Judaism

Listen to the latest audio content relevant to the Jewish community. This playlist features Jewish individuals having great conversations on relevant topics through a cultural lens. Grow your faith with cultural reflection, history and current events. Sourced from premium podcasts.

Hebrew At American Jewish Summer Camps With Sharon Avni, Sarah Bunin Benor, And Jonathan Krasner

Jewish History Matters

04:57 min | 2 d ago

Hebrew At American Jewish Summer Camps With Sharon Avni, Sarah Bunin Benor, And Jonathan Krasner

"Hi sharon hi sarah. Hi jonathan welcome to the podcast. I'm so excited to be able to talk to you guys about this book. Hi jason i'm sarah buchanan. Nor thanks so much for having us. Hines the sharon me. It's really nice to be a part of this. And i'm jonathan crasner. Thank you guys so much. It's such an interesting book. Such a fascinating topic very specific topic. But it's one more. I think there's a lot of really interesting directions in which we can take it. You know talking about jewish camping talking about jewish languages talking about american jewish life. American jewish culture. Kind of broadly speaking. I think that that it might be really useful to actually start out where the book starts the hebrew spoken at jewish camps in the us. What you call cap. Hebrew english is not the same as vernacular hebrew which is spoken in modern day israel. So do you guys. Have you wanna comment about what this idea means to you. Is this language. And why is it important. In terms of understanding the dynamics of jewish culture jewish education and so on we went into camps and we started to hear and see the hebrew that was being used. We recognized immediately that it wasn't hebrew spoken in israel and that it was really a variety of language that was drawing from lots of different sources this variety however look these cam is really drawing for all sorts of histories and experiences and one of the things that we tried to tune in. The book was to trace these histories of cow. Hebrew found its way into american jewish camping. How it changed over time. Both in relation to the american jewish community was happening in the united states. Obviously with the establishment of state of israel. How the american. Jewish community reacted responded with its own relationship with hebrew and then bringing it into the modern times of what's happening today and so when you look at it across the trajectory we can see that this variety of this language really has a very specific meaning within the camp context in has rich cultural meaning for american cheats. I see cap hebrew in three whiz. I see at first and foremost as an insider language. These is a language that is understandable. Only people that are in the group. It's something that they share in common. It's a community building exercise if you will the creation and the dissemination of this language second is jewish language inspired by and it is definitely located with in a jewish context and third. It's zionist language. The decision to have a heavy iced english as opposed to. Yiddish is english or a latino english. That was a specific decision. It was a very conscious decision that was made early on. If you go back and you look at the early history of these camps and how this language was created the people who were invested in the creation of this language were zionists and they were looking to the project in palestine and inspired by it when they started speaking hebrew it now the listeners might be wondering what we're talking about when we're talking about camp. Henry is english. So i guess i should give an example in some camps you might have just jewish life words like they might say after beer cut. We're going to go straight to own egg. And those are words that you would hear outside of camp. In many jewish communal settings but many camps that are more to the right of the on the continuum of hebrew richness would have sentences that have a lot more hebrew words in them so they might say something like honey theme and module him go to the tach run for a lot era of now that has so many hebrew words that it really wouldn't be comprehensible to somebody who didn't go to a jewish summer camp that has a lot of hebrew words but note that it's still an english sentence in that the grammar and the function words are english right. They wouldn't use a full hebrew sentence at most camps and then even farther to the right on that continuum of hebrew richness. You have camps that do all of their announcements in hebrew and in some cases this is a hebrew that is mostly set phrases so they might just say something like guess share a mirage cadore saul Salim live bait knesset right so that they would be saying the name of a group and the place where they're supposed to go and people listening to that would just have to listen for the name of their group and the police. They're supposed to go. But then some camps have much more complex sentences in hebrew in their announcements and in other camp public language.

Sharon Hi Sarah Sarah Buchanan Jonathan Crasner Israel Hines Jonathan Jason United States Palestine Henry Saul Salim
Considering German Jewrys History And Legacy With Jay Geller

Jewish History Matters

05:25 min | 2 weeks ago

Considering German Jewrys History And Legacy With Jay Geller

"Welcome to jewish history matters. I'm jason la steak and jay. Geller is joining me on the podcast today to talk about his book. The show alums a history of the german jewish bourgeoisie from emancipation to destruction. It's a fantastic book. That tells the story of german jewry as a whole through the history of one family and in particular the four scholem brothers each of whom followed their own political and historical path gerhard or gershom scholem the zionist who is most widely known for his scholarship on jewish mysticism alongside. His brothers. varner the communist. Reinhold the nationalist and eric the liberal. It's a multilayered approach towards thinking about jews in germany as well as the broader possibilities of history and its contingency the scholem brothers really showcase the myriad possibilities for political and cultural activity of jews in germany prior to the second world war as well as the different outcomes of the jews in germany verner was murdered by the nazis at involed gershom immigrated to palestine and eric and reinhold made their way toss. Australia altogether sketches the outlines of the german jewish cultural and political millea as the diaspora of the jews of germany after the holocaust and so the scholem family is simultaneously an eminent middle class. Jewish berlin family and at the same time. It's also distinctly normal quotidian every day it showcases through this microcosm the whole story of choose in germany in the lead up to the second world war and the holocaust as well as aftermath jay. Geller is the samuel rosenthal professor of judaic studies at case western reserve university's department of history in addition to the show alums which will talk about. Today he has also written jews in post holocaust. Germany nineteen forty five to nineteen fifty three. I'm so excited that jay is able to join us on the podcast today to discuss the show alums and german jewish history in the largest terms the book and the issues that it raises helps us to think through both the history of jews in germany as well as the legacy of german jewish culture on a wider scale. Thanks for listening in. Welcome to the podcast. Thanks thanks for having me. This book is is such a fascinating. Approach the micro history really that is focusing on the four scholem brothers. You know obviously gershom. Scholem is definitely the most well known of these figures who are studying you as a major figure in jewish intellectual history jewish scholarship. But i think that part of what you've done here which is so interesting is to bring forward a handful of people who each represent different pathways through german jewish history and this really illuminates a lot of important issues. Do you maybe want to explain briefly about these different trajectories About these different figures in the show family and what they represent in the eighteen ninety s arthur bitty show-me who are the owners of a print shop berlin had four sons reinhold arish varner and gerhard litter known gershom and in time they viewed the travails of german society and experience the ambiguities of not the difficulties of german jewelry and they chose for different political paths. Brian whole the oldest was a national liberal or right liberal. Eric was a liberal democrat or a left liberal van was a social democrat and later became a communist in gershom of course was zionist so in this one family among these four brothers we see four political paths taken by german jewry in the first decades of the twentieth century raven. These weren't the only pads but they were by far the most common covering most of the political spectrum verner began his career as a socialist but he joined the communist party at the time of the The merger of the independent social democratic party but the communist party and he quickly rose to become the second most powerful member of the german communist party. He was a personal rival of of stalin and the stalinist clique in german communism in the mid nineteen twenty s when stalinist is attempting to take over the other communist parties in the commoner

Scholem Germany Jason La Steak Gershom Gershom Scholem Geller JAY Samuel Rosenthal Eric Verner Varner Reinhold Gerhard Berlin Department Of History Case Western Reserve Universit Palestine Arthur Bitty
Bristol's Jewish students fight for their University's reputation

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

03:45 min | 5 d ago

Bristol's Jewish students fight for their University's reputation

"Hi my name is. And i'm a final year english literature student at the university of bristol. And my spare time. I also freelance. And i've written articles for the telegraph the times the independent huffington post what is regional papers and i also am features editor of the top bristol So the last two years being jewish student has been quite hard at university of bristol as a result of elektra a sociology professor called professor dave Because in his class he teaches and matic conspiracy theories about jewish organizations. He has a lecture in his home against powerful module where he accuses zionism as being one of the five pillars phobia and he implies using this sort of weighed conspiratorial web that israel on british jewish organizations have a malign influence on british government. And sort of in that slide. He touches on a series of consoles tropes about jewish people and two years ago. My best friend nina freedman. Who was then president of bristol. Jason is now you diaz president-elect made a complaint against david miller on years later in the university still hasn't done anything about it and hasn't advised or supported jewish students in any way but the situation picked up again. I'm a week or two weeks ago. Because david millar appeared in a video where he said that zionism we must cool front end design. Ism were in. He touched on several of the anti semitic tropes of course it really is of course some people into target to join us at in relation to this community in particular done. This through interfaith were pretending that jesus was working together. We'll be an apolitical way of countries. Ism stylings though. It's is the horse for normalizing zionism in the community. I in islamic mosque for example where. The mosque unknowingly held this project of chicken soup with a together. This is really backed project to normalize is within the muslim community. And they're doing that time. During the attack on cobra on this sort of started a new upper on twitter and reaganite hit the movement to get david miller removed from bristol. University campus clinician nasty. Seeing jews everywhere even in loction soup made in mosques while bashing corbin the share arrogance of this man and in one glib soundbite he opposes generations and generations of jewish teaching centuries of daily prayers which users sites to return to. Zion is car us special envoy in combating antisemitism until january. Twenty twenty one. Sinus didn't start in nineteen forty eight zionism spring out of the first zionist cows. Zionism was born in russia. When god says to abraham go forth to a land that i will show you. Zionism reached its consummation in the exodus. When moses let the jewish people to the promised land and zionism found one of its clearest expression

University Of Bristol Professor Dave Because Nina Freedman David Miller Matic Elektra Huffington Post David Millar Bristol The Times Diaz Israel Jason Jesus Corbin Twitter Zion Abraham Russia United States
The Case Of The Murdered Jewess

Judaism Unbound

06:15 min | 2 weeks ago

The Case Of The Murdered Jewess

"We now lay before the reader. A full account of a shocking murder that of miss sarah alexander the beautiful polish jewess. Who was foully murdered in an east new york cornfield. The crime was one of the most shocking that has ever occurred in the metropolis or its vicinity. Cousin of the dead girl to whom she was very much attached was arrested and the discovered fact of her near maternity coupled with the expected arrival of the prisoner's wife from germany furnished. The only clue there was to the horrible deed. Eddie thank you so much for joining me today. Thanks for having their happy to be here. So we're talking about some murder. Pamphlets there were four that were published about the case of pesach. Rubinstein were featuring two of them. These pamphlets were type of pulp literature. They've been around for a long time and were especially popular in the nineteenth century. Tell us more about them. These were mostly eight to sixteen page pamphlets that were often illustrated and described typically in lurid detail well-known murders that took place in the united states. Obviously the time. There's no radio. Tv internet print media is the only thing available and some of them are. I guess you could say enhanced. Sometimes the writers make things up both were pale with lips compressed and is haggard and as they halted and looked at each other their hearts appeared to be like open books every feeling every emotion could be read. She had a knife with which her own life blood was to be. Shed thrust into her bosom and drawing it fourth. She held it toward her companion. He trembled violently. His knees smote together and he was altogether like a man intoxicated. It's obvious these pamphlets were not written by people who knew about jewish beliefs and practices. They contain some false information. They show a lack of knowledge of how jews live and worship. What's an example of this. One of them shows him preying on his hands and knees with his hands clasped before him. So this is obviously how a christian praise and not at all. How a jew praise our artist has graphically sketched him while at prayer and from the illustration a better idea can be gained than any description can give. Now that we've heard about the pamphlets can you give us a detailed overview of the story contained within the particular ones were exploring in eighteen. Seventy five a body was found in a field in east new york. East new yorkers in brooklyn and at the time and eighteen seventy five. It was a far. Now it's not on december fourteen. He found the body of a woman in a cornfield on the ground behind a stack of corn. These stacks were at the lower end of the field near the fence. The farthest off from the plank road. There was a shawl lying by the side of the body. The corpse was about two feet from the base of the corn stack. The body lay on the back and was all cut about the neck win. This went and informed. Mr wessel who in company two other men went and viewed it farmhand had her and he went to the police and told them they came investigated. Took the body away to the morgue. They know who was there had been no reports of anyone missing in brooklyn and so they chose to do so. This person must from manhattan. The police were puzzled. No report had been received of any late disappearance from the neighborhood. Nevertheless the region was scoured. All during tuesday afternoon and evening. The police station was thronged and officers. Say that not less than two thousand persons saw the body no one could identify it and the conclusion was arrived at that. She was a stranger in the village. So what they did was. They put an advertisement in a newspaper which was actually very common at the time claiming that a body had been found and they wrote a description of it now at the same time a woman who worked for a particular family on the lower side had gone missing. Her name was. Sarah alexander at her brother went to the rubinstein family where she worked and he said you know. Have you seen sarah. She didn't come home from work yesterday and they said no she was here until such a time and then she left. We haven't seen her since so her brother. Put an ad in the newspaper looking for missing person and describing her the new york sun december fourteenth eighteen. Seventy five a girl missing since the afternoon of the twelfth age. Seventeen years stout middle height face dark dressed in a light colored dress with the black over skirt striped shawl small gold earrings with red stones. Any information will be received by. J p alexander number thirty essex street coincidentally. The two advertisements appeared on the same page in the same paper and they describe the same person. The father of the rubinstein family happened to get that paper. He saw the advertisements and he went to the police station. Ad said that girl is sarah alexander of number thirty essex street. She was a good religious girl. She did not stay away from home and if she was murdered away out there. Some ruffians must have dragged her away so the police came to the home and began to interview everyone to find out where she had last been seen and while they were entering everyone. One of the sons came in. His name was pace off rubinstein on monday. The sun with great perturbation of manner told them that he had had a dream the previous night. He dreamed that. Sarah alexander was lying murdered alongside of corn stalks ten miles outside of the city. She was murdered by an italian and the knife was close beside her. She wants me to bury her. He said

Sarah Alexander Rubinstein Pesach Mr Wessel New York Haggard Brooklyn Eddie Germany Farmhand United States Manhattan New York Sun Sarah
The American Jewish Philanthropic Complex with Lila Corwin Berman

Jewish History Matters

09:20 min | Last month

The American Jewish Philanthropic Complex with Lila Corwin Berman

"Lila. Corwin berman is professor of history at temple university where she holds the murray friedman chair of american jewish history and directs the feinstein center for american jewish history. She's the author of numerous books including the jewish philanthropic complex. Which we're talking about today. As well as metropolitan jews politics race and religion in postwar detroit which appeared in two thousand fifteen and her two thousand nine book speaking of jews rabbis intellectuals and the creation of an american public identity. I'm so excited to share episode as lila points out in her book. Philanthropy is something that touches on all aspects of our lives and we should think critically about how it operates and what that means in historical and cultural terms. I hope you check out the book. And i've also linked to an excerpt. Thanks for listening. Hi lila will help to the podcast. Thanks i'm so glad you could join us to talk about your book which is really. It's just so phenomenal. I think that there are so many different things that we can talk about from this book and all the different issues that it really raises. I think that one place for us to get started really is to think about the manifold ways that philanthropy touches our lives. Well you know when. I started working on this book. Although i realize i had lived a life that was really very much shaped by philanthropy. It wasn't really something given a lot of you know. And then once. I sort of went back to try to create an inventory. I was a little bit shocked. I literally did try to sit. And kind of calculate like okay. How much money has been invested in me. You know my family. My children would ever through philanthropy. You sort of realized it's everywhere in in a sense. Maybe that's why i hadn't seen it that much because we're just seemed natural is just the world i lived in in. It's not just in my world as a person who happens to be jewish but in museums i go to newspapers. I read the radio station. I listen to kind of every facet of my life had some kind of imprint of philanthropy. So like in a certain sense. I think it makes sense that you know. This isn't a topic that people necessarily think of studying that much because it just feels very ubiquitous but then when you kinda take a step back from it and think about well how does this work and why does it feel like it so natural. It's so inevitable you realize like most things. It has a history and this thing that seems like it's so familiar and has always been the way it may appear in our lives today actually has really changed vastly over time and so that was kind of like the animating question that it had you know even on a kind of philosophical level like what are the things that we just take as being very natural in our lives and how can we sort of dig into them and understand how they formed at how they developed into feeling like these structures that are so so natural. Part of what you're pointing out here is the way in which so many of the tuitions that we interact with like you mentioned. Museums newspapers radio stations. Many of them are charitable in their structure. Right there five. Oh one c. Threes thinking about museums for instance or they are subsidized to large extent by foundations or other kinds of charitable donations. I think that this is an elements that people recognize. We understand this would just don't always give it a lot of thought. I think there's all sorts of ways that you can think about even when you go to university. I mainly thought about how. I pay tuition at the college. They went to his undergraduate in that tuition was paying for my education. But actually the college i went to had an endowment and it had donors who gave an it had a whole other structure that tied it not really contractually in terms of relationship to me right as kind of the customers paying my tuition to go there but actually tied it. In arguably a more contractual way both to the donors who gave money to it into the american state. That in various ways subsidize that. So i think that you suddenly realize the sense that like the room is much fuller than you might have thought or if you think about the people who are like eighteen to maybe thirty or whatever now who go on a trip to israel through birthright generally. I think it feels like you. Think of that as okay. Here's like this college student and ney get accepted into a particular birth-rate program and they go with a bunch of other college students in there are counselors or leaders. Go with then maybe you realize oh well who's paying for this right because it's free of course not free someone's paying for it right so who is paying for it. How do the mechanics of that work. And how is that person or that entity that foundation that federation whatever it might be involved in a relationship in terms of what the program is but also in a relationship again with the american state right because any of that money that is given to a five. Oh one c. Three is also tax wise being subsidized by the american state. So you suddenly have a much more interesting set of actors that really alight on these kinds of nonprofit institutions right that make them actually fairly complicated sites for thinking about how power so that is an incredibly kind of rich place to start to questions about different structures that inhabit and how those structures delimit the kinds of that operates and how those structures have changed retirement y. Yeah i mean you're talking about the way in which we have to have a critical perspective on philanthropy. I think that this is a very narrow line to walk as it were because on the one hand i think that we all recognize the philanthropy and charity are social goods and this is the reason why. The state subsidizes essentially through making it tax deductible so while we recognize that that flappy is a good thing. Why is it important for us to have a critical perspective to bring historical perspective. And how do we do this in a way that still also recognizes that philanthropies of social. Could i don't know that. I am so interested in starting from kind of normative statement of whether something is or isn't social good for me. The important thing to think about is how do these different kinds of forces that continue to shape people's lives. How do we understand their historical formation. And how can that help us ask different questions about the way they're operating and maybe eventually those normative questions about whether or not. They're doing the best that they might be able to do. So it simply is a fact that this system philanthropy exists in american life and certainly sust in american jewish life and it has a history and to understand that history. We need to ask what. I would call critical questions. Which doesn't mean that we need to condemn it or roundly criticize it but the very basic question of saying how did this thing develop into what it is is already itself a critical question. Because it's making us kind of pull back the fashioning of something being just natural or inevitable and having to ask know what were the different. Contexts enforces in conditions. That caused it to be developed. So one of the responses that i would receive when i would tell people especially people who were working in the world of jewish philanthropy when i was talking to them about the book i'm writing. They would say clearly. It's going to be very important that you talk about how generous american jews has been you know and they would talk about the fact that over time american jews have given high levels of charity in that they're very philanthropic minded and in my mind the critical question there is not to say we praise or do we not praise people participated in this system. The critical question is to ask how have people been conscripted into this system. Such that it seems like it itself defines. What is generosity because we also need to ask about other ways that people might have been using their resources or other ways of the american state might have been using its resources to have. Is this particular system. Come to define a mode of generosity. The intellectual project of this book is really asking about how an institution was shaped and how it was formed right. I mean. I think that this is a key distinction that we always seems to be making because critique does not always mean critical right those two words have a linguist relationship to each other but there are different modes of doing this and i think that intellectual critique is really a central animating process that we need to be applied to all aspects of life and all aspects of history even to things which we understand are generally good in their nature. They also have a history like you said they also can be looked from critical perspective without condemning them.

Lila Corwin Berman Murray Friedman Feinstein Center For American Temple University Detroit NEY Israel
Canaan Unconquered - Rachel Havrelock

Judaism Unbound

09:22 min | 2 weeks ago

Canaan Unconquered - Rachel Havrelock

"And kinda interested in talking about the person joshua. He's the title character of this book and he himself from my understanding of scholarly work on biblical criticism or otherwise. He himself has a story like an origin story. That some people think is kind of a retrospection where like after the fact. He's put into the torah in a way that he may not have always been there. And what i'm referring to is specifically. His glory story is that he's one of the two folks in the twelve spies story that goes into the promised land and says This is great all the other ten folks. All land is terrible. Joshua caleb are on the good side that god likes and because it's the land that they're supposed to go to am. I right in my understanding of that. How scholars look at that person joshua and to what extent to we learn more about him in talking about the book that's named after him. Joshua indeed has a book named after him but is one of the flatter hand more hollow biblical characters. I mean for readers. Go in sequence so you know redo romney in which moses in vary tragic psychological terms wrestles with his impending death. And you know even with the existential reality of death itself. so we're going through it moses psyche and when we can turn out of the penza out of the five books of moses when we opened the book of joshua we have an entirely flat character. You know joshua is really characterized by his obedience and interestingly enough has no title right once called the servant of god is not labeled a profit is not labeled a judge is not labeled a king. I mean we get the news of general because he leads these battles but he doesn't even have a title biblical literature does have great literature and just have complex characters. Josh was not one of them. And you can't really do. A lot of psychological depth with an icon in joshua right becomes an icon of this army of this ancient near right to really kind of like a strobe of what i would call. Ancient national is now. I believe that the book of joshua is ultimately synthesized by a group of editors that we call the or novelists they are the ones that are also very smart editors so joshua ends up becoming a kind of a tool that the nommik editors really use to kinda. We've eras together and also to contain a kind of perfect model right. They wanna leader in their language. Who neither the left nor the right right who keeps torah. You know kind of the cuff at all times. And so they give joshua authority by putting him back the times of most read someone who experienced the whole exodus and even while being a member of this desert generation right the generation of the liberated slaves joshua and his spy buddy caleb right are portrayed is the only two who believe in going to war in this land. So i think that's right. I think the shooter anonymous create joshua to be an icon of the kind of unity to which they aspire and one more piece that all add to your question about joshua and caleb who again are depicted is these faithful spies who go against the will of their generation. I love it kinda that the liberated slaves don't want to go to war. I feel like we haven't done enough to really like reclaim that biblical antiwar position expressed by that generation. But you know. John lewis show like i said he's a. He's a tutoring nommik creation. But there's a lot of northern stuff going on with joshua and caleb is a southern figure just as these editors could really say we've always been at war with canaanites. Their system could also absorb later alliances. So kayla who. This southern figure is a canoe. He's a kennedy and the candidates are ultimately a group that gets absorbed under the tribe of judah the twelve tribes structure is very good at pointing to those people who are on the outside who jumped. Don't join the alliance and saying those e mites those canaanites those jebusites there are enemies. But it's also good at absorbing groups that might join the alliance at their own pace and saying. Oh well that's caleb. He's the head of the kennedy clan and that's a sub family of judah so so both things are possible for trying to account for political alliances. Can we situated some of what you're talking about in some sense of historical time to understand sort of when the actual events that are being responded to her happening versus the time where the story is set. What's going on geopolitically. And the time of the israelites when they are making all these alliances. And then if i understand the approximate timeframe here they're basically writing and rewriting these stories that are functionally taking place around five hundred years earlier. Right i mean the so. It almost becomes like their writing and rewriting and massaging this almost like mythic prehistory. It's not just like they're telling a story from fifty years ago differently. They're telling a story from five hundred years ago differently. I'm just curious if you could give us some sense of what was actually going on in in their world at that time that was motivating them to do all this so yes. Speaking about time wine this is the kind of thing. Bible scholars go to conferences to fight of out. So let me kind of breakdown this picture together with a time line let me start somewhere with is a very important piece of poetry and it's important because because of how it serves as a historical in and that's song of deborah and the song of jabra with we believe based on its grammar and syntax is one of the oldest texts in the bible and some people even speak about the year twelve hundred bc. Jabra sings about a war and she sings that some tribes came and fought in the war in some sat home so she disparages the tribes who sat home and she sings the praises of the tribes who k. That's very important to me because it shows that the success or failure of a given tribe in war depended upon their allies. Were so we see major major motivation for these processes of consolidation. Many scholars have shown how end the nine eight century. B c e you've got these policies of consolidating clans in schreiber's into something that looks like a pro donation. This is happening in the region. And it's about war you know. Because if you're national formation right if or if you're a bunch of tribes and you've got a consolidated federation of people's you're gonna lose but then we get you know eighth century b. c. e. the rise of empires in particular syria and the threat of assyria marching. You know or the egyptian empire has its second wind around this time. It's that process. That i think gets people thinking we've got come up. You know with a larger scale organization in army. And so josh. Shaw gives this army which is kind of being configured in real time it gives this army kind of heroic prehistory behind which people can march. And so it means you know that it works and doesn't work because the syrian army takes out the northern kingdom the kingdom of israel in seven twenty two but ends up sparing the kingdom of

Joshua Joshua Caleb Caleb Joshua Authority Romney Kennedy Josh John Lewis Kayla Jabra Deborah Schreiber Syria Army Shaw Syrian Army Israel
Israel and the International Criminal Court; The Power of Music

People of the Pod

04:18 min | Last week

Israel and the International Criminal Court; The Power of Music

"Each week we take you beyond the headlines to help you understand what they all mean for. America israel and the jewish people are cogan. And i'm manuchehr cashman. Last weekend there was a major decision at the international criminal court in the hague that made it more likely that the body will try to prosecute israelis for alleged warcrimes. There's a lot to unpack here about the body itself. The charges against israel the players involved. And what it all means for the jewish state joining us now to help make sense of all. This is barack reviewed a correspondent for axios and the diplomatic correspondent at israel's while news barack. Thank you for joining us. Thank you thank you for having me. So first of all. I feel like the terms of the international criminal court. The is the hague they get tossed around as though everyone knows what they are. But i'm not sure that that's the case. The sec is part of the un is at a different international body. What exactly is its purpose. What is the i can tell you. For a fact that the vast majority of people have no clue and by the way. I don't blame. Anybody is not even for foreign policy. Wonks for international law wong's that's really a small sect in the world so it's not surprising that most of the people really don't know what to talk about. Let's explain the international criminal. Court was supposed to be established more or less after world war. Two as part of the lessons learned from that war but at the time the cold war was just starting and the tensions between the soviet union and the united states is not allowed to get a consensus to form such an international criminal court so instead they decided to form the international court of justice. Also in the hague. Many people get confused and mix up the to the international court of justice deals with more. Let's say principled cases between different countries while the international criminal court is like any criminal court. We know okay which means that it has suspicions. There are suspicions against a certain person for alleged war crimes and this person if he's indicted he's tried by the international criminal court. The international criminal court was only established in two thousand two. As part of the drafting of what is known as the rome statute the rome statute basically said what the international criminal court should investigate. What are the crimes that the food try people for and all the countries that negotiated destroyed at the end of the day had to sign it and approve it in order to be members of the international criminal court re in the us and you and israel have something in common probably many things in common in that neither of our countries signed the rome statute. So what explains that opposition. Why was the. Us opposed to joining the i c c so the irony is that israel was very involved in the negotiations leading up to the drafting of the rome statute and the establishment of the international criminal court. The reason the end of the day that israel did not join the icy and did not sign their own statute was because one of the things that several arab countries pressed very hard to include in the statute as grimes should be investigated by the international criminal. Court were issues that have to do with transferring population into an occupied territory. And as you know when israel built settlements in the west bank it moved its citizens into an occupied territory and for many many years. This was a main issue that israel did not see for example as a breach for geneva convention article. Forty nine in the fourth year neva convention is an article that israel decided that it doesn't agree with so israel.

International Criminal Court Israel Axios Barack International Court Of Justice Cogan Cashman Rome United States Wong SEC UN Soviet Union Grimes West Bank Geneva
The Blood Libel Accusation with Magda Teter

Jewish History Matters

09:53 min | Last month

The Blood Libel Accusation with Magda Teter

"I'm jason leg. And i'm joined today by magden tater to talk about the history of the blood libel accusation and its continued relevance listen in for a wide ranging conversation about the history of the blood libel its origin in mediaeval europe and how it has transformed over the centuries and what it tells us about misinformation and how it spreads magdi. Tater is professor of history and the fiddler chair of judaic studies at fordham university. She's the author of numerous books. Most recently blood libel on the trail of an antisemitic. Myth which will talk about today. The blood libel is one of the long-standing false accusations against the jews. It is the myth in different variations and incarnations the jews murdered christian children and used their blood for various rituals. And it's obviously patently false but somehow people still believe it. And it has persisted. Across nearly a thousand years from medieval england to nazi anti semitism and beyond we can see the ways in which the imagery of the blood libel and it's false narrative persists even in new reconfigured forms like the conspiracy theories of cunanan as mark the these accusations across the centuries and different places and in different times became a vehicle for different anxieties about jews and about people's lives at large. And so we can see the blood libel in a certain way as a mirror of the fears that people had not just about jews but about all sorts of issues nevertheless the blood libel is not just a relic of medieval superstition. Or something like that. It's something which has changed with the times and which in many ways has piggybacked off of new technologies and new developments and this is one of magdi key arguments which is that. It's the printing press that enabled the proliferation and persistence of these false myths and disinformation which when published allowed them both to spread more widely. And also give these false accusations in air of quote unquote respectability because the existed in print in the first place and so this allows us to think deeply about the role of media technologies both image evil and early modern europe and also more recently with things like the radio. The newspaper even the internet as avenues. Not for the spread of information but rather of information. Thank you so much for listening in to this conversation. I hope that you'll check out. Magas book blood libel and also the accompanying web site the blood libel trail dot org where you can learn more about the book and also check out some really fascinating maps and other media about the anti semitic myth of the blood libel. Thanks again for listening. Hi magda welcome to the podcast. Hi jason thank you for having me. This is such an interesting topic. It's i think unfortunately very relevant to talk about bible accusations. Yes unfortunately i'm a scholar of premodern history and we always want to be relevant. But as i always said be careful what you wish for. Suddenly my book became quite rather than to although when i started. It was an academic exercise. Yeah i mean. I think that we are going to get to the question of the ways in which the historical blood libel accusation is still very relevant today but before we do that i think it might be useful for us to think kind of really brawley. What actually is the blood libel accusation manafort putting it into the context of thinking about how this is similar or different to other kinds of accusations that we see throughout history thinking about for instance the accusation of decide the accusation that jews had murder jesus and then also things like the accusation of the desecration of the host the totally kind of bizarre accusation. That jews would steal the the wafers from the church. You're right blood. Libel is one of a series of accusations against jews that emerged in the middle ages. And it's one that has relevance today decide was a theological belief and obviously accusation but became embedded as a believe and maybe then projected onto jews causing violence especially during easter. But it was so to speak a victimless crime. Every year whereas a number of other accusations emerged in the middle ages justice christianity catholicism where also solidifying certain and defining certain types of buildings and then there were also libels that emerged in moments of crisis such as epidemic. So poisoning of wells for instance. So blood libels one of the three medieval accusations. The so-called ritual merger. Acquisition are. Although i prefer to call it murder liable. But it's an accusation that emerged in twelfth century that claim that jews killed christian children to reenact the passion of jesus so that connects to the this site as it projection onto contemporary jews and reenactment that emerged in england and then in the thirteenth century it emerged in a new way on the european continent. And that's when it became blood. Libel that shoes killed christian children to obtain their blood. Although the very first accusation claimed of perhaps some other kind of form of cannibalism of eating a heart or something like that they reason why blood became so central is that this was the moment when the catholic church in the thirteenth century has affirmed the dogma of trans substantiation that is the communion wafer that was consecrated by a priest during mass turned into the actual body and blood of christ therefore blood becomes central motif in christian worship. So this is a moment where we have this both the transformation of the murder liable into blood libel of killing but the purpose of blood but also the emergence of not their occupation that you mentioned day host the secretion accusation that jews obtain steel by the consecrated wafer and then tried to stab it to obtain the blood of christ and both are connected in the sense that the blood becomes a even because jews cannot make their own consecrated way for they needed this blood of the innocent christian to be added to mater effectively making it into both the body and the blood of christ night but a accusation that jews stole the consecrated wafer then desecrated and blood flowed dot accusation kind of waned and disappeared after the reformation the blood libel and the murder liable kind of continued the life of their own. The reason for is is that they are related to deaths of children and to some perhaps victims perhaps accidentally killed drown children so it becomes a very intimate actually charge because it involves a death. Having a way for stabbed doesn't sound as unless you really believe what this way for means but accusing someone of a child. That may be found dead on sometimes. It wasn't even body that may have been somebody's child that becomes a very kind of an intimate accusation and very embodied accusation even that transformation from the murder libel that is of reenactment of the passion of christ which emerges at the moment when christians are beginning to liturgically focus on the passion of christ. So you think about jews and reenactment and all that stuff but the transformation to the blood libel shows you that this begins to be a very malleable accusation that can change depending on needs and the needs to came that connection between the new liturgy and the new theology of the blood and body of christ in the thirteenth century

Jason Leg Magden Tater Cunanan Medieval England Fordham University Tater Manafort Europe Magda Brawley Jason England
The Carrots & Sticks Edition

The Promised Podcast

07:50 min | Last week

The Carrots & Sticks Edition

"Twenty twenty one judo grand slam sponsored by the international judo federation the i j f in which four hundred and thirty judokas one hundred and seventy eight women and two hundred and fifty. Two men representing sixty three countries spread over. Five continents will compete in fourteen weight categories. That's seven each for the women and for the men in hopes of attaining metals. Honor and national. Pride the competitor's come from everywhere from angola to them and everywhere in between and i know what you're thinking you're thinking but angola and zambia share a border. There is literally nowhere in between the two of them but in a broader sense. If in a less accurate one. And gonna begins. With an a and zambia with z and it is beautiful that countries beginning with letters so far apart in the alphabet can meet peaceably here in tel aviv in stark contrast by the way to their invariably tense meetings along their own one thousand kilometer border as listeners who need the journal of borderlands studies will already know all too well from the distressing recent essay. They will have read. They're entitled the consolidation of the angola. Zambia border colon. Violence forced displacement smugglers and savimbi. But i digress of the four hundred and thirty judokas taking part. In the event it is fair to say that one stands out above all the others and he is saieed me a the twenty nine year old former iranian champion who went ordered by government last year to concede his semifinal match at the tokyo world championships rather than compete against the israeli world. Champion sergey. Mookie refused and defected to germany eventually taking mongolian citizenship just over a year ago in the eighteen months since he defected. Sullied malawi has become fast friends with saggy. Mookie who said in a radio interview this week quote. This is a great message to the world. This judo is something that can bring even iran closer to israel. It simply shows how sports can bring people together and break boundaries end quote and there is every possibility likely could really that malawi and mookie will face one another on the mat during the grand slam. Finally having the match they could not have back in japan now because no regular flights landing these days at what remains a mostly closed. Ben gurion airport the eye af chartered planes to fly that you don't get into israel from four spots around the world athletes who have not yet had two shots of a vaccine plus a week which is most of them had to show too negative test results one from seventy two hours before their flight. Another from forty eight hours before when they landed at ben gurion airport. They were tested yet again. And then whisked away to the hilton intel. Vive the whole of which was booked by the i'd af to build the judokas with guards stationed in front of the revolving doors to keep athletes from sneaking out into the city. 'cause we'll be judokas and to keep curious tel-aviv types from sneaking in to get a peek at the competitors despite these pretty serious precautions those who criticized the decision to let the grand slam go forward at all in these pandemic minister of housing mayor. Porush and member of knesset eastern isler both of the ultra orthodox judaism party put out a statement that said among other things quote it is unthinkable that a citizen of israel is forced to go through a great and exhausting mess of bureaucracy to get into the country at the same time that foreign athletes enter easily in their multitudes as though there were no corona pandemic in the world the clerks of the state of israel apply a double standard against people who have the appearance of being deem on the one hand the state embraces the athletes of secular culture and on the other hand it rejects and piles difficulty upon difficulty for heidi citizens. Who asked to come here for basic humanitarian reasons like attending the funeral of a loved. One end quote indeed. The promise podcasts. Own preliminary research has shown that of the four hundred and thirty not even one of them is ultra orthodox. Not even one a fact that his inexplicable except in light of systemic discrimination on the part of the ministry of secular culture and secular sports and of course the idea f who organizes charter debts. But do they have no no. I say q. E. d still arguably. Nothing captures the ironic spirit of this city. We love so well tel aviv. Better than four hundred and thirty judokas gathering from the four corners of the earth from angola to mbia to show the world that pandemic something like the prophecy of isaiah will be fulfilled and the lion. Shell lie with the lamb the iranian shell e ponce nagy the israeli and the golan. Shell cacak these ambien with us. In the studio is a woman who's lovely writing is always an ippon. I refer of course to alison happen. Summer allison is written for political the new republic foreign policy the jerusalem post ata the ford and many other of your very best papers magazines. She is a columnist for our at. You have heard on. Npr pri in the bbc and you have seen her on. I twenty four television. And al jazeera tv alison holds a world centre ward for journalism recognizing excellence reported and a simon rocked our award for excellence and covering zionism and israel. Alison how are you doing. I'm good but i wish i was in the snow in jerusalem with my son lis- tel aviv centric cheerleaders. Like you take hit every time. It snows in jerusalem and they become the cool city rain. We don't take any says the man who is considering moving to boston also with us here in our studio and we are so delighted again is a woman whom i d f may well have had in mind when they set out what they call the judo. Moral code quote courage. Respect modesty sincerity friendship honor and politeness. Obviously i am talking about sally. Ed sally is the resource development director and also one of the elected leaders of the grassroots political movement standing together about which more later sally abbott has been an activist. She was a teen focusing on feminist struggles. And on children's rights she has written for the nation and recently interviewed noam chomsky for majority magazine. Sally how are you doing. I'm great thank you. I'm actually very mad that i'm missing the snow. And we're getting all the wets mess dirty bus messier. I know even had yesterday and hail is being in tel aviv. You know oh. I don't know there's still something about being in tel aviv. I would still rather be here than jerusalem with us now also also with us in the capsule studio reserved for the semi vaccinated right behind us through the wall is a man whom the great saddam yamada might have had in mind when he said of judo and of life itself quote to gain mastery. You must unite the qualities of spirit strength technique and the ability to take the initiative and quote. I refer naturally to ohio delta zubeida. You heard his voice before. Ohio it'll be is a book reviewer for our ad. He rates for offscreen magazine and lately has written fiction for granted in the past hosted a weekly show on halloween. Tv on arts and culture in israel. He's admired for his genius loved for his warm human decency and envied for his effortless. Cool ohad how're you doing. I just can't get over the fact that it's called ju- dough and there are no holiday. Judokas like i know. I'm i'm kind of angry about that. I have to tell you there are places that you would think discrimination would not enter but it's everywhere. It's just everywhere. Yeah yeah now answer me. My name is no renato. Meet to boast but i had my once in a decade colonoscopy this past week and when i saw dr afterwards we want to hear more and i'm sitting behind you behind you so you can see how it's hard a little bit hard not to both about his so i saw the doctor afterwards and he said quote the inside of your colon

Angola Ben Gurion Airport Zambia International Judo Federation Mookie Israel Journal Of Borderlands Studies Savimbi Malawi Aviv Hilton Intel Porush Knesset Eastern Isler Ultra Orthodox Judaism Party TEL Tel Aviv Ministry Of Secular Culture An E. D
Episode 263: Purim Torah - Anna Solomon

Judaism Unbound

07:58 min | 5 d ago

Episode 263: Purim Torah - Anna Solomon

"And i'm lexie berg and depending on when you're listening to this episode. Either happy almost him happy poorer them or hope had happy them. But we normally release are episodes on friday mornings and this friday morning is the holiday of purim but we thought that since our conversation with our guest today is about the book of esther it would actually make sense to be able to listen to it before parham so that. If we talk about anything that makes you think differently about the book of esther. You might actually be able to take that into your purim celebration with you. Wherever that perm celebration might piece so before we jump into the conversation we just wanted to remind you of two things that we're doing in case you're listening to this in time to be able to do them before or on purim. The first is called the mcgilla project which you can find at. Www dot mcgilla project dot com. That's m. e. g. i l. l. a. h. and it's a collection of thirty plus videos all of which are exploring the book of esther from a variety of different angles a wide variety of angles. And there's also an additional resources page there where we've gathered together links to just about everything that we could find on the internet about the book of esther including books and articles but also many actresses have played s area. That i didn't know had ever played us there including joan collins who knew so. Check all that out at mcgill project. And also if you're listening to this on thursday morning. Join us tonight for a purim celebration. That we've called poor live and you can find that at. Www dot judaism unbound dot com slash forum. Twenty twenty one. We're doing it together with the tourist studio. We're gonna be talking to the founder of the studio in this series and a few weeks and it's an unskilled unbound exploration of the ten chapters of the book of esther with a different person leading us through each chapter. It's going to be a lot of fun so join us there. And if you're listening to this after thursday well you can't come this year but hopefully you can come in the future year and you can certainly still enjoy the mcgilla project which our guest today has actually done a short video for so. Let's get into our conversation today with our guest anna solomon. She is a novelist. Who is the author of a book called the book of v which is a take on the book of esther story. There's a lot of layers to it. Some of it takes place in ancient shoeshine or sousa and there's two other layers in the story that take place in modern times and of course don't have to do with the book of esther story or do they. It's a really amazing novel really interesting. Read and we're excited to talk about it today with trying to minimize spoilers. In addition to writing the book v anna salomon has also written two other novels. One is called leaving. Lucy pair and the other one is called the little bride. She has a two time winner of the pushcart prize. Her short fiction essays and reviews have appeared in the new york times magazine ploughshares. One story the boston globe and elsewhere. She's the winner of many many awards for her writing and her short story. The lobster mafia story was chosen as boston's one city. One story read and a is co editor of labor day. True birth stories by today's best women raiders and before becoming a novelist. She was an award-winning journalist for national public. Radio's living on earth. Anna solomon is a graduate of brown university and the iowa workshop and she teaches writing at barnard college. Weren wilson's mfa program in creative writing and the ninety two y unterberg poetry center. We think that the perspective of the arts is a critically important way to understand judaism and to reimagine judaism and so we couldn't be more excited to explore a biblical story on around the day that we actually read the story in the jewish calendar with a novelist who has written a novel about the biblical story. It's going to open us up in all kinds of new ways to look at the bible. So anna solomon. Welcome to judaism unbounded. It's really great to have you. It's great to be here. So we've been doing this series on the bible and it's really exciting to be able to talk to somebody who's written a what you call exactly a biblical novel. A you know that generates itself from a biblical story. But i love to start by understanding like how you chose to write a novel based on the biblical story. You know you've written other books before wh what was the process that brought you to take this on the initial impulse really came from a children's book that i was given to read to my own kids which was sort of a children's version of the book of esther. I expected it to be simpler somehow or to kind of make the book of esther more straightforward and it turned out didn't it all in it actually raised all of the questions that had always had about the book of esther but it was like wait a second. Why was it that. I was always told that esther was really virtuous and it turns out. She's concubine a harem. And what about this fusty character. Who seems to actually have made what we would consider to be the quote virtuous choice by saying no. I won't parade make it. There were all these questions and then plot holes Hush worse who it seems by the end is sort of shocked by what heyman has been doing. This genocide earlier on is like yeah. Sure whatever you know. There's just so many there's so many sort of plot holes and inconsistencies and and my kids had all sorts of questions and it kind of made me want to go back to the book of esther itself and investigate on which is not something. I really have a lot of experienced with the local tax that that was the initial impulse that drove me back with all of these questions. You know a lot of times on this podcast. We've talked about wanting to have people. Will we call regular jews. You know people that are unauthorized. Feel empowered to take on jewish topics and jewish practices and reimagine. Them and a lot of people are intimidated to do that because they say well. I'm not a rabbi. I didn't study. How do i know how to do you know and so. I really love to talk to somebody who's done that kind of day. She's move of saying well. I'm going to really you know. Come to this. Not as somebody who's had a tremendous amount of expertise before i started and i'm curious both about the process of getting started. And did you feel intimidated in that way. And how did you get over it. And also the process of like. How much research did you do until you felt confident to the point of saying okay. Yeah i actually can write a novel about this or like you say i can contribute mid rushed to this book which you know other people say well i mean who are you after. Two thousand years totally. It's a great question. And i am absolutely a regular jew as you said i love that term and i think actually the what you said so the the research was totally tied into my getting to a point of being able to say i can do this but but not in the way. You'd expect not so much. Because i got to a point and i i felt like i knew enough it was because i got to a point and i realized that no one knows and so it gave me the freedom to go in. You know. I mean. I i began by going to my rabbi. This is in park slope brooklyn congregation. Bethelehem rachel to moaner. She's really wonderful. Insertive saying pronounced guest. Oh yeah She so great. And i said you know where do i even start and i was really open about how little i knew and she really you know is like in her office. So here's where you can even begin to go looking for interpretations translations other stories Mid rush of course. And i think for me one of the things that was very freeing in particular was was reading. The very ancient rabbis takes on The book of esther which were wild like really really wild things. That don't have any seem to have any basis in the book itself like in one hayman's daughter Heenan has a daughter first of all and she mistakes heyman for mortified or the other way round in in prayed and drops feces on his head on her father's head and it's like where does that come from in in many things like this and i think the more i read in the more outrageous at all was thought well if the ancient babylonian rabbis could do this then i guess i can. Do you

Anna Solomon Lexie Berg Mcgill Project Anna Salomon Lucy Pair Weren Wilson Y Unterberg Poetry Center Parham Joan Collins Sousa The New York Times Magazine Barnard College The Boston Globe Brown University Raiders Heyman Iowa Boston Esther
The Cairo Genizah with Marina Rustow

Jewish History Matters

06:42 min | 2 months ago

The Cairo Genizah with Marina Rustow

"The cairo. Anita is repository of such immense historical value. That sometimes it's easy to just assume the ways that it's important and i'm so excited to really dig in deep with marina on these important issues and think through all the different ways in which the denisa is an important historical record an important social phenomenon and an important lens through which we can understand medieval jewish has as well as the broader context in which jews as well as their neighbors lived. Thanks for listening in high marina. Welcome to the podcast here. Thank you so much for joining us. I really had such a blast reading your book and it's wonderful to be able to talk about it and to think about the really broadly. I want to think about your starting point from the book. The book is called the lost archive. And it's interesting that you are calling the cairo an archive in part because we have this great twentieth century can use a scholar. Some of gorton. Who talked about the guineas in very different terms in the introduction to his book the mediterranean society. He specifically calls the guineas a kind of an anti archive. I was wondering if you can talk a bit about the way in which you see the news as a kind of a lost archive. And what this means to you. When we think about the way that we approach vanessa and the kinds of questions that we can ask about it and what we can learn from it so i called the book the lost ark on that. Actually the claim that i'm making isn't that they can use it self archive but rather that. It contains traces of other archives. Go was right that they use is not an archive because an archive is arranged and maintained for the purposes. Not just storage. But also a retrieval so things have to be index. They have to be organized. They have to be ordered and they have to prunes for all. Those reasons are kaiser kind of different animal whereas they can isa people were just throwing stuff has early with absolutely no expectation that things would be accessible again in that sense. It was an anti our pod. But gordon says the guineas our guy because it was basically trashy what we would call a recycling bin or something like that but the inisia- is one place where we can find evidence to reconstruct the archiving practices of estate. That didn't it's preserve archive. The fontham calif it so in other words like it'd be so great if we could just walk into a building and i don't know cairo for instance and you know see the whole art of the fontham if it laid out there like i. You have a fiscal documents and then you have the administrative documents and are arranged according to date and place. This is how we kind of expect to work what you have in. The asia is a bunch of documents that may once have been thought archives but eventually were dumped and pruned from them because if things are are preserved for the purposes of retrieval then. Something's eventually have to be pruned. Otherwise you just end up with an infinite archives in kind of bored. Acn way and the other is documents that were never intended for the archive those two types of state document against each other. You can kind of triangulate what the loss ultimate archive looked like. So that's the lost ark. That i'm referring to in the title. Yeah it's this question of how we reconstruct the past in the absence of sources or in the absence of an official repository An official repository is both really good. Because it means that you have a lot of material that you can work with an official repository also means that there may be things that don't make it in there on purpose or the get removed and so i think that part of what you're doing here is using the news as a way to think through how we can approach history really different ways. That's right this is kind of in keeping with a move that some people in my field medieval middle east history have moved towards the last decade. Which is from static. Archives to archiving practices the study. we're cutting practices. And i think there's a much much broader movement towards this which is like you have a history of the book on the one. Hand the history of archives on the other which you know. Well that's your field that when you have a sense of how texts were produced and why they were producing the material forms in which they were produced in an survived again physically. How do they survive. You can actually use them as historical source material in a much more responsible way so i think part of what historians had come to do over the course of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries is in a sense to get kind of lazy which is to say that we re defied archives as a kind of ready made repository store source material as opposed to understanding that the archives an accumulation of different processes obviously not all historians. Did this. but you know. I think my expectation was very much like you know. I would love to be able to walk into a building and start looking through files and then thinking retroactively about what here isn't here whereas going from the other end which is taking all the discarded material and trying to figure out what an archive would have looked like had it survived is a different story or with is in a different way. There's the archive as it was kept in the period in question and there the curatorial conventions and standards and assumptions criteria are interesting to think about it also often quite transparent and then there's the archive as it's kind of evolved over the centuries. Let's say like. I'm an eleven twelve century historian so as it evolved in a an eight hundred subsequent years. I mean if you think about about it all right. This is a place that has some of the oldest continuously operating libraries that we know of but of course the the archival material that they have in these libraries has been organized reorganized. You know dozens of times since the fourth century or or and that means that we have to start asking different questions and the afterlife archives. From how the archives were actually produced and arranged in the time period that were studying.

Cairo Mediterranean Society Gorton Anita Marina Vanessa Gordon Asia Middle East
Episode 262: Marvel's Torah - Abraham Riesman

Judaism Unbound

05:47 min | Last week

Episode 262: Marvel's Torah - Abraham Riesman

"In early march. I'm trying to remember. I think it was basically a week before. Quarantine really happened in a big way and for some of us in may be the last jewish holiday that we're experiencing in the first year of quarantine and in any event from last year was before we had figured out any of this stuff how to do jewish holidays online on zoom. If we have figured it out but this year we're well into covid and we are now in a position to be able to help. People celebrate purim. Digitally in ways that we couldn't last year and here judaism unbound. We actually have two initiatives that you can use to try to make this year's online purim as meaningful an interesting and fun as possible. The first one which is already out in available is called the mcgilla project you can find it at mcgilla project dot com that's m. e. g. i l. a. h. project dot com and that is a collection of over thirty videos. Each of which is exploring the book of esther story from a different angle. Hopefully you'll find everything that you can imagine wanting to find at the mcgilla project. The second initiative is a gathering that we are doing on purim. eve. That's thursday night february twenty fifth at eight thirty pm eastern time five thirty. Pm pacific time. it's called purim. Live and you can find it at judaism unbound dot com slash purim. Twenty twenty one. We're putting this together with another organization called the tourist studio. We're actually going to speak to its founder and a few weeks and it is an unbounded unscrambled journey through the ten chapters of the book of esther. We have ten different people. Each of whom is taking us through one of the chapters in hopefully an interesting and fun way so again it's studios unbound dot com slash forum. Twenty twenty one to register to attend. And now let's go into our interview as you'll remember where in this series of episodes looking at the bible from all kinds of interesting angles and you would think that a book about stanley. One of the creators of the marvel comics. Universe wouldn't exactly fit into a series about the bible. And maybe it doesn't maybe it doesn't we think it does and you'll make your own judgment after our interview. But we're excited to talk to abraham today. He's the author of a new book called true believer the rise and fall of stan lee. It's a biography of stanley. The raider editor who brought marvel comics to the world based on more than one hundred and fifty interviews thousands of pages of archival material. And in this conversation. We're going to talk a lot about stan lee and judaism. They had a complex relationship. And along the way we're gonna make some connections our series on the bible and explorer. Whether what we're looking at we're looking at the marvel universe is a version of biblical material for our time. Our guest today. Abraham richmond is a journalist who mostly writes for new york magazine and it sub site vulture dedicated to arts and culture. He's also done writing video and audio for other media outlets including the washington post. The wall street journal the boston globe and the new republic and of course he is the author of this book which has just come out called true believer the rise and fall of stan lee and he's also in the process of writing. Another biography called ringmaster the life. And times of vince mcmahon in the jewish community abraham richmond is a board member of one of our favourite jewish magazines. Jewish currents so without further. Ado abraham richman welcome to judaism unbounded so great to have you. Finally i've been unbound and allowed to be enjoying. This is the best thing that's ever happened to me seriously. I'm very excited to be here. I've been looking forward to this conversation. We have to so for those of our listeners. who may not be mavens in the world of comics. I thought we could start by. Just can you give us a very brief understanding of sort of. What's the difference between stan. Lee's work at marvel and the other superhero comics especially the world of superman batman the world that we know of like what what was stanley. It's real contribution. Yeah so in thumbnail. Form stanley was an editor. And to some extent writer of these comics came out in the nineteen sixties the beginning of marvel comics and there were a number of innovations that he put into the work that he did all those comics. So one of these things is. He is dialogue narration. The best way to describe him as they were snappy they were melancholic. Veve had the whole range of human emotion. Now you read them now and they come across as stilted and an old fashioned but at the time in the nineteen sixties the warrant comex. That sounded like this and then another thing was the idea of the marvel. universe not necessarily the characters. there's largest butte about who came up with characters but the idea of having all these characters interact star one comic series can interact with start another comic series. They conform a team with a third person and it was pretty from a business standpoint. An to some extent standpoint. It was a genius and extremely innovative idea. But marvel was the the outlet where you had stand appearing on the dick cabbage show and giving speeches too stoned seniors at the seniors in college not senior citizens. Although that would be interesting. I'd love that audiotape. Talking to you know college students Around the country now student seniors though those stones announcements since they technically yes. You're exactly right. You're desperate anyway. So his billy's cell marvel was kind of unparalleled.

Stan Lee Stanley Abraham Richmond Ado Abraham Richman New York Magazine Abraham Vince Mcmahon The Boston Globe The Washington Post The Wall Street Journal Veve Stan LEE Marvel Billy
The Yetzer of Great Men (Sukkah 52a)

The Joy of Text

09:53 min | Last month

The Yetzer of Great Men (Sukkah 52a)

"Below. So what tax do you have today. So i thought we'd look at the text from the gamero from soka fifty two a m. it's a famous tax but i don't think we ever discussed it as groups. I'd love to hear your thoughts. So here's tomorrow and it says as follows new rubber nana rabbis taught. Now this is in the middle of a whole major discussion relating to the gates or hora which the camera tends to me the sexual drive. Not just the general desire to send although could mean that as well so it quotes verse. And it says edited Mirror i am. I will distance this The northern one from you but it says this is referring to the eighth or hara which is hidden in the hearts of human beings and then the end of the versus because he has done greatly like the great power of gates zara and the texas follows. I'm are by media having your jimmy. Coolum that the power of the eighth or hara is greatest amongst the tourists ages and then it tells the following story once happened that by her demand. Say to a woman with us rise early. And we'll go on the road. And i thought i'll follow them and prevent them from sinning because he assumed that they were having some sexual assignation. He went after them about three miles for three meal through the reeds heard them saying our conversation has been so nice and now we must take separate roads by my enemy. Meeting myself would not have contained himself. Could not have if i was with that woman half i would not have been able to contain myself. Leaned against the both of the door and was very sorry that he would have been worse than a common man. So here i rabbi would not have been able to control myself from these this man and woman just friends no man came to him and taught the greater man is the more is he tempted by the evil spirit by the eighth or hara and the hebrew is coho. Godot may have a row each rogue adult men who who is greater than his friend. His desire his yates. There is stronger than than a friend. So my god can i jump and i don't want to jump to very famous bride loftier thoughts so i wonder it may be a slow alternate perspective on this and that the more you put up barriers or the more you like make things You know make the bins into a big deal of being now allowed the harder on those heavier sits on your head. I'm saying this really inarticulate way but it's kind of like if you take a boy and a girl who public school together and all the time wasn't girls and then you send them off to do an errand you don't have two seconds of thought that oh my god you will get a horrible. Overtake them whether you take two kids from haredi community never ever ever have an object to hang out together all the sudden the whole interaction become so much more fraught. So that's the first thing that goes through my head here and so interest. It's it's normally not done or is it. Also because the reason it's not done is it's always framed as being a sexual temptation and for that's the lens that's brought to the reason men and women. We don't have them go together into carry. Community is because women's sexual temptation. Where freight of your yeats their horror and therefore if that's always the message that that also becomes the lens through which you know. The the experience is taking place at boulder trail that's interesting. Yeah i mean my first When i heard this tax was on a totally different tack and maybe not as positive i was like oh god that sounds like a total apologetic for like powerful people like sexually harassing other. People's like oh you know the greater you are the greater your temptation is going to be and it totally like rubbed me the wrong way but i guess watch you're reading is really interesting. I'm like trying to relate to it as like the you know heavier and higher. Your set of expectations for yourself are the like heavier bat. Might weigh upon you like how would you understand that the greater the rabbi quote unquote degraded the rabbi most likely more he has separated himself out from the day to day workings of the world. Right like when we think about great rabbis particular. We think about people who've had a little bit closer themselves from the world's and that's where i'm going with this. Although i do think you are reading sarah which is fascinating to me about the powerful people. There's a whole other way to look at this. Which is that. We often complain about the fact that powerful people are the ones who are much more sexually abusive. And sometimes i we kind of bring it on ourselves because the people that we choose as powerful people and i'm not sure rabbis phones category but generally politicians we go after like people who are charismatic and a little bit narcissistic and who you know love to be loved and one adulation by and we love those people. We pick them. We take them as movie stars. We picked politicians. A man were surprised when they bay. That way does make vase which you cannot see the podcast. So on gonna shut up. Don't disagree with you just. I think that we're missing You know what i. I would consider sort of an obvious perspective. Which is that. it's not just true. We value but the reality that if you think about gates there as more generally as dr could be sexual drive drive lost. You know that. isn't that often. What makes people great. What sort of you know why somebody is nice. Not just your average in our personal. No like i have a passion of doing something in the world making a difference if this you know maybe i don't know if we call it sexual identity that is sublimated and me directly. Guess call it. Yates aaron general. You know that sometimes expresses itself sexually and sometimes super interesting. I really liked that. Yeah totally yeah. I think that's absolutely true. The non psychologist of the group is the one who came up with that with that. There's different ways to look at this. I think. I think it's a really really interesting you know and i think to the damara asked why at all or not statement you know. It is in the context of a discussion of yates. There which is not limited to sexual although the often reduces. Yates there to the sort of sexual drive. You know i mean there's a metric that says the God saw on the end of the steak he told about. Oh you know that it was very good so the mavericks has told my. Opiates are horror so so which is a very i had on suggestive mattress so someone if eight needs out needs mostly good. Who's the gates are. Har- is good but the metrics actually says work not for the easter hara. A person wouldn't build a a major building and wouldn't get married so sort of speaks about the value of the eight sarah as very constructive creative force that can of course he does Destructive as well right. It is really interesting that i won't talk about. These people aren't when travelling. I kinda soon to as a couple so to a while to realize eleven couple with the other question also is the rabbi assumes. Let the same women he's attracted to everybody's attracted to like that's fascinating into dog south houston guy would have trouble with anyone at all or just this particular women were in. A plastic case was just like any sort of vaguely attractive woman would be at the our material or was it. This woman in particular amend the assumption that this woman was that for this guy as well as an. I don't take down kind of winding back way. But i find that also a little bit amusing and that goes back to what i was saying about you. Know if you have no exposure to something to limit your exposure some bank. It makes it much more tempting. You know it's like What's expresses miami. Vinnie lights right. Stolen waters will arm our sweeter so were or the worst the tax about that. You don't trust the somebody's not have sex with their fiance david for the wedding. Because but you're not worried about it after the wedding right because hospice was at once. You have a bread in your basket. Brad's by basket. Like there was no description of the or desirability of the woman was almost like from like exactly what you said that for a by being so sheltered the opportunity to be with any woman would have been just such a irresistible temptation. You know so exactly back shit up. Yeah i was about to say like was that by was he. Did he have any outlet here and also what was he doing following this couple like. Why is that his job. Follow up and make sure that they don't send creepy is is her giving itself a certain allowance. Like i'm gonna make sure they don't see him. But the there's something very right You know What's word titillating out. I think you know about the possibility of of what's going to happen. Yeah kind of and it kind of reminds me of rory of the of the student who goes under the bed like listen to his teacher have but never knows that story. Well rejects. i use it all. I

Hara Gamero Gates Zara Soka Yates Godot Yates Aaron Rabbi Jimmy Damara Texas Sarah Boulder Gates Mavericks Houston Vinnie Miami
Black Power and Jewish Politics with Marc Dollinger

Jewish History Matters

05:14 min | 6 months ago

Black Power and Jewish Politics with Marc Dollinger

"So highmark. Welcome to the PODCAST. Great to be here. Thank you. Yeah. I'm really glad that you can join us for I. Think Really Important and relevant conversation. I read through the book I think it's a fantastic book. I think that you're offering a revision of some of the ways in terms of how people have understood. Especially, Jewish people have understood the question of the history of black Jewish relations. You maybe WANNA get US started off by saying a brief word about your argument in the book and what it is that you're putting forward. Yes, sure when I was growing up as a white suburban Jewish kitten in in La I learned that the civil rights movement was the story of a black Jewish alliance that brought heroic Jews to the south where they fought on behalf of racial justice until the mid nineteen sixties. The. Rise of black militancy of. Black Power of anti-semitism. Community purge Jews and ended what was a wonderful alliance. When I looked in the archives though and began researching the book. I discovered an entirely different story emerging instead of sort of the Dr King Rabbi Hessel arm in arm narrative that I was raised on. I. Found that even White Male Jewish leaders of National Jewish organizations understood as early as the nineteen fifties. There was a fundamental difference between being white and Jewish in America and being black? In. America. And they in fact, knew that there would be limits to the black Jewish alliance and That was my first sort of shocking discovery in terms of revising I knew growing up. It's a really jarring perspective for a lot of people Jewish people I want to say who grow up thinking about and being taught about this alliance within the civil rights movement and the involvement of Jews within the civil rights movement. So I think that what you're offering here is a almost radical perspective, a radical revision of how we understand the role of the Jews in the civil rights movement. I'd like to frame it s a both and and it's really important I to acknowledge the extraordinary American Jewish participation in the civil rights movement and in social justice causes. When you look at the ethnic groups in America, Jews are the most liberal. Progressive. Democratic. Party. Now Voting Group only African Americans vote more. And by that standard I think there's justifiable pride amongst American Jews for the work that we have done and those perspectives have been covered in the historic. Already. What's also true is even as many heroic. Jews. Did go to the south to register voters and in some tragic cases, of course, gave their lives most Americans use didn't. And there became almost sort of in the north, a sense that watching on TV, what the Jewish heroes were doing extended to them as well. So what my book is trying to do is take a broader more inclusive look of all Americans, or at least white American Jews, and now we get to see more complexity to what's going on. So I don't see this as as undermining. The existing truth about Jewish involvement but I see it hopefully deepening it and making it more complex. Why do you think that it's important to offer this complexity to the narrative of first of all? It's surprising in and of itself there's something that custodians recall historical memory, which is what actually happened and what we remember or think happened what we were taught happened is often different. In fact, there's a history of historical memory which says the way in which we choose to remember or forget or analyze or spin. If you want to be more cynical, our historical past actually is meaningful in and of itself. So what I found, when I was surprised to find was that as early as the nineteen fifties, Jewish leaders were calling out the limits of white Jewish liberalism and the inevitability of of African American autonomy and what would become the rise of black power. So at the very time that the public narrative was consensus arm in arm. But I love the called peace love and Bobby. Sherman. Everything's great. At that moment, even the Jewish leaders who were engaged in that kind of consensus politics understood its limits. That's the part that we've forgotten. I think over the last fifty or sixty years and I think it's really important especially in today's climate for us to understand better that it was always deep and complicated an intense and we knew about it at the time. And then the real story is how in journalism and historiographer and in public memory, we sort of forgotten that element until we've remembered it again with the national reckoning on race

Dr King Rabbi Hessel La I America Bobby Sherman
The Sexual Fantasies Episode

The Joy of Text

09:36 min | Last month

The Sexual Fantasies Episode

"In twenty fifteen sadly before my time But we as you like ten okay but basically we just wanted to take a fresh look. At the topic and address it again kind of looking at some facets that weren't really addressed in our first episode and just kind of continuing the conversation about what i think is just a really central topic right so i. I felt strongly about doing this. Because i feel like fantasies are really central to people lives especially on long-term sex lives. I feel like this comes up so often. They concern about fantasizing all for my religious patience and may not religious patients most couples who have been having sex for more than. Let's say two years or three years ago to hit this one way or the other either because they should be fantasizing. 'cause it makes sex more interesting and it allows their sex life to take all kinds of different directions. Also i feel like people have so much trouble with this so from novel. Just i get this idea like. Oh my god i feel guilty that somehow thinking about somebody besides my spouse and from my religious patients i hear oh my god is a major issues with the fact that i'm thinking about my spouse so i can start talking about the fact. Why don't think it's a problem from a moral and ethical perspective. But say something from the you know helen piece. I don't sure So there's a passage in the talmud in dr that says that the man is not allowed to drink from one cup while placing his eye while looking at another cup and obviously it means not allowed to have sex with his wife. while thinking about another woman You don't like the metaphor here from context context says both of them are his wives. So there you go. It's clear almost august. it's basically explicit. So that seems to say exactly that this type of scenario is a problem. But here's the big but it seems that if you actually look at it more closely and you look at what the commentators say I don't think that it relates to the type of fantasy that you're talking about. There's good evidence that at least for many commentators in means that a person is not supposed to be using their wife as standing for the woman they really wanna be having sex with. And i think you see that already. A little bit in the language of etain enough should not be placing his eye which really means like focusing on desiring. Different woman does not just mean sort of fantasizing but maybe helpful. So i i can quote some sources that make that point but maybe it'd be helpful by kevin for you to address that reality like why is it not cheating on your husband or on your wife to be thinking of someone else so i know i've probably made this point in other episodes but i think the most important thing for people to realize is that when you're thinking about somebody else you're thinking about a fictional person even if you're thinking about a real person it's a fictional person because that may be a real person that you have seen on television or have seen at you know you're at a workplace meeting or something so they're real a certain level but the fans you have about having sex with them does not include the fact that you come home every day to them. They don't do the dishes when they say they're going to do the dishes. They don't pick up their socks that they're dropping on the floor right. You have taken this element of this person. And you've distilled it down to the pieces of the person and the elements of the person that turn you on or that will turn you on and that is why. It's not really a real person that you're having sex with it's a fantasy of even if it is. That's why i laugh a little bit when somebody's like if i have a fantasy about a fictional character. Everybody you're having a fantasy about is a fictional character. Even if it's somebody that you kind of know socially again you have just turned them into this fantasy character for you to have sex with them. That's number one number. Two is also for sure before you are making the decision to have sex with this person who is in the room with you and so if you have a fantasy character in her head. It's because you're using that person you're using that person in order to have sex with this person right so who's getting used right. It's a fantasy character not the person you're actually having sex with at the moment and i think that becomes really really important lesson for people. I had this one patient once not that long ago. Who was just so good because it was so distilled where she. She started crying when we start talking about. I asked her if she thought about other people and she was having sex and she said she does but she feels terribly guilty about it. And i said well. Why do you feel guilty bench. Then i think my husband must also be thinking about other women and that makes me feel terrible. And i was like okay. It makes me feel terrible because you think you should only be thing beg you and you should be the only thing that ever turns him on and so she sort of nodding through her tears. I knew she had this. You know grown up daughter. I said your daughter. She's in a relationship. Now do you want for the rest of her life to only be thinking about one man and she sort of looked at me and she started laughing she was like not really and i said and her boyfriend you want if she gets married. You want her husband's only be thinking about her for the rest of his life. You should only be thinking about her as the only that turns him on. Is this young woman. And she's well. Oh my god. I think you'd be a sociopath. If that was the case and i was like yeah you think so. It was so much easier for her to see this with her daughter and her daughter's boyfriend we had these kind of crazy romanticised views. That as soon as you sort of put them under a microscope do not make any sense at all. So i think we like our little kind at ourselves and say like this is really unrealistic. Your erotic brain likes new things. It doesn't like repetition. Repetition is not erotic right road. Familiar tents erotic. So how do you bring the new win to your relationship and you wanna have a good sexual relation with this person for you. Know thirty years forty years of best and easiest way to do that is to use fantasy so like a big fantasies and i i really feel like people need to like lighten up on themselves a little bit now. I will say my only caveat if there is somebody that you know and you keep fantasizing about the same person again and again and again and you're not feeling good about your relationship that's already a different story and that's a problem but that's not what we're talking about. We're talking about most people who are thinking about a movie star or like an idea of somebody you know or a a baseball player. Whatever teacher so what if somebody you know. See someone at work. It's really turned on and come some. Let's say a man comes home and has sex with his wife and doesn't like once keep his eyes closed while he's having sex with his wife so he doesn't he could be thinking of this person and not his wife. He's still choosing to have sex with his white he's married and this other woman is married to like. Sometimes we're not making that choice. Actively those are the circumstances where stuck in our. Let's a funny way to put something like okay. Some saint you. If there's a problem in your relationship this seems like an ongoing problem has to be addressed. But let's let me refrain that like he sees this woman he gets really dot and he uses that in order to have great sex with his wife. That's amazing like what difference does it make. If he's you know if the vision he hasn't his is you know twenty minutes. Twenty seconds before orgasm is sort of blurring between this woman and his wife. It's great now. Those pleasurable feelings have now connected with his wife right if he's constantly fantasizing about this woman and he's having issues with stock which is what you said. This is where stuck with. is that language. Like i feel like that's where the change us abc and stop saying this is what you're stuck with. This is what you're you're using it roddick energy that you pick up from other parts of your life and you're bringing back into your marriage and i think that's much more sort of positive way to look at it. Is sarah looking horrified. I law. i'm. I'm just wondering if we brought in the conversation a little bit because right now it sounds like both of you are talking just about fantasizing about another person or like imagine character or whatever. I'm also wondering your thoughts about just fantasizing in general like maybe fantasizing like during the workday about having a new type of sex with your spouse or you know just kind of like having fantasies about sex like no not while you're having sex so i'm amazed that because why would that be a problem like in other words i feel like the only thing comes up in my mind is problem is the one fantasies are great every fantasy. All the time is great. The only one that people seem to have a lot of problems with our when involves thinking about some of the other than your partner. I don't know though. I mean i feel like there's during the course any kind of sex no but during the day if some of these getting turned on by somebody you know people probably feel guilty through right. I'm well also. I mean this might be coming from my own misinformation. But isn't there an idea of like here. Haram kind of just like negative idea of like fantasizing about sex maybe wall you're learning or like or maybe just in general a we're not supposed to being thoughts are looking for is in our hearts. The laughter here who right so the ramoche divided into two categories. One is to have really plan to do a sin like to plan to commit adultery like a very intentional. So that's put that aside the other one. Is you know men having sexual thoughts which can lead to seminal emission know to masturbation or actually sitting in a worse way. I was once teaching this text out. The problem about here haram in a married man. Whatever ran looking at a woman sexually and the student The guy was teaching it to any sets be. What does it matter where you get your appetite as long as you come home to eat. So which i thought was exactly what

Helen Piece Kevin Baseball ABC Sarah Haram
MK Yifat Shasha-Biton, first Likud lawmaker to defect to New Hope

The Promised Podcast

06:03 min | 2 months ago

MK Yifat Shasha-Biton, first Likud lawmaker to defect to New Hope

"First we have a matter that we're following with alert interest. Great concern is part of an occasional series. We call the premise. Podcast ponders the politics of pentameter and the use of the bard to advance a canard last week. The chair of the knesset corona virus committee. He fought shasha beaten announced that she was leaving the likud to join the new right-wing. Hope party where she would become. Don't sars number to an announcement that right away added five seats to the tally. New hope was showing in early polls. Shasha beaten is a popular politician. Mostly because as the head of the corona committee she overturned government decisions to close pools and gyms and stores in schools and even though her decisions were themselves overturned right back again by the government people came to see her as a straight shooter and someone fighting for the people trying to get to work and pay their bills and maybe grab a little exercise if they can. And who doesn't like a truth to power rebel. Also most everything about josh abi tone is wonderful. She grew up in the development town of kiryat shmona the daughter of a nurse from morocco and moshe feed a guy born in iraq who built up a bus company. She had a phd before she was thirty was deputy mayor of kyoto before he was thirty five and was a college vice president forty. It's partly because shasha tone has so much going on that folks and the likud were furious mad when she announced that she was switching parties and they insisted that she resigned right away. Shasha beaten refused on the grounds that she had been elected in this term and she would serve out. There are practical issues in play each sitting. Mk gets government allocated campaign funds when they run for the successive knesset. So if on stays and she'll have one point seven million shekels to use for new hopes campaign but if she quits now she'll be replaced and some other likud member. We'll get that cash lee cooed transportation minister miri regev tweeted quote. You've thought shasha beaten if you have a drop of integrity left resign. Immediately from connecticut and return the mandate to the national camp which you took for a ride for your own benefit a disgrace and when shasha baton refused the likud petitions something called the knesset house committee basically a rules and procedures committee to declare shasha beaten a quote unquote deserter which status would allow them to strip her of her likud campaign funding at the very least anyway. The committee met a few days ago. And because by then blue and was on the outs with the likud they supported chechen tone and she remains in the knesset with her one point seven million shekels in election funding which is when this happened. Uzi they on a likud. Backbencher angry by the outcome of the committee meeting convinced that chechen beaten had not gotten the come up and she deserves asked to be recognized by the chair leaned into the microphone and said quote. I would like to give some free literary advice to get on the of shasha zones new party that it was for matters such as these that shakespeare wrote in fellow i believe and then diane went onto quote not on alternate translation. I think of rabbani ios warning at the end of act one in fellow look to her more if thou has is to see. She has deceived her father. And may the shot a mile invoked up via gumbo which couplet was met by pandemonium in the committee with shasha be tone saying the volume clement. Actually came on the la. I have heard low things. But i must say that. I have never heard things as low as this. At this point mikhail cutler launch a religious blue and white. Mk screened uzi. Why are you referring to shakespeare. Why not refer to the woman who strays and you'll at least be using our own sources. The woman who strays as a reference to the book of numbers by bar chapter five verses twelve through sixteen about what to do with a wife who acts on faithfully to which topic an entire track date of the tomlin. My second sota is devoted later. Uzi dayan said quote. Someone wrote me and said on your life man. What a sexist remark. if that's how it was perceived. I really apologize and quote. And i know what you're thinking. That's a lousy apology. If that's how it was perceived blah blah blah blah blah. But i'd like to think the best of who was married to my favorite zoologist environmentalists tamar. Diane i adore her and she's lately been. The person who by force of character and charm willed into existence. The amazing new natural history museum at tel aviv university which is among other things. A brilliant polemic for sustainability and there ain't no one more feminists then tomorrow diane uzi on also mostly diane's nephew and yours on geffen's cousin so there's that he thought shasha zone for her part. Classically accepted the apology. And the matter seem to be over but all week. I've been thinking that there was an opportunity. Missed here and i can't get it out of my mind. Would it have hurt chubby tone to respond rather than with. I have never heard things as low as this. By saying with catherine from the taming of the shrew my tongue will tell the anger of my heart or else my heart concealing it will break. Would it have hurt. Shasha beaten to insist with don john and much ado about nothing. Let me be that. I am and seek not to alter me. Would it have hurt. Shasha be tone to say with polonius in hamlet this above all to be true and it must follow as the night the day thou cancer not be false to any man. Am i asking too much from shasha tone. I think not because truly. Now is the winter of our discontent. Elections are nine but a week and a day after the ides of march. But i'll stop. I'll stop because who knows better than me. That truly brevity is the soul of wit and that this is a tale told by an idiot full of sound and fury signifying nothing. This is how safe. Because i am that idiot today.

Shasha Knesset Corona Virus Committee Hope Party Corona Committee Josh Abi Shmona Moshe Feed Lee Cooed Miri Regev National Camp Shasha Baton Knesset House Committee Kiryat Mikhail Cutler Kyoto Morocco Shakespeare Uzi Dayan UZI
What is Judaisms view of Jesus?

Andrew Rappaport's Rapp Report Daily

01:35 min | 6 months ago

What is Judaisms view of Jesus?

"As. We take a look at the Jewish view of Jesus Christ. There is one thing that we know for sure and that is that Judaism does not believe that Christ is the Jewish Messiah. In fact, they believe that is just a fable created by Christianity. Now much of what we see about the Jewish Messiah is from the talent and remember that the time it was something that was written after the time of Christ, and we mentioned in an earlier rap report that it was something that was a redacted work. So therefore, they would edit the later writings of the town would from the earlier and so much of it. Is Responsive and reactionary to the view that Jesus was the Messiah they're reacting to Christianity. Now, they believed that this person who was to be Messiah was known from before the time began, but they believe he was just a human being a human being who is divinely appointed to carry out a special task. They do not believe that he's any supernatural or superhuman deliver. So the one thing that they're all unanimous about when it comes to the comet in all the rabbis is that they are convinced that Jesus Christ could not have been the Messiah. That's one thing. They all seem to agree that there seems to be some differences of who the Messiah would be. and. This is an important point. The differentiates Christianity from Judaism if you won't get more where you can get my book, what do they believe? What do they believe dot com

Talking About Jewish Wealth With Danielle Durchslag

Judaism Unbound

07:29 min | 2 months ago

Talking About Jewish Wealth With Danielle Durchslag

"Durch schlock welcome to judaism unbounded so great to have you thank you so much. I'm glad to be here. I remember. I think i was on a car ride with my family when your article came out about a year ago and somehow i remember sitting in the car and it popping up and saying oh this is going to be interesting and i read your article tablet and i was like. We're going to have to have you on the podcast because this is the conversation that that we want to have. And i mean there was a particular line where you say. The time demands that we as jews train our frank gays on our own discourse about ourselves and money and i was like yeah. Let's do that can create start by just asking a little bit about when you wrote that article. What what was it that you were trying to say. And what was it that you are trying to achieve. So i wrote the jewish one percent in part because the silence around jewish wealth is well earned an understandable but i think actually quite problematic obviously antisemitic conspiracy theories obsessively focus on kind of outlandish amounts of jewish affluence and influence. That's really the main trope of those hateful conspiracy theories and as a result you know our fear of even touching the subject is so seismic. Because we're really concerned that we will somehow validate those hateful fantasies that we just don't go there and to not go there on a subject as important has jews and money jews and capitalism And how those things intersect with. The state is really a loss especially for a community that is so dedicated to questioning too tough discourse and culturally and this is something i reference in the peace. Tim bluntness you know. One of the things. I love about us. Culturally is that we're willing to go there even when the subject is hard or tough or scary to give you a sense of how tender this area is just the title of the essay jewish one percent. Got me push back. I was told by some you know. Obviously there's a big generational gap here. This tends to be older audiences. Where i get this kind of feedback. That title itself is anti-semitic just acknowledging. The jewish wealth exists is problematic. I i have felt all of this for years. Why did i want to write this article now. In this era a cousin. Jews are disproportionately present in this administration in running the country. You know in the white house and the jews who are there tend to be from quote unquote very successful families. Right which is the language is in our community to mean rich there from wealthy jewish families most of them so i thought it was a really important moment to talk about. What has success wrought you know. Is this what success fundamentally should and does look like in our community for those who made it this time for me to have that conversation so i'm curious from your own experience before we get into what you have to say about it. I'm curious about when you try to provoke that conversation through this article. Was it provoked like. Did you feel that people started to have the conversation that you wanted them to have or do you feel like that conversation is still not being had. I think it's mostly not being. Had you know i did get surprisingly kind of enthused response from people. Sort of i'm. I'm turning forty this winter people sort of my age and younger. I got a lot of feedback. That was great. Want to have this conversation. It has felt off limits for so long. It shouldn't be. I got some pushback from older generations. But fundamentally i think the the bring up the essay is still are not really being dealt into in a public way. We are so trepidation about touching these topics which is partly why as visual artists. They're really where i make. My space might really write creatively. Go because there's so much to say. And it's so vitally important and it's really there's a couple things that arise from me in a title like the jewish one percent one is it only makes sense to people that title only works to people at and communicate something because we have a concept of the one percent generally in society. That's not jewish specific. And so i'm actually thinking a lot about the ways in which the generational divide you describe is sort of specific to judaism like we could talk about trauma and fear connected to the holocaust. There's all sorts of ways that like older generations of jews absolutely has some distinctive relationships to wealth that that are important to talk about. And i think that there's a broader conversation beyond just jus about how different generations do and don't talk about wealth like honestly. I think my parents and especially like my grandparents forgetting the jewish friends there non-jewish in general. It was kind of off the table to talk about wealth. I think what you hint at with people under forty or wherever. We're gonna draw the line. Like i think i don't know the millennial generation in quotes part of it. Whatever but like. I think we have recognized that the lack of talking about money isn't just some like benign choice. It has an impact when employers for example. Don't want people talking about the amount of money. They make that actually serves a purpose and leads to the employers being able to have a lot of control and and serve injustice in a variety of ways. And so i'd love to ask sort of about those two pieces like what about. This is a very specific set of jewish questions like the jewish relationship to wealth. And what about. This is actually a broader set of faux pas taboos that we have as a society about talking about money. It's a great couple of points i would say. All americans struggle with open discourse about class. Right it's not what we're famous for is talking successfully and in a nuanced fashion about money so clearly. Jewish americans were part of that culture. There's a lot of fear general around kind of going there. I wanted inactivity In a sort of arts group. That i was part of where we had to line up physically by class. So they said you know the poorest of the poor this side of the room the wealthiest of the wealthy opposite room. Everyone else figure it out and can you guess what everyone did probably went to the middle to start exactly right so i march off to wealth to people who were really strongly identified with and proud of having come from poverty. Go to the other side of the room and everyone else and this was probably a room full of like thirty forty people. They crowd in the middle and they are fighting it out over. How many. Tv's what kinds of tv's one car to kars any cars right. And so those of us on the extreme ends are watching. This really pained discourse as people try to place themselves and it takes a long time after we complete the exercise the people who lead it said to us in the uk. This takes ten minutes. Everyone knows where they are in the class. You talked about it. Their whole lives they line up and then we move on. That's a portrait. I think about a lot in terms of general. What your class discourse in this country

Frank TIM White House UK
The Age of Miracle and Wonder Women

The Promised Podcast

06:11 min | 2 months ago

The Age of Miracle and Wonder Women

"Come to the promised by gas. Brought to you on t. v. one the voice of the city where last week in honor of international human rights day. A huge pride flag was installed in a tubular seal frame atop a massive twelve meter or forty foot flagpole planted in a bit of concrete a ways beneath the soft warm sands of the most the lgbtq beach that divides the hilton from the c. Itai pincus arrived the alderman who holds what is referred to as the pride portfolio on the city. Council said quote. This flag will remind us that all human women and men are equal even if they need to fight for it tel aviv. Jaffa is one of the only cities in the world over which this flag will fly all year round and quote an argument. Nothing captures the spirit of this city. We love so well tel aviv. Feel better than craning back your head shielding your eyes against the sun with your hand and seeing flapping above you. The violet indigo green yellow orange and red stripes representing respectively spirit serenity nature sunlight healing and life and indicating that on these sands on these shores all are equal all are welcome and ideal that we never do meet but that we are always at the very least dedicated to fighting for with us in the studio is a woman who's lovely prose is forever a vehicle for spirit serenity nature sunlight healing and life. I refer of course to alison kaplan. Summer allison is written for politico. The new republic foreign policy that jerusalem posted jt the forward and many other very best papers and magazines. She is a columnist. With how are you have heard on. Npr pri and the bbc and you have seen her on. I twenty four television and aljazeera. Tv you can meet more though obviously not all of your marion hankering these days by listening to her host the arts weekly podcast alison also holds. A neighbor world tenor award for journalism recognizing. Excellence in the asper reported. Emmy simon rock our award for excellence and covering zionism alley in israel. Alison how are you doing. Oh you know. With the third lockdown being announced and fourth elections just spirit serenity and calm. That's that's true of us. All there was ever a time to join a cult at this time. Now i'm just going with the different stripes on this rightfully flag. I think that that we can go with those also with the stage just heard. His voice is a man who's recent contribution to offscreen magazine a journal of israeli film culture which was a joint interview about the newish. Borat movie begins with a single word. Wow naturally i referred to ohio dealt zubaydah. Ohio is a book reviewer. For arts aside from arts and offscreen you have also read ohio's fiction in granta. You probably have read him in the now. Sadly defunct must miss local newspaper ear for which he wrote i when he was fourteen between then and now he hosted a weekly show on halley tv on arts and culture in israel. He is admired for his genius. Love for his warm human decency and envy for his effortless cool. Oh had been too long been doing. It has been too long. I'm very happy to be back in the studio after my mid semester has posted the cutest photo of ohad is a young woman with the promise on my soul so little hair on my face migrated some people wrote in saying i always wondered what oh how to look like and you don't exactly look that way fourteen anymore. What he actually looks like i did. I did underneath when people are responding and saying that. I need to look my name is oh ephron i don't mean to boast but i just received another bottle of caffeine pills fortified with l. nin for quote unquote focused energy. And i have been popping those babies like tic tacs. And i don't mean to brag because that's not how i was brought up but as i get older and i swear this is true as i get older i become more and more. Judy garland every single day. This week we have three topics of non parallel importance. But first we have a matter that we're following with lord interests in great concern as part of an occasional series. We the promise. Podcast coolly considers the classic cohen. When is a friend and anemone. I was scrolling through headlines earlier this week at a news aggregation site called me. Zach live or live newsflash including these quote netanyahu colon blue and white reneged on agreement and dragged us to new elections and from tomorrow colon. Ten new vaccination centres serving all of the health cooperatives will open in the south and the north of our country and more than twenty arrests in demonstrations protesting the killing of a youth by police in the west bank and load colon injured three collided with a parked vehicle while riding his bicycle and tel aviv. Colon a youth hurt while playing with explosives and then this quote. A heartwarming discovery colon. The first anemone has been spotted in the reforest. The first nominee was spotted today by. Its sick lugosi. The j. nf forest ranger who works in the western negative in the same place a negative. Iris has bloomed as well as a tourist huck. Bit plant end quote just after. I saw this headline the new site wine at posted on facebook. A gorgeous close up of the anemone with the heading quote on our way to a red south. The first red anemone has blossomed in the berry forest smiley face emoji with big red hearts for is end quote from there. The item was picked up by all the papers including the online ultra-orthodox paper. Be ma where the reporter who usually covers the security and politics beat isaac gama is his name filed a story headlined report from reforest. The first anemone has appeared. See documentation of the blossoming which peace including two videos. As far as i can tell exclusive videos. One avai single red anemone in the middle of a large grass pasture. The other begins with a close up of four white irises. And then pans across an expanse of grass until it settles on what seems to be the same single read an emmy or colony as we call it in hebrew

Tel Aviv Lgbtq Beach Itai Pincus Alison Kaplan Emmy Simon Rock Our Award Jaffa Ohad Ohio Israel Zubaydah Allison NPR Marion Alison Jerusalem Netanyahu Colon BBC
Smokey Robinson's mispronunciation of Chanukah has gone viral

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:39 sec | 2 months ago

Smokey Robinson's mispronunciation of Chanukah has gone viral

"An an an embarrassing embarrassing embarrassing hoops hoops hoops for for for the the the so so so called called called miracles miracles miracles man. man. man. Smokey Smokey Robinson Robinson is is apologizing apologizing for for a a mispronunciation mispronunciation that's gone viral video message to fan at the request of her son to wish you happy Chanukah. I have no idea what you nuka is but happy Chanukah because they said, So Anyway. Publish it, babe and enjoy Chanukah. Have a wonderful time. Jacobson's mom grew up on the same street as Robinson in Detroit Fans are defending the 80 year old music legend. Blaming the Hanukkah spelling with a C. H. Smokey says that in the spirit of 2020, he's ready for a do over Debra Rodriguez CBS News So the

Smokey Smokey Robinson Robinso Jacobson C. H. Smokey Robinson Detroit Debra Rodriguez Cbs News
Sabrina Orah Mark Writes Into Brokenness

Can We Talk?

08:26 min | 2 months ago

Sabrina Orah Mark Writes Into Brokenness

"Writer and poet. Sabrina or a mark likes to describe her stories as having little poems folded up inside of them. She publishes monthly essays loosely based on motherhood and fairytales in the literary journal the paris review. Here's the opening of her november essay. You break it. We fix it. I am inside. you break it. We fix it holding my son shattered. I-ipad hello i call out. No one answers. The counter glows white and the walls are empty. Hello hello. I wait a few minutes before calling out again. One minute says a raspy voice from the back of the store hopes swells in my chest. Here we comes. We will fix said i hold up the broken screen so we can see it on a little shard of glass. Trump's the floor with a plank. Yeah we says you know what i ask. We says the soldering work required would more than a new ipad. We says it would take weeks possibly months. Sabrina began writing this essay in the weeks leading up to the presidential election. She published it after the election when the sitting president and a large percentage of his allies still refused to accept the decisive results. Oh the next week. I returned. You break it. We fix it with a whole entire country. It's heavy but i managed to carry it through the parking lot leaving behind a trail of seeds in the crisp sent of democracy and something that smells like blood or dirt across. It is a growing crack. A trial too young to be alone is out in front holding a broken country to store is gone out of business as the child. I shift the country to one arm and tried appear in. But it's shuddered and dark. Told you says the child out of business. I text my husband. You break it we fix. It is closed. I've come here for nothing again. The texture of sabrina 's essays is a rich. We've of fairytales politics. The past and her children's voices. Sabrina joins us for the fourth. In our four part series on creativity in the global pandemic. We started off talking about how she's managing to find the time to write with two young kids. At home she drew parallels between the ways that motherhood and quarantine have shaped her creative process right now. we're home schooling. And so there's this. I mean it's it's it's a packed house like twenty four seven and there is like the endless ness of like of things everywhere and snacks and then trying to ride. And then you know I do feel like. I've been working harder than i've ever worked in my entire life like you know since march like because you just have to grab the pieces of time where you can find it. It was funny because i was homeschooling. You know all day long like all day and at one point i just it was like from four to five i just i climbed into my bed and just like sat there with like staring at a wall at five o'clock my signs come into my room and they're like you forgot about us like what do you mean i forgot about you like how could i forget like it was like a whole hour went by you know like where i wasn't just right i was. Yeah you write about your kids a lot and their voices creep into your writing sometimes in unexpected ways. Which is one of the things that i really love about your writing so just to back up a little bit. You've said that after you had children the form that you're writing took changed after. I had kids. Is i think in many ways like i became more porous like i allowed. I had to allow more of the world and and it was right around that time where In many ways my prose poems started sort of growing and growing and growing part of it was just time. Because i couldn't like live inside of a single poem. I used to write these prose poems. In the instance of lake hermetically sealed likes Boxes and spaces of time. And i couldn't do that anymore after i had kids. And so would sort of just keep returning and returning and returning to my writing and then it would kind of get bigger and longer and stranger and more porous and there was more interruptions and then in many ways my palm started turning into stories and then with these essays. Even more of the world's i think started coming in And i really believe in some crossing. John rouse and having things blurb because i do think that you know fiction will leak into reality and reality leaks into affection and i don't really believe in like you know the the strict border between between john or as For myself creatively lake. I need to sort of move back and forth in that fluid way. It's really interesting that you connect that with having children. Yeah i used to be able to like work in these. These of yeah on interrupted Spaces and then the interruptions actually ended up really feeling like like a gift you know. And that's sort of something. I've been thinking a lot lately. Just you know inside of a. You know these last seven months of That that in certain ways like a lot what we lose often. You know We gain in these other places Like i'm trying really hard to find those places where like the thing that feels like a loss is not really a loss. And i'll give you an example like i'm teaching A class in poland's on on zoom and one of my students is disabled and she was talking about how you know. Normally these students are all Brought onto a university campus in the states and in a millionaire. She never would have been able to participate in this program. And she said you know Your captivity like when the world's closed for you the world opened up for the first time for me. And i would never have been able to meet her otherwise i would never have been able to know her and know her writing and hear her voice and mike see her. You know and when i moved all of my classes that i teach online. I thought like oh god. I don't wanna teach these workshops online. I love sort of the intimacy of the classroom that i've created an ideal but i think that like i held onto this idea of how things are supposed to be all of the time like so intensely that had i not been forced into this like other space. I would never have known this. You know what. I wasn't seeing Like why did i ever offered classes online before thinking about like you know people who for a million different reasons like wouldn't be able to get semi to a classroom. It was like the perfect moment of like what we loses. What we gain

Sabrina Sabrina Joins The Paris Review Literary Journal Donald Trump John Rouse John Poland Mike
Facebook Bans Holocaust Denial Content

People of the Pod

07:33 min | 4 months ago

Facebook Bans Holocaust Denial Content

"On Monday in a major departure from the company's previous position facebook announced that it would ban Holocaust denial content from the platform E. J.. C. is proud of our sustained advocacy to help facebook or at this decision. Joining us now to discuss the new policy is join ANA cutler facebook head of policy for Israel and the Jewish Diaspora. Jordan, thank you so much for joining us. Thanks for having me here now in two thousand eighteen facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg famously said that he hates Holocaust denial but that he doesn't believe it is facebook's place to censor the free exchange of ideas. This week facebook reversed course and announced that Holocaust denial would no longer be permitted on the platform what changed between then and now. I think I'll start just bipolar mark because I could say a lot of things but I think the most important thing is what he says himself I think what's really interesting mark doesn't post about every policy change and every step of the company takes, but he felt it was important that he posted he set himself. I struggled with the tension between standing for freedom of expression and the harm caused by minimizing or denying the her the Holocaust. My thinking has evolved as I've seen data showing an increase in. Antisemitic violence as our water policies have also changed on hate speech drawing the right lines between what is and isn't acceptable speech in straightforward but with the current state of the world I believe this is the right balance and I just I felt it was important just to read all of his words. I'm I'm sure many of you saw it on facebook and then read one hundred other news articles but to go back into what mark said his thinking of all for two reasons, one data in the real world. And I'm really actually excited to get the data from the new AJC survey coming up not to give you a plug. No one asked me to do that. By all means, plug away that day that is important to us. We we look at it and we see it as a connection between what we see online and offline world that's important to us, and second is the discussions that we've had with people around the world. That's also important Tyson. You guys have been a part of that. So again, these processes evolve and I think it's important to note all of our processes and all of our policies evolve. So mark you know having. A policy change isn't that unusual? This one obviously is something that we've been all very focused on so it stands out to us. facebook famously has more than a billion, maybe even two billion monthly active users, something like that. Right the the numbers. That I'm not counting. The number is is way up there and certainly makes you number one among social media platforms. So I would imagine with so many people. So frequently using facebook, the sheer number of posts, individual posts in facebook's history must be well well into the billions does this decision apply retroactively? So if someone five years ago, posted some piece of Holocaust denial content in among these many billions of posts is facebook using some kind of system to find that and remove it. Great question because we actually find remove. Two ways the first is our AI systems that look and find for this stuff and the second is user reports and hoping many the listeners here when they see content that they think violates our policies, not just our speech policy but any of our policies that they report it because every piece of content whether it's a comment page post, all of those pieces of content are things that you can report and have checked by were, and those reviewers are people that are. Based all around the world that are operating twenty, four, seven, and operating in every language on our platform to find those violations it's important to say that no matter what changes we've made as soon as content is violating our platform, we will remove it because hate speech what it was two years ago isn't necessarily hate speech today, and that's not just because we've changed our policies the words that we used as slurs change over time and so speech changes as time. Evolves. We also take a look at those changes and reevaluate our policies. So of course, if we find content because it's reported to us or because we find it no matter when it was posted, we will remove that from our platform. Now, it will take time when it comes to this new policy to get it up to speed and to try to get as much of this content off. One of the things about ai is that it takes time for us to. Learn and to be able to use automated technology to find things and remove them. does take a learning process especially considering how many languages we have. So I just encourage everybody listening if you see Holocaust denial or distortion content to report it, but I would like to flag that we might make mistakes especially in the beginning, you'll have an opportunity to appeal that mistake, and if we continue to make mistakes I can promise you that will continue to work on improving. One thing I've seen kind of these things will go viral when when mistakes are made sometimes. On on twitter of course, not not facebook but you'll see that someone you know intended or someone. Did you know share their great grandmother's story of being in the Holocaust something in there there's a line about how you know someone once told her that her story was made up or something and enough words are used in just the right pattern that the AI picks it up and flags it as something like that. So I guess those are the kinds of mistakes that that can happen is they're? Going to be some kind of a notice I, go on my facebook and I like post my usual daily Holocaust denial post and ten of my friends like it and two more calm and whatever, and then someone says like what the hell are you doing like this is terrible and they report me and facebook becomes aware of it and they take it down as well. They should what happens then well, it's going to be the same as any other content on our platform and I think it's important. To notice the policy that we came out with to remove how Austin I own distortion content is a subsection of an existing hate speech policy that already provided a lot of protections against hate speech or antisemitic content against Jews, and so for us it's I wouldn't say reinventing the wheel here. What we're doing is adding onto a policy that we already started in August I kind of look at that as the moment where these changes really took shape where we added a line into the hate speech. Policy that said, we will remove harmful stereotypes against Jewish people that claims that they are controlling the world arts, major institutions, and so this is going to be a line under that. If you go in and anyone can go door community standards and see there's a new bullet point under there that says Holocaust denial distortion anyone who reports content for violating hate speech policy we'll be treated the same anyone who reporting any content is treated the same. We're not doing something separate for this policy so just in. General. When you report content I think it's important to know that often anonymous reports so people should feel safe to report the person on the other side. If that content isn't violating, they're not going to even know that that content was reported. But if the content is violating, then they will get a message from US telling them that the content was removed and we'll tell them for what policy it was removed. We won't be specific as to what word was violating. We will tell them what policy. That's been a huge undertaking from our engineering teams. We usually just in the past would say this is violating our community standards and we understood that that wasn't enough information for people. So now we explain what policy was violating. It's important to note that people report content for many different reasons. But when we see that report will look at it under all of our policies. So you might report something for being hate speech, but we actually removed it because it was nudity we will evaluate all that content. And then let the person know as to why we also explained to them that if you continue to violate our policies, we will block you from using our services or eventually remove you from our services

Facebook AI Mark Zuckerberg Ana Cutler Israel Jordan Jewish Diaspora Founder United States Tyson Austin
Unpacking Israeli History

Israel Story

03:23 min | 5 months ago

Unpacking Israeli History

"Back in twenty seventeen, the New York Times published an article about Amadeo Garcia Garcia. The. Last Living Speaker of the top story. Once, spoken for centuries by thousands of members of an Amazon tribe Madeo, the sole survivor, and the last person on earth to know the language his tried which had lived uncontactable for centuries along Amazon River in Peru slowly died out due to the weapons diseases brought to them from intruders when Avodados brother passed away his last remaining relative the missionary asked Amodio how he felt. Adele responded in the broken Spanish that he had. The only way he had to communicate with outside world he said. It's now over for us. Why? Dale no longer has some to speak to and when you have no one else to speak to, you will lose your language. That's why was over for Amodio. Losing a language is like losing an identity, a culture history. I don't mean to sound over dramatic here but losing a language is really losing oneself. Looking back at the history of the Jewish people that Jews faced a very similar problem. And the reality today is that over the last one, hundred, fifty years, a modern miracle took place for almost two thousand years Hebrew the language of the Torah the Bible and so much Jewish literature you know the prayers was mostly reserved for the ritual. And now. Jews. Over the world's beekeeper, a language that was essentially dead as a spoken language. Something like this has never happened in history of language. The. Fact that the majority of Jews around the world speak Hebrew today is not something to take for granted. There are approximately fourteen point, seven, million Jews in the world and six point seven, million of them live in Israel where Hebrew is the national language. And many hundreds of thousands outside of Israel, speak language as well learning it in. Jewish. Day schools and summer camps or at home. Short. The Bible prayers and religious texts were written and read in Hebrew. Literally nobody spoke in daily life for like almost two thousand years. So How'd an almost extinct biblical language reemerge as spoken language in the span of only a few decades? Was Zionism that deserves the credit Certain. Figure named Elliot's Ben Yehuda. And what is it always obvious that Hebrew would be the national language of the Jewish state. Let's jump back in time to learn about the history of the Hebrew language details about the spoken language of Hebrew in ancient times are not perfect. Here's what we know. In the Bible the Jews otherwise as Hebrews spoken ancient Biblical version of. Biblical Hebrew was the spoken language of the Jews for over a thousand years. But one of the Romans destroyed the second Jewish Temple in seventy CE HEBREW AGAIN. To die. Out.

Amodio Amadeo Garcia Garcia Israel Amazon River New York Times Living Speaker Peru Adele Dale Ben Yehuda Elliot
Eva Schloss on Holocaust forgiveness

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

06:44 min | 5 months ago

Eva Schloss on Holocaust forgiveness

"This S Charlie Goals Jewish. States those who listen for those who are willing to listen. Now. Thank you very much. tweed action. and. I've. Lived a long time and have experienced a lot of wonderful things but Israel. I'm believable Bihar. And of course, it leaves it says sign on my way overlooking. World. Let's just bring it back to today in this country. I think it's fair to say that British Jews experienced a visceral form of antisemitism that they have never done before with the election of Jeremy Corbyn, the leader ship of the Labor Party and the genuine threat that should he have won the election in December twenty nine hundred thank goodness didn't that Future, existence in the united. Kingdom. was under threats. Can I ask you in this for years of quite quite considerable pain for the Jewish community here? Could you feel parallels with what she experienced in Vienna announced the damage as a child not at all not at all and no people's starting to be afraid he upset about it. But as always say Sicily announcing and you know unfortunately antisemitism has always been and always be I don't know why but it is affects. Who is essential his and? It does it's just. It's language. So it's subsequent assist inborn in the people, but it is thus Mention it just same. Like what this I'm doesn't. Nazi. Time. So I must say, it doesn't really bother me and mustard personally offend million may. Not experienced any antisemitism in again thank you for making that clear. Now, you lived in the same apartment block in Amsterdam and frank, and you were only a month apart in Asian. Playmates together in early teenage, and then in nineteen forty two, you both went into hiding to avoid the Nazi effort to capture Jews in Amsterdam. Now, you'll family was captured by the Nazis after being betrayed by double agent in the Dutch underground and transported to Auschwitz. You father and brother didn't survive the ordeal, but you and your mother were barely alive while you afraid by Soviet troops in nineteen, forty five. How Did it feel. To have left your home city of the Anna. To try and create new life understood them. And for that to happen to you, even as you fled from way you used to. Well as it was. At tangible tangible time. Have a very happy little girl in Australia had old plaza who was Like older process should be very protective for me. I have a sort of a viable child. It was much more at a bookworm and he had to be all his stories which he was dating Again. Pants. Kaslow's advice Elliott wonderful family life, and then to go to Belgium. Glad we got out of Australia Benny. Many of our family members didn't because it was spent thirty eight. It was very difficult to get past the German Jews had already gone to England and land, and France and everywhere, and most of those companies did the daily want any more Jews? So only if you're somebody special. got visas any more. But advising referenced in Jim and then Mefatha actually lift in Holland and remain Belgium, and of course, the war stock that my father had asked to get as well to Holland because in a war board as will be closed and view may not be able to see. So in in forties ewing's a wall that in February nineteen forty because visas to for three months to visit by Fassa in in Holland. So relief like you say on the same Dressy not an apartment block, it was a hold area of. More than it'll buildings and there was eleven years old. But of course, you know ahead on trust French said ahead to Dutch Andam. difficult to accept that Baz also children and even by the teaches and. So lost all my confidence. became shy Biz stone but friendly and eventually settled down. But of course, the Nazis invaded. And, of course, a measures Jewish people started to come. And for two years VI IN FIA to be arrested. And in nineteen forty two, then southbound young people go to call up notice have to come to a place respect pex given exactly start Schefter Blake to deported to Germany to work in German factories. But Zach to him benighted forty-two most of German Jews had been deported to get us or two camps. So why on Earth should your one more young Jewish be to Cup to Germany? So Zet sit time when Anna's Fazah auto frank and my father and many other Jewish feminists is cited civil send Sam young people, but we would go into hiding. While I was just sit at ten years old. And my father called us together. And he said, hence, you not going to set you we going to hiding. But we couldn't find a family who was to take it for people. So we have split up. I go visit my Mazda enhance feel bismuth files. And that started to cry. And did not want to be separated the game.

Holland Jeremy Corbyn Germany Australia Amsterdam Bihar Belgium Israel Sicily Frank Zach Anna Vienna Labor Party Auschwitz France Fassa Schefter Blake Ewing
Early childhood sex education

The Joy of Text

06:12 min | 6 months ago

Early childhood sex education

"So so much to talk about when it comes to sex education that we really need a split this topic up into two smaller episodes. So this episode we're going to be talking about sex ED with younger kids. This is part one, and then you can stay tuned for part to in the future when will discuss sex education teens and young adults. So sex education with younger kids. So I feel like the number one question with this topic that I actually have heard people ask me people I feel like like this is just everyone's like top question is when should you start speaking to your kids about sex? Right? How young is too young or how old is too old I love this question my favorite question and there is no such thing as too young and I think that comes from people understanding that when you the moment you are holding touching, kissing your baby, you are teaching them about Zack's like that is the most critical thing like to understand that teaching A. Child, about sex is teaching them about their body feeling comfortable with their body understanding that loving touch could be really amazing as they get older using the correct body parts and needs for body parts talking about sex super comfortably when they're really young when it's not comfortable and then it develops as time goes on and getting books for kids even at age two or three about like body parts and taking care of their bodies and ready five or six and a little bit where babies come from. So you'll people are often shocked when I say start really on the are so many reasons to start young the younger you start. Better. Could I just ask a question though about the use of the term sex education in all of those areas because When you talk about hugging and kissing out of affection for your child to me that's not sex or that's something to be distinguished from sexual touch or body parts even though their sexual organs there they have other functions as well. I'm wondering why this all put under the heading of sex education because sex education starts with a really good sense of her own. Body and sexuality like that is just it's a basis for being able to have the tax and so understanding your body being comfortable with your body being able to talk about your body picking up the fact that those aren't things are not shameful at touch is important. Part of all this that is that is the building blocks the underlying building blocks for sex education. I think another super important point is that at the very young age often kids getting talks about like stranger danger and about like who who is it appropriate to? Reveal your body in front of WHO's allowed to touch your body. So all of these things which are really age appropriate for very young kids are like really the fundamentals of Lake consent and body autonomy which is not usually how we think about it but I think that's also like a like a real fundamental of of sex ed I'm really glad you raised that because I think it's the most understandable to people. You WanNA teach consent when they're older as the consent that we think of as consent. But already when you have a three year old and you insist that three year old kisses, uncle, Harry you're sort of giving a masjid may not want to. You know one of my favorite sex educators. That from day her children are born basically they have a choice. It's like wave hogger kiss or something or shake hands wave or kiss like an every time they meet somebody they get to choose how they interact with that person and that is she believes the bottom line of sent in the end I think that she's right and so it's the same kind of thing if. They grow up feeling comfortable saying the giant and Penis and vulva any no their body parts don't feel shame with them back is going to be one of the building blocks that helps them have a good healthy sex life. It's very hard to kind of go back and age you know fifteen or eighteen or twenty-one and say, well, you shouldn't have shame about those things because. They're not sample when you've been treating them shameful since the day they were born. Another really important thing. Sorry guys I'm really passionate about this topic. I think another really important point when kids are very young as like the first time you see your kid touching their own private parts, right unlike how that's like such an opportunity for parents to really address that in like in open affirming healthy way, I'll pose it as a question for Chevra. Like if you're a parent your three year old. Daughter is touching her vulva. How do you handle that conversation? So that's such. A common question might cause your kids are going to masturbate. You have raised the not to be ashamed of their body they're gonNA try touch their body does it's GonNa feel good to them, and the way you respond is completely setting the stage for how they're gonNA react to their bodies and even if you just sort of your lips and the big deep oh my God and then don't see anything that's a message getting press breast your children it's almost like. Messages are given even if you're not copying need to be aware of that. So it's absolutely essential that you are super comfortable with this which honestly I almost we jumped the gun because I feel like the most important thing about sex education for parents especially with little kids is to start becoming comfortable themselves. If you are lucky enough to be addressing this when your kids are really little, you're lucky enough to say, okay, I'm GonNa get past the hump of feeling uncomfortable with this. And you need to really be honest with yourself because I cannot tell you how often I see parents groups and they say, well, how many of you are comfortable time at and everybody raises their hand and then I how many of you actually talked about sex you gives none of them, raise your hand or of them raise their hands and I'm like well, why not amazing what we could ask and the kids are going to ask you need. To start this conversation and you need to be really comfortable and it's much easier when your child is two or three or four, or five or six to have these conversations and

Zack Chevra Harry