Judaism

Listen to the latest audio content relevant to the Jewish community. This playlist features Jewish individuals having great conversations on relevant topics through a cultural lens. Grow your faith with cultural reflection, history and current events. Sourced from premium podcasts.

A highlight from Celebrating Mizrahi Heritage Month with The Forgotten Exodus: Iran

People of the Pod

08:22 min | 15 hrs ago

A highlight from Celebrating Mizrahi Heritage Month with The Forgotten Exodus: Iran

"Earlier this month, the UN Human Rights Council announced it would investigate the brutality of the Iranian regime in its most recent deadly crackdown on protesters. Behind the protests that have unfolded since mid September, the death of 22 year old masa amini after she was detained for allegedly wearing her hijab improperly. That injustice sounds all too familiar to Iranian American author and poet roya hakakian. It has been nearly 40 years since she escaped Iran with her parents after the Iranian revolution. As we wrap up miss rahi heritage month, we are re airing the final episode of the forgotten exodus. Our podcast series on the 800,000 Jews who once called Arab lands and Iran home. Roya shared her family's journey as Jewish refugees. What life was like prior to the revolution, and the anti semitism that caused most Jews to flee the only home generations of their family had ever known. In 1984, when my mother and I left on my father was left alone in Iran, that was yet another major dramatic and traumatic separation. When I look back at the events of 1979, I think, you know, people constantly think about the revolution having, in some ways, blown up Iran. But it also blew up families. And my own family was among them. The world has overlooked an important episode in modern history. The 800,000 Jews who left or were driven from their homes in Arab nations and Iran in the mid 20th century. This series brought to you by American Jewish committee, explores that pivotal moment in Jewish history and the rich Jewish heritage of Iran and Arab nations as some begin to build relations with Israel. I'm your host, manja brashear pashman. Join us as we explore family histories and personal stories of courage, perseverance, and resilience. This is the forgotten exodus. Today's episode, leaving Iran. Outside Israel, Iran has the largest Jewish population in the Middle East. Yes, the Islamic Republic of Iran, in 2022. Though there is no official census, experts estimate about 10,000 Jews now live in the region, previously known as Persia. But since the 1979 Iranian revolution, Jews in Iran don't advertise their Jewish identity. They adhere to Iran's morality code. Women stay veiled from head to toe and men and women who aren't married or related, stay apart in public. They don't express support for Israel. They don't ask questions, and they don't disagree with the regime. One might ask, with all these don'ts, is this a way of living a Jewish life? Or a way to live, period? For author, journalist and poet roya hakakian and her family. The answer was ultimately no. Roya has devoted her life to being a fact finder and truth teller. A former associate producer at the CBS News show 60 minutes and a Guggenheim fellow, roya has written two volumes of poetry and Persian and three books of nonfiction in English. The first of which was published in 2004, journey from the land of no. A memoir about her charmed childhood and a cursed adolescence growing up Jewish in Iran under two different regimes. It was hugely important for me to create an account that could be relied on as a historic document. And I did my best through being very, very careful about gathering interviewing, talking to observing facts, evidence, documents, from everyone, including my most immediate members of my family, to do what we both as reporters, but also as Jews are called to do, which is to bear witness. No seem to be the backdrop of life for women, especially of religious minorities and in my own case Jewish background. So I thought what better way to name the book than to call it as what my experience had been, which was the constant knows that I heard. So land of know was Iran. As a journalist, as a Jew, as a daughter of Iran, royal will not accept no for an answer. After publishing her memoir, she went on to write assassins of the Turquoise palace, a meticulously reported book about a widely underreported incident. In 19 92, at a Berlin restaurant, a terrorist attack by the Iranian proxy Hezbollah, targeted and killed four Iranian Kurdish exiles. The book highlighted Iran's enormous global footprint, made possible by its terror proxies, who don't let international borders get in the way of silencing Iran's critics. Roya also cofounded the Iran human rights documentation center, an independent nonprofit that reports on Iran's human rights abuses. Her work is not prompted Ayatollah Khomeini to publicly issue a fatwa against her, like the murder order against Salman Rushdie issued by his predecessor. But in 2019, one of her teenage sons answered a knock at the door. It was the FBI, warning her that she was in the crosshairs of the Iranian regime's operatives in America. Most recently, Roy wrote a beginner's guide to America for the immigrant and the curious about the emotional roller coaster of arriving in America while still missing a beloved homeland, especially one where their community has endured for thousands of years. I felt very strongly that one stays in one's homeland that you don't just simply take off when things go wrong, that you stick around and try to figure a way through a bad situation. We came to the point where it didn't seem like it would lead to any sort of real life. And leaving was the only option. The story of Jews in Iran often referred to as Persia until 1935, is a millennia long tale, a saga of suffering, repression, and persecution, peppered with brief moments of relief, or at least relative peace, as long as everyone plays by the rules of the regime. The history of Jews in Iran goes back to around 2700 years ago. And a lot of people assume that Jews came to Iran in fact, well, at that time it was called the Persian Empire. In 5 86 BCE, with a Babylonian exile, but Jews actually came a lot earlier. We are thinking 7 21 7 22 BCE with the Assyrian exile, which makes us one of the oldest Jewish communities. That's doctor Saba sumac, a Professor of world religions and Middle Eastern history, and the author of from the Shah's to Los Angeles, three generations of Iranian Jewish women between religion and culture. She also serves as associate director of American Jewish committee in Los Angeles, home to America's largest concentration of Persian Jewish immigrants. Saba's parents fled Iran in 1978. Shortly before the revolution, when Saba and her sister were toddlers. She has devoted her career to preserving Iranian Jewish history. Saba said Zoroastrian rulers until the 7th century common era, vacillated between tolerance and persecution of Jews. For example, according to the biblical account in the book of Ezra, Cyrus the great freed the Jews from Babylonian rule, granted all of them citizenship and permitted them to return to Jerusalem to rebuild their temple. The book of Esther goes on to tell the story of another Persian king, believed to be xerxes the first, whose closest adviser called haman conspires to murder all the Jews, a plot that is

Iran Roya Roya Hakakian Masa Amini Manja Brashear Republic Of Iran Israel Un Human Rights Council American Jewish Committee Turquoise Palace Iranian Proxy Hezbollah Iran Human Rights Documentatio Cbs News America Middle East Ayatollah Khomeini Salman Rushdie Berlin Saba Sumac
A highlight from Episode 84: Modern Loss with Rebecca Soffer

Can We Talk?

05:41 min | Last week

A highlight from Episode 84: Modern Loss with Rebecca Soffer

"We talk? The podcast of the Jewish women's archive were gender, history, and Jewish culture meet. When Rebecca sofer was in her 20s, she never would have guessed that one day she'd be writing books about grief and loss. She was living in New York City working full-time in TV when her life was upended. My mom was killed when I was 30 and my dad died four years later. So between the ages of 30 and 34, I lost both my parents and I felt like I was snipped loose from everything that had tethered me to a foundation in my life. And I did not understand how to be honest and open about what I was going through in a world that kept making it very clear that it was not particularly interested in that. Rebecca was frustrated by the stigma that seemed to surround death and loss. So she decided to do something about it. In 2013, Rebecca launched the website modern loss, along with her friend Gabrielle berkner. The site's tagline, candid conversations about grief, beginners welcome. In the beginning, modern lost mostly published essays about grief. These were raw, deeply personal reflections on the death of a loved one. Often said, but also with an unexpected twist. Like the one where a woman uses her late husband's life insurance money to buy a fancy diamond ring. Their how to guides were also offbeat, with headlines like disrupting the funeral, 7 innovations you should know about, and yes, you should binge watch Netflix on Mother's Day. In all of these pieces, people faced loss head on without platitudes or saccharine sentimentality. I stumbled on the site in its early years. It was over a decade after my mother had died, and I was still struggling. It was especially hard to find people who understood what I was going through. Reading the modern loss essays, I felt like I finally had. In fact, I started occasionally writing and even editing essays for the website. Putting words to my grief and reading other people's words was really therapeutic. Over the years, modern loss grew. People started sharing their reflections and experiences on the site's Facebook and Instagram pages. There were mindfulness and yoga retreats, live storytelling events, even swaps, modern loss had become more than a website. It was a community. And then COVID hit. And all of a sudden, the entire modern loss community, which had learned to, yes, very much lean on the community online and in person, but also lean on coping mechanisms that it had developed along the way, such as going to therapy. You know, like having brunch with friends, taking that walk, finding soulless in your office as a break. Volunteering at your kid's school as a respite. People didn't have that anymore. And that was very overwhelming, because I felt this enormous responsibility to be there for so many people who suddenly had not only feelings of grief that were newer, but resurfaced feelings of older grief that were being triggered in this pandemic. Rebecca had been hoping for a while to create a resource that would guide people through grief and loss. Now the need seemed especially urgent. So she wrote the modern loss handbook, an interactive guide to moving through grief and building resilience. The book came out earlier this year. In this episode of can we talk, Rebecca and I talk modern loss. Trigger days bespoke holidays, Jewish grief rituals, and what to say, and not to say, to someone in mourning. I've read my share of books on grief, and one of the things that sets the modern laws handbook apart is the interactive element. In one section, the book includes space for readers to write down the reflections about what Rebecca calls their person. The things they loved most about that person, but also the things they found most annoying or infuriating. Their favorite memories and the ones they wish they could forget. In another section, readers are invited to describe and draw the early stages of their grief as an island, and their current grief as a city. There's even a sad lib for readers to complete. You know, instead of a mad lib. I asked Rebecca why she decided to make the book so interactive. Because I feel like what people suddenly didn't have was interaction. They were just alone with their thoughts and very, very lonely and scared and not understanding how to move through grief in a world that was suddenly incredibly socially isolated where even just the calming self of a physical touch was something that we were scared of. And so I wrote this in such a way that it would be like a friend guiding you through a really, really hard time, but one who was like, listen, there is no one size fits all for this. And so why don't you just try some of this stuff and see if any of them can be tools in your toolbox, and if something works, that's amazing, put it in the box, something else doesn't work. Fine. Doesn't work. That's cool. Something else. I really appreciated about the book, is that it includes some elements that are a little bit more lighthearted than you might expect in a grief and loss book. So one that I really liked was this bingo card where readers are invited to color in all the experiences you've graced with your tears either intentionally or unexpectedly. Things like at a Disney property at karaoke to a kind or shockingly unkind customer service agent.

Rebecca Rebecca Sofer Gabrielle Berkner New York City Netflix Instagram Facebook Disney
A highlight from From Chopped to the White House: TikTok Chef Eitan Bernath on Being a Loud and Proud Jew

People of the Pod

04:54 min | Last week

A highlight from From Chopped to the White House: TikTok Chef Eitan Bernath on Being a Loud and Proud Jew

"Committee. Each week, we take you beyond the headlines to help you understand what they all mean for America, Israel, and the Jewish people. I'm your host, manja brashear pashman. Eitan bernath is a celebrity chef, entertainer, author, social media influencer, television personality, and entrepreneur, with a following of 7 million across his social media accounts. He is the principal culinary contributor for the Drew Barrymore show on CBS and earlier this year, he was named to the Forbes list of 30 under 30 for food and drink. But here's the thing, the list could have been called 20 under 20. When he turned 20 in April of this year, he was already CEO of his own multi-million dollar company, eitan productions, and his first cookbook was about to hit stores, eitan eats the world. Ahead of Thanksgiving, eitan is with us now to talk about how he hopes to use his role as an influencer to fight anti semitism, and why he feels it is so important for young people, Jews and non Jews alike to be involved in that fight and the fight to save our democracy. Eitan. Welcome to people of the pod. Thank you so much for having me. I'm so excited to be here. So you grew up in New Jersey, which is where I live now. And I watched your TikTok video on the day, the FBI warned synagogues a few weeks ago that there was a credible threat. You immediately called your family and I'd like to talk to you about what you said to them. Yeah, so I was actually on my way to school. I take a class at Columbia, and I was on the way to school. I have a debit driving actually that day. And I got a text from my roommate Noah of a link to the Twitter post from the FBI. And I was at a stoplight. And I read it. And I instantly burst out into tears. Just was overcome with emotions. Obviously you know anti semitism is out there. There's not a day that goes by that there aren't people who are spewing anti semitism around the world. But the FBI doesn't just casually alert a massive group of people that there's a threat towards them. And so immediately I took that very seriously and my dad does a lot of work with this tool that we go to the synagogue and that my parents go to in Jersey. My mom works out a Jewish high school, my brother goes to Jewish high school and I immediately called my family and I spoke about in the video I released online that you know I said something like please don't go to shore this week. Please just stay away from right now and I got a lot of responses to, which I actually think is totally valid is people are like, no, they should go. They should go out there. That's what they want. And I honestly agree with that. I think the gut reaction I had of being terrified for my family and not wanting them to go is valid and I'm sure a lot of people felt that way, but at the same time, it is true. You know, the goal of people who commit anti semitic attacks or any type of hate crime is to suppress that group of people. And so by hiding at home, you're kind of getting into what they want. It's a hard dichotomy to balance. My children were celebrating their consecration into religious school that week. And we face the same dilemma. I mean, do we go? My husband and I had to discuss it, whether or not it was the smart thing to do. And if we didn't go, how are we going to explain that to our children? It is a dilemma that no one should have to face when they're deciding whether to go to their house of worship. But so many people do wrestle with that. So I'm curious, what kind of message did you want to send that day and what kind of message do you want to send now? Yeah, so when I took that video, I had just gone to Jersey after my class, and I was just still so overcome with emotions and that tweet from the FBI came right after a week where there have been a lot of dialog about Kanye West. Just anti semitic rhetoric and beyond that he was spewing. And I talked about on the video that I hated having to talk about him. You know, I wish that we could not care about Kanye West being anti semitic. And saying I said in that video is there is no Jewish person who is offended that Kanye West is anti semitic. Our feelings aren't hurt, we care because his words have consequences. If you go all the way back to Europe before the Holocaust, the Holocaust did not start in the gas chambers. The Holocaust started with anti semitic conspiracies, anti semitic rhetoric, being normalized, and the reason why those words matter so much is because they normalize it. You know, anti semitism lives out there. Everyone who's Jewish always knows there's people whether it's on social media in real life, social media is real. You know what I mean? Physically. True. Who spew anti semitism? However,

Eitan Manja Brashear Eitan Bernath FBI Eitan Productions Drew Barrymore CBS Israel Noah New Jersey America Jersey Columbia Kanye West Twitter Europe
What is The Shmita Year?

Judaism Unbound

02:10 min | 1 year ago

What is The Shmita Year?

"We're so excited to jump into this topic of the sh- meter for the series. And for this year so hannah nib henza. Sarah's l. young welcome to judaism unbounded so great to have you here great. Severe here yeah really lovely to be joining today. I think you. I want to start just by understanding. What is your take the shumita projects take on the schmidt. And what it's all about. And how how are you moving forward with that. Take into practical reality at has own. We talk a lot about the jewish calendar rate like e cycles of time that we we're so familiar with going through every year right our holiday structure and the the weekly cycles of work and rest but one of the things. We don't talk that often about. Is this bigger seven year cycle. This this gift that comes around every seventh year called the schmidt a year in which we really get to take a step back and ask bigger systems wide questions around The way that these biblical concepts might have something to say for our our life today so traditionally if you read the original source tax the the original torah on what schmead to is. It sounds an awful lot lake. Will you were just talking about farmers or well. We're just talking about the way that we treat our land or harvests or You know it's a very place based thing on the surface but if you really look at the context there if you really start to have conversation with a about what what issue to. What is its relevance what is what are the rabbis trying to say the commentary around this this concept You really start to understand that. It's it's not just about agricultural rules and regulations. It's really about the way that we are living in relationship to land to the natural world to the cycles of the world that are around us to one another to debt to The the trappings of sort of modern life. And this is the thing that We really understand to be dynamic and fluid and constantly relevant

Hannah Nib Schmidt Sarah
Deborah Lipstadt Picked as Biden's Antisemitism Envoy

People of the Pod

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Deborah Lipstadt Picked as Biden's Antisemitism Envoy

"Alarmed by a wave of attacks on american jews tied to the recent violence between israel and hamas american jewish committee and others in may press the white house to address a glaring void in the us state department the absence of a special envoy to monitor and combat anti-semitism around the world. This week president biden. Fill that vacancy. With one of america's preeminent jewish historians and holocaust scholars emory university professor. Deborah lipstadt professor. Lipstadt joined us on people at the pod shortly after the release of her latest book anti-semitism here and now a series of letters to an imagined college student and imagined colleague. Both of whom are perplexed by contemporary expressions of the most ancient hatred. We discussed whether the world is sufficiently aware of this ever present. danger professor. Thank you for joining us. Thank you for having me so tell me what did inspire you to write this book wind. Did you start writing it. Was there a catalyst. The catalyst was a lot of things that happen amazingly enough now. It sounds like h industry a in two thousand fourteen. The shooting in brussels the the murderer in brussels of visitors to the jewish museum there and a lot of the anti-semitism that emerged around the war in gaza. But it was clear to me that it wasn't just related to the war in gaza that there had been enough other things happening that to just say. Oh this is all about. Gaza was a simplistic view. I wrote an op. Ed for the new york times got a tremendous amount of attention. Discussion and Finally i didn't. I thought that would be the end of it. My agent set me deborah. There's a book here. Where's the proposal. I said i have wallowed in the sewers of anti semitism and holocaust and office so much in my life. I really don't want to write about this. But he wouldn't give up. So i wrote the proposal. He presented to a publisher. They were interested in. I had to write the book. I mean a flip about that really. But as the time where i really started writing the book i would say two thousand fifteen amid to end two thousand fifteen and by that point. It was clear that the book was to me. It was clear that the book was

Hamas American Jewish Committe Us State Department President Biden Deborah Lipstadt Lipstadt Emory University Brussels White House Gaza Israel America The New York Times ED Deborah
Finding the Meaning in the 2020 Pew Study With Tema Smith

Judaism Unbound

01:58 min | 1 year ago

Finding the Meaning in the 2020 Pew Study With Tema Smith

"To some extent the genesis of judaism unbound in a bit of roundabout way as the previous pew study. That came out in two thousand thirteen. Took us a few years to our act together and start the podcast but it was kind of jumping off that understanding of the jewish community as looking different from the way a lot of people thought it did and facing that optimistic way in a lot of people were reading about it and we were whatever. The opposite of fretting is we were. We were ready to embrace this and figure out what it all means and we wanted to have you on starting to talk based on the two thousand twenty p study because he wrote this great piece or put together this great piece to think about how the data of the study could be presented in a way that would give it a different reception. Let's say within the jewish community. So could we start with you just describing a little bit about some of the examples of what you put out there and also like what motivated you to do this. Yes shera so one of the things that really stuck with me. After the last few study was how the data was presented where there was actually what it was showing was actually an increase in for example jewish identification for children of interfaith families and things like that but the data was being presented as doomsday scenario. That you know Children of interfaith families are less likely to be jewish and so when this time around the study came out. That was the first chart i looked for. And guess what it said the same thing but the chart had said intermarried parents much less likely to be raising their children jewish and i looked at it and actually it looks like the numbers had gone up from the previous time and yet we were still telling the doomsday narrative and it was very clear to me. They're the majority of jews who have married somebody of a different background or raising their children. Jewish this is a very different picture than comparing to a jewish jewish couple

The Battle Raging Over Antisemitism and Israel in the Kids’ Literature World

People of the Pod

02:41 min | 1 year ago

The Battle Raging Over Antisemitism and Israel in the Kids’ Literature World

"A few weeks ago. I did a chabad table. Talk segment about a statement condemning anti-semitism released by the society of children's book writers and illustrators. And the apology that followed but there's much more to the story in fact. A battle has been brewing over anti-semitism israel in the children's literature world for quite a while. Gabby deutsche the reporter for jewish insider who wrote about the wider issue is with us now to discuss. Gabby welcome to people of the pod. Thank you excited to be here. So let's first talk about that apology. Did all of this come to light. Share so in the world of As these writers all kids literature is shorthanded. Everybody uses there has been a movement toward diversity calling out racism and all forms of aid and several months years as there has been of course in american society has evolved and about a month ago the beginning of june this organization the society of children's but writers illustrators put out a statement unequivocally condemning antisemitism was a very strong statement it was not political at all. It's not mention. Israel did not mention the politics of the u. s. or elsewhere in the world and jewish writers in fields. Were excited to see it and it was actually. I found my reporting the results of a lot of work by jewish writers. There was an open letter sent around urging this organization to put out a statement. It's an organization that you have to be a part of what you are starting your career. As a writer of children's books and young adult novels it helps people find agents. It helps them promote books. It helps them get bite to give talks. And we'll a lot of influence so when they put out a statement condemning. Assumpta cemetery to wait what happened after that was a lot of controversy on a statement that on the face of it looked very positive which writers in the jewish community ultimately agreed that it was so about two weeks after that statement semitism issued the same organization. Put out another statement. That looked in part to be walked that back. It seems sort of like an apology for their statement on anti-semitism. It's we apologize. The people we've heard you know specifically palistinian american writers muslim writers and many people. The jewish community got the sense that they were saying we can't condemn anti-semitism unless we also condemned islamophobia and other forms of pay and of course the jewish writers also scab against other forms of paid as well. But they were surprised to see the statement following what had been said about anti semitism which did not mention israel. It did not even mention the recent conflict between israel from us it was purely referring to the rise memphis is in the united

Society Of Children Gabby Deutsche Israel Gabby Assumpta Cemetery American Society Memphis United
IDF Paratroopers Head to Europe to Jump for Hannah Szenes's 100th Birthday

The Promised Podcast

02:02 min | 1 year ago

IDF Paratroopers Head to Europe to Jump for Hannah Szenes's 100th Birthday

"We learned this week that next sunday as we recorded on july eighteenth another delegation of one hundred fifty or so idea of soldiers code-named the lightning of the heavens will leave israel on a mission marking. What would have been the hundredth birthday of hannah. Censh- mayor memory for blessing. Hana sanish the budapest born poet and soldier in these secret british special operations executive who on march fourteenth nineteen forty four. When she was just twenty two parachuted with others into yugoslavia where she joined a partisan group and was soon captured by nazi soldiers at the hungarian border and then tortured and murdered by firing squad on monday. To a f- hercules transport. Planes will fly over the forests of eastern slovenia. Where sanish made her last. Jump and one hundred soldiers mostly from the idea but also hungarian. Slovenian and croatian soldiers were reenact sandwiches. Jump the purpose of the reenactment. According to colonel yuval guys the commander of some hueneme the idea paratroopers brigade is to strengthen the ties between the idf and local countries and to try to recreate the heroism of the shoe paratroopers and quote the name of the mission. The lightning of the heavens is taken from his most famous poem. Highly colicky sorry. I walked the case. Aria which goes my god. My god may these never end the sand and the see the rush of the water the lightning of heaven. The prayer of man among the soldiers travelling to slovenia is one who was called up for reserve duty to serve as an educational officer for the mission tel aviv university professor of jewish history. Lieutenant colonel seem Golden husan lieutenant. Haddara golden may refer blessing was killed at twenty three in the two thousand and fourteen gaza war and whose body has been held by hamas for the seven years since and again like mariam said it would take hours months even dissect and elucidate the historical religious and political currents that converge in. This baffling act of symbolism

Hana Sanish Sanish Colonel Yuval Paratroopers Brigade Slovenia Hannah Yugoslavia Hueneme Israel IDF Mission Tel Aviv University Golden Husan Haddara Golden Gaza Mariam Hamas
Speaking to the Senators Behind the Senate Caucus on Black-Jewish Relations

People of the Pod

02:22 min | 1 year ago

Speaking to the Senators Behind the Senate Caucus on Black-Jewish Relations

"Last month. Three us senators announced the launch of the bipartisan senate caucus on black jewish relations. I sat down with senators. Jackie rosen of nevada. Tim scott of south carolina and cory booker of new jersey to discuss the mission of the new caucus. Here's a portion of our conversation senators. Welcome thank you. it's good to be with you. You very very much reinvigorating. The black jewish alliance is that was at the bedrock of the civil rights movement. And it's key to combating racism rising anti-semitism both here in america and around the world. And that's why today's announcement is so critical. The three of you have joined us here on the global forum stage to announce the first ever senate caucus on black jewish relations which you share with our audience fees each of you. What you hope to accomplish. During this caucus i would suggest the wisdom to i yielding. Jackie i it sounds good. Well thank you. I appreciate that. And i want to tell you that. I'm so proud to be here with tim and corey because when i went and talked to them about this idea there wasn't a hesitation for a second and i'm just so excited to do this first time it's ever happened in the senate and i just know that we are going to have so many good conversations positive things going forward and we're going to show real leadership in this issue and just very excited to announce this those senators white. Why didn't you hesitate for me. It's been a lifelong journey in many ways. understanding appreciating the parallel tracks that the jewish community in the black community have been on if you think about it from a biblical perspective for centuries of slavery in egypt and you think about the four centuries. African americans were enslaved. There are tracks that are parallel and pain. That creates promise an opportunity. The tragedies that became triumphs. it's a story that continues on and for my life For me it seems. It's just personal in that. By some of my first mentors larry freudenberg. Who helped me become a part of his insurance agency. And then it gave me a piece of the pie and taught me not to work for someone but worked for yourself

Jackie Rosen Black Jewish Alliance Senate Tim Scott Cory Booker South Carolina United States Nevada New Jersey Jackie Corey TIM Egypt Larry Freudenberg
Boston Rabbi Stabbed Outside Synagogue, Suspect in Custody

WBZ Afternoon News

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Boston Rabbi Stabbed Outside Synagogue, Suspect in Custody

"Developing news tonight out of Boston's Brighton neighborhood. That's where rabbi was stabbed today in broad daylight right outside the shallow house on Chestnut Hill Avenue. Boston. Police say one person is under arrest. As of now, we do not know who they are or their motive for that attack. Now. The center's executive director, Rabbi Dan Rodkin, says the rabbi who was stabbed is Rabbi Schlomann against key. He says he was attacked outside the house during a day camp for Children the campus into a lockdown for a time, But Rabbi Rodkin says at no point where any of the Children in danger, Rabbi Nijinsky is reportedly being treated for stab wounds to his arm. He has apparently in stable condition tonight.

Boston Rabbi Dan Rodkin Rabbi Schlomann Brighton Rabbi Rabbi Rodkin Rabbi Nijinsky
Anita Diamant Talks Menstrual Justice

Can We Talk?

01:39 min | 1 year ago

Anita Diamant Talks Menstrual Justice

"Tough to be stranded without period products but the stigma around periods can be even tougher and neither diamond wants to help. You should put please everybody put in your bathroom. The one that you that guests use a container with pads and tampons even if nobody needs them it is a sign. It signals the fact that is an amenity. It's not a luxury that needs to be out just like toilet papers so and towels in your bathroom. Anita diamond is the author of many books. Her most recent out this may is called period end of sentence. A new chapter in the fight for menstrual justice the book shares its title with documentary film about a women's collective in rural india that makes and sells pads. The film won an oscar in two thousand nineteen when they announced that this movie had one. I jumped off the couch. Fist bump in the air they as the director said. I can't believe a movie about periods. Just want to ask. That's when anita got involved. The film's producers reached out to her. Because she's well known for her period positive attitude her nine hundred ninety seven bestselling novel. The red tent was named for the imagined retreat. The biblical matriarchs went to during their periods. We discussed the red tent in a live taping. Can we talk several years ago. Anita's fictionalized vision of ancient menstruation. Practices struck a chord with readers around the world now with period end of sentence. Anita is exploring contemporary menstrual justice activism globally and here in the united states.

Anita Diamond Oscar Anita India United States
Tzipi Hotovely: Israels first female ambassador in the United Kingdom

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

02:07 min | 1 year ago

Tzipi Hotovely: Israels first female ambassador in the United Kingdom

"Of the battle. He's not just east rail. Your jewish we all need to fight together. And i think the fact that old people were arrested. I know that the british government and the british police been very active around. It is a good place to start but this is not the end we need. We need to do more in order to fight. Antisemitism and i know the jewish communities very much concerned because no one experienced anything like that in britain and we need to make sure that britain will be the free democratic country that it stands for its values and not a country where jews are afraid to go to school or go to synagogues or to look lectures should be hotter valley as israel's first female. Uk ambassador she was born in recovered in nineteen seventy eight. The daughter of soviet georgian emigrants ardent zionists as with previous ambassador gavin episode thirty. He one about social mobility in israel. The dynamism of the economy tragically. There's anti zionism among young jewish people across the west in the us and he two heads are being turned by media and peer pressure. And while seventy five percent of american jews support israel as a jewish state eighty. Five percents say it's important or very important to stand up for the oppressed or marginalized hundreds of jewish google employees rejected. What they call the conflict of israel with the jewish people overbearing anti-israel narrative makes bias out of balance palestinian. Ism chant along by half wit football. Whoa korie and tv celebrities and her excellency has a message for those in the diaspora who are less than supportive of the jewish state. The young generation in britain can sometimes be very critical but israel's policy in certain fields in areas. But i think that most israelis have their own opinions like as you know. We're we're a country that everyone can criticize the government But i think by criticizing policy. You cannot just go and not support israel. Supporting

British Police Israel Britain Gavin Episode British Government Whoa Korie UK Google United States Football
Rachel Gross on her book The Deli is My Synagogue

Judaism Unbound

02:39 min | 1 year ago

Rachel Gross on her book The Deli is My Synagogue

"Rachel gross welcome back to judaism unbounded so great to have you. It's so great to be back. Thanks for having me so. I wanted to start with a question that i feel like lexin. I were debating for a while a couple of years ago. And then we kinda stop debating it. And i think we should be debating it again which is basically. What does religion mean you know. What do we mean when we're talking about religion because the subtitle of your book as jewish nostalgia as religious practice. And i think it's really important to start by understanding. What do you mean when you say religion or religious practice. I think religion as really important relationships so those relationships can be relationships between humans and the divine or other sacred figures between living humans in community with one another or between humans and their ancestors all kinds of meaningful relationships and then the practices attacks the stories that we use to build those relationships and coming to this definition. I'm building on many other scholars of religious studies and particularly religious studies scholar robert or see who thinks about religion as relationships. And i'm i'm building on that to think about these three hypes of relationships. I think we're jews. We might think about how some jews might be interested in a relationship with god for other jews. The relationship with god may really be in the background and we might be thinking about relationships with the people around us or with our ancestors. And i think that those types of relationships are as important that we can understand religion as as those relationships too. I guess i'm really just struggling with this question of like okay but you know in common use people say well. I'm jewish but i'm not religious. You know they mean some version of like. I'm not into the god stuff for the praying and we could redefine. I mean this is what. I was really struggling with this. I was reading your book. It's like we could redefine religion so that everybody's religious now it's okay. Why is it better to redefine the term religion than to just find a different word. Capture this loyalty. This interest in judy judaism jewishness that you have but also being able to distinguish it between what the people who go to synagogue. Chabad and pray for three hours. What they're doing. So the question is why does defining religion matter and white is redefining. It matter

Rachel Gross Robert Judy Judaism
How Interfaith Relations Helped Drive the Abraham Accords

People of the Pod

01:48 min | 1 year ago

How Interfaith Relations Helped Drive the Abraham Accords

"For years many have seen a religious diversity in the middle east as an obstacle to resolving conflict there but american jewish committee is international director of interreligious affairs. David rosen believes the contrary the shared religious heritage embodied by the prophet. Abraham should pave the way to peace with us now to discuss. How leaders have already begun to make this ideal. A reality is rabbi rosen. And dr ali rashid new amy founder and chairman of the world council of muslim communities. Gentlemen welcome to people love the pod. Dr l. new. We'll start with you. Welcome last year. We watch the historic. Signing of the abraham accords between the united arab emirates and bahrain and soon israel was welcoming relations with morocco and sudan some of said to expand arab israeli peace in the middle east. It's not only important for countries to normalize relations with israel. Which of course is what the accordance did it's also important for diplomats to foster interreligious relationships in the name of abraham. What does that mean. And why is that so important. Well first of all thank you for inviting me to be a part of this event and to speak to such an outstanding audience well from our perspective in the uae. we don't look at mcchord as we're of dividends and stay within the diplomatic arena way. We see that the accord actually bring to nation together. And what i say to nation. I see that you know what happened. Actually on august their teams that we started making history in this area. Where i so that engagement of gold sector of all stakeholders from the east inside and from israeli side.

Rabbi Rosen Dr Ali Rashid New Amy Abraham World Council Of Muslim Commun Dr L David Rosen American Jewish Committee Middle East UAE Israel Bahrain Morocco Sudan Mcchord
JIMENA: Mizrahi and Sephardi Voices

Can We Talk?

02:49 min | 1 year ago

JIMENA: Mizrahi and Sephardi Voices

"Ovid is a dancer and choreographer from aden yemen. She moved to israel as a girl in nineteen forty nine and became a founding member of the inbal dance. Company marguerite recorded her oral history for the gemina oral history project. In two thousand eleven gimenez stands for jews indigenous to the middle east and north africa region that jewish communities thrive in for over two thousand years until the twentieth century. When a million mizraki sephardi jews fled and were forced out of the land of their ancestors. The san francisco based gemina is working to preserve that rich heritage and history producer. Asala sunny poor recently sat down with sarah levin gimenez executive director to talk about some of the stories in the archive as well as their own family histories. A saw worked with sarah on the archives many years ago sayre you and i worked really closely together while i was in college My very first internship ever was with jim messina and working on this oral history project. I like to think that it's what really launched my love of storytelling. I wanted to start by asking you. Why do you think it's important to preserve these stories as told in the words of those who lived it. So i am so happy to be doing this with you a saul. I think that judaism as grounded and stories like that is the legacy of our people. That's the foundation of haha. That's the foundation of what it means to be jewish as passing on stories Were the combination of thousands of years of stories and in regards to gimenez oral history project We collected stories of communities of people who who hadn't been given a platform to share. They hadn't been given a microphone. They hadn't been given an opportunity to talk about what happened to them when they lived and fled countries throughout the middle east. North africa and their stories are an incredibly critical part of contemporary jewish history. And where we are. Today with establishment of the state of israel nineteen forty eight posts showa post arab nationalism and uprisings in the middle east and north africa there was a major disruption of over two thousand years of continuous jewish life in the middle east north africa. Kinda came to an end and that is a huge part of the jewish story. And we have this very unique opportunity to collect the stories from the people who lived through this historical moment in time and it was an honor to collect these stories and hopefully add them to the record of jewish

Gimenez Aden Yemen Gemina Sarah Levin Gimenez Ovid Middle East North Africa Marguerite Foundation Of Haha Jim Messina Sayre Israel San Francisco Sarah Middle East North Africa
Trans Jewish Fiction - Leiah Moser

Judaism Unbound

02:13 min | 1 year ago

Trans Jewish Fiction - Leiah Moser

"Lay moser welcome to judaism unbounded so great to have you thanks. It's really nice to be here well. I'm excited to have this conversation. I was poking around your blog recently. And i came across the blog post. That was actually from about a decade ago. So i don't specifically necessarily what ask about the post i in the case. You don't remember post from ten years ago but the particular blog plus that you wrote. That's one about how their are similarities between coming out his trends and converting judy them and i found that really interesting because it was a connecting topics that i think people don't necessarily tend to connect and when i've been thinking about it i've been thinking a lot about the idea of trends these days helping people understand that the gender binary is not necessarily a binary. And maybe that's also true. Judaism maybe it's just not jew and non jew. There's more interesting stuff going on there. And i was wondering if you could talk a little bit about some of those connections and also others that that you've seen on this journey if i'm remembering correctly the post you're referring to like a like a list of a number of ways in which he ing transgender is similar to being a garrett setting a convert to judaism and i think that that's a comparison that you know that really has hit me early on in my transition process and stayed with me throughout the process really because i myself am emit convert to judaism right. That's my own story And also because i've ended up you know over the years working quite a bit with other folks who are either converts or who are in the process of converting that that's kind of a big meaningful thing to me. In both cases the whole journey is structured around the idea of there being sort of a point of arrival not for everybody but for at least many folks who are transitioning. There's sort of a sense that one has of. This is the place that i wanna get to you know. Many people's gender transition journey involve a movement toward something right and the eye. An implicit in the idea of a movement toward is the idea that there's a destination to get to.

Moser Garrett
The Mystery of Esther Brandeau

Can We Talk?

02:11 min | 1 year ago

The Mystery of Esther Brandeau

"This story starts in the seventeen thirty s. Seventeen thirty three to be precise and this historical figure who i call esther brando shacklock. This figure is being sent to family in amsterdam on a dutch ship but this dutch boat runs aground. She's rescued and then ensues a five year journey. She doesn't go back to her family. She stays for time in beats which is a coastal town nearby for a little while and then sets off as a young man and travels all along coastal france working on boats between bordeaux and don't for example deserting at not continues onto a han in brittany where they work for taylor then for a time in semi lower. They work for a baker and then they work for a time in a religious order and they work for a retired soldier and then ultimately at some point. they're arrested and suspected as a thief but then released twenty four hours later and then eventually they board a ship at lower shell a typical starting point for transatlantic voltages to what the french empire called new france. What we today call quebec quebec city in particular. Which is when dot territory. There is only one account written by a woman about the story from that time period written by a nun in a letter to a friend in which she says. This happened in canada. This person arrive to turned out to be a jewish young jewish girl. Aleve the new cetinje on canada. In fiji we've dc matlock look on soup. Sonar came this year to canada. A jewish girl disguised as a sailor. She was suspected of being a person on the ship but she did not admit to it. Monsieur de don don interrogated her. She told him the truth and that she had fled from her parents because she was less loved by them than one of our sisters.

Esther Brando Shacklock Amsterdam Bordeaux Brittany New France France Taylor Quebec City Canada Quebec Fiji Monsieur De Don Don
Upheaval: The Journey of Menachem Begin With Director Jonathan Gruber

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

02:23 min | 1 year ago

Upheaval: The Journey of Menachem Begin With Director Jonathan Gruber

"Jonathan gruber a warm. Welcome to johnny gould's jewish state. Hey johnny thanks for having. I've been looking forward to this interview for some time and indeed i've been waiting for a movie like this for what i'm unashamedly proud to say is my favorite israeli of the modern era. This was a man with a massive heart and for those of us who appear to understand him a little bit more a bit more gracious in their memory of him. I don't think he's quite as controversial or indeed as contradictory as people say interesting. I think he is pretty complex. The i i don't think he's one side or the other i think that's you know like most people they have different opinions on different Different topics he just happened to be in charge of lots of things and i found a tremendous amount about that. I never learned before. I own web Very young during the ad the peace accords egypt and understand his history in sort of the scope. Israel's history and even going back to world war two was was fascinating. Let's go back to belarus because he talked about his upbringing. His father was very learned. Torah scholar and his mom was the best mom in the world like older that jewish mothers. And that's kind of what chills me in a way jonathan because here we are in washington. Dc and in london living. What looked like a very similar life and then an absolute disaster prevailed for him sheild started jewish or hebrew. Education are very devoted parents. Our father was a very educated man. Mainly sage in judaism and mother was as any sun can save perhaps the best in the world it sounded to me that there was prevailing antisemitism. Grow out so he might have had a lovely family life. Things were not so great at school in the film talks about anti semites that would fight stick up for themselves so there certainly were issues than and sad to say. There are issues In in the uk in the united states anti semitism

Jonathan Gruber Johnny Gould Johnny Belarus Egypt Israel Jonathan Washington London UK United States
Allyship Fundamentals - Mike Moskowitz

Judaism Unbound

02:29 min | 1 year ago

Allyship Fundamentals - Mike Moskowitz

"Moskowitz welcome to judaism unbounded so great to have you. He's still for so. I'd love to start with a question that i'm sure you've been asked a million times. But basically how did an ultra orthodox rabbi come to be the scholar and residence for trans and queer studies at a progressive judaism synagogue that is actually the largest lgbt synagogue in the world. And i think what are the first so how did that happen. Rabbi hyman and i met in the back of a police wagon where we both got arrested for civil disobedience over daca. It was in dc about three and a half years ago and in the back of this police wagon. We are all in handcuffs. And there's five melded a vying folks on one side makita a metal partition in the middle of this police. Dan and then five defying rabat's on the other side and rabbi climate says you know bunch of to share toronto share and it's a captive audience role in hand and i just read an article in gender and clothing and so i share these thoughts with her and through the course of the afternoon where we were massive warehouse in also separated by gender. She a little bit of my story. How is a rabbi in harlem at columbia and was now working at a deli lakewood new jersey. I've taken off the day to get arrested. And she got together and created this position for me. Because i wasn't able to find a job in the radio world anymore because of the positions taken very publicly Those positions for me came about As it does most people as a function of proximity someone in my family transitions at a student. Congregation who had transitioned really wasn't kind of authority and also works representation within the rabbinate to create a sacred space for people to be who they are without having to choose between a gender identity and religious identity. In so i kind of started the occupying that space void and cdc showed up as as my ally to give me the platform in the agency to able to do that. It's been a fantastic relationship. That's i think has been surprisingly simple. It actually lacks the complexity of what i think. Most people would assume would be awkwardness of being in both of those spaces. Because i think. Cbs team particular frames. Judaism as being in relationship with tradition. And god it really allows for the commonality of individuality where we're all struggling were journeying. Were also exploring And that way were all equal

Rabbi Hyman Daca Moskowitz Rabat DC Harlem DAN Lakewood Toronto Columbia New Jersey CDC CBS
Being Heumann with Judy Heumann

Can We Talk?

01:58 min | 1 year ago

Being Heumann with Judy Heumann

"Judy. Human is a legend in the disability rights movement. The fruits of her labor everywhere. Sidewalk curb cuts accessible public transportation. Equal access to public services from fighting for the right to live in her college dorm. To leading major initiatives at the world bank and state department. Judy has been a lifelong activist. Her activism often includes telling her own story her book is called being human an unrepentant memoir of disability rights activist. Judy was born in brooklyn in nineteen forty seven. She got polio when she was eighteen months old and it left her. Unable to walk we spoke over zoom about her activism. In her early years growing up in a world she had to fight to be included in. She started telling me about the time when she first realized that people saw her differently. It was an incident that happened. When i was about eight years old in my neighborhood and at that point when no motorized wheelchair so that's why people were having to push me and my next door neighbor arlene and i were going to the store to the candy store and on our way to the candy store some boy came over and asked me if i was sick and that incident really made me feel quite undressed in as much as i really had not seen myself until that moment as being consciously different from other people and the word that this boy used with me was are you sick and so the use of the word sick still today And now we're talking sixty. Some years later is still. I think a prominent where that people think about and use his

World Bank And State Departmen Judy Polio Brooklyn Arlene
Rhythms of Sacred Protest - Koach Baruch Frazier

Judaism Unbound

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Rhythms of Sacred Protest - Koach Baruch Frazier

"Wanna talk about somebody coming to to do what you're doing which is to be in rabbinical school after a career in another field. I'm just curious about that because up until relatively recently being a rabbi was like something that people did more or less out of college and as somebody who's now on the old side. I kind of feel like i actually have learned a lot in the last thirty years and if i were to become a rabbi which i've got rid would never be but if i if i did today audi much better at it than i would have been thirty years ago and so i'm wondering just could you talk a little bit about how you made that decision to become a rabbi. After having done something else for a long time. And how has that influenced the way that you experience being a rabbinical student. One of the things that was on my mind. When i decided that i wanted to go to rabbinical school was as a leader Leader in community already in saint louis missouri. Which is where most recently from people were already assigning the title. Rabbi to me. It felt very strange. A i that was one thing that propelled into rabbinical school. The other thing is that. I spent a lot of time as an audiologist and i was starting to notice that some of the people who were coming to me weren't necessarily coming to me for their physical. Let's say a problems or their physical situations that they were actually coming to me. And i was more so as chaplain than i. Was there. audiologist in as that started to shift. I say you know what. I think i should go to school. So that I've gone to school for a audiology. And i felt of my career was great and i also knew that there was foundational learning. That made that career great along with the experience in so i decided that i needed to go to rabbinical school to get some foundational learning so that those moments in time when i'm spending with people as their rabbi that the foundation is there

Audi Saint Louis Rabbi Missouri
The Jewish Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo

Can We Talk?

02:39 min | 1 year ago

The Jewish Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo

"In nineteen seventy six argentina. A military dictatorship seized power in what came to be known as the dirty war. The regime systematically kidnapped tortured and killed anyone suspected of including priests teachers and members of labor unions and protest movements bodies were thrown into the river plate and never recovered hundreds of pregnant. Women were kidnapped allowed to deliver their babies and then killed their babies were given to military families. The thirty thousand victims. Who were never heard from again are known as the disappeared. Twelve percent of them were jewish even though jews accounted for only one percent of the population of argentina a year into the dirty war a group of mothers whose grown children had been disappeared began demonstrating in the plaza de mayo in buenos. Id's many of them were jewish women during this time of tremendous fear and terror. These women were the only ones who are really standing up publicly and demanding that something happened and their children be returned. Natasha's arete ski is an anthropologist who focuses on human rights memory and justice. She writes about the jewish mothers of the plaza de maggio injectables updated encyclopedia of jewish women. Natasha says the movement began with a group of mothers publicly demanding to know what had been done to their sons and daughters. So you have women who started standing every thursday afternoon in the main public square in argentina which faces the presidential palace. They were simple white headscarves into which they stitch the names of their children and the dates of their disappearance and they would hold pictures of their children as well and they did this every thursday afternoon battle and at first they were kind of ignored and no one really paid attention to them and there was no retribution from the authorities and there was almost a certain sacredness to the fact that they were mothers and then as they received more international attention. That's when they started being targeted as well. There were a number of others who were kidnapped and tortured and detained and yet they remained in that plaza putting their own bodies at risk in order to try to find some kind of

Argentina Natasha Plaza De Mayo Main Public Square Buenos
Police Investigating Vandalism at Chicago-Area Synagogue as Hate Crime

Chris Plante

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

Police Investigating Vandalism at Chicago-Area Synagogue as Hate Crime

"Police in north suburban scope here investigating a report of vandalism at a synagogue is a hate crime. Police say. Someone smashed a window at the Persian Hebrew congregation Sunday afternoon and left a flag and a pro Palestine sign outside. There is surveillance video of the crime. No one was at the synagogue at the time. No one was injured, and now security has been

Persian Hebrew Congregation Palestine
Beyond Binaries, Beyond Orthodoxies - Jericho Vincent

Judaism Unbound

02:21 min | 1 year ago

Beyond Binaries, Beyond Orthodoxies - Jericho Vincent

"We are really thrilled to be having this conversation. So jericho vincent welcome to judaism unbound. It's so great to have you on the. I'm really excited to talk to you. Because i just finished reading your book cut me. Loose was yesterday or this morning. I just finished it. So i was hoping just that. Because i'm always conscious about like spoiler alert that you could tell a little bit of your story just to get us started here in the way that you you tell it so that people understand you know who you are and where you've come from and where you're going sure. So i published my memoir back in two thousand fourteen skuld comey loose and it tells the story of my upbringing in an ultra orthodox rabbinic family. And what happened. When i started pushing back against some of the rules of that lifestyle Spoiler i can tell you what happened was pretty dreadful things. My family basically pushed me out. I was totally unprepared as an ultra orthodox teenager to live on my own in new york city which is what i ended up doing a lot of trauma. I'm as i try to survive before. Finally starting to pull myself out of that. And trying to rebuild a life the stable safe and that's sort of the ark of the book the ark of life stories much larger than that. Yeah we've had guests on this show. Who have left ultra-orthodox judaism and in that book. We if we were having this conversation some years ago. I think that's the conversation that we would have been having but in the time since you published that book you came out as trans and i'm not sure exactly when that was in the timeline so you can help us understand where we're sitting today and then down the road when i'm really also really interested in. Is this connection or maybe it is. Maybe it isn't a way to understand judaism differently in light of the way that we are now understanding gender differently. So i came out publicly about tune half years ago and i came out as gender queer which is under the umbrella of trans identity and will the thing about writing a memoir is that you discover when you sit down to write. It is that human life is so massive and contain so many narratives. You can only fit very small. Sliver that into a book. And when i actually sat down to write my memoir i didn't know that i was gender queer

Jericho Vincent Skuld Comey New York City
Playing Fair with Eve Rodsky

Can We Talk?

02:20 min | 1 year ago

Playing Fair with Eve Rodsky

"I wanted to talk to eve because even for me. A professional feminist this balance has been elusive. And it's humbling. Because feminists have been trying to address this. For many decades nineteenth century feminists created a professional field of home economics to bring value to domestic labor second way feminist tried renegotiating the terms of marriage and coined the phrase the politics of housework recognizing that was often seen as a personal struggle is part of a whole system that doesn't value or support caregiving and domestic work. Today many women in higher paying jobs outsource chelsea karen housework but that work is still being done by other women lower paying jobs who are often women of color. Covert has really laid bare. How imperfect and unjust the system is but as. We re emerge rebuild. That insight may give us an opportunity to renegotiate the terms or as eradicate would say. Reveal the deck. You've created a system that recognizes the true value of caregiving and seeks to redistribute it like all feminists revolutions. It started with a very personal moment. And that's where we began our conversation. I did have a series of experiences. That sort of changed. The course of my life and one of those experiences was a text. My husband sent me nine years ago. That said i'm surprised you didn't get blueberries and the passenger seat of my car. I had a diaper bag and a breast pump at a newborn baby at home and amidst all this chaos racing to get my older son zach at the time he was three. I had a client contract in my lap. And every time i would hit the brakes. Penn would serve stabbed me in the vagina making me completely. Saban pullover to the side of the road. I live in la now and so we don't take traffic lightly so for me to pull over and be laid to pick up zach. Something was really wrong in my marriage. And that was a the fact that i was the fulfill his smoothing needs and literally every single other task for my family was seemingly falling in my lap at the time but more importantly i did not have the career marriage combo i thought i was going to have all those realizations. Were sort of raining down on me that day. When sesame that tax

Chelsea Karen Zach Saban Penn LA
Why Jewish Fiction? With David Hirshberg

Judaism Unbound

02:12 min | 1 year ago

Why Jewish Fiction? With David Hirshberg

"Hershberg welcome to judaism unbounded so great to have you. Thank you very much. It's nice to be we both of you. Well where starting this kind of series which is distributed through the next few months where we're talking to a number of authors of fiction from a jewish perspective or from a jewish point of view or about the jewish experience Last week we talked to some folks who are earlier in their lives who are writing fiction and this week. We're talking with you. Who is somebody who came to write fiction after a long career as moore. I'm wondering a little bit if you could talk about where that impulse to write. Fiction comes from at this stage of your life and you're trying to do by now becoming a novelist. I spent a career in in biotech developing drugs and about four or five years ago. I decided that i needed something. A second act in. I always wanted to write and fishing was what i wanted to write so i decided to do something i wrote. I wrote it off. And when i was finished with our very proud and then did probably the best thing i've ever done. I deleted it. It was one hundred. Twenty four thousand words and out of that between fifteen. Eighteen hundred words were preserved and those preserved words went into my first book called my mother son which came out three years ago. The decision to to write was one that. If i didn't start doing it. I would have one of these regrets. Later on rai would say. Oh i could have done this. I'm so disappointed. I didn't do that. And the worst thing would happen. Since i did on my own was it wouldn't be very good and no one else would no. I wouldn't suffer any of the negative consequences. I was lucky when i sent chapters around to people who said they likely very much and they continued to push me to write at. That was at the same time. I was leaving last. Ceo job in biotech. And so now. I have more time to write. Although i'm advising a few companies now it doesn't take too much.

Hershberg Moore
What You Should Know About the Iran Nuclear Talks

People of the Pod

02:08 min | 1 year ago

What You Should Know About the Iran Nuclear Talks

"Earlier this month six world powers reopened negotiations with iran over the two thousand fifteen nuclear accord or joint comprehensive plan of action. From which the united states withdrew into thousand eighteen officials have described the initial discussions focused on bringing iran into compliance and lifting. Us sanctions as constructive here to discuss. The implications of these talks is a longtime friend of american jewish committee. Patrick clawson director of research at the washington institute where he directs the Turbie program on iran and us policy. Dr clawson welcome back to people of the pod. Thank you for having me. So let's start with the current state of the two thousand fifteen. Nuclear agreement at this point is iran and compliance with any of its restrictions. A few okay which ones and which ones has violated will iran is largely in compliance of the not entirely with the commitments made about providing access to the international inspectors the international topic energy agency. Even there it's not full. In compliance and iran is also in compliance with some of the restrictions on one of the reactors that he uses so the most important restrictions however were on the enrichment of uranium and they're iran is across the board noncompliance. The situation is even worse than it looks because the original agreement required iran not to do research on how to enrich to a higher level and how to use more advanced centrifuges. We'll iran has done that research and you can't undo that research once you've done it so iran is allowing the inspectors still to come in but hasn't iran threatened to limit the inspectors access to its research facilities correct in may will come up with a deadline. Set down by runs parliament saying that if there's been no progress in the negotiations than the access for the inspectors will stop. The widespread expectation is that iran will say well. I guess there's enough progress. We can keep on going for a little while longer

Iran Patrick Clawson Dr Clawson International Topic Energy Age American Jewish Committee United States Washington Institute Parliament
Jewish Stories We Need: Aimee Lucido, Sofiya Pasternack

Judaism Unbound

02:16 min | 1 year ago

Jewish Stories We Need: Aimee Lucido, Sofiya Pasternack

"Pasternak aimee lucido welcome to judaism unbounded so great to have you. Thank you so much. We're excited to be here. Is thanks for having us well. I'm really excited to have you as somebody who thinks a lot about writing fiction. And i'm not really sure i have it in me. I have a story to tell. But i don't really know if i have it meteoroid fiction so i'm therefore always excited an admiring of anybody that's actually written fiction so i would love to start by just hearing a little bit of the story of how each of you came to get in this. I'm sure highly lucrative business of ratings jewish fiction for young people. I wrote my first story. Think when i was six or seven years old i have always just liked making up stories and then one day i figured out like oh you can get paid for this like oh okay. And that became my dream job. And i didn't pursue that because why would i got a bunch of other league medical related jobs instead but writing the whole time and anya and the dragon was. I don't like my exploration of my own judaism because i wasn't raised jewish. Not really like. It was very vague in the old country type of thing. But we don't do that anymore. And then when. I became an adult and i started getting into genealogy and i realize like okay like my mom's side my moms moms dads cider all jewish or they were and i thought well i wanna i wanna get more into that and the writing of onion. The dragon was my own kind of as i was learning about my family's religion. I was putting together this book as well so her experience is very similar to my own kind of that like 'isolation and not really having a community and that kind of thing because like it's a joke. I'm i'm in my thirties. It's hard to make friends now and it's also hard to get involved in other communities. You just feel weird so it has been very isolating. And i have a great community. I live in utah. So it's a great community. It's a small community but it is really

Pasternak Aimee Lucido Anya Utah
Habima to Be Owned by Tel Aviv Municipality Following Financial Crisis

The Promised Podcast

02:00 min | 1 year ago

Habima to Be Owned by Tel Aviv Municipality Following Financial Crisis

"Come to promised cast brought to you on t. v. One the voice of the city that this week announced that it is taking ownership of the national theatre habima and in so doing taking on one hundred million shekels in debt that habima has run up over the past years and in doing all this bringing to a happy conclusion a crisis that we first became aware of a year and a half ago in november twenty nineteen when a man named core case safron sued demanding that the company liquidated its assets and use the proceeds to pay the four million. It owed him for telemarketing services provided to habima by his company. Power dialing at the time the press made saffron out to be a grinch like figure shutting down the world's oldest hebrew theatre for something as unexhausted money filthy lucre. But the fact is you have to do a lot of power dialing. Run up a tab of four million shekels and it's like the old saying goes don't the cold call if you ain't got the windfall. It's the saying. I've heard a lot of people say that anyway. During the hearing it came out that the national theatre was much worse debt than anyone knew so much that that it was like an iceberg and the four million telemarketing chuckles. Were only the small little point. You see above the waterline. Which debt of course only got lots worse during the pandemic and of course the national government has an approved a budget since march twenty eighteen. Meaning that it would be complicated. And maybe even impossible for the treasury and ministry of culture in jerusalem to bail out the theater even if they were of a mind to do it and finally tel aviv mayor room the stepped up and negotiated a deal whereby the theater would become a municipal corporation like the art museum and the land of israel museum in the cinematheque and the camera theater. The director general of habima. A man named noam semel who was hired just over a year ago to steer the national theatre through its financial crisis said quote the tel aviv. Municipality is the mother and father that the bima has never had and quote

Habima National Theatre Habima Safron National Theatre National Government Ministry Of Culture Camera Theater Treasury Tel Aviv Jerusalem Noam Semel Israel Museum Aviv
The Six Day War: On the Seventh Day

The Jewish Story

02:07 min | 1 year ago

The Six Day War: On the Seventh Day

"In the six day war begs the question of what happened on the seven day. And if you're a jew like me. Relationship between six and seven is far from neutral. It of course brings to mind this notion of chabad the seventh day that brings sanctity meaning brings rest into the activity of creation. That relationship between six and seven isn't just between sort of doing and being the six days of work in the seventh day of rest. Although we shouldn't miss that it is also an opportunity to understand nature. What's called an emergent property. There's something which you can only know. Once the structure is in place. There's some aspect of an event which you can only understand once it's over and we can truly begin to consider the meaning which emerges now that we have. It's homeless in place now at meeting of course is always going to be defined in derived in the present and in the present. We're going to look back on an event like the six day war and we're going to understand it an in turn how we understand it. Now cause us to interpret the events of the past and since all meaning is future-driven we all have a vision of where we're trying to get to that deeply colors who we are right now. Which in turn is the lens through which we see what's come before. Well then that means in our case the best place to start with the framing of the massive victory in the two thousand six at yar to the set of sieben or as we say in the non jewish calendar june fifth to tenth ease with its name. Now good tradition. Has it that defense minister. Moshe dayan was the first to actually label. Israel's victory as the six day war and it's no secret that the name was deliberate effort of the six days of creation. Like i said his hope and the hope of so many of his peers with indeed. Everything was now different that the war created a whole new world. And of course what one believed that that new world looks like or at least to look like is going to depend much and how the understood the old one.

Moshe Dayan Israel
The Six Day War: The Waiting

The Jewish Story

02:20 min | 1 year ago

The Six Day War: The Waiting

"This episode. we're going to walk right up to the brink of war. And when i think about such terrifying in awesome event i think a lot about the courage bound up with the needs of the hour is fascinating idea to me. I mean where does it come from this capacity within the human spirit to overcome the rational mind tells. You is a terrible chance of survival. Not only that. But i think a lot about the courage embedded in our history about wien durrance which it takes to consistently over come. The obstacles life puts on our way in pursuit of the things which we believe our most sacred and when i started to do a little bit of research about what courage actually is. I found that in western culture. The idea reaches its first crystallization in plato's early writings and they're he calls it a sort of endurance of the soul. And you know despite the fact that we in the greeks parted ways long ago. If anybody makes the rich it's certainly plato. And that's a very jewish notion that courage is an endurance of the soul that pure essence the embodiment of the divine element within human existence. Is what gives us the ability to overcome all the challenges physical emotional mental and even spiritual know of. It's not a surprise that the origin of the word in latin is from coal. Right meeting heart. That somehow courage means that you lead from the heart that the head we'll get itself wrapped up in fear sometimes in fights paralyzed in the face of events in its ability to make a decision. But you can rely on the heart to know and push forward another piece of what courage is or that i found in my research at least actually comes from a completely different culture from the dow de ching out zoo and he says from caring comes courage. Where do we get courage from. When we feel that that which matters to us most is under threat. Think of the mother bear defending the cubs. Think of the amazing things that were all capable in. The name of love is a very important idea because it tells us that the powers of the human spirit don't always find their most powerful focus within the mind sometimes like i said the heart has to lead the

Wien Durrance Plato Latin Cubs
The Jewish Story - Six Day War, Something Miraculous

The Jewish Story

01:37 min | 1 year ago

The Jewish Story - Six Day War, Something Miraculous

"I ask you to list. The three biggest miracles in jewish history. What would you say split the red sea plague of the firstborn the mono- sinai. Maybe you get a little more subtle and offer me highlights esters rise to her place in the palace but how many people listening right now would mention operation mccade the critical turning point in the battles of the six day war that we're going to speak about in a bit of detail in just a moment not simply throwing it out there in order to set the stage for what's to come. I'm giving it as an opportunity to contemplate. What exactly a miracle might be the work for miracle in hebrew is this and it has more than one meeting classically. Like i said if you ask person what's a miracle they'll start listing off the sort of cataclysmic events of the biblical narrative. They might also start talking about what we call the hidden miracles or the more subtle expressions of god's hand in their own lives but i think the deeper meaning of miracle comes out when we look at its other definition in the hebrew language in nasa's and just a miracle it's also a flagpole or a sign. It's something which is lifted up beyond the horizon in which we normally dwell. I mean after all in the battle or in frankly in the american national anthem. What is a flag on the battlefield other than a reminder of that which you're fighting for which lies above the plane of struggle it didn't occasion that there's a broader horizon with in which the events of our lives are taking place.

Sinai Nasa