservation degree. So i i had two degrees architecture and historic preservation So this was part of the preservation work but even for preservation. It's an unusual topic. I will say that preservation as a field is broadening its scope it started as preserve penn station preserve the beautiful buildings that are in danger of disappearing. And there's still a lot of that and still a lot of you know houses. A founding fathers and things like that but The story is starting to expand as in many fields We are starting to tell deeper stories and more stories. So you know if you have a historic house museum for example the story of its gay occupant. Maybe was never told. And now it's starting to be told or if you have a house of a slave owner. The stories of the slaves are starting to told things like that. So the field is expanding. And i see my work as part of the expansion of this field. And i very lucky to have many wonderful allies in this work in new york and certainly It's a place where the idea of historic preservation has a field is growing quickly. So

Wendelin New York City Penn Station New York
Coming of Age During the AIDS Crisis

Making Gay History

01:52 min | 5 months ago

Coming of Age During the AIDS Crisis

"It was the first notice that we had a rare cancer seeing among male homosexuals. There was call eight. Concrete group man was pepsi's sarcoma rear cancer forty one homosexual we would tell nick died of cat scratch fever which does not kill you. You know it's just not possible. He died before they knew what they walked knowing. They're all running around and going. We don't understand. this is all about. He got sick in Eighty and he died generation team of eighty one. We didn't know then that this zaid's but it was aids even when we found out in eighty one. It was much bigger than we thought. I felt so strongly that that would have been a page one story. If it'd been anybody else getting when. I thought on the new york times i was scared of times covers. It has to be real. It's july third nineteen eighty-one and i'm reading the new york times over breakfast. Cheerios and low fat milk sliced banana. Doug is still asleep. He's my best friend from college. Not an early riser. We're renting a tiny apartment for the summer in hell's kitchen a few blocks west of manhattan's theater district. I'd say the neighborhood is rough around the edges but it isn't just the edges page twenty of the paper. A thin single column story running down the left hand side catches my eye at the top. Two lines bowl type rare cancer seen in forty one homosexuals. A shiver runs up my spine to me. Where gay men. But the editors of the new york times are still insisting in nineteen ninety-one that we can only be referred to as homosexuals some say homosexuals forty-one homosexuals in an often rapidly. Fatal form of cancer kaposi's sarcoma.

Sarcoma Rear Cancer Cat Scratch Fever The New York Times Pepsi Cancer Nick Aids Doug Manhattan Kaposi's Sarcoma
This Is Tracie Lamourie and Her Gift

Voices Of Courage (Walk The Talk)

01:49 min | 5 months ago

This Is Tracie Lamourie and Her Gift

"Everybody welcome back. This is brandy j voices courage. This season is know your purpose today. I have with me an amazing award. Winning publicist she's the founder of the more media inc. And this is tracey. The maury and tracy please please tell me. I'm saying your last name correctly. Are you got it. Ll amaury and i answered all kinds of bursa a you got it. Awesome awesome awesome chasing. Thank you for being here. Oh not at all. Thank you so much revenue growth anytime. You don't tracy. I want to say you that. I find it amazing that you were founded on kindness. That's my big thing that i live by kindness empathy go. It's everything yup very key. Everything it really is. San wasn't alone that you're not. I know it can feel like it sometimes but but you got right. People are the bottom line. I've always said that from being an activist. Even having my own company is people that are the bottom line. You know not like money yes it is. Can't i feel like you can't run the world like a like a business business world but people will. We're not products. We are not being if people are exactly your frontline workers or customers your everything and you know and it's more than just that can look. I don't even think. I think when activists perspective. It's only recently that i you know got into the business lead ten years in the business world in terms of building a business but all of the platforms that have got. It came from me. Doing activists worth not trying to build a business empire. So it's been a nice

More Media Inc. Ll Amaury Tracy Tracey SAN
How Chavela Vargas Broke Gender Stereotypes in Mexican Music

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:44 min | 5 months ago

How Chavela Vargas Broke Gender Stereotypes in Mexican Music

"Before she was chubby. La she was e- seville bosley sanel. She was born in costa rica on april seventeenth. Nineteen nineteen to francisco bargains and immediately saana. I was born singing chubby. Once proclaimed she sang to entertain herself during her lonely and painful childhood. See much lenny. Naroda the strange girl and her religious family and conservative community. She did not present herself like a prim and feminine young lady as is expected despite her upbringing china was a romantic and determined to chase her dreams leaving. Her conservative community became her obsession at the age of seventeen. Something called her to mexico when trump arrived she. I turned to singing on the streets and later saying taverns bars and cabarets chubby saying banchetta a traditional genre of mexican music that dates back to before the mexican revolution of nineteen. Ten branch showed us our festive songs. Usually sung from a man's perspective with mariachi band when women perform them they typically did so in heels and colorful bright dresses with ribbons chubby. Did none of these things instead she drank tequila wore toted a gun and sang like a man. She didn't even change the pronouns in the songs. I was the first woman who dared to sing to another woman she later said. Her performance caught people's attention. They wanted to know who this woman was who wore pants. Cha took other artistic liberties to she slowed down the tempo of these

Seville Bosley Sanel Costa Rica Lenny LA Francisco Donald Trump China Mexico CHA
California Adds 5 Anti-LGBTQ+ States to State-Funded Travel Ban

Wisconsin's Morning News with Gene Mueller

00:39 sec | 5 months ago

California Adds 5 Anti-LGBTQ+ States to State-Funded Travel Ban

"States that the list of places where state funded travel is now banned. This is because of discriminatory discriminatory laws targeting the LGBTQ community. 17 states now off limits to California state funded travel because most are being added, in part because they are working to prevent transgender women and girls from participating in school sports consistent with their gender identity. California Attorney General Rob Bonta of the States are a part of a recent Dangerous wave of discriminatory new bill signed into law and states all across the country. The newest states, Florida, Arkansas, Montana, North Dakota and West Virginia.

Attorney General Rob Bonta California Arkansas Florida Montana North Dakota West Virginia
Chella Man: Trans, Deaf, Goofy, Hungry, and Tired

LGBTQ&A

02:04 min | 5 months ago

Chella Man: Trans, Deaf, Goofy, Hungry, and Tired

"So before reading the book my some shin was that since you have coke clear implants that you would have perfect one hundred percent hearing and never need to think about it ever again. And so obviously. That's not the case. You say you can hear some. What can you describe a bit more about what that somewhat is. Yeah exactly i mean. It's a huge misconception. I always kind of compare it to. Have you ever taken a video outside when it's windy. You know how like when you play back later. How that win sounds. That's just how i hear win in general so everything is very mechanical. I always used to say i don't have any moisture human hearing necessarily and it's just bury like mechanical is just like asking you at what is it like to see you know. How do you describe that to someone. That's the best comparison. I think i can give you since you do rely on reading lips like our video calls like this challenging. Yes oh it's a lot of energy typically and how have live captioning so if you have a hard of hearing person next time having live captioning super helpful in google hangouts actually has that imbedded in in it holding on those platforms is typically what i usually do but right now i actually feel pretty comfortable because i'm in a quiet environment at your lips are clear you have that fancy mark so i'm pretty good. Okay let me know if that changes to and that's great to know for next time also so thank you with the cochlear implants. I know that not every person has them. Was that a choice that you made or were you too young. That was made for you. That's a great question. A lot of kids. Don't get the choice but my parents intentionally did a lot of research about the controversy within the deaf community about cochlear implants and they wanted me to have the decision myself. So for longtime up i would be. I think they asked me like once every single year. At least you know do you. How do you feel about getting coakley. Implants now and i would always be deeply opposed to it

Coke Google Coakley
Megan Fox Celebrates Being Bisexual 'For Over Two Decades' in Pride Post

The Adam Carolla Show

00:39 sec | 5 months ago

Megan Fox Celebrates Being Bisexual 'For Over Two Decades' in Pride Post

"Right now. Megan fox is celebrating pride as by sexual woman. According to yahoo news The thirty five year old actress flashed her rainbow inspired manicure and a bunch of instagram selfish. This weekend i think we have those as pride. Celebrations underway cielo tips or rainbow Though currently with machine gun kelly. The mom of three from. Brian austin green. Says she's been putting a be in the lgbtq for decades fox the bipolar. That's right fox. Publicly spoke about it in two thousand eighteen. G q said she had a crush on. Live your wild and jenna. Jameson and revealed she briefly dated a female stripper when she was

Megan Fox Yahoo Brian Austin Green Kelly Jenna Jameson
Supreme Court Rejects Transgender Bathroom Dispute in Win for Student

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | 5 months ago

Supreme Court Rejects Transgender Bathroom Dispute in Win for Student

"Virginia school boards appeal to reinstate its transgender bathroom ban. Justices have decided to leave in place a lower court ruling that found that policy unconstitutional. The case involved a former high school student, Gavin Grimm. Transgender male who sued Gloucester County public schools after he was told he could not use the boys bathroom at his high school. Two justices on the High Court, Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas did vote to hear the board's appeal. A small plane with five

Virginia School Boards Gavin Grimm Gloucester County Samuel Alito High Court Clarence Thomas
President Biden Celebrates Pride Month

AP 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 5 months ago

President Biden Celebrates Pride Month

"President Biden celebrated the LGBT Q community as Pride month winds down, it reflects the community's stature at government's highest level, with the president, saying Pride month represents many things, including courage and justice, and above all, pride month stands for love. Among those at an East Room commemoration. Transportation Secretary Pete Buddha judge the first openly gay person confirmed to a Cabinet post plus even being here proves how much change is possible. In America. The president earlier named a special Diplomatic envoy for LGBTQ rights and also signed the measure. Designating Orlando's Pulse nightclub. A national memorial 49 people were killed at the gay club five years ago. The deadliest attack on the nation's L G B T Q

President Biden Pete Buddha Cabinet America Orlando Gay Club