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Listen to the latest audio content relevant to the Jewish community. This playlist features Jewish individuals having great conversations on relevant topics through a cultural lens. Grow your faith with cultural reflection, history and current events. Sourced from premium podcasts.

Israel starts surveilling virus carriers, sends 400 who were nearby to isolation

On The Media

6:08 listening | 2 months ago

Israel starts surveilling virus carriers, sends 400 who were nearby to isolation

"Take me back to last Wednesday when four hundred. Some Israelis got a text message on their phones. What did it say basically the you may already be infected with the corona virus. This was a brand new program that Benjamin Netanyahu had asked for and got permission to implement in which the State Security Service was allowed to use its digital surveillance systems in the service of viral tracking. Basically they were able to go through the phones. Presumably of every Israeli see where they had been in the previous few weeks overlay that onto where they knew certain cove in nineteen positive cases that Ben and extrapolated who might be at risk of having been infected. Those four hundred people were all notified that they were on that list and we're told to begin self isolation immediately well it's an attention grabber strictly from epidemiological perspective would seem to make some sense who is in proximity of someone known to be infected elsewhere. Public health officials are using more laborious analog way through interviews and so on but this nonetheless has been criticized. Why did did raise it media. Objections from privacy advocates. No one gave consent for this kind of monitoring. So Israelis are trying to decide whether the cost is worth the benefit even those people who were notified of the few that we talked to found it very creepy without a doubt but we're also quite aware of the benefits of being able to track the virus. There is also a question I gather of really how much security because this thing is not all that precise a tool. Yeah that's right there. There's not a lot known about exactly what the government is doing here. And there's a lot of elements to Israel's intelligence service generally and specifically its digital capabilities. That just aren't known as you say when it's just a matter of my Cell Phone Ping the cell tower somewhere in Tel Aviv. At a certain time of day where a known corona virus patient was also picking tower. There's not a lot of precision there. You're still talking about dozens of square miles of territory and at a recommended distance transmission for this virus of six feet. What's not known? Or what other intelligence digital surveillance capabilities. The Security Agency might be bringing to bear. Its suspected that Israel has ways of sorting a lot of material. That's more precise than that. We don't know exactly what they're using so All by itself it's low resolution tool but maybe something else from the Security State toolkit is enhancing the image. That's right there's been other reporting including by the New York Times that the government is bringing to bear other more sophisticated intelligence apparatus. Here you mentioned concern from privacy advocates does their voice matter in Israel in March of twenty twenty are. They drowned out by other voices. Well there's so much going on here not just the pandemic but also an ongoing political crisis where Israelis are beginning to question some very long held beliefs about the soundness of their democracy. I think as in countries all over the world prime minister. Benjamin Netanyahu here is pushing the boundaries of government power. Is He addresses this crisis. Some of those concerns seem to have as much to do with endangered political power as they do responding to the pandemic for example his handpicked Justice Minister early on in the crisis cancelled pretty much all judicial proceedings in the country. Two days before Netanyahu's own trial on corruption was scheduled to begin. I don't think many people here thought it was a coincidence. It is kind of hard now to imagine Normally function court system. Nothing else is operating as normal plenty of democracy advocates. Feel like it's just one of Midi our grabs that he has instituted in the name of fighting the corona virus including the restrictions on parliamentary activity. That serve his 'cause well now that his faction no longer has the majority and there's a lot of concern that He's willing to go a lot further. He's desperate to hang onto power. He's proven willing to incite against the justice system against the Arab minority against anyone who opposes his ability to maintain power as he flips. Forward as sort of the essential person the only one as his supporters will say who can help Israel get through this pandemic so you have an authoritarian leaning prime minister struggling for power and his own personal liberty as a matter of fact neutering the parliament historian. Yuval Noah. Harari has said that's just tantamount dictatorship just today former president of the Israeli Supreme Court said that the speaker of the Knesset refusal to adhere to a High Court ruling that he must allow vote. That would likely take. His own job is rocking the foundations of democracy in Israel. It's hard to overstate the triple sense of crisis in this country. I think Israelis are wondering exactly how they're going to get out of this.

Israel Benjamin Netanyahu Government Prime Minister State Security Service Tel Aviv Security Agency Israeli Supreme Court Yuval Noah New York Times High Court Knesset Justice Minister Harari BEN Twenty Twenty President Trump
Netanyahu's future still uncertain after Israeli election

Pod Save the World

5:58 listening | 2 months ago

Netanyahu's future still uncertain after Israeli election

"Let's turn to Israel. This week is rarely voters went to the polls for the third time in a year. Yes a year So first of all of the results that ninety percent in the last time I checked prime minister bb. Netanyahu was winning and projected to win fifty nine seats in. Israel's parliament the Knesset so that's good news for bb because he's five or six seats ahead of any guns from the blue and white party whose his chief rival but it still not be enough to end this electoral purgatory citizens. And here's why so. Israel's system is not like ours. You don't win the election. And then you're in charge. You have to build a coalition that controls sixty one of the one hundred twenty seats in the Israeli Knesset in the last two elections and Netanyahu Angolans have failed in that coalition building task So now they're gonNA try again. Ben Is pretty depressing. That voters didn't care about the fact that Netanyahu is going to stand trial in a few weeks on corruption charges in fact. Bb has gained votes since the September elections so cool. It's also depressing for those of us. Who WANT A two states solution in Israel because both candidates out there talking about annexing the West Bank? Interestingly an alliance of Arab voters did well in selection and They're now the third biggest party in Israel. So That's interesting chaining dynamic but you know in the near future. I think a lot of people worried that Israel is careening towards a constitutional crisis or even a fourth election because bb is about to stand trial and will likely demagogue and say fake news and say it's a witch hunt to get him just like trump because they're the same person. Yeah and I feel like we've had the same conversation now. Three times And this question will be. Can he can form a coalition get to sixty votes He may need the help of avenue or Lieberman Israeli politician. Who's kind of become quite An ENEMY OF BBC. At least in in that case you know we could return to one of the formulas that we talked about in the fall. Some form of unity government or agreement where they rotate as prime minister's all this is pretty bleak because Israel can't break this logjam. Bbc poising their politics with increasingly extremist positions. You know we've evolved in the third election. All the way to the fish in the West Bank Each election it kind of gets worse in terms of BB's platform on the Palestinians It speaks Not just the polarization in Israeli society in that. Bbc has kind of a big media apparatus and demagogues the opposition. But also you know Benny. Gones is just not a good politician. You know for those who don't follow as closely like you know he's a former military guy kind of the centrist who could be a you know a safe space for a bunch of different parties but political talent like he he he didn't wasn't a natural communicator. And I think the only way for the CENTRE-LEFT WE'VE IN THE CENTER. I guess in Israel to really break through is that they're going to need someone with more political chops at some point. They're going to need a leader or you know grassroots movement combined with lear that they can overcome bb's support which is not a majority of the country but is a strong minority in enough to kind of hold the line here in prevents someone else like. Gods from winning so You know we could be headed towards a messy coalition politics in some bizarre unity government Tumbled over whether these indictments against bb go forward. In any event. I think the situation with the Palestinians is very grim And is really politics until bb can finally exit stage right here. And hopefully the center of the centre-left can get stronger leader. We're going to be kind of stuck in this place. Maybe they can borrow one of our. Amer candidates primary speaking of which Last week we talked about Bernie Sanders decision to skip the APEC conference. The Big Pro Israel lobby conference so At that that this weekend the Israeli ambassador to the UN Danny Danon said we don't want Sanders APEC. We don't want him in Israel. Anyone who calls our prime minister a racist either a liar. Ignorant fool or both which is very charming The CEO of a pack hard core also obliquely accused sanders of demonizing Israel. Nate that gave Mike Pence a platform to smear Bernie into Democrats side. Israel's enemies so it was nice of these folks to almost immediately prove that Bernie's fishing was a wise one. And I would suggest everyone listening that if you want a vibrant democratic Israel Checkout Jay Street. Yeah Yeah it to me. The the biggest problem here right is the the massive red carpet that they roll out every time for bb and his biggest goons and for like pants and Mike Pompeo and these guys and then you know they they have some democratic members of Congress. We've always gone to a pack. And they they try to claim. This broad bipartisan view of things. This is not on the level here. You know APEC wants to be able to put the bipartisan stamp of approval on itself while relentlessly over the last several years. Supporting the agenda of the Likud party in Israel and the Republican Party in the United States relentlessly attacking Barack Obama. Frankly putting us in this shitty situation that we're in where we pulled out of the Iran nuclear agreement so actively harming US interests with the end of the Iran nuclear agreement and then complaining that people don't show up at their conference. I mean come on guys like And then you know dunking on everybody because a bunch of other candidates like send videos like the. I hate to break it to you. The people send videos to a lot of things. Right also is a racist. I mean he's he's says racist things on the regular choice last laws that devalues human beings who happen to be Arab. Yeah yeah I mean and and every election we get this rhetoric about the Arabs voting is in an inherently bad when they are citizens of Israel. You know so Like I I'm I'm kind of you. Know over this debate We'll keep watching the election

Israel BB Prime Minister Bernie Sanders BBC Netanyahu Apec Israeli Knesset Knesset Likud Party West Bank BEN Lieberman Gones Iran Mike Pompeo Benny Republican Party Lear Danny Danon
A Rosenberg by Any Other Name?

Jewish History Matters

11:11 listening | 3 months ago

A Rosenberg by Any Other Name?

"I'm Jason La Steak and I'm really excited to welcome Geraldine. Good a fan and Kirsten from left to the podcast today. To talk about Kirsten's book a Rosenberg by any other name. A history of Jewish name changing America Josie could offend. It's a scholar of modern your studies currently teaching at American University. She received her. Phd In history from Brandeis University in two thousand eighteen and her research is focused on migration gender and the intersection of law and religion in French. American Jewish history. And we're also joined of course by Kirstin from Agla who's an associate professor at Michigan State University's Department of History her book Rosenberg by any other name. Which we're GonNa talk about today explores the history of name changing in the US in the twentieth century and her first book American Dreams and not nightmares looked at secular Jewish intellectuals. Use of the Holocaust in the early nineteen sixties. Thanks Jason I'm Geraldine. I'm very excited to talk with Kirsten today about her book on Jewish name changing in the United States. I was really fascinated to read Christian books because he deals with so many different things. And one thing that really stood out is the question of the types of economic and social anti-semitism that juice faced in the twentieth century. And this is a story that has been obscured both in how American Jews tell their own story and how they really name changing itself. But it's also a topic that has been obscured largely in the history of American Jews. And so a lot of the discussion with Kirsten really centered on the question of how everyday life of Jews in America were is shaped by anti-semitism and how American Jews del their own story in their recounting of how juice change their names in the twentieth century. I hope you'll enjoy this conversation. Kirsten hiding for joining the Jewish history matters podcast. Thank you so much for having me. I'm really excited so I actually wanted to start with a joke. That's awesome so it's actually a French. Joke offense Jewish joke as I understand it. So it's a story of Mister Meshu Shoe Katzman. We'll goes to the French authorities in the early twentieth century because he wants to change his name. A finds that cats minis for to foreign sounding Fort Jewish sounding so he asked no. Would it be possible to change the name and the French official tells him yes? Sure Okay so what's your name Katzman. So he breaks cats on into to any asked him. So what does that mean in German and the Jewish men says it means Shah Cat in English Okay what does men mean and the men answers it means lum the men so essential official says okay. Katzman you are no no longer cats men but shallow brilliant. It is marvelous because it's really about how your revealing I see in the process of trying to conceal it as you say in the book. Jewish name changing is no laughing matter. We have a lot of jokes involving name changing but it is in fact a very serious topic and so I wanted to start the conversation by asking you why it is such a serious topic and also what do you mean by name changing because I think the readers need to understand what that meant in the American context so the first thing that's really important to say is I only looked at one archive when space for name changing which was official name changing in civil court. It wound up being incredibly rich space. But there's lots of other places in lots of other ways that people could change their names for example. When I started talking about my work I had immigration. Historians say but this is not the only kind of name changing that happens if immigration memoirs you can see and I teach for my students memoirs where people decide to change their name on the shop floor. You know all the people they work with at the sweatshop. I'll sit around and spend the day talking about what your new American names should be. There's definitely kind of informal name changing people sort of take on names and the US among if not the than among the most flexible places in name changing you can really informally. Change Your name to anything. You want without any kind of permission or official status whatsoever. And it's legal this Anglo American law that the US actually took it even to a greater extent in England in some ways on sort of informal name changing people's selecting names because they like them because it sounds good. Those actually are are themselves legal so people can really change their names to anything so because I was using official name changes in city in civil court. I was looking at people who chose to do so officially who chose to be having the state know about their name changing and so- choosing to look at official name. Tinging meant that I was also looking not just at the state it wound up meaning also that I was looking at other kinds of people who might be interested in your name private employers or universities or other kinds of places and spaces where they might these surveillance you. I think maybe watching you questioning. Why your name looks different from one place from the other? What I saw gave us a real insight into the impact of the anti-ageing and the importance of it which is actually kind of your second question right. Why is this important? Why is it serious? A lot of what I've found in the archives. I mean I think a lot of people would have found it boring people's reasons for changing their names if you didn't spend a lot of time looking at them. They were very boring. I want to change my name because it's hard to spell because it's hard to pronounce equal can't remember it. It's hard to say on the telephone. You know a lot of sort of things like that so you had to kind of read through the lines but also some sad stories people who would talk about being excluded in the military people who talked about their employer telling them they had to change their name when they got promoted people who wanted to erase memories of having escaped Germany during World War Two. There are a lot of those sad stories and in other kinds of readings. I did oral history is that I did. It's not always you know. Sort of a tragedy. But there's a lot of lingering sadnesses there's a lot of lingering ambivalence and I think the larger part of the story is people feeling like they had to do this. Some of the interesting part of looking at the state and the government's interest in doing this right and sort of making name changing available to people so easily right so readily you can change your name. Go ahead and change. Her name is volunteerism. The circumstances under which they're changing their names are not free and open they are constrained. They are significantly constrained not forcibly coerced. But they are constrained and sometimes they are being asked to or told to change their names by employers by military officers by defense industry contractors by people who kind of represent some kind of power and have interactions with Stay or certainly with their possibilities of getting a job and living in America. I think it's interesting that everybody's treated this so much as a joke that no scholar studied it. You know which I find really interesting right. That people have so far. Brush this and treated it as something that was not serious that was insignificant or Hurace. Something that was not really important so you actually mentioned the state a few times so I wanted to ask you about the state. What's at stake in controlling names and name changes from a state perspective so the federal government begins asking about name tinges voluntarily on Naturalization Petitions in nineteen of Sex. It is voluntary. It's just a line on your naturalization petition so I only did a very limited look at naturalization petitions but I found at least a few where somebody clearly had changed their name so that it looked very different but clearly the people setting this out that they didn't fill out a name change like the government didn't see this change in spelling as actually being a change in name. So there's a certain amount of laxity that European grants are being treated with in their ability to change their names so my story more begins with really World War One and then especially the Inter war period and World War Two and it spirals as the welfare state as the government begins to be concerned with issues of security and be concerned that the people standing in front of whatever federal worker may not be who they size so one of the most important things I think that leads to the nineteen forties in particular being. Sort of the place. Where you see. More of these official petitions being submitted than any other time in the twentieth century is that the government decides that during World War Two. It actually happened in nineteen ninety eight. They begin having defense. Contractors require birth certificates on so they can ensure the safety of their defense plates. So you see beginning in the nineteen thirties forties this kind of spiraling new. People start to have to produce their birth certificates in order to get jobs to become a part of the war effort which is where the jobs are happening and then as people begin to register for the draft or as they begin to be officers they are getting inconsistent right. It's not I don't think this is every single person who goes to apply to become an officer or to register for the draft or even to try to work for the defense industry but what you get is just more and more people who are getting defense contractors or officers or rotc people or whoever saying. Oh your name doesn't match you know you're going to have troubles you know you need to come back. And produce a birth certificate that matches so some of this is about security right security as the country is going to war and I think some of it is just about the government beginning to look to documents. They are trying more during the welfare state especially during the war to keep track of. Who's who I didn't see a lie. That was necessarily pushed by the Alien Registration. Act But that is something that is starting to begin to question people who have not become citizens yet so my gases that is playing a sub textual role in some people's decisions to do this. The state is beginning to keep track of people and so this kind of very open ended name policy which was working really to sort of bring white immigrants into the country and enfold them seamlessly as the US goes to war as it begins to offer benefits like welfare benefits but also especially as it begins to go to a second war it begins to want to keep track of people and it's using names as part of that way of kind of keeping track of

Official Kirsten United States Mister Meshu Shoe Katzman American University America Brandeis University Jason La Steak Josie Officer Rosenberg Michigan State University Jason I Kirstin Associate Professor Germany England Tinging
'Viral: Anti-Semitism in Four Mutations': A Close-Up on Hatred

People of the Pod

13:03 listening | 3 months ago

'Viral: Anti-Semitism in Four Mutations': A Close-Up on Hatred

"In an unhealthy society? That has problems. They say who did this to us? And the Jews are always candidate. That's columnist George will who's featured in a new documentary on anti-semitism out in theaters across the country on Friday with us in the studio to discuss that film is its creator. Andrew Goldberg in two thousand nine. Andrew focused his lens on the resurgence of Anti Jewish hatred around the world and in mainstream media but after the two thousand sixteen election and the CHARLOTTESVILLE rally where protesters proclaimed the Jews will not replace us. Goldberg felt compelled to return to the topic for an even deeper exploration in viral for mutations of anti-semitism Goldberg travels through four countries. The United States Great Britain France and Hungary to speak firsthand with victims witnesses anti-semites an high profile figures including bill. Clinton Tony Blair Deborah Lipstadt and AJC Europe director. Simone Rodin Benkin in Pittsburgh. He examined the far right ideas that led to the attack on the tree of life synagogue in Hungary he looks at the Anti Immigration. Anti George Soros anti-jewish propaganda promoted by the government and in the UK. He explores the pain caused by the Anti Zionist messages from the UK's Labor Party the film also explores the repeated violence against Jews in France carried out by Islamists Andrew. Welcome glad to be here. Thank you so thank you for making this documentary and I'm curious. Can you kind of take our audience back to the original conception of it and how it evolved over time since I believe some events actually transpired in the making of the documentary will shortly after the election? We noticed there was sort of an uptick in anti Semitic incidents around the country. There were series a bomb threats which we know turned out to be bogus but those caught. Everyone's attention and suddenly everyone was noticing things and shortly after that a lot of tombstones were desecrated several different cemeteries and then the sort of global eyeballs started to notice these things talk about them more in the press and online and we immediately thought we should make a film about antisemitism and we didn't know what it would look like or what it would be. I think our initial thoughts were that would be about the United States but as we did more and more research and we knew this was a global issue. We knew it was happening in other countries. But as you unpack these things you realize that. There's an urgency to a lot of these stories and so we decided to really expanded and to look at four different situations. Those would be the far right in the United States. The far left in England in Hungary where the prime minister has launched a massive PR campaign against a Jewish philanthropist and in France where Islamist have been killing Jews in various terror attacks and other violent attacks against Jews to the tune of what unofficial numbers seemed to be more than three thousand a year. Now you've been making documentaries and doing journalism for twenty years As have I and I was a religion reporter for fifteen years in Chicago and I will tell you when I came here. I was stunned by just how much people hate. Jews. And I'm curious you I. I mentioned this to a former colleague at the Tribune recently and his response. He's in his eighties. He said we'll of course you grew up at a different time You know it's no surprise to me but yeah of course you didn't realize I'm just curious if this was a real shock to your system as you were doing the reporting the idea that Jews are hated was never foreign to me. I mean keep in mind. I'm fifty one and so I grew up where the Holocaust was not that far off. I mean I was raised in the seventies so I guess it was still thirty years old but it was not as it is now sixty plus years old where the next generation of people don't even know it was there Growing UP IN CHICAGO BEING JEWISH WAS It was not something to be celebrated at least among my friends and among my peers. I was made fun of for it a few times. It wasn't I didn't grow up in the midst of it but the Holocaust was connected to us in a way that it was very very real and so for that reason I understood that Jews were absolutely despised and I started making films in my first film that had anything to do with Jewish subjects was around two thousand and two or so and you know it was about Eastern European Jewish life before the war. So we're talking about you. Know all black and white footage of shuttles of Warsaw of what we might call the Yiddish world and that whole world is utterly destroyed in Eastern Europe and in Europe and in Russia and that made it pretty easy to see and in doing that film I started to learn about it. I automate fillmore at antisemitism in the media in the Middle East at one point and you realize that it is it is widespread. There's Anti Semitism where there are Jews. There's antisemitism where there are not Jews. There's Anti Semitism among people who are friends with Jews so my awareness of this has grown so in other words you entered into this project knowing there was a history of this but you had never seen it kind of in the current context as well. I had not seen it the way I see it now. I when I made a film in two thousand seven on antisemitism in the in the in the arab-islamic world per particularly North Africa and the Middle East I didn't focus that much on Europe and the US at the time antisemitism in the US was a very minor issue compared to what it is now. I don't want to say it was minor because there were plenty of people experiencing antisemitism but we didn't have it to the magnitude and we didn't have the Internet the way we do now but I knew that it was alive and well in the Middle East and that was surprising to see just how deep it is just how woven into the fabric of conversation and media it is. I was interviewing some kids in Egypt on the street and I said to them what are Jews they said User Satan Jews are evil. Juice should die. I said what if a Jewish kid was walking right here across the street and got hit by a car. They said we would call an ambulance. These two ideas existed right next to each other. And that's what's so interesting. One is in the abstract one is in the day to day Would you say that abstract versus day day is what's also infecting Western Europe United States? This wave of anti-semitism that we're seeing or is it. Is it very different? I think they crossover so for example. In Hungary there's virtually no violence against Jews In Hungary a survey showed that forty percent. Forty two percent of Hungarians held at least one or more anti Semitic views. Does that mean that? The people by larger anti-semites probably not but it means that the numbers are higher. Those numbers were higher than they were anywhere else in Europe or give or take a country. How many countries are there in Europe? A lot right so but there's no violence against Jews physical violence. That's what I mean physical violence against Jews but those lines do tend to cross over at points and so the fear is that it can translate these nationalist movement so in Hungary just to give some context the government has launched a huge campaign against George. Soros it's on Mute right now. It's not running right now but it ran not too long ago during the European Union elections. It came back up again. I asked one of the spokespeople of Hungary will come back and he told me that it would come back in a very consistent way so the whole idea that the Hungarian government has put forth. Is that this Jewish billionaire. George Soros is out to flood the nation with Muslim immigrants and since Muslim immigrants in the eyes of the Hungarian government are bad. You the Hungarian citizen the White Christian Hungarian citizen are in danger. And you're in danger because of a Jew. So here's these people are all worked up about a Jew who actually isn't doing anything like this but yet at the same time they're not vandalizing. All the Jewish shops are not beating Jews. And what have you? Although there's I've heard some rumblings that a little of that has happened so we'll have to see but I'm no expert on the data right. Well I think that's the argument. I mean argument. Deborah Lipstadt makes in the film. For example it starts with words it starts with comments and then does eventually escalate. That's the danger of not addressing it nipping in the bud. When you see. I think that's here right so I think that in America we've seen rage on the Internet translate into violence than I think you know the hatred in Hungary is really a government media campaign which took place on TV on the radio on the Internet. But also on billboards outside it was like an all encompassing life. You would drive down the street and you'd be bombarded with it here This antisemitism isn't billboards. I mean there's we'd see them occasionally but it's all on the Internet and people get the Internet sort of like you and your computer. You Lock yourself in this little space and then you start to get worked up and you start to hate and so we see that. Not all but many of these. Violent attacks in the United States are people who sort of incubated these ideas on the Internet. You raise a good point billboards in Hungary that was the been the vehicle of communication there for that. Soros campaign but I'm curious what about social media. What about the comments in violence on social media is it just as rampant in places like Hungary as it is here we'll so the makeup and the nature of the of the campaign in Hungary? We didn't break down so I don't know what percentage of it certainly on social media and not only was it on social media is a place where people can share about it right so in addition to whatever the government put on social media because the government had all these different forms they had radio they had. Tv They billboards aid magazines. It's social media mailings mailing mailing which is in the film How much of their media mix was the Internet? I don't know but if you're a person with anti Semitic views you can't do anything with billboard but some people did right hateful messages on billboards with magic markers in pain. They actually vandalize them. But by and large the billboards are you don't interact with them in the billboard. Don't post against back and forth a TV commercial. You don't respond to that. The Internet is where everybody took their hatred in their dislike of George Soros and they brought it to the Internet. And I think that's a place where you would see a lot more of this. Anti Jewish rhetoric the Internet is where it becomes the People's action not the government right. You have obsession in the film that talks about the brief history of blaming Jews. And you talk about the films that you've done in the past and the history of this but one critique of the film that I've read is that doesn't include enough historical context now I hear this critique all the time as a journalist you only have so much space or time right to address the whole of a situation but I'm curious what your thoughts are on whether to include more history or trajectory. The history of antisemitism is extremely complex. It grows out of misinterpretations if that's a word of people misinterpreted biblical scripture. It's changed and it's more throughout the centuries throughout Europe. If you WANNA talk about how it's been a part of the story of Christianity knew very thorny and complicated history which takes a long time to get in and out of now take that for a minute and think about. We have limited shelf space in our movie. I always say to people in movies not a casserole but take that from it in a notice that in the film we have that history. We have extensive history of the civil rights movement in the United States with history of the entire Orban's campaign and where that came from in Hungary in Oregon was we talk all about a migration and the history of colonialism in France as to give the backbone of that in England we talk about the Labor Party going all the way back to two thousand and eight. What we don't do is this deep analysis of Christian history but my response is also this. If I make a film about racism in about how African Americans are being shot in the street by police. Do I need to tell you? The history of why blacks are disliked by racists in this country. If I talk about misogyny do I need to tell you? The history of why people are misogynists to me and the same goes for LGBTQ. Americans no one's asking why. Why do I need to get into the fact of why Trans People are being murdered? Right now are being beaten up. I don't need to analyze that. Well that too comes from the Bible. Right hatred of homophobia grows right out of scripture. But I don't need to give that analysis so it's a it. We talk about double standards and antisemitism and I don't want to say this is anti Semitism but it's almost a reflex that people feel like anything has to do with Jews. With antisemitism with Israel has to be held to some type of second order of scrutiny and I found that a little bit frustrating. There've been some debates on college campuses about whether or not Jewish students who are pro. Israel can join feminist marches. Lgbtq right marches. You other causes. They feel excluded from those causes because of their Zionist positions and so. That's where intersection. -ality has come up a lot in conversations here is how do you address that exclusion? Even though it's very different causes communities have gotten together and there has not been room for the Jewish issue of antisemitism has four complicated reasons not been welcome into that crew. Because many in this left is idea. Do not like how they don't like what's going on with the Arab Israeli conflict let's not even parse the Israeli conflict. Unfortunate part of this. Is that a Jewish students who have nothing to do with Israel who are oblivious to Israel are still being singled out now. It's very dangerous to to assume. Length phrases like colleges are a battleground. We visited colleges as we spoke to a lot of students. It's a very complicated and mixed bag. But there's no doubt that on some college campuses and we don't have hard data on how or where or what we have a lot of anecdotes. We have a lot of very upset parents. We have a lot of very upset students. But what that actually translates into numbers. We don't know what we do know. Is that Jewish? Students are being asked to somehow be called to task for what Israel is said to be

Hungary United States George Soros Europe Government Semitism France Andrew Goldberg Middle East Chicago Israel Labor Party UK Simone Rodin Benkin Tribune Pittsburgh England Ajc Europe
Princess Diana's Niece Kitty Spencer Converting to Judaism for Soon-To-Be Husband Michael Lewis

Unorthodox

3:08 listening | 3 months ago

Princess Diana's Niece Kitty Spencer Converting to Judaism for Soon-To-Be Husband Michael Lewis

"Lady Kitty Spencer. Princess Diana's niece who apparently according to various British reports is going to convert to Judaism She's marrying a Jewish fashion tycoon. More than twice her age. According to The Times of London Lady Kitty Spencer. A twenty nine year old model. GotTa give to Michael Lewis. Sixty one year old chair of the Foscarini group in December. Not The author. Michael Lewis not who leaving Tabitha Soren former MTV news for percents. Don't even say that pooh-pooh Kim Hoorah for very specific subset of royal watchers. Who are Jewish like. This is like catnip. This is the perfect thing. It's sort of like how Meghan Markle's I wish there was a whole thing of like is Meghan markle Jewish that was like a few days of of speculation on the Jewish Internet. Yeah I mean. I don't really care about this. I'll be perfectly honest. I just think that it's I liked marvel at the fact that like this is the stuff of headlines. We don't really run this kind of blog at tablet anymore but like there is a world in which this generates headlines for like at least three days. I'm well on the record over the years I've written about his royal watching especially for an American proud citizen of a country that fought a war to get rid of royals and to not have to bow and shit before them. Royal watching an American is sad to begin with Amen. If you'RE GONNA watch if you're going to be obsessed with them out of some sort of weird deep Anglo Philip Pathology. We want them to be sort of like dysfunctional church of England like like drunk in dysfunctional wasps. Like I don't want I want there to be no Jews in the royal family. I want them to be this like fabulous train wreck of what happens. Through centuries of high church Y Anglo Inbreeding you see kids. That's why we fought a war right the idea that we want them to kind of that. We Ju- sort of want to sneak in through marriage through conversion on no way this like we will be off running. Hollywood and the media and electing Bernie Sanders President or having jared Kushner baked peas or whatever we do in America. Were Jews. Get to do it up. We that. That's our bag. The royal bag is being like stiff. Upper lipped GIN tonic addled extramarital affair having Weirdos and I want nothing to do with that exact these I think might be your most controversial take yet or the one that's GonNa get you into the most trouble and I look forward to it but I don't think I wholeheartedly. I hate you. Fine Century MELTSA Leila Mark. But I don't think people wash because they like want to be I mean there's a fascination we watch and we watch from a distance from an ocean away Understanding that this is not our culture but just finding a fascination in the pomp and the pageantry and. I don't think there's anything wrong with that. I think you're inferring. A lot of weird things onto people who just like to watch a pretty wedding fine but then it's not a Jewish wedding that that's not the wedding we want to watch. We've seen enough Jewish weddings. We've been to Leonard's of great neck I disagree they do a great Bat Mitzvah. The thing about the royal family over the years is that like it's basically become a reality show right like all day thing about William and Kate's wedding. We can watch it. There's no reason why we can't see ourselves in that world because they're they become so much a part of our world so I think it's I'm all for it. I love my Jewish relatives too much. I love the Big Jewish family too much to wish any of us into that family but all the sparkling thing into the most useless family on the face of this plan south. No

Meghan Markle Michael Lewis Kitty Spencer Princess Diana Anglo Philip Pathology Tabitha Soren MTV England Jared Kushner Bernie Sanders Leila Mark JU The Times Hollywood Leonard William President Trump America Kate
Yaakov Lappin: Europe's Refugee Crisis II and the Virtual Caliphate

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

5:52 listening | 3 months ago

Yaakov Lappin: Europe's Refugee Crisis II and the Virtual Caliphate

"Predicted the rise of Islamic state. And where it would establish a caliphate in his book. The virtual caliphate published nearly a decade ago. It's Yaacov Lapeyton military affairs correspondent and analyst research. Associate Bagan sit at center for research studies at Bar. Ilan University and in House analyst with the Miriam Institute. And it's with thanks to Chief Executive Sergeant Benjamin Anthony for making our introduction in nineteen twenty four the last caliphate. An Islamic state as envisioned by the Koran was dismantled in Turkey but in twenty eleven the virtual caliphate outlined an Islamic state that already exist on computer servers around the world used by Islamists to carry out functions typically reserved for physical state like creating training camps mapping out to states constitution and drafting tax laws. His book predicted how Islamists equipped with twenty first century technology to achieve as Seventh-century Vision would upload the virtual caliphate into the physical world. You predicted I. S I did and I even humbly. I predicted that they would establish it in either Iraq or any area where they would find a failure of state sovereignty. I didn't foresee Syria. But I certainly saw the crescent of Iraq area has a place where he's Law mcstay could upload it's vision and absolutely we have seen this transition from the online jihadist world into the physical off-line territorial world you've seen this vision being uploaded and then destroyed by a coalition of Western countries. I look at contemporary history around the world. I'm looking at that terrible attack on this for non-christians is not the same. Inspired idea that they are testing the Buddhist majority in Sri Lanka the Muslims there or are they sending another message is one hundred percent of the same ideology. Salafi Jihadists Salafi jihadists believe that they are in a state of war with the entire world. Where anywhere that does not fall in line with their fundamentalist a vision of how state should be run which is the most extreme of adherence to Islamic law They consider themselves to be municipal war with that place. It doesn't matter if it's an Arab Muslim country that's not religious with them. A Christian country a secular country where Buddhists country and the terrorist cell to carry out this relaxed bombings is perhaps the same Salafi Jihadist ideology that gave birth to al Qaeda and two Islamic. State's Yaacov as you develop these ideas through your research. What extraordinary developments have you found? Well when I was researching the virtual caliphate book which was as you point out approximately a decade ago. I was amazed by first of all how accessible this online activity was was an English. I was being exposed to English. Recruitment chat rooms where a senior Islamist jihadist figures were basically bringing me in British Muslims into their way of thinking and I was alarmed by this by published articles in the times when I was exposing this activity and it also makes me about how how easy it was to get into these foreign taxable. This entire world was these days. I know that things have changed very much so I'm not active in this line of research anymore. But I'm well aware that these chat rooms are encrypted. They're very difficult to enter and they've lowered their profiles so the activities still very much going on very much danger to international security much harder for people who are looking for to find it and get into these four without being spotted by therefore managers now since he wrote the book. We have seen the rise of Islamic state in Iraq and Syria than subsequent defeat and the consequential mass migration of refugees into Europe which has changed the politics of Europe is the gap between the people and their governments in the West bigger than ever in the West. It's hard for me to comment on because I Expertise does not focus on the West. What I can say about migration and how it's going to change Middle Eastern migration to the West. And how could change politics is is? This is just one reason why Middle Eastern refugees are pouring into the West. Another reason is say take the Assad regime. The Assad regime is responsible for millions of Syrians. Leaving the state of Syria. And the fact is that most of these people who are who have emigrated from Syria who who escaped conflict there are Sunnis and they're running away because of the coalition of Shiite Alawites who are waging the war in Syria on behalf of us have basically ethically funds them from their homes through mass murderer and war-crimes so what we're seeing here. Sectarian Warfare Creating wave upon wave of refugees from the Middle East and I think that will destabilize To a certain extent the political systems in the West if it repeat itself C. Another wave which I think is quite likely I mean if I said continues. He's about to launch a major offensive in Italy And if that creates another wave of refugees or if Turkey makes good on its threats to open the gates open the floodgates on Syrian refugees and let them travelling to Europe and we'll see this trend

Syria West Iraq Europe Assad Analyst Turkey Yaacov Lapeyton Middle East Sri Lanka Yaacov Chief Executive Ilan University Benjamin Anthony Miriam Institute Italy
Super Soul Sexuality with Rabbi Lisa Grushcow

Chosen Family

8:57 listening | 3 months ago

Super Soul Sexuality with Rabbi Lisa Grushcow

"Both been really drawn to Judaism. I know for me personally. So many of my artistic. Inspirations I mean not consciously but they're all Jewish like Bette midler Sandra Bernhardt Barbra streisand lake. These people have informed so much of my view of the arts. And you know there's a strong part of what they do is related to Judaism and their spirituality and same for me. My I like comedy against version was Sarah Silverman who Super Jewish. And she's not embrace it and what I love about that. Religion is how it's both faith but also like an intellectual practice and people love to be conflicted in argue and disagree and I was raised Catholic. But I've never felt that catalyst ISM was really a space to question and I just love it. You get to do that in the Jewish faith. I don't think we could have found anyone better than Rabbi Lisa Grechko. Who is our special guest today? She used the Montreal Legend would you say the rabbi well she's a Rockstar as much as a rabbi. Can Be yes she is a rabbi at Temple Emanuel Shalom here in Montreal. She is the first queer. Rabbi that I personally know. She's quite famous here for really embracing progressive views for a religious leader. I'm in her sermons or super popular like people actually go out on a Friday night. Yeah I heard about it from a friend of mine. Who'S NOT Jewish? Who was just going and really found something real there. I feel she would be a great character on sex in the city. Like the girls would go to my sermon. I mean I just think we need rabbi Grechko in our lives in many ways as possible so we had a great conversation with her about sexuality. Faith family even divorce because she she has the same sex partner but she was divorced in the past and that sounded like it was a bigger problem in her community than being a lesbian. Rabbi crush go also does a lot of interfaith works. He works with Muslim. Meteors Christian leaders and it was really important for us to go beyond the politics of the day or whatever opinion people can have about different religions and some listeners might be atheists or some people listening might be fervent believers. We wanted to go beyond that and ask the big super bowl questions through. Rabbi you really got into Lake you we got rabbi Grechko set up a new. Didn't waste a second to get into your big oprah like question what came first in Your Life God or same sex desire. I was conscious of my spirituality. Let's say and religious sense of connection before I was aware of my own sexuality and then I was a relatively late bloomer. I wasn't out 'til My mid twenty say so for a while there was a real sense of struggle. And how would navigate those things together But that was more. A challenge with institution spiritually. That piece always stage. Did you feel spiritual As a child because I felt very I relate because I did feel as before I was kind of socialized in school and the world I felt the presence of a higher power. Is that what you're referencing? I had I had You know it's interesting because that's one of the things that might be different about Judaism in some ways that were so community based in so behaviorally based so I was very connected to the Jewish community as a kid. I went to a Jewish day school. I went to synagogue on a regular basis Shabat Dinners. Were part of our family life family celebration so all of those things were part of it. Some of the deeper connection came through learning which Jewish is a very spiritual activity kind of encountering sacred texts and asking questions and I grew up. Thanks to my parents with a lot of nature. A lot of travel lot of just sense of of being connected to something bigger you know going out in the middle of the night and lying down on a blanket and watching star shower I would say for me. It only took on a deeper resonance. Actually when I was struggling with coming out and figuring out what that meant for my path towards the rabbinate that was in some ways the closest that I got to a sense of calling or a Pitney because it felt like there's this path that I'm on and it's not going to be as smooth as I thought it would be so if I'm going to be on this path that has to really matter to me. It has to really be what I feel like I should be doing. Were you looking for answers? And that moment I think it was much more a feeling of of yearning of desire of closeness and relationship. I would say a sense that there was something someone who I couldn't didn't WanNa walk away from you said that coming out brought you closer to God. Can you talk about what way it brought you closer to God? I mean if you look at the story of the Hebrew Bible though stories that you've learned as a kid for US issues. One of the central parts of that story is the story of the exodus from Egypt. And it's a story of if you if you know the Hebrew going from meets rhyme. Which is the word for Egypt? But literally means the narrow place to a place of openness and possibility and the God who speaks to Moses out of the burning Bush. It's often terribly mistranslated as I am that I am. You know that Wayne was assessed. Who are you and imagine the Ten Commandments? Among God says I am that I am but it really is. I will be and so from me. Coming out was a very It connected me to that story of leaving a place of of narrowness and constraint and having a new sense of of possibility and freedom And to me that was a very religious spiritual story which I understood in a whole different way. I'm certainly not the first to do that. And that story has been used by so many people in so many important ways but for me. It really resonated. At that time John were usual. Kid I think maybe the arts for me and like my experience of the arts was the closest that came to spirituality as a kid but other than you know just loving Bible stories. I enjoyed it in the same way that I enjoyed fairy tales. You know what I mean. I don't think I really thought that. Much about my spirituality growing up Christian for me. I wasn't necessarily ashamed of being queer or being gay but shame was definitely an undertone in what in what you're describing it doesn't sound like that was your experience. It sounds like it was quite beautiful discovery for you to lean on that same sex desire and that queen is that was within you. I think in that sense it really Revealed from a Fault. Line between institutionalized religion spirituality And you know it's it's ironic because I'm a representative of of organized religion though. I sometimes joke. That Judaism is as disorganized. Religion is one can get. We don't have a central hierarchy in line of authority. You know it's a good thing now. I think it's a good thing and the rabbi isn't with direct line to God. The rabbi is a teacher and a member of the community so there isn't a sense of of infallibility or of kind of being closer to God than anybody else I love So that's you know when we we tend to be an argumentative argument to people and it's not a dog. Matic religion by enlarge. It's much more about what you do then kind of signing onto a creed and so by and large. There's a lot of room to move in that. But I grew up in a an arm of Judaism which has changed since but then wasn't ordaining. Lgbt folks that piece became a real real faultline for me. And I did grow up with not anything that anybody said. But we're not seeing anybody who looked like me and having an old you know commentary that was on our in our pews at the synagogue which spoke about that chapter in Leviticus and same sex relationships as being. I don't remember what the language was whether it's something around depravity and paganism in that kind of thing so that I remember but it wasn't the overall messaging you said something about spirituality and religion and I think a lot of people feel spiritual but don't necessarily want to belong to a religion that's more organized or more conservative more conservative. I understand but I sometimes worry that we sell ourselves short by not looking because I think when we look were sometimes surprised by what we find you know and the fact is organized religion and institutions as much as they are like dirty. Words can do things that you can't do when you're just meeting in somebody's living room right. We can create sacred space. We can organize community together. We can be there for each other and offer things in different ways that you can't if it's more do it yourself you know and I figure religions have been asking spiritual questions for Millennia so to be able to come in and be part of that conversation right instead of feeling like you have to start from zero and make it up from you as you go along. I think is really powerful.

Rabbi Lisa Grechko Bette Midler Sandra Bernhardt Montreal Sarah Silverman Egypt Temple Emanuel Shalom United States Partner Pitney Wayne John Representative
A Closer Look at the Black-Jewish Congressional Caucus

People of the Pod

14:21 listening | 3 months ago

A Closer Look at the Black-Jewish Congressional Caucus

"January and February have been full of commemorative moments for both the black and Jewish Communities. The birthday of Martin Luther King Junior the death anniversary of Anne Frank International Holocaust remembrance and Black History Month we sat down individually with three founders of the Black Jewish congressional caucus democratic congresswoman Brenda Lawrence Democratic congresswoman. Debbie Wasserman Schultz and Republican Congressman Lee Zeldin to discuss why the caucus exists the issues. They think it will address and why it's important for black and Jewish leaders to work together. Not Apart I I asked about the original purpose of the Black Jewish congressional caucus how that purpose has evolved since its conception and what the main issues the caucus to address we. I posed the question to chief. Founder Representative Brenda Lawrence when I went to my colleagues. And ask them if they would be interested in forming a black Jewish Caucus. Civically this administration. I have seen an uptick in divisiveness and Rachel tension and also hate crimes been reported as validated being on Increasing and we have such a strong and long history of lack American and the Jewish community coming together in those times when our country lost its way the Jewish community came to the support of the black community during the civil rights movement. We have shared experience between the Holocaust. Slavery of being people oppressed by no other reason except for who we are and We know and we feel uniquely the stereotypes in the tension that are often placed on us as black and Jewish citizens of this country. And we are here in Congress to write laws and policies to ensure quality to make sure that we're forcing the civil rights of this country and we should be having a unique conversation around this and I can tell you I was so impressed with the support and willingness in a bipartisan way to form the caucus so what are the main issues that the caucus hopes to address. Well I want to know that as we look at hate crimes and discrimination as anti Semitic. It's racist xenophobic Often go back to Martin Luther King. Our unity is born of our common struggle for centuries not only to rid ourselves bandage but to make oppression of any people by others impossible so when we plan or what. Our jackets is our is that we will make sure that we are uniquely informed. We are aware of these incidents and policies and situations where we see Racism not being addressed properly or being able or being nurtured and that we can pass policies and enforce loss through our justice system to ensure we're holding true to one nation under God indivisible with liberty and justice for all next. We asked Representative Debbie Wasserman Schultz during the civil rights movement jewish-americans lent critical support to the N. Double ACP and fought alongside. Dr Martin Luther King Junior to challenge racial segregation in public accommodations and black leaders have stood with the Jewish community following the tragic shootings. At synagogues in Pittsburgh Pennsylvania and POW California Joakim Prinz german-american Rabbi and refugee of Nazi. Germany represented the Jewish community as an organizer during the nineteen sixty three march on Washington. So that history is long and and significant and so the the The Black Jewish caucus is really important for us to be able to to retie those binds. And make sure that we can work on the modern day issues that are of mutual concern to both communities are purposes to assemble leaders to learn from one. Another advocate for joint concerns Regardless of party we believe And we exist because all partners are committed calling out hate and racism and discrimination anti-semitism and xenophobia whenever and wherever it rears its ugly head and you know our alliance in the Black Jewish caucus is really important so that we can work to honor and strengthen and safeguard the bond of our communities that have been developed in the struggle for equality in America. Then we asked representative Lee Zeldin. There is a need to better bridge the gap between the Jewish community and the black community and understanding a long rich history of the the black community fighting for on behalf of with the Jewish Committee and community and vice versa This isn't a new concept for us to be working closely and back in World War. Two was seven sixty first tank battalion. Bed Liberated gun skirt skin and God almost four hundred medals for their heroics their efforts and it was Jewish members who stood side by side with the black community during the civil rights push and some actually ended up giving up their lives in that fight for Justice and equality fast forward to two thousand and nineteen. This was announced in June But we were talking to each other about it for a few months leading up to that. Brenda Lawrence Really did a fantastic job taking a lead initiative. The American Jewish Committee was also influential and helpful with that. 'cause how has it evolved since then? I would say that more and more people have expressed interest in being part of it so it's become a bigger and it's allowed us to build a stronger network and we've seen a divide close But the challenges still exist and we just had a Hanukkah in two thousand nineteen that was marked by violent antisemitic attacks in and around the New York City area and some of the people who were paying attention to it saw that the individuals who are carrying out the attacks weren't neo Nazis. They weren't they weren't white supremacists. They weren't a radical Islamic extremists. And they they weren't Politically motivated it was a different dynamic than what you might have been talking about in June of two thousand nineteen You had some people who are talking about the the black Israel The Hebrew Israelite Movement But then others within that movement rejecting the acts carried out up in Munsey attacking the rabbi's home as well as attacking The the Jewish Kosher Supermarket in New Jersey. So in a way if you ask me how it evolved part of. It's been positive With all of the outreach in all of the new relationships and part of it has been an added challenge added friction as we witnessed what happened in the Hanukkah two thousand nineteen and struggling with figuring out how to as quickly as possible Deal with that next. We asked how the black community can support Jewish concerns and how the Jewish community can more forcefully advocate for African American issues. Here's what Linda Lawrence had to say. Yes the Jewish community has in the past as as you know during the civil rights movement Jewish communities one of our strongest legal and justice advocate on the judicial system but it is lifting the voice of Black America Black Lives Matter Institutional that is. Our biggest challenge institutional racism when it comes to the education when it comes to housing when it comes to the criminal justice lending voice to the black community and pointing out those things that are wrong and the black community. What we can do is make sure that we are calling out the stereotypes against the Jewish community. Then we heard from Debbie Wasserman Schultz. There is really some significant overlap that particularly with the violence and the Anti Semitism and bigotry. That is being hurled at our communities not just with these horrendous murders but with social media attacks and you know protest against our communities and discriminatory actions so we have a lot on our plate. Initially that I think are in my view important for our communities mutually and you know because the Caucasus really in its infancy as we mature and move down the road. Get to know one another issues that you know. We can be across the aisle and across our communities and the caucus focused on trying to prioritize the issues that the individual communities find important and lastly representative Lee Zeldin. Well we always spent a lot of times so far I talking about the way. The Jewish community has been targeted with not just Anti Semitic thoughts but antisemitic actions and violent and some cases of its cost people their lives. So you know the the ways for the the black community to identify what? The top issues are Right now for the Jewish community. We're seeing it. Play out really in the national news and the national debate for the Black Community The there still is racism in our country in many respects and I think that teaching tolerance and and understanding ensuring that policies aren't discriminatory that individuals have the ability to achieve the American dream and shouldn't be held back just because they might be someone of color or they might be practicing a different religion like Judaism. That discrimination racism still exists in our country. We saw it play out not too long ago on. Long Island where I'm from the first. Congressional district of New York is on the east end of Long Island There was a story that was in. Newsday was an investigative report of members of the real estate industry discriminating against people of color who were trying to find housing trying to Purchase a home to achieve the American dream. And unfortunately that's an exception and not the norm. It's rare But the response has been robust with investigations. That have been lost. launched as well as the real estate industry themselves Self policing Each Other To educate but educate each other and to push out of their industry people who are discriminating against Black individuals who are trying to own a home and then she the American dream so I would say as far as identifying some of the biggest needs right now of the black community. I would say that just like it was easy to identify anti-semitism as a top needed needs to get addressed for the Jewish community. I would say. Racism is something that's very prevalent and still needs to be addressed absolutely with regards to the black community next. We asked what issues of mutual concern? The caucus can address. Here's what Brenda Lawrence had to say. I think it's extremely important. That the black and Jewish community allow the history of oppression for either of our people to be forgotten. You know there's some people who like to say the Holocaust didn't happen. There are people who say You know black people so each other to slavery. So what's the big deal? We cannot allow the history that as horrific as it is to be forgotten. And that's something else that I think that we uniquely can do as citizens of this country and as survivor and Debbie Wasserman Schultz. Right now we have a really significant challenge around white supremacy and the rise of white supremacists in United States white supremacist increasingly targeted and killed large groups of people in recent years because of their race or religion in the United States in Twenty fifteen we had nine African Americans who were murdered murdered by a gunman whose name I won't mention at the Emmanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church Mother Emmanuel in Charleston South Carolina. Because and this is quoting the murderer. He knew that it would be a place to get a small amount of black people in one area. You had Robert Bowers. Last year yelled antisemitic. Slurs before he opened fire and killed eleven worshippers at the tree of life synagogue in Pittsburgh Pennsylvania and that was the deadliest attack on the Jewish community. American history you've had attacks on mosques where insecurity has had to be increased after fifty one people were massacred to mosques in New Zealand. So we have a very current urgent challenge with bigotry. Anti-semitism white supremacists who are engaging in in deadly violence and so that's at the security and houses of fighting. Anti Semitism and bigotry is Is really the top of our current list of issue the very tragic areas of mutual concern for for both communities and and I would also add Particularly because most of these crimes perpetrated with guns the Jewish community in the African American community have have really come together around making sure that we can close all the loopholes that allow people who shouldn't have a gun under federal law here in the US be able to get them Now that issue is unfortunately not bipartisan. I was just getting ready to say. That's gotta be bipartisan. doesn't mean that That the hawks On Black Jewish relations can't take it on

Black Community Jewish Caucus Representative Debbie Wasserma Jewish Communities Representative Brenda Lawrence American Jewish Committee Congressman Lee Zeldin Martin Luther King Black Community The Jewish Committee Black Israel The Hebrew Israel African American Community Representative New York America Long Island Dr Martin Luther
A Live Chat with Two of the Biggest Rabbis in Phoenix

Unorthodox

8:52 listening | 3 months ago

A Live Chat with Two of the Biggest Rabbis in Phoenix

"Have two of the biggest rabbis and Phoenix here with US tonight. Rabbi Dr Smelly Yanko. It's the president and Dina validate me Josh and Rabbi Pinchas. Illusion is the founding rabbi of Congregation Beth Safina in Scottsdale Arizona. Come come welcome rebuttal. Don't usually have two guests because things can get really off the rails so we'll see what happens here rabbis. I'm GONNA call you. We'll we'll we'll figure out what we're GONNA call you but let's start with this question for both of you. Why isn't this Jewish community different from all other Stephanie Loud Mark this is why all the people who don't touch the MIC? Don't have problems every house. That better josh all right there we go sorry Stephanie. So let's start off because there's like no spoilers here because only spoilers so rabbis. Why is this Jewish community different from all other Jewish communities? Are you guys even Jewish? You're letting each other speak. It's an excellent question you went on to. I twenty all right so I think for two main reasons number one. It's a community that has just been founded really in the past. Few decades other communities are centuries old. This community is quite new and therefore its future is still very much ahead of it. I think that's why many people are really attracted to the potential of the community year as I was when I first move you thirteen years ago. And it's buzzing with excitement that's number one number two. I also think that it's a community. It's quite diverse and it's diverse in its culture it's diverse in its levels of observance of background. But it's not just the diversity that is attracting and that is quite unique to Phoenix. But it's a unity within the diversity truly feel that we're a united community which can't be said about Kish Committees. That was speaking about before in other places so those are the two main things that I see almost immediately like musing. Yeah well you say when. I was thinking about moving in the middle my seventh year. The two points that people shared as to why I shouldn't consider it. They said it's an intellectual wasteland which is totally untrue. We have people coming out to our learning events every night interesting ideas. And secondly they said it's a moral morally passive community very private very individualistic which is also completely untrue. When we have various activists campaigns people lined up lined up to show support. Who said that? And should we beat them up here? Do you want the crowd here? That can go after them. We the J. Crew here I want. I want to address the thing that you just said. So I'm kind of two minds about the activism angle. There's a part of me that thinks that it's really beautiful and essential for community of face to be very involved in you know social political elements and feel this kind of moral calling and there's another part of me that is a little bit kind of taken aback by how dominant this political discussion. Become just you know. Want to go to show just to hear the Torah just to be together with Jews and worry about that later some other place. How should we be feeling about? Its connection being social justice and question so Rambam my monitors in the third section of his guide for the perplexed. Says what's the purpose of all this stuff and answer is the welfare of the body and the welfare of the soul by which he means the well. If you have to know a little play there which we do. The welfare of the body means just state and the welfare of the sole means the perfection of the intellect so basically the goal of Judaism view is our inner life and our outer life which is to say the inner life is our ritual or beliefs or spirituality stuff. You're touching on and the outer life which he comes to say becomes the priority is that Jews should be on the front and center of fostering the Jus- -ociety and so I think we have a problem. Today I think that The traditional segment of Jewish life prioritizes the parochial and the traditional and not the universal. And I think the more liberal segments of Jewish life prioritize the universal and less of the less attritional and this middle ground of saying yes we care about the world we care society and we care about Jews. That complete package is what we're GONNA do. You agree that he taught us to call them. Yeah that's pleasure. No NOPE BRONCO. Way Back like twenty minutes back calls me peony so all my friends do so no problem. I I would agree with that. I would say though that needs to be a healthy balance of course between the two because if almost like Mark Twain said some people are so open minded that the brain spill out. Sometimes we were so much in open that we forget the message. And so we have to be steeped in the roots of Judaism very much so and yet not forget a calling to go to the outside point out also that if there is an emphasis in Judaism on which side counts the most. It's the outside if you think of the idea of Mitzvah. Most of the six hundred thirteen meets vote are outside oriented. They deal with the world that don't really deal with the internal world. I can only think I don't know maybe you can take more of to mitzvahs on top of the mind that deal with the inside. Prayer Torah study but otherwise everything else really deals with the outside so there is. I do find this emphasis on. Tacona LOMB on trying to rectify the world of course with God's light and with God's message but on the other hand also not forgetting where we come from forgetting to be a steeped in our roots as possible. Something we talk about a lot on the show. Is this idea that a lot of juice today don't necessarily feel like they can just walk into a synagogue and be welcomed or would even feel comfortable. There would even know how to get there. What do you think is the best way to connect with Jews? Who Don't haven't necessarily found their place within the institutional Jewish world thank you. They should go to the valley. Bettman rush to go ahead twenty. I was first before you go second. I'm sorry what did what are these. Mutations Paul Ince Geneva come on these guys could pull off a Juku. They've got the organization got the intellect coming the trail be stealthy. It's a fascinating question and I think that was a really good at alien one another. It's true and I think that the percentages of Jews were not engaged. Not because they're disinterested because they've been alienated is also very high and I think the challenge here is to embrace pluralism which does not bracket are absolutes but creates space for other absolutes. That means that for those of us who are really fervent beliefs. We learn how to create space for others. And those who are more relativistic and actually don't hold. Views are able to cultivate those in our space. I'm worried about those on the margins. I'm worried about single folks who have had had trouble finding partners and we were the people of Color feel alienated those of lower socioeconomic status who feel alienated Those who are converts all types of marginalized Jews that I think are. Establishments can do better being inclusive those with physical disabilities or and really a whole host of others. And I think our community is very good at embracing those who naturally fit in. I would agree also. I think it's an excellent question because he hit it right on the now. I think the biggest challenge we have is rabbis is to make Judaism not just relevant but also accessible and I would say that the lenses I try to wear as rabbi and I think that all Jews should try to wear is the lenses of what my rabbi teaches in his book. We Jews the STEINFELDT He came up with the idea that he was the first one since then. I've heard it many times. But he came up with this idea. That Judaism is not a religion. I don't approach another Jew because of religion nor do I approach another job. Because he's part of my ethnic group. Judaism is not an ethnic group. Judaism is also another nationality. We don't have to live in Israel to be Jewish. What is Judaism? Judaism is a family. I approach another Jew. Because he's my family and yes you could have two Jews and seven opinions but as another Aba of mine taught it's one heart and we can't forget that we do have one hot. We we are part of that. Same family what unites us is much greater than what divides us as the CLICHE goes. But it's not just a cliche it's the truth and therefore not do is better than me. We all have the same soul. No Jew is wiser than me. No Jew is deeper than me. I think every Jew in a way is a part of God and you can't add measurements to divinity to the infinity God is God and Jews that reflection of God he has that Jewish soul and together as a family. That's what unites us. That's what we celebrate. There's that great bit in Michigan where they say that you know. Why did God make us all descended from the same couple so that nobody could say you're better than my father is so so

Phoenix Rabbi Dr Smelly Yanko Josh United States Beth Safina Rabbi Pinchas Arizona President Trump Stephanie Kish Committees Mark Twain Jus- -Ociety Paul Ince Dina Israel Michigan Bettman Juku
Family Papers and the Sephardic Twentieth Century with Sarah Abrevaya Stein

Jewish History Matters

9:09 listening | 3 months ago

Family Papers and the Sephardic Twentieth Century with Sarah Abrevaya Stein

Israel and Sudan Will Push to Normalize Relations

People of the Pod

6:45 listening | 3 months ago

Israel and Sudan Will Push to Normalize Relations

"Get now to this month's news that Israel and Sudan will push to normalize relations that sounds like a huge diplomatic coup for Israel. Is that right? It is a massive diplomatic coup for Israel. it's a great thing. I think for Sudan as well A separate matter is how it was conducted however and that has to be said If you look at what's good for Sudan itself I think Any measure that strengthens Sudan's economy and at the same time strengthens the The the cohesion of the Democratic Forces that one would hope would emerge prevail in a sustainable way way up on elections for the down. The line is a good thing for Sudan Israel's role there Obviously is is one of Assisting and in having Sudan seen as a friendly country towards the West which which is the port of call for assistance in the development of Sudan And that was much the idea behind the the elements in the Sudanese governance structure. That looked for this meeting with with with Prime Minister Netanyahu The however There's a diversity of news of views among the civilian political constellation in in Sudan as to how and when to engage with Israel. And what's been announced by Netanyahu and and And General Borhan in compiler Is that copolymers. The capital of Uganda. That is intended to set up afterwards normalization of relationships. You know the other the other interests there. There are In in in this in this Development are to Wean Sudan from the potential influence of Iran. And that's the reason why in this meeting it is understood that there was a heavy involvement of the of of the Gulf Gulf powers especially the United Arab Emirates which presumably set it up where it's understood. Set it up after about three months of negotiations Negotiations with the military To Go back to your question about Israel and Sudan in the last few decades you may remember that there were reported bombings by Israel of convoys of arms and Sudan I it was understood at the time that that's that Sudan. was getting assistance from Iran to arm elements in the Gaza Strip. And that was the route that these ratings bombed The main obstacle that Sudan has right now economically is the fact that because Osama bin Laden was was hosted in Sudan enlarged in Sudan the US designated Sudan a state sponsor of terrorism and That designation stands in the way of Sudan enjoying the support of certain multilateral entities that are deemed to be indispensable for unblocking the hurdles towards development in Sudan and that was very much behind the the idea of the military elements that engage in this conversation with Netanyahu there are elements within the civilian spectrum in Sudan that are not particularly opposed to engaging with Israel but saw in the way this was conducted a trampling of the agreement that that he would be the council itself not one member of the counselor one element of the council that would develop foreign policy decision of this dimension and it was reported that the prime minister hadn't been even warned about this meeting and they learned about it through the press even though the military claim they told him a couple of days before So what I'm trying to say here is that while it's a wonderful development the way this is delivered Mccarey some risks because it could fray The or could exacerbate tensions between the civilian elements and military within Sudan from the Israeli point of view. We have to also realize that to the extent that this engagement has to do with brokering results from Sudan. If those results do not materialize you have to wonder how how Israel is going to be perceived on how engagement with Israel is going to be perceived a relationship like this though a warming thawing of ties. It doesn't come out of nowhere right. There's a lot of hard work that went into this. Certainly a lot of a lot of hard work has gone into this Their reports actually that Israel had engaged with Bush here as well in two thousand sixteen by sheer kind of had some nice things to say about about Israel at least relative to its neighbors. Right when the Syrian civil war was kind of ramping up but she said you know even if Israel had taken over Syria. We wouldn't be seeing something this terrible exactly which is mild statement as we would see it. It's not mile given the context in which it was made It's not uncommon for African countries and countries elsewhere. Really do think that the road To Washington go through Jerusalem and This is at play very much here. But it sounds vaguely anti Semitic you know. It isn't and yet if you see it. From the point of view of our ability to insert the values of democracy that Israel represents and the potential for engagement with neighbors that develop in that direction. I don't necessarily think it is so unfortunately though It is one of the main reasons Why many of these governments bother to engage because otherwise they're very focused on their own Takeout from from that engagement in certain carries risks I mean there's no shortage of radical Islamist movements in especially in this hell in Africa that threatened to destabilize governments upon engagement with Israel. So they have to be at sea benefit and the benefit. Gm oftentimes has to do with with acceding to Raising their profile of attention in America and in the mainstream world and they they do think that the Jewish community in America and and and Israel can can help in that direction and point of fact after this meeting in compiler the General General Received a call from Mike Pompeo inviting him to Washington so It was pretty explicit

Sudan Israel Prime Minister Netanyahu Iran Gulf Gulf Uganda Israel. Osama Bin Laden United Arab Emirates Africa Mike Pompeo Gaza Strip Prime Minister Mccarey GM America Washington Syria
Mark Regev: Israel's Modern Story

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

10:10 listening | 3 months ago

Mark Regev: Israel's Modern Story

"Has been in post since April twenty sixteen prior to that he was the chief spokesman for the Prime Minister of Israel. A position he held for eight years. He joined Israel's Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Nineteen Ninety seven his deputy chief of mission of the Consulate General in Hong Kong and spokesman at the Israeli Embassy in Beijing. He also served a spokesman at the embassy in DC and he was the spokesman for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Jerusalem from two thousand and four to two thousand and seven. He also said as a combat soldier in the whole brigade the idea originally from Melbourne Australia. Mock Fry bug as he wants back then moved to Israel as a twenty two year old no significant family or contacts his progress to embassador shows. How flat Israeli society is. This is one of a number of Israeli related episodes in the series of Johnny Goad Jewish. State scroll down to find biographer of Lord Balfour and the historian of the decades leading up to the formation of the state of Israel. Lord Leslie Turn Bug that's episode the Teen and life in Shin Bets with its former chief Yaacov Peri. That's episode ten so his ambassador again have and we started by unpacking that Australian background. Who is the way out of this world competition belief against me? It's not a competition and busted a regular. Thank you very much feel time and agreeing to the interview today. Here on Johnny Jewish state. I'm happy to be with you so now. Your background. Which is very interesting. I think to the Anglo Saxon. Speaking world of jewelry is that you're Australian correct. I was born in Melbourne Australia. In nineteen sixty and my father was born in Australia. He was a what they call in Australia. Postwar refugee he was a survivor dollar cost originally born in Germany. My Mother's family. She was born in Australia. They were Polish Jews who were lucky enough smart enough to get out of the nineteen twenties and they They arrived in Australia. I think even the last year of that decade and I remember my grandmother always saying that. Save the family. Had they stayed in Poland their fate would have been the fate of Polish Jews which was not good. And how did they Australia? Unity family story so I know on on both sides on my mother's side. My grandfather was on a train some going from Poland to Germany where he was studying engineering. Things were pretty GLIMP- for Jews in Poland in the nineteen twenties and he read an article in a magazine that Australia is the country of the future on the other on the German side of the family. I think after the Holocaust people say what is the furtherest place away from Europe Austria qualified. Freiburg was the family name Going back to the rations my head this thing at the age of twenty one I had. I said these people tried to kill us. Do I really want to German. Name for the rest of my life retrospectively. Now I know I made a mistake because I I very. He never said anything to me. But I offended my father very greatly but at the time at the age of twenty one twenty two when I did it. I was convinced that this was the right thing to do. I'm aware of how Ashkenazim took on the name of the town where they came from and of course a lot of the early. Zionists took their Ashkenazi names and totally he. Bray is did correct David. Ben-gurion is probably the prime example. I Prime Minister Shamir also Menachem Begin. Correct having said that though I suppose it was if it was part of me becoming an Israeli though. Part of what you said isn't correct. 'cause Freiburg the place in Germany is U. R. G. And my family was always. Rg so I'm not sure. It was connected to that physical location in Germany. Look when you head. Brewer is a name different ways of doing it so Freiberg is in English. It's free and Burgers mountain so I could have taken the Hebrew accrued of innocent played with that and I did and nothing successful came out but I was going out at the time with a woman who was studying literature at the Hebrew University. And she said you can also do it by playing with the letters so Freiberg in Hebrew is pay raise bait and you can play with the letters and rig of came out very nicely. Well I think it's It was an intriguing name when I first came across all those years ago. I'm glad to this question. Lazy Lane so now being an Anglo Saxon speaker is a real asset to Israel in the modern media world to explain Israel across borders to billions of people. Whose language is. It's their mother tongue or their second. Language is a huge asset. And something if I might say that has been quite a glaring omission from Israel's diplomatic mission in early years of the Jewish state so I think if you look at the people who held the position that I hold now we've had some English speakers of native born English speakers and And those Israelis who held the role of also had mother tongue English run persona had still has of course grading this. He is the son of a diplomat himself and as a result he went to school abroad. And so. But you're right I think The ability to speak English at mother tongue is a crucial element. If you want to successfully make the case for Israeli and international audiences it is a prerequisite but in itself. It's not enough like I sometimes made in my previous job in Israel when I was the spokesman for the prime minister is to meet a young immigrants with mother tongue English mark. I'd like a job like yours. How do I get it right and I would explain to them so good? English is important. But it's as I say it's a necessary prerequisite but it's not in itself enough. You have to know the issues backwards. You have to read everything that is relevant. After the politics you have to know the history you have to understand the issues and I think that is just as important if not more important than having a strong command of the language because he my early teens. I used to despair at some of these really politicians who were fairly Broosk in their approach and even their attire to media interviews with the BBC and others. I don't think that really helped. So this new generation I think led by the Prime Minister himself who speaks in. I think the best way to describe these fluent American. Well I believe. The current prime minister did grow up in Pennsylvania in Philadelphia and his father was a visiting professor and he he he grew up there returning to Israel to do. His Army Service is to mother tongue languages. He had both burning which is a marvellous advantage to have and but I think to be over. Critical of the founding generation because that founding generation includes people like our Evan who was an amazing spokesman for his very articulate People say that he's speeches. Go down in history as some of the most awful speeches in English in the twentieth century thousands of years ago a people land language came together in Israel birth and the cost of Man's life and thought was lifted to a new point of elevation. Then for centuries this pattern was split asunder. The people the land of the language were separated and tragedy and danger befell of the mall separated each from the other. None of these three achieved the creative potent sit which they each knew when they lived together. What IS MODERN ISRAEL? Except the reunion of this people land and language in the sublime fulfillment of history cycle a bridge thrown across the Gulf of continents and generations to symbolize the unity ofo historic experienced. Many people will know you from your competitive interviews with snow during the Gaza offenses being the media spokesman for the prime minister a hugely different communications brief to that of being an ambassador. I was arrested by that idea that when you became the ambassador it was a completely different communications brief almost a different personality from the attack dog to John. Snow on on media so being spokesman I had responsibility over specific areas and as ambassador. You have a much more general responsibility as spokesman. My job was to make sure that the people in international audiences understand Israeli government behavior is government policy and so forth and so that was done through communications as ambassador. That's part of your job as well but you have many other facets economic relationship cultural ties government to government discussions. Him obviously as ambassador. I'M STILL THE PUBLIC FACE FOR ISRAEL. I will do interviews. I will give talks. I will brief and so forth but A. I'm also doing things as ambassador that were not part of my portfolio when I was the government spokesperson. It's a more broad range of of job.

Israel Prime Minister Australia Germany Melbourne Australia Lord Balfour Israeli Embassy Prime Minister Shamir Johnny Goad Yaacov Peri Ministry Of Foreign Affairs Poland Jerusalem Hong Kong Beijing Deputy Chief Of Mission Government Melbourne
Valium: The House That Leo Built

American Innovations

3:41 listening | 3 months ago

Valium: The House That Leo Built

"It's nineteen forty and thirty two year old Leo Stern Bach and his new wife Harrison or on a train bound for Portugal from there. They will board a ship to America. The Swiss company that Stern back works for hoffmann-laroche has obtained visas for all its Jewish employees. But right now they are stopped in Nazi occupied France. How to looks over at Stern Buck? Her Eyes Wide. Why are we stopping? I don't know the door opened and two soldiers dressed German uniforms aboard their young but they carry themselves with authority. They marched up to an old woman sitting in the first row papers. The woman hurries to hand over her papers. To the soldiers. Her to discreetly wipes her brow. Straw gets the hint and takes his handkerchief to her forehead rubbing away the sweat. That is beaded there. They knew it was likely they would be stopped but that doesn't make it any less. Stressful Stern Bach is a Jewish Polish citizen and that makes them vulnerable to harassment or detention by these soldiers. Stern back takes deep breath and tries to steady his nerves. The only way he will get through. This is by keeping calm right now. Tranquillising drugs are a decade from anyone's mind. The soldiers have moved on to the next row. It's only a matter of minutes before they reach Leo and Herta Leo reaches over and squeezes hurt his hand trying to apologize. It's his fault. She's in this mess stern but could move to Switzerland on a fellowship in one thousand nine hundred eighty seven. After the University of Krakow demanded that a Christian employee replace him. As a researcher and lecturer hurts it was his landlady's daughter and the two quickly fell in love or in Christian she was risking her safety by marrying a Jewish man and under Swiss law by marrying a foreigner. She had to give up for Swiss citizenship and declare herself Polish national. Like her husband papers. The soldier is right in front of him. His hand is outstretched inches from stern box. Face stern fights his inclination to lean back willing his hand not to tremble stern buck reaches into his coat pocket and carefully removes his passport. He hands it to the soldier. The soldier Examines Stern. Bach watches the soldiers eyebrow. Shoot up and surprise. He shows it to his colleague and the two exchange agitated whispers that Stern Bach can't make count Stern Buckfield his heart beating in his chest. Each beat echoes through his brain. He just hopes the soldiers can't hear it next to him. Heard it gives them a nervous smile? The soldiers stop talking and turn back to Stern Bach. This passport is Swiss stern back nods the Swiss government issue special passports for immigrants that declined to state the holder's nationality or ethnicity including whether or not they are Jewish soldiers. Study Stern box face. Are You Swiss? I'm coming from Switzerland. Yes there's another pause then after. What feels like ages. The soldiers shrugs and hands the passport back to Stern Bach. They move onto the next passenger Stern Bucks. Slumps in his seat the adrenaline rapidly leaving his bloodstream. A few weeks later. Sternberg can hurt arrive in Nutley New Jersey. He begins work as a senior. Chemist at hoffmann-laroche synthesizing vitamins. He is the lowest level chemist in the company but he is safe from Nazi persecution. By the time he retires thirty three years later. Leo starbuck will have invented a drug responsible for forty percent of all the company's sales internally hoffmann-laroche will go by another name the House that Leo Belt.

Leo Stern Bach Stern Buck Stern Stern Bucks Switzerland Herta Leo Leo Starbuck Straw France Leo Belt America Portugal University Of Krakow Harrison Nutley New Jersey Sternberg Harassment Researcher Lecturer
Whole Hearted

Unorthodox

9:43 listening | 3 months ago

Whole Hearted

"This is Unorthodox University leading Jewish podcast. I'm your host Mark Oppenheimer Anaheim our joined this week by another host tablets senior writer. Liel Liebowitz hello to you you lying. Doug Face Pony soldier. Oh isn't that the greatest I word ever cody soldier. This Joe Biden thing I did not. Did you call someone a pony soldier. A very lovely moment. Ask them very innocuous question. He turned around and said No. You didn't you lying dog faced pony soldier. Wow then she was like what he's like. It's woman old. John Wayne move was like no. It's not every single John we you literally. It was big in Delaware that instead slander. That's slur was big in Delaware. The nineteen fifty. It was a pre talkie. That's got to the president just for the Retro Quality. Just just to take us back in time Lille and I are alone in the studio today. Stephanie has jury duty so it's just only al to celebrate. Celebrate the upcoming hog known to the gentiles. Valentine's Day is revelatory. Yeah that's right Ed. We will be speaking with some people who know something about Love Seduce today. They are among others. We're going to have the cast members of the web series soon by you about dating in the modern Orthodox world how carp when our favorite guests from the apology episode came to our live in Cincinnati to tell us a very very special story. And then if you like hearing US whisper sweet nothings into your ear. Buds wait until Oh you hear the lovely singing voices in our interview with cantorial student. Jacob Sandler yes he gets US singing. We really do put you in the Mood for love. This is love is in the air in twenty twenty s as the corona virus. But Hey you win some you lose so the the updates on our lives. Stephanie is currently only doing civic duty during jury duty somewhere in the five boroughs Stephanie was in Scotch Plains New Jersey having a great event there a few days ago Maybe we'll we'll get the update next week. Leo You're in the motherland right. I was in beautiful Israel. Why for my grandmother's one year as a memorial service? Yeah Had a chance to sit and study some Tomlin with my Gerke Hassett cousins. I dearly love and again you know. We're often kind of like you know funny about these matters here but every now and then I really do get the urge to be sincere when I sit with people who you would think we have absolutely nothing uncommon. But then you realize we are truly literally and metaphorically speaking family and when we get together that love that connection is completely puttable we have spent very a little time talking about the fact that you're related to Garros So how did these are first cousins of yourself. I Costa who went. Who Went Garrard in your family? My Grandmother's sisters Shula Married Girl Haas. Okay this is a particular sect of Hasidim. What is there? What's the What their vibe? Like what what makes Gerhardt's put it like this cafe after the memorial service writing grandmother. Someone was talking about a person who's become about Shuba who's found religion later in life and became a gir- haas acid and one of my cousins who is Haas it said really no one becomes Bolshevik becomes a hostage and I asked why not and my cousin said well. Because it's it's perfectly fine to be like a really religious Jew and not go all the way to where we are. Why would you ever do the house? We have no choice right. Mind way you ever come here. It's so interesting I don't have any Cassini blackadder's any Haredi in my family I have modern orthodox cousins in Israel whose parents my mother's first cousin hasn't her husband actually were leaders of the conservative movement in Israel but then there's not much of a conservative movement in Israel so if you grow up kind of conservative conservative acts like observant conservative but if you SORTA got a pick or are you going secular going modern Orthodox and they're you know they're orthodox but I don't know of anyone who's like got the hat and the beard. It's a great a crying. Shame you have Hasidic material written all over your basically and this is the thing that I I kind of realized this week. 'cause we were hanging we were talking and at some point. The conversation vacation got kind of really elevated. And then I thought you know moved to dial like three clicks to the right and we're talking about Cherry Garcia Right in one thousand nine hundred. Seventy right eating shrimps and the bus and the way to Monterrey. That's kind of the VIBE. Yeah really the essence of not just observing the strict strict interpretation of the law but really trying to find this motionless spiritual connect mystical court to it would love to. I WanNa hang with your gear custom in cousins or Greg. I had a slightly different experience but in its way no less mystical by the way while you're talking about Jerry Garcia on the bus. Were you on the conference call when I when we were all doing like a pre show Oh crap and Rebecca. My thirteen year old was in the car and she was saying Dad. Can you explain the the grateful dead to me which is a really deep question because you know I could say I mean. I think we'd been listening to uncle. John's John's Bander Casey Jones. Or something you've come on. Come on the playlist in the car and I could say well it's a it's a group from about nineteen sixty seven to nineteen. Ninety give is playing the debt side. But I could give you the Brownie right and you'll eat it thirty five minutes you'll understand everything about this man. I mean I. It's really hard to say because it's so much more than a band to six never made sense to me before I try them on. Meet cliche thing to say. One is a grateful dead. The second is tennis and attended attended. I'm like wait until you understand. 'em This is a great game. I just have to move my eleven right. I'm so into this now. I add my own mystical experience in Wia missing in Pennsylvania and a bunch of people came like they'd set up fifty chairs. Forty five of the chairs were were filled with super curious. Interesting people of all ages a young rabbi from Lebanon Pennsylvania brought his twenties and thirties. Group is like young singles of which there were five or six and they were super into it and they listen to the show and they wanted copies the book and it was magical. The Jewish Cultural Committee organizes their author series was three people. None of whom was is Jewish. Okay one of them was Nancy Russo. WHO's married to to Paul something? Jewish and Nancy is is Italian Catholic by upbringing. The main woman the director of cultural life for the Jewish nation is Amanda Hornberger. Whose husband is like something German Lutheran? She herself grew up. Congregational est she's on the vestry of her united the Church of Christ Congregational Church. I've always said that the congregation great out and there was a local librarian named John who grew up in Baltimore where he did sixteen years of Catholic school and then went off to college college. I mean literally none of these people even guys. Every time we meet a gentle on our show it turns out there a quarter Jewish. These people like zero Jew in them and yet they are keeping the Jewish heart beating y missing Pennsylvania. They were interested they were curious they're booking good authors. They're running great programs. The people they bring in Inter asking smart questions Jews by choice we had a convert. who showed up a Sherry came and said thank you for your your help on my journey? The podcast has been meaningful to me. gentile L. spouses of Jews. Why a missing? Pennsylvania was among the greatest afternoons of my life is how it ought to be how it ought to be. Whatever New York like fucking fucking A.? Y. A. Missing Pennsylvania it there. Are Jews starve reading. The News starts reading this and I want to see even today do an event at the Barnes and Noble in Union Square. And you'll get fifty fifty three people and I go to why missing and get forty and in town. That's probably like twelve thousand people get numbers you get. People are truly engaged truly engaged and so grateful full end their listeners and the ones who aren't listeners could become listeners I it was it was magical. Speaking of Magic Amazon is somehow making the Nazis disappear in news to the Jews. This this week we learned from the New York Times about that Amazon is and I quote quietly canceling its Nazis over the past eighteen months. The retailer has removed books by David. Duke a former the leader of the Ku Klux Klan as well as several titles by George Lincoln Rockwell founder of the American Nazi Party Amazon also prohibited volumes like the ruling elite the Zionist seizure of world power and and history of central banking and the enslavement of mankind from its virtual shelves. What are we think of Amazon? Taking strong hand Nazi literature out of its store. You're I'm not down with it. I'm not either tell you. Because here's the thing. Once you at a major conglomerates start making judgment calls about what is and is is not permissible for its captive audience to read. I think you're sorta screwed actually kind of a free speech absolutist in this way like yes I want everyone three David Duke Doc if only because once you do unless you're total frigging maniacal moron. You'd understand that this is absolute drivel. Actually want like free copies and like every this show be like. Hey guys here you go and try to get your way through mine com- If you can't get twelve pages into it. It's the most boring stuff you'll ever find. The beginning is funny. The middle sags the characterization gets gets a little thin toward the ad still never figured out how it ended. I never read it. No but really like do I really want Amazon making this call them. Why not the next up being like well you know This type of ideology is also quite offensive to us in history is in the type of thing we want people to read. You can imagine agenda that you can imagine where it goes very quickly to Jews in the Middle East or Zionist saying. We don't WanNa read you know the Hamas Charter and Palestinian activists saying we don't want to read. This spoke about the founding of Israel. I mean it's all of a sudden you've a lot of people who authentically believe that they are keeping genocidal literature out of the hands of other people saying what people can and cannot read and you add in the fact that Amazon really does have a kind of monopoly power. What we're reading? Yeah and find the these days of elsewhere.

Israel Amazon John Wayne Pennsylvania Stephanie David Duke Doc Joe Biden Delaware Liel Liebowitz Doug Face Mark Oppenheimer Cody Lille Middle East Jerry Garcia Nancy Russo Girl Haas Writer Jewish Cultural Committee Cincinnati
Whispering Sweet Nothings? (Zohar I:49a-b)

The Joy of Text

9:55 listening | 3 months ago

Whispering Sweet Nothings? (Zohar I:49a-b)

"I'm Sarah Rosner Lawrence and I'm here as usual with Arthur Marcus Clinical Director of knees women's health high. I loved these many tax. I feel like I learned so much. And I'm also here with our by Windsor. Russia Stephen President of Holiday Torah High. I love doing these men text episodes. Okay so what do you you have for us today. Rylander well few episodes ago. We did a mini text episodes from Zohar. On Kissing. And Love. That episodes I know about Chev- totally loved that And it's really great because the Zohar because as I've mentioned before Has Sex is such a central part of its understanding of God In the life of the Kaaba List in terms of effecting the different aspects of God we have we have more discussions about sex Than in many other sources So this is another text from Sohar. The exact source is Volume one page forty. Nine Eight A. B. and it's on diverse break sheet from via L. Haddam. I'm that God created eve the woman and brought her to man so here it is. I'll just read a few words in the Aramaic. And then I'll switch over to the English. The English is from the translation. flation of Daniel Matt. So they ha ho Lee from here we learn divine above EMA DECARLA that the mother and the father of the bride a require the Abu Take the time to bring the bride into the domain of the room. So far that sort of what we know the parents give the girl over. Give give the their daughter over to the groom. I'm GonNa Switch just the English as it is said. I've given my daughter to this man from this point on her husband comes to her for the House is hers as it is written. He came into her so that is actually a verse about interquest by Vo Allow. What's being read here as he comes into her domain? It's her home. He came into Rachel also again verse about Intercourse I. He brought her to the man. God brought to the man for up to this point. The father and mother should act by giving your daughter over afterward. He should come to her for the entire houses hers and he must obtain her permission. So this talking about sex is talking about you know the home. Is the women's domain A little bit of both. It sounds possibly what what consent consent. So we're going to get there. We have aroused just our awareness. Interesting word arouse but okay. We have aroused or awareness of this as written. This is now by Jakko. He approached the place and stayed there for the night. First first obtaining permission from here we learn that one who joins his wife shouldn't treat her and sweet in her with words or otherwise not spend the night with her so that the does careers their desire be as one with no coercion. Now just skip a paragraph and now we're GONNA continue with Jakko for a minute before we circle back to Adam and eve. We've he took one of the stones of the place and put it under his head here. We learn that if a king has golden beds and precious spreads in which to spend the night and his consort his wife prepares him a better rain with stones. Right because that was the bed of Jacob the stones he should leave his own and sleep in the one she prepares and is as it is written then he lay down in that place now back to Adam come and see what is written here. The man said this one at last shall be called woman behold the fragrance fragrance of words to draw love with her draw her towards his desire arouse passion together like he's praising her and this is you know look how beautiful those words are it to get her in the mood. See how sweet how full of love own of my bones flesh a flesh. Showing their one inseparable now he begins praising inker this one shall be called woman this one is unparalleled. Glory of the House all women compared to her like eight compared to humans. Certainly this this 'cause this was the only real woman this one shall be called woman. Perfection of all this one and no others at is as it is written many daughters have done virtuously precisely but you surpass them all some GonNa Pause here the last paragraph if we get a chance goes onto a different point but there's a lot to be said about this all open the floor. I don't like Oh deep sigh out. It feel I'm trying to separate out my like twenty per century injury sensibility. Hear about lake over. flowery doesn't sound real I don't know how you feel about to Sarah and I don't know I I mean like I'm kind of. I'm struggling to get to the to the lake. punchline point of this text like so far it feels a little a bit like flowery to me kind of similar to two bunch of his impression but what I'm understanding from this end. Correct me if I'm wrong. Is that basically. There is a dynamic where the the woman's parents bring her to the man's domain initially. But then after that it's sort of the man's responsibility to a kind of appease her and treat sex with her and being with her as her domain right and something that he sort of has to approach her heroic to choose the one in charge. You don't feel like it feels like he's sort of Connie her into it. That's that's sort of where I'm getting my back a little bit. I I think in a society in which men could easily coerce their wives rape right or use pressure to have them to agree to saks. Even though they really weren't into admit you know a lighter form of rape or coercion. You know but here it's like completely reversing that and saying the woman is in charge. It's her home. You know. I think it sort of doing like the round you know. She's the balanced bias. She's the one in charge of she's the one in charge of the domestic sphere and also the merging of that with to come into her. You know if you you want to have sex with her. She's the one in charge of her body and like you need her permission and she wants to sleep on the floor. Usually on the floor right soon. I love that piece. The one where you'd have the golden bed and then it gets usually one stones so that actually is quite lovely and not having the same reaction that Oh my God is all talking talking about her Making her happy and I'm trying to figure out. Is it last section. Where he's giving this flowery? Praise your the most wonderful women have no at no other woman has anything like you. I mean it saying look. Those words might not work for you right that like their power. Look I I know that there are a lot of women who dirt during before during sex you know WanNa feel desired WanNa feel ladder. Sure there's nothing on my woman on as much as feeling like she is desired right that again and again the most beautiful woman ever so this way way. It's the express. That is possible that I'm that I'm reacting to that. Yeah Yeah Yeah. It's so it's it's kind of interesting because I feel like what I'm reacting to negativity is not exactly the same thing but is like this dislike. Egalitarian sensibility that contra my like twenty-first-century brain gene of like. Why should be his job to only approach her and why like dislike one directional aw energy that's bothering me too but I think that sort of becomes like well the option to that is not both of them entreating the other the option to that is enforcing right right right completely? Changed the Pierre de and say that he helped picks initiatives. We're still going to allow for that. But it's still she's in charge. You know you have to ask her permission. You have to get her in the mood. But you're right. It's speaking to them right right. So it's like it's like don't rape her get her permission in and entreat her and flatter and all these things whereas I wish it was like you approach sometimes and she approaches you. I WanNa say it's much more than don't rape her so that may be as y you know they're both equally into it. It's an equal merging of the cells to me. I right now so that is really I think thing. That's a really important point because I think what's bothering me and you're reading it differently is that it feels like look. I WANNA have sex and so I want to get you to agree to have sex and that feels different to me that I want us to see if I get you to a place where you want to have sex too and that feels very different to me and that is how you're reading it you're probably sadly right it. The text itself has maybe we should be the last pair perfect okay. Tell me if this helps hurts. Perfect therefore let him a man leaves his father and mother and cleaves to his wife and they become one flesh all to draw her into love to clear to her once he had aroused her with all these words. It's what is written. Now the serpent was slide than any creature of the field the evil impulse now. This is a tricky tax arouse to seize her binding her with bodily desire fire rousing in her other things in which evil impulse delights until eventually what is written the woman saw. The tree was good for eating delight to the eye and took of its shoot in eight receiving leaving it willingly. He gave to her husband beside her for now. She aroused desirous Lee towards him offering passionate. Love this shows human beings how the act corresponds above so this is a tricky text because it has the serpent evil desire but the end of it sounds like the fact that he had these very physical co lusts was actually a positive thing for the next paragraph in the Zohar which I did not do actually says wait a minute. If this bloke response to above how do you think that there's such a thing and as the evil desire above and basically says sort of is like the divine has the right and the left side and anyway. It's you know getting all all right. Les Is maybe a bad thing. But maybe it's a good jockey I think that's exactly is fastened

Rape Wanna Sarah Rosner Lawrence LEE Sohar Adam Russia Windsor Daniel Matt Arthur Marcus Clinical Directo Rachel Jakko L. Haddam President Trump Jacob Connie LES Saks
Study shows Jewish population in Philadelphia area is growing, more diverse

KYW 24 Hour News

1:00 listening | 3 months ago

Study shows Jewish population in Philadelphia area is growing, more diverse

"Researchers surprised at some of the results of a recent study on the Jewish population in Philadelphia and the suburbs a little center primer tells us about the findings which were released today the first thing that jumped out at Stephen Rosenberg with the Jewish federation of greater Philadelphia we found that the community is larger than we had originally thought with over three hundred fifty thousand Jewish people that numbers two thirds higher than the last time the study was done ten years ago something else that caught his eye we found that the community is more diverse than we had anticipated almost ten percent of the population are Jews of color which is of growing subset we have a large interface community bought forty eight percent he says the study isn't just on out of curiosity we have a nine two synagogues in our region we have dozens of Jewish agencies that we allocate grants to over the course of the year and this data will allow us to be even more planned for as we make these allocations and with all of today's technology at their fingertips Rosenberg says they may not wait ten more years to do the study again at the Jewish community services building in center city enter Kramer K. one of your

Philadelphia Stephen Rosenberg Jewish Federation Kramer K.
Ashley Blaker: Goy Friendly

People of the Pod

10:29 listening | 3 months ago

Ashley Blaker: Goy Friendly

"Talk about some. I'm pretty heavy issues. Israel Iran Patriot of Jews. So our next guest is a pretty big leap for us. Ashley Blaker is Jewish standup comedian. He is the first Orthodox Fox Jewish comedian to be given his own BBC. Show Ashley Blaker. GOYA's guide to Judaism which returned to the air in October. Two Thousand Nineteen. Now he's in New York for his latest off off Broadway. Show Ashley Blaker Goi friendly which premieres at the Soho playhouse. On February third and runs through February twenty third. While his previous off-broadway production strictly unorthodox was tailored for Jewish audiences. This one he says is not just for the Jews. It tells the story of how Ashley's close friendship with Muslim. Comedian Imron on. UCS completely changed his life with antisemitic incidents on the rise around the globe and even here in New York actually hopes to make the audience laugh but also understand stand a little bit more about their Jewish neighbors Ashley. Welcome to our studio. Thank you for having me so I have to ask you right out of the gate. anti-semitism is not funny. So how how do you address that topic with humor. Well the reality is I think he's anything can be funny. So I'll let you come to Louis showing judge whether I make. It isn't about antisemitism. I should say that there is actually a section is a band. Semitism thought. I think the more interesting is the fact that that when antisemitism is on the rise there are two ways of dealing with. This is a way of kind of hunkering down. Just going. We're we're now gonNA stick to ourselves and and try and protect ourselves and put up the security barriers and let's have lots of armed guards on the on the door in social ones bags and all of that stuff all you can kind of outreach. As it were and try and engage with the outside world and that's what my shows about about the latter it's about reaching out to the outside world and in a way this makes wants a comedy show. You know hopefully nonstop funny. Sound sound incredibly dry but Hopefully demystify Judaism a little bit. That's certainly one of the aims. Okay well I would say you could do both right. Do the security see the undercover getting having no security either. All kind of you know very good at that accused but I actually my playbill. I wrote a Performance note and for Bates Him. But I said something about how you know very good dividing ourselves as a as an in one of the things into I enjoy doing you mentioned my show strictly and also those I I love bringing choose together because we figured it kind of separating ourselves in so many different ways you know on the whole joke about the Jewish man who lands on a desert island and he builds two synagogues one ones that he'll go to one that he wouldn't ever be seen dead and that's like what we're like but I do think that there is it is an important time to actually reach out a little bit and we can. I think sometimes certainly not in any way suggesting that we. We are in any way a foot four and symptom of course but I sometimes think that actually being too insular. Isn't that helpful. Listen so now you are from the UK so well the Labor Party. I have to ask you about the Labor Party. I'm afraid But it's often regarded as the political liberal party of choice by many Jews in Great Britain. And I'm curious how you dealt with the last election and whether or not you felt politically homeless as I kept had reading about the Jewish community. There didn't myself but I'm sure other people did and I think that yes certainly in the post for many Jews the Labor faulty will have. I've been there home by just as much as the Conservative Party would be for many Liberal Democrat. We have quite a different political system. Should know to to to the Americans as many but yes I mean. It was incredible. What happened over the last few years and how symtas I'm just rose and seem to not be dealt with toll within the Labor Party in? Yeah it was a terrible thing we still really really been dealt with properly gone away. Yeah I know there were. There were several vile things said many vile things said ed by Labour politicians but then also Jeremy Corbyn himself was talking about the lack of irony that many British Jews seem to have. I don't know if you recall that particular. Yes it was Avia. Yeah it was a video I think from a while ago. Actually but he had yes he had said something. And there's a lot of these kind of allusions I think is because they. They caught clever then. They don't outright. This isn't the foul right then marking the street saying killed the Jews. It's a very allusive. Quite clever thing of of Hinson these particular weight alluding that Jews and Israel inflating the to and to you know the whole talking about antisemitism and anti Zionism also that that things that really came along with the Labor Party and I saw something videos of people saying no no we. We're not intimately to we like the right to choose. I think there's that thing of the good news and the bad news and I think that's a really good. Jews has ones March against Israel and kind of write letters to the Guardian saying that we support Sanctioned bedia smell that kind of thing uh-huh and then the ninety five percent of the badges. I mean that's clearly terrible things so it's been a really dark period and I didn't know it'll be interesting to see in the the next four five years. How things change? Have you tried to address it with humor. There over showed. I just did a toll in opened in in May with my friend Imran you mentioned draymond so imminent. He did a tour together called profit sharing actually breaking news in profit sharing seek clever title. And it's not address head on there are other people addressing this head on and the the truth is the way to look on twitter five minutes especially around the time the election to see that kind of Echo Chamber people. Don't WanNa hear they. You know you you tweet. Something about Labor Jeremy Corbyn and immediately comes back. This prepared list of twenty times. Jeremy Corbyn has both a motion ocean in parliament. That's been helpful to community Blah Blah Blah say. No one listens to each other anymore. People just spout the same thing. So I'm not sure engaging in that kind of way addressing head on is that helpful she because people just don't want to listen right. I'm sure it's the same here with trump and I'm sure there are people who are vehemently say one one thing you don't want to listen to the side. Yes that is. That is a problem that area. So I think that's something we've seen a lot particular around brexit and all these issues as we've had in the UK and the F. But so my show anyway. Mike show look comedy show. That's the the the main PARV. So I'll tell you briefly I mean essence shows. It's about yeah. Tell us about the show but then I also want to hear more about Enron and your friendship so the show about my friend she was Enron said. So that's the kind of I think in film in terms they call that the macguffin. He's kind of you know that you heard that term. I'm not familiar with that. So it's like using the original star wars. I think C. Three Po an onto d two of the macguffin that they're the ones like sent off into onto the desert and enter tattooing. They've got the messages item. Thank you the whole plot revolves from. Then there's no actually about them but it starts from them so in a way money's the macguffin hit because is a true story we're good friends we went untold together. And he's very interested custody my life he didn't know much about Judaism me belly of June. We spent many hours together in the call. He was always drawing because he he's Muslim. Couldn't in claiming been drinking and he's always asked me questions and I kind of wanted to teach him about Judaism. But where do you start. We've got six hundred thirteen commandments. It's too long to the call I didn't want to spend money on guests so I thought well I teach him about the Ten Commandments. And we started looking at the Ten Commandments. And I unrealized. They're not that practical you know he doesn't have an ox next all so there's no need to worry about not coveting it and I so I could. Maybe set myself challenge of coming up with my own ten commandments. That I could be a bit more practical. But they could actually explain what it's like to be an Orthodox Jew in two thousand twenty and in a way. It was my friendship with him. That made me reconsider my Judaism. Because she had I've been living as an Orthodox Jew for the best part of twenty years but it's only when an outside comes along install challenging us at you start having to think about it you start thinking about your love. So that's what the shows about and it's about me going through these ten commandments. My New Ten Commandments. antiquing this to him okay. So do you mind sharing a few of the talk commanded if you're the one of them is thou shalt develop obsessive compulsive disorder okay. She's an integral Paulsville so shoot as But we cover branch of Judy. Check that box right exactly. So we cover a lot of these areas we cover kosher food and living in a Jewish area. We talk about the curse of praying public and this covers a lot of ground really comes a lot of ground in the show and then And then the story I keep finished. The story has a continuation because of how Im- reacted and then what we went off did something together which I don't want to spoil because that's the narrative But it's a pretty funny chairman. I it really is. I'm super proud of it. So you say I did. This show could street Lennox. It was aimed at a Jewish audience. All Jews knock. He's also dogs. Reform Perform Conservative unaffiliated. But Still Jews and I think it's a really. I really wanted to do something. Everyone could cutting joy That would be in a language WIGGs. Everyone can understand but the is serious does not scrimp on the jokes atone. It's the funniest show of ever done this by miles miles because I've already but still called the serious stuff when we do discuss antisemitism and there are some real takeaways well foam it excellent zone. The show's name. Is Ashley. Blaker friendly it's at the Soho playhouse here in New York City from February third to twenty-third. Thank you for joining us. Thank

Ashley Blaker Labor Party Jeremy Corbyn Israel New York Soho Playhouse Enron Goya Comedian Imron Conservative Party UK Semitism Twitter Louis Bates New York City Great Britain Avia Guardian
Anthony Scaramucci on The Deal Of The Century

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

5:07 listening | 3 months ago

Anthony Scaramucci on The Deal Of The Century

"Hi It's Johnny of justice out of the Four Seasons Hotel Ten Trinity Square Very Upmarket Hotel in private cloud wet tonight. Members were treated to a talk in a very intimate setting given by former White House. Communications director in the trump administration. Anthony Anthony SCARAMUCCI. Now he wasn't in the job for very long was he. He said something in confidence to what he thought was a friend. And that friend doped it in and all trump sacked him. Kim says he regretted working for trump. But I'm not so sure. He's made the very best out of it and he's become pretty well known all over the world but now I feel he SCARAMUCCI Mucci two point not after the public humiliation of his dismissal. In the world wide media glare it affected every part of his life including his marriage trump capitalized on that on twitter. But he's since reconciled with his other half now he's going out to campaign for Mike Bloomberg mini Mike as he calls him and we've heard that he's being true to his political instincts as a democrat. He wants to underpin the principles and institutions of the American constitution which she says are paper thin enough to his talk. I got a chance to talk to him. One on one about the deal of the century a bid for new settlement in Israel title with the Palestinians the issue with the Palestinians he says. Is that oftens in this discourse. They don't have adequate political advocacy Kazeem. People don't care about them because they not an economic engine. Israel is an economic engine so if the PA's failed leadership doesn't come to the table able and Israel pushes for the annexation as he calls it of all territories which they regard as that which they feel they need against the people who called a won't negotiate he says is a route to hopelessness and self destruction in SCARAMUCCI is book. They need to come to the table. Take the fifty billion dollars in stock the negotiation man. He drew powered else with the American founding. Fathers Protecting the tyranny of the individual the most sacred minority in the system against the Overriding majority well. That's not a fulsome parallel. But I understand his point. SCARAMUCCI is a Roman Catholic not Jewish. But he's a self declared Zionist. He's even happy to call it Judea and Samaria not the West Bank. Have a listen to Anthony SCARAMUCCI. Thank you very much ronsard. That's a Jewish. I am Jewish as honest like Y. Ou explain why but here. It's it doesn't matter whether you and I this if you WANNA protect Israel and you want to provide for peace and security for Israel. They need an advocate at the table Palestinian. It's almost like a prime minister. Should say okay okay. You're the designated advocate for the Palestinians. Not handling it themselves. You have to go in there and try to convince these people to do things certain SORTA way they can get the rights of the need and the sovereignty. They need the self-fulfilment it. They just keep on the Palestinians on being used internationally as vehicle sandwiches such a credit but they don't have a willing leadership then not in the business. Yeah no exactly so. This deal is about a divorce. Peace Not War. Do you agree with her. Yeah but but I I think that we have to be more than think water with the bigger for it to be more transformation. Of course they're being used. You gotTA understand. The Israelis have an advocate the United States they have members of the West that are provided vitamin advocacy. If you don't create balance or some level of symmetry remember von Metternich. Said about peace in peace when you need balance in peace you need. A structured forces were allies of committed to suppressing the Internet. And if you're that on balance you're going to create a period of hopelessness that will be. They have hopelessness already. Understand that you started a next Xingdong territories. Okay Listen We gave slack mckim from. I don't call it the West Bank. I call it today in Somalia area. I'm from that camp understand that but I'm telling you you want to figure out a way to cohabitate with wanted the Jarrett's the plan is close. Actually John's plan but it needs to be slightly better for them. And then you can have the peace with the security right now. Israel's through the very strong stable nation very secure wi jeopardizes security by that and I. I've been destroyed. I've seen the MINORA that's made out of a case of Hamas Ian's but I'm telling you you've gotta come up with something. There equalised slightly equalize awesome.

Israel Anthony Anthony Scaramucci Four Seasons Hotel Ten Trinity Donald Trump White House West Bank Director Mike Bloomberg Somalia Twitter Jarrett KIM Prime Minister TA
Soul Cycles

Unorthodox

2:26 listening | 3 months ago

Soul Cycles

"It's Kinda bad for the Jews here in the United States. Many episodes odes of antisemitism every week we email updates for this sort of thing the most interesting one this week A woman in the Hudson River valley was charged with throwing a piece of pork at a synagogue. She's been charged with hate crime for throwing pork chops at a synagogue in Columbia County. What do we make of this? Can you say this. This is a heartache. But I was pretty impressed with her for her action. She could've gone with the very cheap kind of you know two dollar a pound pork. She went with a pork pork. Chop that is both expensive and in my mind a semi respectful thing. If you're going to go hate crime can I just read this to you. Rios on January nine in between the hours of five twenty three PM. Three Twenty eight am through a package of pork chops. A non kosher food onto the front steps of the congregation Andrzej MFA causing pork fluids to spilled onto its steps according to criminal complaint. That is just like so gory. Gross and like Kerry ask. I mean it's really fluids was the name of my high school band the back in the morning to photograph it. It's just really weirdly specific. My first thought when I read this was well. Well if it's a reformed temple they'll take the pork chops inside and cook them and have have a Nice Kesha. So last week was like reform movement kindness week take this is sponsored by the clan and honestly no judgment here. It's food and if you eat as many many the people as most American Jews do add more power to them than you take it inside you fry it up and you have a nice pork cutlet but it does seem that the show that she threw the pork chops at was a conservative synagogue. And this is what's really diabolical about it right because the conservative synagogue. Most of your members in fact do eat pork but they pretend not to eat pork and the rabbi pretends not to eat pork and the synagogue doesn't allow to be cooked on its premises. So what she's doing. She's throwing them this tasty cut of meat that they they all really would like to enjoy at their own homes that day after God. But she's throwing it at the synagogue on the slam of American Judaism. I mean she went like right into the hypocritical. Soul of American Judy. She's a one woman theological seminary. Oh Oh my it just feels like a waste of perfectly good pork.

Hudson River Valley Columbia County United States Andrzej Mfa Rios Kerry
Social Justice and Israel/Palestine with Mira Sucharov and Aaron Hahn Tapper

Jewish History Matters

10:11 listening | 4 months ago

Social Justice and Israel/Palestine with Mira Sucharov and Aaron Hahn Tapper

"Hope that you'll enjoy our conversation as we dive into the connection between scarlet work and the social justice issues of Israel and Palestine. A major major way in which history matters because through history we can better understand pressing issues of the day and as I think it'll come through clearly in our a conversation that as historians and experts we have something to contribute to these conversations to thanks for listening. I'm your hi Erin. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you Jason Thank you. I'm really glad that you guys are here to talk about this book which I was really excited to see and to read through I wanna I wanNA start off by asking. What do you mean by Social Justice and Israel-palestine when you look at the title itself? What is the connection there? And why do you think that it's important to integrate. These two realms in the discussion of social justice on the one hand and the broad set of issues around Israel and Palestine part of our idea was that Israel Palestine conflict is taught as is an informational explanatory lands right through prescriptive questions in what happened in terms of what we mean. By a lens of social justice we we mean an inter our disciplinary perspective places concepts like rights justice and oppression at the forefront and that aims to Dick sexualize Israel-palestine Israel-palestine especially for those who think of this as some sort of Auger. That's been going on forever and we'll go on forever but it it's a conflict that will end. I just like the troubles in Northern Ireland and the horrific stuff in Rwanda in apartheid in South Africa and other conflicts in the world the people in Israel Palestinian or not onto logically different In terms of their humanness than other people conflict. That will end also our goal in terms of approaching this was social justice. Justice is this notion of introducing power to the conversation if we had only included voices of people with particular social identities and now other voices. I don't think that necessarily would have been just. But our attempt is to bring in a variety of voices and introduced concepts jobs related to power dynamics which is goes down the rabbit hole of privileged status access oppression etcetera so it also means bringing in the grassroots spotlighting hot-listing minority identities as rusty Israelis essay. Anat there's an essay on Bedouin. BS courses a grassroots in many ways a grassroots treats movement and really. Were trying to broaden the discussion from what is typically explanatory questions to more prescriptive questions saying what should happen in order for. Israeli people have Palestinian people in the region to experience a sense of justice and the social part is just that we wanted to flag that. It isn't simply a book about illegal intricacies. I have a little bit of a vested interest in the term because during the twenty eleven ten protests in Israel that started on Rothschild Boulevard in Tel Levine. Is released were protesting high cost of living biceps cottage cheese of the price of housing. And they were talking in terms of social justice. Senate Clinical Lt and it became very clear early on that to maintain a broad based movement. It would be bracketing. The question of Palestinians and social justice in purely early economic terms. And we know that here when social justice movements more broadly progressive movement's about social justice thinking not only economically editor of racial justice ethnic justice religious justice justice for every individual and collective. And so we're really trying lick the conversation back towards saying how. How can Israel and the Palestinians live their lives and we as editors have a singular answer to that but we brought together scholars and activists that have very specific the the actors for that very important question and they're engaging with one another on that question? We just had the episode Rachel Harris where we talked about her book about teaching about Israel and Palestine. And there it's very clearly a book about pedagogy a book that is directed at professors teachers. Thinking about how they can teach about the subject and here you're dealing much much more conceptually much more about getting into the issues themselves as opposed to how we teach them when you think about a book like this. Who Do you see as the person who you want to pick it up what you want them to get out of it? I think we intended this book per use in classrooms where the Israel Palestinian dynamic is being taught whether it's Israeli Israeli Palestinian conflict glasser history class or the social dynamics of how Israelis and Palestinians relate with one another so it's really meant for students and the professors who teach awesome. We also seems to make it as readable as possible as accessible as possible to a wide audience. Who aren't necessarily subject specialists and to that end really took care to write very concise intro pieces to each of the eight conceptual chapters showing the reader? What's at stake? AAC each of these major debates. I have an essay that appears Rachel's Book as well in the essay that I wrote in her book is really a precursor to this project which I engaged with Aaron and really. It's a short essay about my own personal struggle of how I had been seeking to keep politics out of the classroom and had been even feeling a little bit frightened of students. What if they brought the a word? I would say appears the night before a particularly contentious topic topic where I was worried. That apartheid come. What do I do in my the the foil for the students do? I need to debate the students that they see the other side. Whatever the other side is depending on what perspective is student is raising and I realized it wasn't really very healthier constructive approach so I think what we really wanted to? The book was to enable a wave for politics it should be able to seep into the classroom in a way that doesn't put the professor on the hot seat but enables the professor to shepherd students through the debates enabling students succeed as many perspectives as they can in contrast to mirror. I was coming up this project from perhaps not in context given that was a precursor newark yet that stage but in any event for about ten years I was part of a not for profit educational organization where we worked with muscles views Israelis Palestinians and everything we did was co taught. CO-DEVELOPED CO design. So I ran the organization with the Muslim Palestinian woman are high school programs with Jews. Muslims awesome were run developed design fifty fifty by twos Muslims etcetera. And so I was coming at this project from a number of years back back so to speak from the vantage point that regardless of attempts by some people to engage in objectivity or neutrality perhaps closer to objectivity than they might otherwise present. Things that it's impossible. I think to teach each about things in the humanities frankly without offering perspectives. Even if you said all right. Here's our issue. And here's three vantage vantage points on the issue. Great probably ten others twenty thirty others so I was already at that place because that was is how I been socialized in. That's my experiences regardless. Yeah I mean I think that what you both have brought up really is a critical issue. You look at this book wishes to say as I read it and as I was thinking about it. It seems to me that the central issue that you're engaging with this fundamental idea and and the way I think about this is that even though this is a book with many authors many contributors are pushing this fundamental central thesis that the politics the issues should be a part of how we engage with Israel and Palestine scholars in a way that some people say I want to avoid the politics I want to avoid the touchy issues and try to achieve some kind of noble dream of objectivity of neutrality etc.. I think part of what. This book is arguing in this ties into to mirror. What you were saying in your essay and Rachel Harris Book as well you have to do with the idea about what is the role of the scholar and how we interact with these issues? Yeah to that. I would add one more specific thing especially in the case the way I've been teaching the courses in my field. Political Science and international relations and in many areas of social science. Generally professors tend to focus on. Why questions or we could call explanatory questions? So why did Israel extended extended olive branch to the PLO nineteen ninety-three. Why did Camp David Two thousand fail and instead of keeping prescriptive questions the questions what should be what shall be? Why should it be this way? Instead of keeping those questions that Bay we wanted to invite space for students to see how scholars activists make those prescriptive arguments particularly as the book has become available for use in my own courses finding consigning op. Ed Science for students to write much more frequently and I'm encouraging students to take the various topics that we covered in the course I which is really pretty united eight until present day and make a prescriptive argument should be. DSP Out Lodge should be various political parties depending on what case they're looking at encountered the US embrace a different view of Palestine within their platforms. I should trump have proved the the embassy to Jerusalem or not and make an argument that necessitates taking into account the arguments of another point of view and really taking those arguments seriously in making a good case whereas in some years I might have read a student paper like that. Oh this is too ideological. This is too opinionated. I no longer separate informed. Well argued opinion. That is derived from a scholarly understanding of the situation. I no longer divorce that argumentation from a more detached explanatory Brian Tori type of

Israel Palestine Professor Rachel Harris Erin Rachel United States Newark Anat Rwanda Senate Ed Science Editor Brian Tori Dick Sexualize Jerusalem BAY
The Holocaust diary that lay unread for 70 years

This Day in History Class

4:01 listening | 4 months ago

The Holocaust diary that lay unread for 70 years

"Arranged rain. Yes Beagle was living in Poland months before the outbreak of World War Two when she wrote the first entry in her now published diary. Spiegel died the Holocaust but her diary has since shed light on her life. Under Soviet and Nazi Rule Spiegel was born village in Poland in one thousand nine hundred eighty four. Her parents points were Russa and Bernard Spiegel and she had a younger sister named Arianna in nineteen. Thirty eight Arianna a child. Actress went to live in Warsaw with Russia in pursuit of her career Iran. Yeah went to live with her grandparents in Shimmer a town in Poland. Ariana went back to Shimmer. Show that summer returning turning without her mother on January thirty first nineteen thirty nine when she was fifteen years old Spiegel began writing in her diary in her first diary diary. Entry Spiegel wrote the following in part. Why did I decide to start a diary today? Has something important happened. Have I discovered that my friends are keeping diaries of their own own. No I just want a friend somebody I can talk to about my everyday worries. Enjoys somebody who will feel what I feel. Believe what I say. Never reveal we all my secrets. No human being could ever be that kind of friend. She wrote about how her life used to be in Warsaw. How she missed her mother and how she felt like she had no real home? She also wrote about her school in classmates. As the start of World War Two loomed Spiegel continue to write in her diary about her friends. Friends family boys sadness nostalgia in war. She also wrote poems. Andrew in the diary but by September of Nineteen thirty nine Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union occupied Poland and the country was divided between the two invaders with the Nazis. In the west and the Soviets in the East Rusell was stuck in Nazi controlled territory while arena and Arianna were on the Soviet side. The two children and their grandfather left town while their grandmother stayed behind their father disappeared during the war and was presumed killed as World War. Two steadily intensified Spiegel kept attending school in Schimmel and fell in love with a boy named Zygmunt Sparser in one thousand nine hundred eighty one days after her first kiss with sparser the the Third Reich declared war on the Soviet Union arena and other Jewish people begin. Having to wear a white armband with a Blue Star of David on it the Germans Hans began establishing ghettos in Poland in July nineteen forty two s the Nazis murder thousands of Jewish Polish people. They set up a sealed ghetto commercial arena and her friends and relatives were ordered to stay in the ghetto. Zygmunt who was working with the local resistance managed to get a and Arianna out of the ghetto he set arena and his parents up in the attic of a house where his uncle lived. He took Arianna to a friend's father and he took over arenas his diary writing about his efforts to save his girlfriend and family. The Nazis executed arena farceurs parents on July thirtieth nineteen forty two to when they found the attic hiding spot arena was only eighteen years old when she was killed sparser wrote the last words in the diary he. He wrote about the execution of Iranian and his parents expressing his anguish at their deaths survived the Holocaust and eventually pass the diary to roots and Arianna Oriana now named Elizabeth Belic the two women had fled to the US after World War Two. The nearly seven hundred page diary stayed in a safe deposit posit box in New York City for more than forty years. It was published in Polish in twenty sixteen and in two thousand nineteen. The first full English translation of the diary was published. The diary is noted. As a unique and well-written personal account of everyday life under Soviet and Nazi occupation in Poland.

Rule Spiegel Poland Arianna Oriana Soviet Union Arena Zygmunt Sparser Warsaw Bernard Spiegel Soviet Union Nazi Germany Russa Ariana New York City Iran Andrew Murder David Schimmel United States Elizabeth Belic
Kate Middleton Reveals She and Prince William Have Discussed the Holocaust with Prince George

Unorthodox

2:56 listening | 4 months ago

Kate Middleton Reveals She and Prince William Have Discussed the Holocaust with Prince George

"We learned from people magazine that Princess Kate and Prince William have been talking about the Holocaust with the little future King George. I'm going to quote from People magazine. Kate Middleton revealed that she and Prince William of told their children about the Holocaust revealed this at the Holocaust Memorial Day service in London on Monday. The royal mom thirty gate was talking to Holocaust survivor. Malla Trish at the reception commemorating the seventy fifth anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz Birkenau and after the deeply moving ceremony. She said we are talking to the children children about it earlier today but we have to be you know for a six year old. The interpretation the royal added suggesting that she had to choose her words carefully to explain the mass murder of six a million Jews by the Nazis to Prince George the oldest of their three children. Okay end quote so first of all appreciate the snark from people. Magazine's hang that Princess. This is kate had to choose her words lightly when discussing mass murderer with a six year old so I was talking to last night just before we finished watching Zoe's extraordinary playlist. which is the best show? I've ever I really. It's unanswered. That was made for me. It was like dumb. Sitcom meets great playlist made for me. We're about to fire up the last ten minutes of it. I said to sit as like can. Can you believe they're talking about the. It's so nice that trying to be culturally sensitive telling their little six year old Church of England future king boy about the Holocaust but frankly someone should tell them like maybe a professional g like me to tell. You don't have to tell a six year old. I mean our kids learn about it when they're nine ten eleven but like six like Little Anna. We have a six year old. She doesn't Know Jack Squat about going full Israel in Israel. He started like at three area but they'd sit says to me she's like Oh you think Anna doesn't know about the Holocaust. Have you noticed the book that she's been reading and re reading and re reading and it was like you mean white bird by that the guy that lady who wrote wonder polite Palaccio and since it yeah and I said Yeah it's about a bird right and since it only know it's all about the Holocaust cost which is why today we pulled up in front of neighborhood. Music School and Anna hopped out and put her hand up in the air and said Hail Hitler I said wait a second. You mean to tell me that today might just blonde like looking zero Audubon street new haven. Where like all taste the coffee shop? The music school across from the high school like every family in our social sir. Everyone is like coming and going and picking up and dropping off and Anna hops out little blonde. Green Eyed Anna ops out. It gives and says Hail Hitler. Hails Hitler is a great remix of Ohio. And I said well I guess we should have had the princess. Kate conversation with Kate. Okay but what are we save a six year old again. 'cause we seem to be very totally dropped the ball that she has no idea that Hitler is not good. I have to say like for them for the royals. It's really easy Zeke's all they have to do is go. Talk to Uncle Harry. Who likes to dress up just opposite lowering talk to Jonathan Sachs? who had to like? Give Harry talking to after that. So maybe they could just call up there like like Jewish applicants for chief rabbi of England's preach to an ever shrinking community of Jews from time to time to holocaust education with ignorant

Princess Kate Anna Hail Hitler People Magazine Little Anna Prince William Malla Trish ZOE Uncle Harry King George Prince George Jonathan Sachs London Murder Israel Zeke Church Of England England Palaccio Ohio
Nikki Haley on Her Defense of Israel at the UN

Journeys of Faith with Paula Faris

3:46 listening | 4 months ago

Nikki Haley on Her Defense of Israel at the UN

"Let's talk about your time at the UN. You were the big champion for Israel during your time there. I know you supported moving the embassy to Jerusalem you often called out what you referred to as anti Israel bias within the UN So as a woman of faith. How did you reconcile support for Israel when You could say that there are some human rights abuse allegations against Against Israel for how they've treated Arabs in the region Palestinians. There were a couple of things first of all me speaking out against the israel-bashing at the United Nations was speaking out over. Something I saw and telling the truth. It was unfair it was Overly early critical that when you have countries like Syria and North Korea and Iran and Cuba doing all in Venezuela. Doing all these terrible things. You're not saying anything about those countries but you are tenfold complaining about Israel so that it was just not balanced at all that that was so that was what I've mainly criticized. The second thing was. I told my team. I said I can't continue to talk on this issue without going and seeing being it for myself so I traveled to Israel for the first time and I traveled to the Palestinian areas for the first time. Because I wanted to see for myself. What is the conflict? Why is it there? And is there any resolution that could comma that and what I found is there is not one Palestinian Finian living in those areas that deserves that they should have a better quality of life. I talk about the book how I became emotional after going to the Palestinian camps. Because when you see playgrounds in UC nets above those camps to stop the When when they throw tear gas to stop the canisters from hitting the kids? It's heartbreaking and so I will always fight and say that Palestinian people deserve for better life and that's only going to happen if we have a peace deal in place but right now. The Palestinians won't even come to the table and so it's not the Palestinian people. Boy I blame. It's the people that govern them that don't allow them to have a better quality of life and so when it comes to the Israeli people I know. Oh that basically they're issue is security. They have to protect themselves. Both sides have to come to the table. Both sides are going to have to give a little. The ones that will benefit in a deal are actually the Palestinians because the only place they can go with up but there has to be reasonable thinking reasonable openness and there has to be a will and I believe that if there is a peace deal that comes both outsides will benefit and will no peace for the first time so I pray for peace always for both Israelis in the Palestinians because they all deserve better better and right now is just you know. It's something that I hope that one day the Palestinian leadership will realize this is not about them. This is about the people what I noticed is Israel is is ready and willing to come to the table but they're not gonna go sacrifice everything they have in their national security when the Palestinians continue to threaten continue continue to fight back and continue not to come to the

Israel UN Jerusalem United Nations Syria North Korea Iran Venezuela Cuba
Nikki Haley: "No One Is Going to Fight For You But You"

Journeys of Faith with Paula Faris

9:58 listening | 4 months ago

Nikki Haley: "No One Is Going to Fight For You But You"

"Hey there it's Paula Farris and welcome to journeys of faith. Our next guest is widely expected to run for president in twenty twenty four. We're talking to Nikki. Haley former governor of South Carolina and United States Ambassador to the UN on this episode. Haley whose parents are from India talks about being raised in in a Sikh family in rural South Carolina. She reveals what she loves about the Sikh faith but also why she converted to Christianity Haley also dives lives into the confederate flag. Debate those rumors about her replacing Mike Pence on the ticket and she opens up like never before about a possible run for president. Here's Nikki Haley. Nikki Haley welcome into the studio for the journeys of Faith podcast. Last time I saw you on the sidelines of the National Championship Chip College Football Championship game. When Clemson was beating Alabama? Such a good time had an amazing program. I'm really three National Championships. UNSHIPPED four years. We're proud Davo. Were proud of that team or product. Schoon yeah you are and you went to Clemson just for all of those listening out there. You graduated from Clemson and I'm not GonNa date you and say when which are very young well I graduated from Clemson met my husband my first weekend at Clemson got engaged at Clemson and our daughter daughter is now at Clemson's who were a bit clemson obsessed what I really love about your history. Your faith history. You're raised in a seekonk so tell me uh-huh maybe some of the tenants the main tenants of the Sikh faith. Well you know it's interesting because we were the only Indian family in a small southern town probably less the one percent of the population in South Carolina's Indian. And then you go when you look at the Sikhs in the area I mean it was just small. Every third Sunday Sunday seek families would get together at someone's home in the state to have to have prayers and so it was probably no more than one hundred people people that we would get together with but the faith itself is a very kind peaceful faith. It's one that's all accepting mm-hmm they believe in one God and what was so interesting was even though I would go every third Sunday with my family somewhere My parents made us go to different churches. Methodist Baptist Catholic Yummy. You name it. They go so my mom would say I want you to respect everyone and how they do their prayers but you understand. There's one guide but everyone has has their own pathway. And as long as you have your relationship with God the new will be okay and so they just wanted us one to respect other religions but to to understand and see the relationship people have with God and so it was really important because I talk about how and why I converted converted when I would go to a good war or temple for prayers. I would feel it. I would feel God in the room but I couldn't understand understand it because I didn't I didn't know the religion I didn't know the language and so when I started dating my husband and we started going more and more to his church and he was methodist. I immediately could relate I immediately. You found a connection of a sudden there was not just the feeling but it was the words that I could relate to. That really meant something to me. And that was really when I knew if I wanted to grow deeper in my faith if I wanted to have a stronger relationship tip I needed to have something that spoke to me and so that was that was how it happened so your husband was methodist when you met him. Yeah you're seek and you had a multi-denominational wedding you celebrated the methodist traditions and the Sikh traditions girl my family obviously wanted to see me have an Indian ceremony so I did. So that was for all of their friends and family and then we had a Christian ceremony for Michael's friends and family so in the end we got married twice. Were doubly. Okay yes you're deli okay. I know you just touched on it. But what made you convert to Christianity from the Sikh faith a faith that your parents still adhere adhere to it really was when you grow your faith you have to be able to talk to God and you have to be able to go to a service service and feel it and if you don't understand the language you're not hearing it and it's harder and harder to feel it and so the the language that they're speaking is just to clarify Punjabi. Yes was what they were speaking at the time. But you know you have to have that connection and when you're sitting thing in service and you feel it that's one it's so important you know I always say My faith has grown over time. Because you know I you have a faith because your appearance teach you to have a strong faith then you start to grow when you get married because you have faith together with your husband and then when you have children it takes you to a whole new level because Michael always said that our children if we could teach them a faith and a conscience everything else would be okay and so all of a sudden it gets deeper and then as I went through challenges in my life it just went to another level I mean obviously when we dealt with the Charleston shooting. I think that was a huge turning point for me because it was so painful and it was so hard that there was no one or nothing that was going to get me through that but God and I I mean that's when I started to believe in and just recite Joshua one nine be strong and be courageous. Do not be afraid you know or the Lord. Your God is with you wherever God with you wherever you go and I think that was you know when you when you feel that and you and it speaks to you you look more for how else it can speak to you and how you can grow your faith. Hey I want to touch on the Charleston shooting in just a moment which you write about in yearbook. That's out with all due respect it was released in two thousand nineteen but just going back to the Sikh faith. I know you have converted to Christianity. Your parents are still seek. Are there parts of the faith. The tradition practices that you still implement into to your daily life that you still hold dear. I think you know more than that. It's just respect for parents. Respect for family Love of all people MHM Respect for all people and you know in the Sikh faith it acknowledges other religions so it doesn't say you have to be secret nothing else. It acknowledges analogize other religions it acknowledges Jesus it acknowledges you know that Jesus was the son of God you and so there's different things that they had more than that what I take from it is the is the respect and the peaceful side of the Sikh faith which is respect everyone and in everything you do in your life should lead to peace and the best way to appreciate your blessings is to give back. Those were the things that I took away from what my parents parents taught us. And when the Sikh faith taught us and so then when I converted to Christianity those are all things that you can still go and build on and carry it forward right but I I you know. I can't give enough credit to my parents for how they raised us. And how much emphasis put on the respect of other religions and I think that's that's what made for me and easier transition and they have never had a problem with the fact that I've converted and I want to talk about your book. Yes called with all due respect out. Now congratulations thank you a lot of fun to write very therapeutic. I can imagine but in one of the sections. I know you talk about your faith in the book but in one of the sections you talk about the Charleston shooting which you just mentioned in how much you relied on your faith to get you through that you also made the decision to take down the confederate flag can at the State House grounds. And you said at the time that it because of the connection in the connotation to hatred and racism At I know recently you WanNa Glenn Back and you said that you caused a little controversy in that interview. You said that some saw the confederate flag is service and sacrifice and heritage. And that Dylann unroofed. The gunmen hijacked it. Some people felt that this was a reversal. Because in two thousand fifteen you say that it's deeply offensive symbol of brutally oppressive past. I was at a reversal. So telling of how toxic politics has gotten literally the same words I said in Glen on the Glenn Beck Show are the same words. I said in twenty-fifty if you go back and read my speech where I'm asking for the flag to come down. I talk about how some some people in the state saw the flag and related to service and heritage and talk about the other people in the state that saw all the flag and felt pain. And what I said was. We don't want anyone in our state to feel pain when they see that flag and I went on onto say not to judge either side as a governor. That's not your job. You Represent All people what it was was. I need all of you to come together. You can have respect for the confederate flag. But we're going to move it to a museum because it is a living breathing symbol. That does not represent. Is that all of the people in the state and went on to talk about. How if it causes any child pain when they passed that Nate House? There's something wrong and and we needed to pull it down. Had I gone and said that half the state was racist. That flag would never have come

Nikki Haley Clemson South Carolina Charleston Michael Mike Pence President Trump Paula Farris India UN Methodist Baptist Catholic Yum Pain United States Ambassador Alabama Seekonk Nate House Dylann Unroofed Joshua State House