Islam

Listen to the latest audio content in Islamic culture, identity, politics and history. This playlist features Islamic individuals having great conversations on relevant topics through a cultural lens. Broadcast from premium podcasts.

abused by a spiritual figure with Uzma and Ramzia

Not Another Mum Pod

06:13 min | 3 weeks ago

abused by a spiritual figure with Uzma and Ramzia

"We're just gonna come back to your story. Asthma now that we know who he is and we've worked at the dynamics when your grandfather passed away. How did you feel straight after. And then when did you a finally speak up or be realized that he had affected you more. You knew at the time when he passed away. I did kind of feel sad because although he was good to us but he was good to other people. He was a very strong pillar. He was very well respected. Man no as sad as i would feel with someone who. I was really close to but i was still sad. I didn't process it because the has stopped when he was ill. So i think i just put it behind me and i moved on the first time that i realized that it's affecting me now was lost year of a degree. That's when i actually called to be married and do you know obviously engaged to think of some things any attraction to your fiancee and stuff. Although we went on speaking terms up. That thomas really shy person but the thing is it did affect me and slowly started to get pressure and i realized i was getting afraid or scared taught how to explain that feeling but i started to go into depression and although it was a really good student. I didn't do well in my lost year. Because i call a gauge the beginning of the year. It speak to anyone about it. I was acting fine. But when deep down i knew i wasn't able to concentrate on anything at post it so i started press graduate. Couth this will add it. Okay i have a here to get married. Maybe it will help be professionally. I was doing the k. Although it was quite stressful of doing fine but depression was getting at me. Especially close to the wedding. The to press i go. Can i just ask how did you know you're depressed. You had you recognize that you were depressed. What does the reason was able to concentrate. And if the parents asked me the okay lescot this list with is as a family and i wanted to say out at one to watch. Maybe with them. I didn't want to read books than i did. What to do. Anything dying -joyed doing. I always coveted up by saying this stressful. The coosa stressful. I want to do really well in. I was covered up with that with my parents at the new. I was old enough to make my own choices. So i knew that this was of depression because i was feeling who lived in treating myself happy from inside and did you make that connection to what had happened to you and the fact that you're getting married at that time you just was bewildered now. I didn't know why it would have a certain. Everything started like started. Feel so depressed when i was fine for these years the closer to getting the west got to be honest. I've well say openly by failed my postgraduate because i just couldn't concentrate the last few months ago a completely let go and failed there. Obviously i was proud by. I didn't even tell my parents because the results was supposed to come out after got married so i didn't want to spoil it but i also wanted to get married. It wasn't the. I was trying to avoid it but obviously i think you can imagine what happened. After a mariner what happened tell us rent intimacy. Salted is stopped. My husband that a a key felt as well as kind of disconnected at a wanted to cry a literally the first time when you were being intimate what was going through your head at that point. Did you connect to the trauma that happened to you as a child to how disconnected. You're feeling at the time of the did not fast enough snow. I think it was about a week later and it was newly married and it started to hit me really bad the i added. What my husband to touch me and it came became so bad that i had Nights i was employed at that time. I wasn't to what i was doing my job properly. I didn't want to be there and then it can. Appointment was current Three pink. I would get skit. I would think that there was somebody meru but it wasn't an hong. That's what was my grandfather who seems like what had happened with actually triggered. You're in trouble responses. So yes it took you back was also getting to go back to you know when you grandfather was his last moments and stuff you said you've felt confused and i think there is this thing about your grandfather being protected and also you know your such abuse for a child and even as an adult as well. It's a very difficult thing to actually come to terms with you know especially when our parents and if a parent or caregiver your grandfather is actually supposed to be somebody who's protecting actually he's also abuses. It's a really difficult thing to come to terms with But it seems like i toll set of grief process. I've told you cried. As i said after a marriage investment behind and i used to cry all the time on stock. Yeah so there was no grieving process when he passed away. Yeah what how did your husband react to what was happening. Did he think when newlyweds. You being shy or did he figure out. I think something was. He did figure out something was wrong. I thought it was because of stressed about the job. But because off from joe biden Sanctions some politics so basically stuff that she said. I was depressed because the way i spoke to admit told accounts sleep and it was two weeks to add. Couldn't referred the services and she has to take some leave. But what i did said was walked to buy boss's office Coming back tamar. Alcon to a cold and i was like this is why did at i think for the first few days. He did think that calls the job. That was dressing up me with newly married life near disabilities and a fulltime job but then has been a stilted get better and i was seeing someone who i used to feel like this trying to connect me and a started to get some professional help as well and i spoke. I had dot did a told. This was the person that was seeing and the said the question why i was saying no know anyone else and while i was scared to see him.

Depression Lescot Asthma Thomas Joe Biden Alcon Cold
Living with cancer (with guest Celina Be)

Not Another Mum Pod

06:13 min | 2 months ago

Living with cancer (with guest Celina Be)

"A forty nine votes single kids age between fifteen to twenty one in march two thousand and sixteen nineteen was diagnosed with stage to press council of her left. Breast yesterday tells the constant Polity unfortunately the council is now ten. No and there's no cure In words she's just flying time. Not just being an advocate for breast cancer since diagnosis. She's been interviewed by all genres of media local to her wishes based in south africa as well as internationally she also has a facebook breast cancer awareness page and she founded a private breast cancer center. Group helps women and their loved ones through their emotional mental and physical activity of the journey. One in eight women will be diagnosed. Suppress is indiscriminate age gender nationality. And you don't need a genetic predisposition to get rest council please note will include all relevant support links and details on our website page for this episode so for now. Let's welcome nadia to the show. Let's say not yet. Thank you so much for agreeing to come on the show today and talk about your experience with really on it and privileged to have him sauce. So we fest met on a facebook group. The three of us on Medicine up until the moment. You shan't story. I just assumed you just a regular key to mom. You're trying to do is a bit of winning coming up with some new recipes but when you said that you battling council on that it was ten. No we were completely oil struck. I mean you always come across as really vibrant positive industry. Help happiest time. And can i ask you. How do you manage to stay so positive in the face of such as not isis seem. It's absolutely wonderful to be speaking to you. Ladies first of all. I'm not always happy to get that straight. I'm always happy. Can't say he's a journey right so we can have a good days and days however i am single mom of four children and that quote him shoulder but they really adults house. They range from fifteen to twenty one years old. We just try to win each day for a day and then be go onto the next day and by. We need each day for me. Winning means taking the rule sips waking up in the morning getting into the shuttle eating well trying to exercise communication with the kids for me. That's winning the day. Yeah so. I suppose that probably does radiate a positive attitude but by no means am i positive. Twenty four hours a day seven days a week. 'cause i mean you still managed to get through. All of this is just absolutely amazing to me so oversee you've been battling cancer for fee has now how have you changed as a pass throughout janney however you when you first diagnosed compared to how you are today give you a little brief history that goes beyond the bio that you probably have given about me so i was diagnosed in march two thousand sixteen. So that's more than four years and eight months into this journey. To be absolutely honest. I was really different person. I was absolutely my vibrant. You would not catch me sitting on the sofa for five minutes a day. I was a go getter. I empty force so a few years ago for financial reasons. I had to go out to work. So i was working six days a week coming home and slow doing my thing as a mom suddenly without any warning with no symptoms no genetic predisposition. I actually decided to go to the gynecologist and she said to have you ever done a mammogram and took i said no. I have not interested. Okay let's just appointment for you and they'll say rent. Mary way. I remember sitting in the offices now off the mammogram department. And not thinking anything thinking okay. I'm becky tomorrow. Lang dollars is the bid looking at women's is i think something's flickering is. I looked and she said we need to do this. The spot to gain an immediate felt cold. Show going down my soul. I think it was and The coming office. And i remember the so clearly. She asked assistant to. Please give me a couple of key. And she said you know these a lump and ninety five percents malignancy without even doing a biopsy from presenting itself the mammogram scan in terms of appearance size and positioning. We are ninety. Five percent confirmed malignancy and it was almost as if i was watching a movie or somebody else. I was expecting this. I knew i to come homing cooking dinner for my kids. Get back to work. The next day. I got into my car and drove home in nyc state and the minute they got home called the meeting with my kids and broke dollars. This is what they found in. We're gonna have to gather together as a team and get through. This and my life changed on that day. Competely competely cancers the journey. It affects a person on every level from a mental state of mind to an emotional state of mind. It's fix the body physically. It debilitates the body search. Ernie you get into complete dock spaces and you can have fine the strength in your veins to pull yourself out to face the next day and what is being my safe said. I fought back on of very strong. Mindset that has kept me going in addition to my a being completely open with my community and in a larger scale my social media community about my diagnosis taking out to people creating awareness encouraging women to go for mammograms is that is being catharsis to be absolutely honest with you in a nutshell.

Breast Cancer Press Council Facebook Nadia South Africa Janney Cancer Becky Lang Mary NYC Ernie
Ep 120 - My Father was Murdered by a Neo-nazi Terrorist (ft. Maz Saleem)

TMV Podcast

05:45 min | 2 d ago

Ep 120 - My Father was Murdered by a Neo-nazi Terrorist (ft. Maz Saleem)

"Her right. The beginning of the podcast. When i came across the story. I was kind of stunned that i i wasn't aware of it. And i think of people aren't aware of the details of happened in the fact that there was a whole campaign and bombs were planted and detonated outside of mosques in birmingham targeted anti muslim terrorist attacks. But it hasn't had the attention that it deserves in in the media and from the government and and just general kind of reporting so most homes about have first hand experience. I guess a facing this off of the work that she's gone to do after that particularly being involved with obvious case with a twelve year old girl who died in bari in what's officially being stated as an accident but the sort of controversy around how particular case without further ado. Here's our conversation with most just a quick trigger warning before we get underway with the podcast. We do talk about issues surrounding hate crimes And there are descriptions of violence and murder which some people may find distressing. Salama's like like you very much. Thank you both for for for joining me today. so like i was. We just said we recorded this. Podcast like two three years ago and we had some technical issues so we lost the entirety of the recording. Unfortunately so we're back for round two trying to do this again So thank you again. I guess for agreement comeback. We've had a few of these kinds of who issues in a few weeks and it's frustrating. You know we we get by right. So i guess to kick off with. I think the for context. When i came across your personal story and your father story specifically I was quite alarmed. The fact that this was like going back a few years. But i was alarmed at the fact that i hadn't come across it sooner. It wasn't more prominent in the kind of mainstream And there wasn't talk of this reference of this as a particular case of anti muslim terrorism that had taken place on uk soil. And i think what's again quite alarming is that i only stumbled across it because i was kind of researching and i was trying to prove a point in an article or something that was putting together and i saw this and then i kind of went down the rabbit hole of finding out more and it was just astonishing that i there was no prominence to this so i guess i assumed that a lot of people. Listen this may not have come across yourself or your father story. So would you be able to very briefly. Kind of recap what happened. And how your family's life change in two thousand and thirteen yes of course On the twenty. Nine april twenty thirteen. That's is going to a eight years This year My father mohammed. Salim was eighty two years old at the time and he praised at the local moisture which is green mustard which is at the end of our street. And he's done that most of his life any praise at five times a day to day one so that dodge the mice jed back involve To read always press on this particular night He went to read his issue press and when he left the mosquera roundabout. Tim poston pm on this particular. Actually dad wasn't feeling great. Normally my uncle would does with him to the mosque and comes back and not nine. My uncle had some relatives so he basically said oh. I have to go home with you. Go don't worry i'll walk. You know because he's just not far as just at the end of our road and On this night my phone was followed home and know on the cc tv at one who lives on a street. Not many people will have double glazing. They can hear dot because he's not normally walking in the middle of the road because he's a quiet coup de sac area on these guys walking steak and he's normally hitting a code cannell something on the street and this particular night you can notice on the tv's walking quite fast. And then he crosses over the road to the school gate and he was basically funded home By a neo. Nazi called pablo up shane. Who'd only been in the country for five days and who got british sponsorship. He shook behind. Firstly of the british ambassador. In ukraine then go sponsorships small eve the predominantly muslim area and lived on the premises of dell com-. He followed my father home and this nine stabbed him to death from behind And then he went on a three month bombing campaign air and bombs side now bombed that saw three mosques in also over rampton tipton. This was one of the biggest oxyde terrorism on uk. So yet today your board explained now. Many people have heard the media have played down you know. At the time you know a doug's stanford they. We were prime suspects. That's how how disgusting. A was west midlands. Police say they treated our family. The came to our house and they told his record italian descent. A racist tunc. A we said you know. How can you tell us. It's not racist attack. You know tried to. They look to every other motivated by hate. Crime was never possible motive and you know we were suspects in this case as well and was quite disgusting because he had they not called pablo and we're ready to pin this on one of one of my family members.

Salama Bari Tim Poston Birmingham Salim JED Mohammed UK Rampton Tipton Pablo Shane Ukraine Dell West Midlands Doug
Ep 119 - Investing Money in a Halal Way (ft. Khurram Agha)

TMV Podcast

06:00 min | Last week

Ep 119 - Investing Money in a Halal Way (ft. Khurram Agha)

"Talking about financial literacy. How people spend and invest their money and essentially the whole of financial life cycle as escort puts in the conversation. And also i guess off the back of that where he came up with the idea for our guys in service it offers and provides for the muslim community. We're at an interesting time. I think generally where technology and finance a meeting this fintech and now we're seeing more and more muslims entering the space and all solutions for muslims. Were looking at hal. Ethical financial solutions for themselves and their families so without further ado. Here's my conversation with koram. Salaam corum why. I'm telling her you good. thank you. Thank you very much for joining us on the podcast today. So bad for for your invitation. I'm glad to be here. Thank you very much so in terms of the conversation we wanted to have today. I think for me. At least it's it's important that we spend a bit of time talking about money Quite broadly and i think we've had a few weeks ago discussing what we wanted to talk about. And whatever else. And i feel for me. Understanding and mulling over relationship with money as muslims Is is something that i kind of. I wanna do today in a conversation with you and also understand your own journey. I'm with regards to how you kind of went through that Struggle and and dilemma known. Had i guess growing up and then where that leads you to eventually but I think initially just generally speaking the notion of money my own thoughts on that when we look at it from a muslim lens often there is this perception. I guess that chasing money is bad. Money can lead to a negative things. Which i i. I firmly believe to be true. I think. And you're looking at social media and influences and and the whole space. It's all very much about materialism and all of that. But then we also have an islamic tradition and heritage a wife of muhammad said a dj. Who fundamentally was an entrepreneur a very successful entrepreneur and islam wouldn't be where where it is today without her financing and backing the the movement so to speak early on So i guess the first question for yourself is just. Where do you sit on that kind of money. Spectrum sums of what role it plays in life and how we should well. How do you look at that money in your own life. Yeah it's First differentiation we need to make really is between money and wealth. Sometimes people say well when they need money and when they say money when the mean world if you're in In a desert somewhere and you have a million dollars in your pocket that's useless so money is really useless. In certain regards wealth however could be very useful if you had a bottle of water when you're in a desert the you're very well demand or or woman so i think the first distinction people should think about i think audit like this is money and built a different things. They are both required They're not the same thing though. So what do i think about money. And you're actually right that the prophet mohammed. His journey about self discovery in about islam and about new wa actually started after financial worries. Were taken away. He was not a very rich man growing up in fact when he got married to dj. After that didn't have to worry about money per se and then he was able to make this difference in this significant. I the rest of humanity that he did so. I think money or lack there off in significantly hamper one's life one's goals in life. Everything about so myself. I don't think money is bat. I think people have developed this fear of money. I don't think money is bad. It's what we do with money. That sometimes wrong. It's like a tool. It's like a gun. It's like television. You could do bad things with it. You could do good things with it. So i believe money as a tool. It's what to do with it. That's good at not many per se on may one more point and it's a psychological behavioral finance topic. Maybe we can delve into a little bit later. But people villainy share many aspects of their life. Like i can call my friend up and he told me. I had food this mediterranean place yesterday and he told me all about and he told me what kind of food he ate. How whether we liked it. What the ambiance was and everything but then if i ask him he did you buy yesterday. Or how much money did you save two years ago. Old your annual tax. He don't talk about that now. It's personal i get it. It's private information. I get it. But i do feel that money has become this topic and we just don't talk about it as openly as we probably can. What why did you think. That is I believe because people in something. Maybe you said maybe people are ashamed of their success. People have started to associate their early success with the number of dollars or the digits on their bank accounts and then they want to keep it safe because the feel people will get jealous or become envious or what not so they would they would rather keep all of this information in house and not talk about is interesting. You say that. I i almost feel the opposite. Where because we're always looking and social media. Who is comes up in kind of conversations but because people always looking over their shoulders at others biz this kind of perception. That outlook how successful. This person is a cow wealthy and i know you separate wealth from money which i think is a very important distinction to make but unit you look at how financially wealthy or what else this person is and it was filled our own successes our own financial gains or whatever it might be a significant as others. Right that like i.

Koram Salaam Corum Muhammad Mediterranean
Why I left Islam with Celina Hanif

Not Another Mum Pod

04:38 min | 4 months ago

Why I left Islam with Celina Hanif

"Honey is a master practitioner of neuro-linguistic programming and hypnosis. Cena is also a divorce coach who helped South Asians recreate rebuild and restore their lives post-divorce, which is also a full-time mom and a home educator to have four boys. Okay, Selena when I read this poem just go up smacked when I saw that you got full boys and I have two boys. I've been educating them in lockdown for the last three months and I'm dying already before we begin. I just need to know how you managed to look after for voice without sending this. I need to know this. I think those who have education has been enforced upon own a very different place. Those who choose to do it by choice, we sort of ease our way into it. We do our you know research and we prepare ourselves. Let's say about one or two years before so we do eat ourselves. But I appreciate those who have kids that were attending school and all of a sudden without any preparation. There was a forced into it. It would be very challenging it if I was in that situation be very challenging for me see, how old are your boys my boys are 986 and for six year old and a four-year-old. Like how do we stop them from killing each other every day? I mean, it's amazing what you're doing Selena just do start the conversation that we're going to talk about how you left Islam at one point of your life. And then how you returned? When was the first time you felt disconnected to Islam? I would say it was in my teen years and I think the when I when I left this line, it was sort of tip of the iceberg. But I do feel a lot of factors are in play from a very young age. I'm the youngest of seven siblings that serves as 40 year gap between me and the and the second-youngest. Wow, so mom taught me to understand and I was about four years of age for a better education which meant being away from family including my father and looking back. I think I had to conform quite a bit from a young age and I thought of struggles to figure out where I fit him so she was going back home and having to completely different culture and having faith in a new language. My my siblings were adults and I was born and they were settled in their own family my nieces and nephews were my age, but I was second generation while they were third generation and I wasn't sure what I was Pakistani or British because I'd gone to like a thousand so she engaged and not being able to get him from a very young age might have played a part in that so just woke Looking back to your childhood. Yeah and not fitting in. When was the first time you connected that with Islam. I didn't really connect that that sort of times like now I spoke to the public schools of my childhood and how that shaped me and have that then led to me wanting really wanting to discover who I am and where I fit in in my teenage years. I came back to England. But by the time I come back, there's no relationship with my with my siblings. Is that a decade gap between I don't need to see them that often. But by the time I came back, my father was diagnosed with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's like my parents had been quite late. My mum was forty-five when I was born. So by the time I reached my teen years so they would they would get to the old and they're almost as a sort of catching up on them and by my mid-teens I was there full-time carer and that that took that put a lot of pressure on me when I was in Rome. Me I thought I'd explore this lamb or control. Then Islam wasn't medium-sized bonus in in the family. My siblings had a very liberal upbringing so it was back in place, but I was curious about Islam and I attended some lectures and that was the point where I again didn't feel not only did I not feel office with him, but I I felt judgment from people maybe cuz the way I was dressed or I I appeared I didn't appear to be practicing I didn't obviously look extremely I didn't look like I'm listening. So if you Muslim is just another place and just that Vibe of not not being accepted and a few words as I sat down. It was an Islamic lecture. I thought okay. This is going to be good with the same religious and that would be good. Then I'll be welcoming but my experience was totally the opposite and that was the point where I walked out. So,

Selena Cena Alzheimer England Rome Parkinson
interview With Ustadh Asim Khan

IlmFeed Podcast

04:47 min | Last month

interview With Ustadh Asim Khan

"Today. We have a guest who must allow is What we call hitting his hat trick on the on the podcast. 'cause this is fed periods. And that's exactly why it doesn't need any introduction. Masha llah It's our very own. Stop us on joining us this time of actually it said i'm ali consortium while they salamina the law and Doug missile three-time hatrick you get the hat trick. Bonus blades but how you doing okay. I'm very well and I really appreciate been given us all to sit with you. Get an shot lava in Interesting conversation cha thank you for taking the time. I guess i'm in a couple of things that are different from lost. You know the the Fest two times. I guess that you joined us. I guess the first thing is you will with us you know. We were together physically in the same space in the in the studio Now obviously because of events over the pasta zero so You know we have to connect remotely virtually in other words and the second difference. Is that in terms of what we're going to be discussing. Usually we talk about a lot right when we have discussions and today it's not directly related to the hold on. It's more going to be focused on the sierra which is interesting because We haven't we haven't yet on the on the podcast that we've done here had like a proper compensation on this era so i think it's a good opportunity to to get into the of course we've touched on aspects of it but not like a dedicated focus conversation on this year so that should be interesting and before we started recording. Ah realized that You recognize something in my bookshelf. That that we go. I'm pointing at right now. That's my salon salon. Book the heart of the on his commentary and so they seed and we. We are going to speak about books as well today. Write checks and we're gonna talk about some exciting new projects as well. Yes definitely in. Charlotte are super announcement to make Some point jolla. But you know what point you made it in the beginning about how things are different now right so meeting. Virtually and in many ways. There's lots of things got to lose out on the company of each other being one of them and the brotherhood that comes with it But i don't know if you know this but many many years ago i used to work as a pharmacy manager and it was part of a big corporation and read had this appraisal. So you sit down with the guy who's aligned manager took about what you're gonna and talk about what you know other challenges i think is particularly correct that these so basically he the by lineman's game piece of advice and When he said it. That's pretty deep actually and during this whole lockdown and pandemic time that we've been going through that has been ringing in my mind. So basically what he said was awesome. Was what makes a successful business wasn't number one quality that makes us successful business and i was like this that and he's like no. It's actually the ability to adapt house. I interesting he goes yet. Look we're in a crowded marketplace And things are changing all the time and small changes If you don't keep up with them you get left behind very quickly. As a cutthroat business say goes if we adapt continuously to the changes that we will be we will be successful and economic of the business mind and putting that into maybe a spiritual place. I think that looking up. The prophecy salaam for example is a real manifestation of this like you think about how his life began when he's reaching age of fourteen which is usually the comfort zone for many people. He's williston upside down. He's made a profit of law and a messenger to humanity and people that loved him. No hate him. And he's got the way to the world on his shoulders and he doesn't crumble sapan he adepts and every day today because things didn't stay the same from that day until the day passes away twenty three years later What days of loss of sorrow of fighting of dealing with abuse of you know. Unbelievable things happen during his life. So feel like this pandemic Though this so much negativity when you think about it yeah also and there's a lot. There's a lot of positivity we can take chrome especially on that perspective of how the adapt is probably how you succeed

Masha Llah Doug Missile Hatrick Jolla Charlotte Lineman Sapan Salaam
interview With Sana Saeed

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

05:36 min | Last month

interview With Sana Saeed

"Welcome to abuse congruence. The american muslim experience episode one. Oh wait. I'm sorry you're codes and as usual. I enjoin by. Hey welcome back listeners. Welcome back We this is our first episode of twenty twenty one but it feels like a lots already happened in this very short year or short lived year. So far we've got a lot but here we are on good to be back and get you back with. You are things i guess. All things being equal These k- Have some family members were affected by cove. Unfortunately so bring them Just distracted long. I mean china. Try not to get distracted by polit political stuff and keeping on it super interesting but other than that just getting back in the swing of things in life and that of course keeping the family members who who were in their situation some. Yeah i mean interesting about the political stuff being kind of The least of all adjectives as you describe it but anyway we're super excited to have our guest on the show today and omer if you wanna honored as long as marquess. Absolute son is the is the host in senior producer who has been with. Aj plus since two thousand fourteen hoping. Watch the channel. She's a canadian so most of her life in the us and is interested in politics. Religion culture end She works to stay out arguments on twitter as she has a background in media critique and analysis in has had worked in appear in the new york times the la times courts the guardian salon. And of course aj so. Hey thanks so much for having me happy to be here. Yeah it's great and so you. Avoid twitter fights that that that defeats the whole purpose of revenue on this show. I mean usually told us that when we were booking. I'm i'm jay. Try to successful at avoiding twitter fights. That's right. I'm relatively new to twitter and I've unfortunately gone up on the deep end and But which is some of the stuff. I'd love to talk to you about as someone who obviously studies media is involved in media and I i i'm sure as social media being a part of that so But yeah i guess before. We get into that meteors stuff on not to say that Will be what i do want to start off with is not me but i'd love to kind of talk about your background in as we like to call it the origin story. So tell us about says aids origin story and We we'd love to hear that. I know that you did spend some time in the bay area. So i'm i know that's where our paths crossed on. However i know there's so much more to the story we love to hear that and you could start way back as a as you'd like sure yeah So i was actually born in pakistan. I was born in lahore and My family background is kashmiri And we're lake whereas a lot of kashmir's inbox on her infant job as well. We're like the pajama fight. Kashmiri's but like my family is extreme has actually retained a lot of kashmiri customs and identity. It's been that's always been really interesting. The way we kind of have balanced those two identities very strongly And like my family also emigrated from kashmir basically at like a little bit before and during the the petition. Yeah during the partition. So yeah i was born in exxon. And when i was about like four or five months old. My parents My dad had already moved at that point. He had moved to the united states. Kind of like take the family business there And my mom. And i filed suit and in nineteen eighty eighty seventy eight. We were in In new york. So when i was in new yorker basically up until the end of ninety nine early two thousand so grew up in initially flushing queens and then eventually to Moved onto a long island. Washington long island which is where i grew up And your basic so. We have citizenship. The only person in my family who has us citizenship is actually my brother. Since he was born there so we then applied for canadian citizenship and ended up in canada and moved to vancouver. I was there for up until i had to go to college then. I moved to montreal. I went to mcgill where i did. I from my undergrad. I studied political science in italy studies. And then i continued on ethicon decided. I'm like don't wanna do law school. Do i want do grad school. I ended up applying to only one loss one one grad school and because my french fluency at that point was not that great. I ended up not getting into the mcgill law school because they do require french fluency so I went to grad school. And i did islamic studies and that was To be honest it was the greatest blessing and it was the greatest blessing. Not because oh you know. You're studying islam except it was a blessing because Doing that masters program really kind of set the stage for i would say my approach to

Twitter Kashmir La Times New York Times China JAY Lahore United States Bay Area Exxon Pakistan Ethicon Mcgill Law School Mcgill New York Washington Vancouver Montreal Canada Italy
Lessons from lockdown with Nafisa and Tasneem

Not Another Mum Pod

05:58 min | 5 months ago

Lessons from lockdown with Nafisa and Tasneem

"Never, go member one but I can Salaam Haney visa high fiving. I am sweltering melting we speaking literally. You know while I'm just glad that we do sound and visuals right now. THREAT PAINT, down my face. Drooping. Disgusting. Listeners would literally block us if they could see us right now but. Shit. That'll be enough of this nasty window computer screen as well. With more. So what we talking about today, we're talking about lessons that we've learned from lockdown. So with one lockdown behind us and another potentially on the way we thought we take a look at three lessons that we've learned from lockdown. Tasneem. Let's start off with you and your family. What's the one family lesson that you've learned that we can learn from? Okay I'll try and condense it to one family. And okay, so obviously. It's been difficult being stuck with the same people day in day out but I. Realized, that can be enjoyable as well. If you just let go a little bit and not kind sweat the little stuff. Like you I'm so busy at work of time and all of that kind of as she see my kids that much during the week by reading it enjoy spending some time with them and it made me realize I. so important to spend that time with family and not just with the kids there. But with elders, my grandma passed away during lock Tom and I so many regrets because I haven't seen her for about two months because we were in lockdown about six weeks before she passed away. So she had no guests. No one could go see her haven't seen her for about two months and I think that burke me just knowing that she went issue pretty much alone and no one was around with echo she was in hospital and that Kinda thing and then I missed not just her everyone that we couldn't agree together we couldn't mourn together. We couldn't do anything together we would just so isolated and I kept thinking and my parents are getting old or if they go their next and then to see them and not getting to spend time with them, and all of that was playing through my mind and I just realized that is so important just to. Enjoy spending time with family wall. We still have them. All kids are elders everybody just? Yeah. It's priceless. I completely agree with you and I felt some of what you felt as well not taking family for granted and just really missing one after awhile initially, it was kind of a novelty and you think you're a quite like being isolated and thank God we don't have any more guests don't have to go to anyone. So we went through that for a while and then the fatigue slowly started to settle in and we kept thinking Oh, imagine if we could do this and imagine if you could visit that person especially you know Ramadan came and went and eat and the same thing I lost my grandma as well. Just start of lockdown. Husband works from home and I work from home. So we do see children quite a lot when they're at home and at school. So for us even though effect like summer, holidays, Christmas holidays at the beginning, we did slowly start to realize that what the school does for them is priceless as well. My husband especially felt like the school really painted important role in the children's lives, which which we didn't value may be as much or just think about it although we really enjoyed spending time with children and there were so many other things we did that we didn't do before lockdown you know playing more games finding imaginative ways of doing things. We did miss the outside world. We were thinking something simple as meeting somebody or a stranger even being able to walk past without recoiling and things like that I think it really made us realize the importance of simple things that we took for granted I think what you said about the schools do for kids and how undervalue a parochial is definitely true. I think. Obviously, like you said, we really enjoyed the time the kids, but it did come to a point win it was getting overwhelming and I think the home schooling. Pov, it was getting overwhelming and it made me realize that I could never ever heard school my children like every day I'd log on and do the work with them and I just felt like destroying the education. Helping on doing all the good the teachers done the loss. Gee, I ruined all. I'm pretty sure I'm learning feeling like that as well on really tough and to be honest my kids tools the end just lockdown was lifted hunter lot the right time the beginning of feral. Call from outside both. So long stuff that the navy do before they started doing like damn and they need space because everyone doesn he space from everyone else and they also need space from each other and you. Definitely me. And they weren't getting that. Everything, in moderation, right thing is really important to have in life. So you have times but you take some time out, take a step back and just reflect right. But then at the same time, you need other things to go on. So it's important to take a step back ball forever. Yet. That's absolutely true. I do agree with you test the, but he is hunting I'm a qualified teacher by profession even though I don't teach at the moment. So I as a qualified teacher tell you that it cannot teach my children to save my life and then I as a mother of four children. Another lesson I learned was going to be mother. So then you go. To a good job on I, think everyone has as moments right? Who have we just want to pack it all in disappear never surface again Oh, you have no idea whether you do have an idea but you know it was like we're in lockdown with our kids and will in lockdown our minds on the in just everything was in lockdown and our husbands Heller. How Ya. Fifth in my life. No No. Sorry am I really love you and you're not child a promise. On much much. Okay. He's going to be like, why are you talking about me again? It's not gonNA. Listen is too busy. You know I don't trust that man I'm only joking. You'd never know.

Burke TOM GEE Hunter
CelebrateMercy, with Tarek El-Messidi

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

05:51 min | 2 months ago

CelebrateMercy, with Tarek El-Messidi

"I am. I am really psyched about this episode. Is i knew. I'd say that about everything but We have a guest on today of that is tarek on mri muslim american speaker activists social entrepreneur on you probably know him best from The celebrate mercy of project which he founded dark is. I'm just citing excited because it was really kind of like ven diagram if we were to compose a ven diagram of where i think a lot of guests that we've had on the show and a lot of People that we consider to be mentors influencers on us are the same people who have been on not only in celebrate mercy's programming but also You know have been mentors and thought leaders that i know therapists As as as also has has been has made an indelible impact on the work that arctic does and so Without really further ado dark. I mean i know. We'll get into a lot of Not only your own background at as well as of course celebrate mercies while we have you on mike. So i'll i'll keep the introduction short. Because i want to do true justice to you and the work you do so welcome to the show. Thank you for having me. It's an honor to be here in the mushroom you've had such great Thought leaders scholars activists. You know On this show so it's definitely an honor thank you yeah and You know and i you know we always get. We always start with an origin story. Dark and and i know i know eventually you'll get this particular point in your own story but where i think. Our paths crossed Was years and years ago. I wanna say oh. I'm terrible with dates. But it had to have been in the late nineties I mean you could probably place it better better because you were. I believe of msa president at the time. But i visited the university of tennessee. Knoxville For a weekend with lectures and and i think i was just one of the speakers that was Was in attendance. But i think that's probably the first time we met. I don't know if you remember that. I i i remember that trip. Very very fondly So in fact. What now i remember. It had to been like two thousand and two two thousand three two dozen three because on one of the partying presence that the msa gave was my wife. And i were expecting our first our eldest daughter and so we were pregnant. And i think i mentioned that and it was like this. Beautiful little The volunteers onesie I remember that ryan for right. Yeah it's a great little parting gift at the. Msa gave me in so it had to been yet. It does not was like Maybe the year. After i i was president of the year after i graduated undergrad. That was still there in knoxville. But i definitely remember when you visited. I definitely remember that although our paths. Have i think across over the years in fact it was a mutual friend. An old friend of yours but again going back to the knoxville. Msa days iran. Kodi she who i want to mention his name on on air as as putting it sort of in touch in together and Iran is a listener of this show. We're honored to have folks. Like ron listening. So dan high school together. Actually wow saturday at high school. So yeah i guess Like i said we like to dive into kind of an origin story so tell us about You know growing up in tennessee of all places. That's really where your origin story begins. Yeah this manasseh so My parents were both immigrants. From egypt's that's where the story begins. That coming over in the late seventies mom Not too much later after that and he came for grad school and just has been his state ever since from egypt. Civil engineer And we moved around quite a bit. I was born in houston. Actually i think you're early. You're from houston right. I am. I was born in texas. Although it's spent most of my young life in in any in houston and Omar also overlapped in houston for a little bit on and was born in new orleans so help another southern boy. I actually the only sibling not born in texas. That's liar yeah. I still have relatives there. Actually in we moved around a bit new mexico. Pennsylvania eventually settled in knoxville with my dad's work. You know moving moving around So since the second grade. I grew up in east tennessee Near the smoky mountains in knoxville tennessee. The third largest city and it was really then that we became active with the local muslim community. I remember you know. I vaguely remember them like bill building their first mosque from scratch. You know i i. It was like a rented home. And then i remember like in the early eighties mid eighties when they were building. That first mosque purpose built mosque and sunday. School was really like where. I began to learn about my faith. And that's where everything began. I think like where. I where i really became know growing up in like a ninety percent white very evangelical out bipolar belts City in tennessee. Although is you know it's it's a university city But you know where where. I grew up in west knoxville. You know the the baptist and and people are often trying to convert you who you know. Sometimes you know you classmates.

Knoxville Tarek Dan High School Houston Arctic University Of Tennessee Kodi Mike Egypt Tennessee Manasseh Ryan Iran Texas RON Omar East Tennessee Smoky Mountains
A Spiritual Take on The Surrender Experiment

TMV Podcast

06:30 min | 2 months ago

A Spiritual Take on The Surrender Experiment

"Saddam and welcome to another team To you by the muslim vibe as always i'm your host and qassem And on this week's podcast. I'm joined by dr shake joa shamali. We've had a few times before. All the episodes is built have been really really fascinating. Listens and some of the most listen to episodes. Actually that we've ever done so on this week's podcast We're talking so we start by talking about. A book called surrender experiment which i was reading and we had a few of line conversations about and i said you know. Let's let's talk about on the podcast. And then we kind of went onto discuss islamic spirituality in the kind of mainstream rome and where it's letting us down as a community and why on the kind of white doesn't have the same mass appeal that these other books like this render experiment to have surrender experiment by the way is a really fascinating. Read highly recommended i had an audible. I was listening to audible. And i think it's a michael singer who's the author who actually read out as well but it's a fascinating journey. Really interesting concept definitely recommended on my side. Obviously we discussed on the podcast that orbit and yes. I've been told by the way by my team. By team. by the team. I rambled too much. Dina the podcast. I'm trying to keep it really brief and succinct one. Half minutes isn't bad. Here is my conversation with Dr jawara shomali saddam's saddam. Sally rank you very much for for joining us again on the podcast That appearance now. And i feel like we've covered quite of ground in the past But there's always more that we can talk about and we've always wanted to and i think for context how this kind of came about was the last time you were on. We were talking about Changing habits as a means to get closer to got into find god and we. We spoke about a variety of things. I think the where we started from was The power of now. No the power of now it was. How hormone the name of the book. The power of habits the power of habit. Yes charles doug it something like that. Remember his name That's where we started. Yeah and then. The conversation went on some winding routes incredible discussion wind blowing beautiful discussion. If you haven't heard the podcasts do check it out. i'll put the link in the description. But what i said to you after that. Actually i sent you a voice. No 'cause i started listening to a book that you mentioned on that podcast. I believe if not then someone mentioned it to me afterwards. cold I'm really blanking. Names of surrender experimental surrender experiment By michael a singer. And what i said to you was when i finished this book. It will be great to sit down and like any time i do. One of these read one of these self development personal growth books. Yeah it will be good to sit down with yourself. Because i think you've covered off why you've read one of them but you have seems have enough time and to kind of have a conversation and i guess i guess start with the concept and the notions within the book and then use that as a leapfrog into just where it goes. Yeah and ironically with this one. We'll talk about surrender at the beginning. But when i tried to sit down with you and discuss what we're going to talk about you just gave me nothing and said just surrender and we'll see where it goes So i think let's start with the book and the notion of render so so i guess for people that haven't come across it it's it's quite a fascinating book. I think in terms of. It's almost like an autobiography Like a very introspective autobiography of of micro housing Is is big on yoga and rich rotting through that means but he started out on the journey by kind of the appreciating the fact that his in a his thoughts that run through his head in the narrative in his head not necessarily him And that's just a part of him that he can detach froman and whatever else And then he started learning how to silence his mind. And then the journey took him to kind of surrendering to whatever life was put in front of him. Yeah and it led him down a a remarkable road. I mean as the book went on. I was like okay. This is getting a bit more and more farfetched. Yeah until you get to the. I don't want to ruin the his his story in his journey. Yeah but it's it's quite crazy. And i i was thinking throughout and i guess i'll start with this question. I was thinking throughout. You know whether. It's just a coincidence. That someone who has this kind of approach to life of surrendering went on to have a remarkable and an enormous crazy life in that sense. Or if that's actually part of surrender Very tuition despite of or because of yeah. Yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah. It's a very fascinating book. And it's been received really well of course. This wasn't his first book. He had the untethered soul which is another amazing book and really recommend it to people who are going through anxiety or basically anyone who wants to have a better life but this one was very interesting he basically as you said mentions the story of his life and how this one simple practice of surrender basically changed the course of his life and i think the way he puts it in the book and we can discuss whether we agree or not is that it was actually because of surrender that everything happened to him. And what was your personal like. Take on like when you were listening. Could you relate to it or or coffee machine something to say. I think i love your coffee machine. Even last time we to participate and i really feel good like if people don't want to listen to me at least the coffee machine. Yeah yeah yeah. We'll wait for it to stop I think hopefully done So in terms of. I guess what when i'm reading these listening to these books. I'm i'm trying to see if i can resonate with the narrative

Dr Shake Joa Shamali Saddam Dr Jawara Shomali Saddam Charles Doug Michael Dina Froman Rome Sally
Lessons from lockdown (with Nafisa & Tasneem)

Not Another Mum Pod

04:56 min | 5 months ago

Lessons from lockdown (with Nafisa & Tasneem)

"Never, go member one but I can Salaam Haney visa high fiving. I am sweltering melting we speaking literally. You know while I'm just glad that we do sound and visuals right now. THREAT PAINT, down my face. Drooping. Disgusting. Listeners would literally block us if they could see us right now but. Shit. That'll be enough of this nasty window computer screen as well. With more. So what we talking about today, we're talking about lessons that we've learned from lockdown. So with one lockdown behind us and another potentially on the way we thought we take a look at three lessons that we've learned from lockdown. Tasneem. Let's start off with you and your family. What's the one family lesson that you've learned that we can learn from? Okay I'll try and condense it to one family. And okay, so obviously. It's been difficult being stuck with the same people day in day out but I. Realized, that can be enjoyable as well. If you just let go a little bit and not kind sweat the little stuff. Like you I'm so busy at work of time and all of that kind of as she see my kids that much during the week by reading it enjoy spending some time with them and it made me realize I. so important to spend that time with family and not just with the kids there. But with elders, my grandma passed away during lock Tom and I so many regrets because I haven't seen her for about two months because we were in lockdown about six weeks before she passed away. So she had no guests. No one could go see her haven't seen her for about two months and I think that burke me just knowing that she went issue pretty much alone and no one was around with echo she was in hospital and that Kinda thing and then I missed not just her everyone that we couldn't agree together we couldn't mourn together. We couldn't do anything together we would just so isolated and I kept thinking and my parents are getting old or if they go their next and then to see them and not getting to spend time with them, and all of that was playing through my mind and I just realized that is so important just to. Enjoy spending time with family wall. We still have them. All kids are elders everybody just? Yeah. It's priceless. I completely agree with you and I felt some of what you felt as well not taking family for granted and just really missing one after awhile initially, it was kind of a novelty and you think you're a quite like being isolated and thank God we don't have any more guests don't have to go to anyone. So we went through that for a while and then the fatigue slowly started to settle in and we kept thinking Oh, imagine if we could do this and imagine if you could visit that person especially you know Ramadan came and went and eat and the same thing I lost my grandma as well. Just start of lockdown. Husband works from home and I work from home. So we do see children quite a lot when they're at home and at school. So for us even though effect like summer, holidays, Christmas holidays at the beginning, we did slowly start to realize that what the school does for them is priceless as well. My husband especially felt like the school really painted important role in the children's lives, which which we didn't value may be as much or just think about it although we really enjoyed spending time with children and there were so many other things we did that we didn't do before lockdown you know playing more games finding imaginative ways of doing things. We did miss the outside world. We were thinking something simple as meeting somebody or a stranger even being able to walk past without recoiling and things like that I think it really made us realize the importance of simple things that we took for granted I think what you said about the schools do for kids and how undervalue a parochial is definitely true. I think. Obviously, like you said, we really enjoyed the time the kids, but it did come to a point win it was getting overwhelming and I think the home schooling. Pov, it was getting overwhelming and it made me realize that I could never ever heard school my children like every day I'd log on and do the work with them and I just felt like destroying the education. Helping on doing all the good the teachers done the loss. Gee, I ruined all. I'm pretty sure I'm learning feeling like that as well on really tough and to be honest my kids tools the end just lockdown was lifted hunter lot the right time the beginning of feral. Call from outside both. So long stuff that the navy do before they started doing like damn and they need space because everyone doesn he space from everyone else and they also need space from each other and you. Definitely me. And they weren't getting that. Everything, in moderation, right thing is really important to have in life. So you have times but you take some time out, take a step back and just reflect right. But then at the same time, you need other things to go on. So it's important to take a step back ball forever.

Burke TOM GEE Hunter
What's Next for Muslims in America?

TMV Podcast

06:24 min | 3 months ago

What's Next for Muslims in America?

"Audit hoda. Novus anomoly continue all Thank you joining us here. On this table where we are discussing. How post election forts. And what's next for muslims in america. I'm sure you can all agree. It's been crazy times and in many ways we're kind of up the woodsmen anyways we're entering new self woods with new challenges to face. I wanted to start off just by asking. What role did muslim voters play in this election. The way we've done things in the past. There has been slow grassroots initiatives. Here and there are different organizations. But this time. There was a lot of And i think you know over among. Muslims voted in the election. That's phenomenal like that's beyond anyone's expectations. Of was there before the election started or the early voting started States like michigan. I think some delivered. They delivered michigan to the biden. Victory and i think minnesota what we snare issues exceptional sixty plus muslims. That got elected this election. And that says something. When you see that in the Legislator reflects what our community looks like need looked at this election Strategically see where we needed to Where we needed to help out in order to get border turn out and what community could actually build those coalitions. I feel like there is the sentiment and i saw this on social media in leading up to the election. There was this kind of sentiment that muslim organizations who Kind of you know. representing The muslim grassroots on the ground for the biden campaign Was being kind of you know there was kind of i. Don't use the word fighting but into dialogue lesage's to be kind About various organizations. And whether or not they have essentially the right to represent listen votes. You think that that kind of infighting is kind of unfair leading up to election where it's so important that muslims gathered together as a coalition and trump office. The muslim communities diverse in there has to be important questions that are asked in our organization. Do need to help be held accountable. so i i see nothing wrong in conversations about directions. Muslim organizations are going. You know as long as they're done in a manner that's productive in in a manner that's intended to move the community forward And i think you know how organizations respond to that is also telling of the direction they want to. And i think organizations and i've been with an organization before at at abc has been under the gun. That's been under community pressure to make changes. I've gone through it on the other side. And i understand that. They namic of running an organization. Dan dynamics of being annetta. That's a separate conversation of how organizations have to react and have to respond to community pressure and valid concerns. I think the question money raise was well is is this a time to talk about you. Know community Is at the time where we have an elections where we're trying to vote out a fascist and You know everybody has a different opinion. There is no right or wrong. Answer in both sides have concerns about the timing and so forth wasn't twenty sixteen on repeat. A lot of people did fall in line disappoint. Joe biden even May not have agreed that he was the best choice. Personally i do think he was a better choice. Donald trump a happily voted for him. I didn't have an issue. Voting for him are his policies. Perfect no by any means. They're not he's not the perfect candidate but i'm not looking for the perfect candidate. I'm not looking for somebody that i'm going to go out and stand in line for hours and it's going to get me. You know up to to see him. I'm i'm looking for president and it's normal. You know somebody that we can. When we do fight against our fight policies and push back on somebody that's gonna be receptive to listening to us so the democratic party joe biden's administration. We have to give them room to prove you know to to to prove themselves to the community. We have to give them room to answer to our concerns and our demands. And and see how reacts and i'm not saying biden is going to completely shut the door issues. He may well come out and be the bus president. We've seen for the community. We do have to give them that opportunity to do so. We have to give that room for him to to work in and navigate with us and see what comes about something that you said that like we just want a normal president and i think that that is really scary for me because i think a normal president in the united states is a warmonger will still enact other types of bands will still children are still being separated in the united states via the incarceration systems People are still being shot and killed by police. They're still surveillance they're still going to be a us empire and so these like he's very core. Fundamental forms of violence are not going to be raised at all. I think that is something that It's central to what i think i'm really pushing for. Is that a yes. We should have diversity of tactics absolutely. We can't just like protests everybody in the street and then like think. Everything's going to change if we don't have a strategy. If we are able to actually think about things strategically. I agree that a diversity of tactics is very important but i also think i think there's celebration i think there's a difference between a celebration of trump leaving office and biden entering office. I think it's like great. I love seeing trump depress. The white house or about the whole thing at the that was great. I love that. But there's truly nothing to celebrate about biden sneaking office and truly nothing to celebrate about going back to the status quo in the status quo is so deeply violent. The bar has been so much lowered based on how much violence that we've normalized. And i think that that's something that we can't allow. We allow ourselves normalized. Violence like biden saying that he's going to reverse the muslim ban. You shouldn't be sprayed it as a hero. That is like the basic thing that he should be doing and so i think that us getting excited. That biden is doing not even the bare minimum but just like reversing back to normal. Violent status quo is not a celebration. I think that unfortunately trump has really really destroyed our sense of normalcy but are also like before that even our sense of normalcy was like really endanger. And i think we don't do enough imagining about what we're actually trying to build toward And i think if we're actually able to sit down and be like all right. We're trying to elect muslims into positions of power for what what is our end goal like. We're going to rally around biden to get into power for what

Biden Hoda Dan Dynamics Annetta Michigan Novus Joe Biden United States Minnesota Donald Trump ABC Democratic Party White House
Sensuality And Spirituality With Dr Wafaa Eltantawy And Habeeb Akande

TMV Podcast

05:05 min | 4 months ago

Sensuality And Spirituality With Dr Wafaa Eltantawy And Habeeb Akande

"I wanna start by mentioning that when we spoke about the of phone call a couple of weeks ago and i said i would probably do like a disclaimer at the beginning to say that you know today. We're having a conversation. That's a very mature topic. And you're just to kind of put out that when i did that. Both of you kind of shout. You pretty much told me off. I wouldn't say shower felt. I'm really sorry but what i felt like. You are trying to cover up or trying to introduce a topic which is very crucial for muslim societies and muslim people in a way like covered this what we are doing in six. We are covering everything up so people. Don't know anything about so. I felt like this is the time we need to open up and we need be able to speak about it. Frankly and say satelites name. I think i don't know which i'm gonna pinot a new but someone said that was infantilism. The muslim community by so she's pointing to your said was by even suggesting or thinking about framing in that way he did say that. Do stick by the as this similar to what to what i up it. Mrs important compensation for people of all ages again. We're going to be respectful wisconsin age appropriate. I don't think this is only a compensation for people of Age of twenty five for example married people who are unmarried people Married people are divorced. People looking to get married should listen to this conversation understand. What does islam say about sex intimacy. And what and as muslim allies understand about and this important topic. So i think it's a subject that should be important beneficial for everyone so to be honest like a after that that call which is a very interesting call in its entirety. But after that specific moment i did think about it quite law and i think for me. It needs to know. Is that the kind of reservations i have about having. This conversation is of that kind of cultural baggage that we have within the muslim community when it comes to talking about south city so it was. I mean i appreciate being told guys. I'm just. I just thought it was interesting to to mention that because it really did get me thinking before he just wanna take my health to you because even if you found this conversation diffic- difficult we have another the fact that you're win so kudos to vandals. So the fact that we're having a system board to That's not really a woman but competent in this subject. Because i think it's easy as men foster talk about this subject again for things important. We have a muslim woman and his qualified can speak about that muslim. Women can resonate listen to understand from so critters to for again by an environmental terms. And i think is one like part of it when when we were speaking. Initially that i you kinda get one show at conversation like this and you wanna do it right. You won't be able to be able to listen with an open mind and actually take on what's being said and as you said if it was two men for having the compensation than sisters would fill like. Oh it's xyz two sisters discussing it. Men feel kind of sideline alienated from it. So thank you both kind of agreeing on. Oh you guys don't know each other from beforehand. So but i guess what's what's also really good. Is that you both come from very different disciplines and perspectives on this. I think that that's jump straight in So the first thing for me was about the i guess. Let's put out there. Is there a problem with how sex is perceived or discussed within the muslim community. And i guess dr wafaa will start with you on that one yeah. There is a huge problem. Same communities about how sixes addressed or Sexist talked about and we see clearly in our work. Six is not never been talked about a tool all in muslim communities and even stocks when it when it is talked about it's talked about heddon and nothing is clear and you you mentioned as well. You kind of travel to the middle east for conferences and and have are in those kinds of spaces where these things are happening. Is there a difference between the the obviously folks to the muslim community muslim communities here and there with regards to attitudes towards sex and all of this was just mirrored regardless of where you are in the world. I think this stuff is mattered. Are mannered a lot of it mattered. Because you would find that. Most agricultural they have organization. The more or less like six is a temple. Never ever talked about it when you marry with what we're gonna do and your husband will lead you and that's frustrating for me when i hear there and six thirty six is not good sexes about all. Support your husband is about how to serve. The man and i found this restraining. I work with people because they only there because they were told to do it. They are not engage. They are not having any sexual pleasure and is something. We need to talk about

Wisconsin Middle East
Pre-marriage encounters

Not Another Mum Pod

07:04 min | 5 months ago

Pre-marriage encounters

"Task Do you have any funny stories about meeting with its when yourself or your family members anyone. I really have any money ones for myself but I remember my sister. had. Quite a few I've gone sister. And we as older than me. She's -solutely. Stunning right especially with women younger like every single person who met have, which is four head over heels in love with her you know what? Out of assist designed really know which one you're talking about. Exact. Back in the day like she had everyone off to have right and my dad had been desperately trying to marry her off Sushil. Sixteen bit like your dad a few also worried that she doesn't know all run off with somebody else. Too much interest to competent hurry up and so her house from when she was sixteen, he was like trying to find people who by his which is bringing the wrong people my sister she was he job she prays all that she's not the most religious person Navy format, but he would bring in these proper holy problem on up types. Yeah. And I remember one like into the House and she must have been about eighteen at the time. Else fourteen and he had a really really big bed heels skinny his very clock initial show Wa Camis at the top Ian. Getting shoes. I, pull off when she saw him right. Anyway, so they're in the room together and wadden whose idea was to be in the room as well. Yeah. Fourteen year old mock anthem his sister was in the room to. So he sister spoke the whole time she didn't get a single word in heating guessing wanted the system which is going on on on on her. For about half an hour and see my sister she's looking at me Schlep peas get me out. Get me out of here. Right. So finally our top the courage to say so do you have any questions for my sister? DISA- quickly jumped in she'll slide say questions and often all these different things and finally my sister was like so what you're looking for in a wife and he was mortified that she'd even spoke Nina he was looking at the floor was bright van. Dislike, he mumbled something and we're like, sorry what did you say his? Piety and that was it. Literally, that will only word. He said the whole time. Right they left the house. My Dad was how did it go musters smoking happening, right? Mom Fund straight away and then she was like, yeah, we really liked everyone. We're interested WANNA go ahead and my dad was like he didn't know missing. I don't know what came over him. He told my sister. You know what? You tell them that you don't WanNa marry the. Alcohol and tell him. You know what you told the by just did and she's long in that utility Lonard even though the didn't say one way to me I'm not saying it and who's like what I'm working if my friend yeah, you keep saying not everybody you ruining relationships with everyone you didn't. Do it. Are. List on. The worst. Be Locking someone's misery. Have I wore her that could won Gina I have so many like we could do another show on them seriously I have got so many one of the most funny ones the I'll tell you about is I went to Bangladesh on a holiday you know what that means you know a lot. Marriageable Age or was on holiday is a marriage or trip? Yeah. I was twenty three, maybe twenty four and I was quite capable. I may say not obviously not like now but anyway I was in prime shall I say and so it was a normal day I didn't even know why I dressed up for no reason. No I just decided I'm going to dress up today had Mahara had coupon the comedian and the community itself was really small as well. I'M mmj Just came in a he knew he was avoiding me actually he was hitting me like like the plague and I wondered what was up with him. He sent somebody to tell me to look decent because someone's coming to see me and I was like no way. I went mad. You can't just spring a guy on me and out of rebellion I just decided not to get change. They can see me as Western as I look you know even though I was Bring Asian. My show. Great. I went to the hairdresser's yesterday. It was really sure and I just refuse to wear anything traditional. Oh, look any different than what I was wearing just if you want them to come and see me, they have to see me how I am and my dad didn't. Surprise. You didn't get clue slaps. On No, I didn't but you just wait until you hear what happened. I thought you have got one up on everyone I'm just GonNa stay like this. Anyway they came and guess who came. Not. The guy but the whole family came except for the guy and I was like if there's no guy, why am I meant to look at hia pardoned? The Guy was traveling on the parents didn't want wait for the guy to fly to. Bangladesh at some point. So they thought while I was dead they will just catch me Davis worth him meeting you Chinnawat decides never happened before. So horrified sounds like what is the point of all this? So anyway, the mum. Came bless her. She was really sweet. You know my told my sister I. Don't know if I've told you before she's really attractive and very young king and everybody like says, she's really the Patrick. Bengali. doted material and so she was really shook the cool. Very friendly sociable. So she was looking into Kenyan they the mother in no the potential mother. No, she was like staring at my sister on like all wise and she went door or in no wise in at her. Look at such long and I was sitting opposite the lady and my art was sitting next to me. I just whispered to my artists at you a bit. She thinks my sister knows me I. Don't know why I said that it's just the way the mother was looking at my sister. No. Mantis was like, no way of course she knows it's you. I said now look at look at my sister, nor this is going beyond long gang is this is. This is this is my daughter knowing that kind of on my on very politely said so you've met officer, the Commun- office in the Bengal Leeway. Were heavy and she put her arms around my bear arms and kind of shoved me a bit. Frontal. This is enough this. You know I'm the look of shock on the mother thinks. She saw did A. Hundred Sixty degrees ton and faced me. She was like that. Does that sad what Sandra I? Looked to me like what the Hell it's you oh my God and then she started looking at me with fresh eyes and obviously you look long just turned to disappointment. and. Then that disappointments turn to quiet defeat an acceptance before she left she gave me you know sometimes give you a gift giving a. Book to though isn't it? Yeah. She gave me this book. How did you know Oh my God? She she gave this book. I took it obviously, but I just feel so sorry for Hasso oppo you. You know you didn't get the DOJ want

Bangladesh Sandra I Gina I Wa Camis Disa Mom Fund Hasso DOJ Mahara WAN Nina Officer Davis Bengali. Chinnawat Bengal
The 2020 Election, a Discussion with Democratic Strategist Mustafa Tameez

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

05:31 min | 4 months ago

The 2020 Election, a Discussion with Democratic Strategist Mustafa Tameez

"Hey everyone. This is diffuse congruence the American Muslim experience episode one, hundred, four I'm sorry and as always I'm joined by my co host Hey. Welcome back listeners I know we've been Nakanishi episodes out without much lapse, which is great on. But we wanted to have a very special show. I know we've talked a lot in the past about the election we've talked about Covid, but this is sort of the the the sort of ruminations of men Omer, who by no means experts, but this time. We are joined by a very special guest who is an expert in this field and so he is a political consultant and so omer. Why don't you tell us who we have on the show and we're super excited to welcome our guest to shout absolutely and we are T. minus twelve days from the election and honored to have most of the knees on the show. Is Outreach strategic founder and president you began his career New York using corporate clients. But after moving to Texas, he shifted to advising successful campaigns for state legislators, mayors, members of Congress in public institutions. The is a national opinion leader with over six hundred appearances on CNN and Fox News Msnbc and CBS. News. The Atlantic names as a top democratic consultant in Texas and Texas monthly person as one of the top Democrats to watch most of is the chairman of the Transportation Advocacy Group board a director of the Texas Lithium a member of the Unity National Bank board among other civic and business affiliations. He's also provide extensive consulting for the Department of Homeland Security End must've wasn't the show you'll have to educate me on the pronunciation of lithium. Texas likes you. Okay. Got It. So, welcome A. Twelve days away from the election. There's a there's a debate tonight you must be very busy. Yeah it's you know almost fifty million Americans have already voted. and as you approach selection day, you know by the time we reach election almost seventy five percent of voters have already bought it. So it election is a season more than his day and this this particular election cycle people are really taking advantage of it across the country we've seen record turnouts and so yes, all of us are are enthralled with it in our busy with an it's an exciting time. To be a voter and as a Democrat is in. I. That's the that's that's the understanding I have of your background in your take. Early voting is a good thing. Correct. Voting a whole is a good thing. I mean, I think fat I, mean Tetris. We became a majority minority state in two thousand, four, sixteen years ago But the the the representation whether it's in Congress with the State House or. At a state level is that reflective of the state's population and that's because Texas not a republican state or democratic state for years Texas has been a nonvoting sick. And as voter participation goes up. In the cycle, you're gonNA start seeing the faces and the backgrounds of those that we lack mirror more of the population of Texas and as as we see that across the country. Yeah. One of the things that we. I know at least a couple of weeks ago was kind of a new story was the governor Abbot kind of restricting where people could I think drop off mail in ballots rate I think it was sort of like Harris County, had the same number as any smaller county in West Texas somewhere. So has that has that improved any he he has made that decision in because of it. It again, it's it's an attempt to create. Chaos is an attempt to make it harder for people to vote. Right. Now the just like while we're on. The Texas Supreme Court just ruled that we can have drive thru voting in Harris County. This was a a contention and and literally just as I was getting on the court just ruled which is really important that if you make voting easier for people if you give people multiple options to vote. UC's turnout go up in this what we've seen in Harris. County. Turnouts going up everywhere around the country including Texas. But especially in Harris County because we Harris County has become a democratic counties of the last election cycle and because of that the leadership that's there. Wants to be inclusive wants to hear the voices of people that live in this county. And made many things easier including having drive thru voting like if you can drive through and do a banking transaction if you can drive through and an order the the best fast food. which we have in Texas because we are. Right. We should be able to vote. And I think that that's important. You know the this cycle I wanNA thank cove nineteen. People were given a task for covert ninety blood tests while they were in their cars. So we can do all of that white. Canton.

Texas Harris County Texas Supreme Court Consultant Omer Congress West Texas Covid Founder And President State House Canton New York Department Of Homeland CNN Harris Unity National Bank CBS Chairman Transportation Advocacy Group
Winter And Snow

Not Another Mum Pod

02:55 min | 6 months ago

Winter And Snow

"Hi Iron Sammy ages-old around the fund of course good Sam. and. I'm Nafisa Siamese Mum and I'm the host of a podcast called not another month. Today. We are discussing themes around pictures of collections from the Museum of London, for their memories of London program and. A London lives podcast in order to inspire a musical story, which is accessible for people living with dementia as well as their families. Today footer, we will be discussing shows children playing in the snow. My favorite part about playing in the snow is wound makes nobles and throw it at. Don't remind me I remember sometimes you would end up snow fighting in the House and Bob I used to get this ledge out on the would go up and down the Hill I love that it would go so fast except broker we had to buy new one. That's right. If it doesn't snow this year I think we should create some fake snow. Can you imagine if we could do that we? Can Make It with baking soda and shaving cream and it feels coated touch as well. I didn't know you could yeah Ma am I truly lived in like a place like Noneya were was always winter how would you feel? Oh, I don't know as much as I love winter I do love summer to summer can really affect your mood and make you happier and just generally more hopeful although into exciting after while you do feel a bit gloomy especially when the snow tends to slash everything looks more gray and starts pretty what do you think I think I like some more because we don't get much snow in the winter and we didn't have any snow this year by the way. Here's a fun fact. Do you know which is the most obvious place on us. Some mountainous part of California? That tree Japan the north of Japan in the mountains there was a place could sukey on June and apparently they have fifty to sixty feature snow. Oh Gosh that's shocking thing I need to look this up. So that's about ten fifteen feet above my head or my God. It. And they have snow monkeys to that we have to see. Lastly, do love snowflakes have a fun fact for you to? No Two snowflakes are the same. Each one is unique how amazing it's up. Oh that's very. Last question if it never snowed again, what is one thing? You'll miss our unless making snowmen? I will miss that warm fuzzy feeling of both our childhoods, the hot chocolate and marshmallows the hot soups and roast dinners and stews defeating of waking up rushing to the. Feeling that all of natural beauty,

London Museum Of London Japan California Noneya Bob I
Tales of Prophet Hud

Jannah Firdaus Mediapro Podcast

05:11 min | 6 months ago

Tales of Prophet Hud

"Chapter. One. The people of odd lived many years in the windswept hills of an area between Yemen and Oman. They were physically well bill and we known for their craftsmanship especially in the construction of tall buildings with lofty towers they were outstanding among all the nations in power and wealth, which unfortunately made them arrogant boastful. Their political power was held in the hen of unjust rulers against whom no one dared to raise a voice. There were not ignoring of the existence of a law nor did they refuse to worship him? What they did refuse was to worship alone. They worshiped other gods also including is. This is one sin of luck does not forgive. Alone wanted to guide and discipline these people. So he sent a prophet from among them. This profit was hot peace be upon Him and noblemen who handled this task with great resoluteness and tolerance. Even. Julia reported that he was high even sully even our function even Sam Ebbing. Noah based upon him. He. Also reported that Prophet Hud Peace Be. Upon. Him was from a tribe called I'd even us even Sam even Noah who were Arabs living in I'll off in Yemen between Oman and Hadramout on a land called usher stretching out into the seat. The name of their valley was Mugabe's. Some traditions claim that hot peace be upon him was the first person who spoke Arabic while others claim that Prophet Noah, peace be upon him was the first. It was also sad that Prophet Adam peace be upon him was the first. Prophet Hood Aber condemned idol worship, and admonished his people. My people, what is the benefit of these Jones that you car your own? Henson worship. In reality, it is an insult to the intellect. There was only one diety worthy of worship and that is a law. Worship of him and him alone is compulsory on you. He created you he provides for you and he is the one who will cost you to die. He gave you wonderful physiques and blessed you in many ways. So believe in him and do not be blind to his favors or the same fate that destroyed. No was people will overtake you. With such reasoning hot hope to instill faith in them. But there refused to accept his message. His people ask him. Do. You desire to be or master with your call. What payment do you want? Hud tried to make them understand that he would receive his. From a law. He did not demand anything from them except that they let the light of truth touch their minds and hearts. Although the Almighty states. And to odd people, we send their brother hot. He said. Oh my people worship along. You have no other law but him. Certainly you do nothing but invent is. Oh my people I ask of you know reward for it. My reward is only from him who created me Will you not then understand? And Oh my people. Ask, forgiveness of your Lord and then repented to him. He will send you from the sky abundant rain and at Strang's your strength. So do not turn away as Muturi mean or criminals disbelievers in the oneness of a law. They SAT. Ohio. No evidence have you brought us and we shall not leave or gods for your mere saying. We are not believers in you. All that we say is that some of our guts have seized you with evil. He said. I call a lot to witness and bear you witness that I am free from that which you describe as partners in worship. And with him. So plot against me all of you and gave me no respect. I put my trust in Allah, my Lord, and your Lord. There is not a living creature, but he has crossed of its warlock. Fairly. My Lord is on the straight path. So if you turn away still I have conveyed the message with which I was sent to you.

Prophet Noah Muturi Yemen Oman Sam Ebbing Mugabe HUD Hood Aber Adam Henson Julia Jones Hadramout Strang Ohio
Addiction in the Age of Covid, with Dr. Amer Raheemullah, M.D.

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

05:47 min | 6 months ago

Addiction in the Age of Covid, with Dr. Amer Raheemullah, M.D.

"Honor Rahimullah It really happy to have A. On the show we've known omair out, of course, outside of work for quite some time as well. But I, myself didn't know about all the really interesting area of expertise that he dabbles in omair is a clinical consultant at Lucid Lane which is a startup. He'll be talking about relevant to the topic at hand today, which is addiction. and Dr Amirah Hemas, a clinical assistant professor at Stanford University. School of Medicine and Director of the Addiction Medicine Consultant Service at Stanford Hospital. We're GONNA be talking a lot about addiction as expertise today. Given all the stressors that are happening in the world right now, armor is board certified in Addiction Medicine Internal Medicine, and he completed his training at Stanford University School of Medicine in his internal medicine training at the University of Illinois College of Medicine. So as I said, his specialization as OPIOID, N., Benzodiazepine take. Notice that tapers off. You'RE GONNA have to educate us on on the right promotional US now say. We call it the Golden Ben Zozo Okay Ben says, and treating substance use disorders in residential and outpatient programs as well as in patient and office based setting. You're welcome super interesting to talk about this very important although under not as much talked about topic. So really important and interesting to dive into that. Thanks for having me Yeah and Omer touched on this or alluded to this Excuse me I'm we obviously know you personally out beyond just having you on the show full disclosure armour's my cousin and I think, Omer, you've got an interesting sort of linked to armor as well. Raise your brother in law and armor Western. Or Medical School they went med school together. That's right. My brother-in-law they went to med school together and. we live we all live in the bay area, of course. Ten to happen with this show but Yeah. Of course, you know my I live right across the bridge from Stanford in Amer works at Stanford. So but but again, really interesting really really interested to dive into some of these talks I didn't even didn't even I didn't even know all these things about her so Yeah. Yeah for sure for sure. Absolutely and as we often like to do err on you know I guess tell us a little bit about yourself Obviously we we we heard University of Illinois being mentioned there You are originally from Chicago Illinois maybe talk a little bit about your background, and then we can get into your professional life. Sure. Absolutely. So So you know born and raised in the Chicago. Land area. We moved out here a couple years ago to the Bay Area California, to pursue some extra training and addiction medicine and started working at Stanford, you know loved the weather and the work I was doing out here and I stayed on to launch an addiction consult service at Stanford. Hospital. Addiction concert services are a way of intervening and increasing access to addiction treatment in the hospital setting. So for example, you know we have a drug overdose epidemic you'll have things like drug courts because people with addictions commonly get arrested for things are run. INS with the law so they'll have drug courts where they'll have. treatment associated with these Felonies her charges that people get such this. It's this concept of intervening where there's a large population of drug addicts and people with alcohol problems. Save the hospital people with addictions also have a higher prevalence of higher incidents of hospitalization. So by intervening at the hospital level rate to. Intervene on a large concentrated population of people with addiction. So we we go in and we talked to people in the hospital who have a medical consequence of their addiction, and this is you know crystal meth heroin, alcohol cannabis issues as well. So psychiatric complications of their addiction or medical complications of their addiction, and they're really in more reachable and teachable moment just like you know after they have a legal consequence with the drug courts, there are much more reachable and teachable moment. So in the hospital we come in, we'll do a brief intervention get your family involved, get them started on treatment therapy medications, and then linked them to ongoing treatments. It's really new, cut a model, but it's rapidly increasing all over the country to address it's the idea of their. They've Kinda hit this low and you're kind of turn the leverage that low point to and make into a turn around moment, right? Absolutely. Absolutely. A lot of our patients are just going on about their business. Some of them have been thinking about salvaging and alcohol for some time others not even a thought, but once they come to the hospital. Their lives are such somewhat disrupted, and now they are in the hospital away from drugs and alcohol minds clearing up a little bit and in some sort of pain and suffering from their medical consequence. So now they're a little bit more teachable, reachable, frustrated, sick, and tired of being sick and tired. Then we come in and tell us and we start to have a real collaborative patient centered discussion and go from there.

Stanford University Addiction Medicine Internal Me Director Of The Addiction Medi Stanford Hospital Stanford University School Of University Of Illinois College School Of Medicine Chicago Omer Drug Overdose Dr Amirah Hemas Clinical Consultant University Of Illinois Ben Zozo Clinical Assistant Professor Medical School Bay Area California Illinois Benzodiazepine Heroin
Unifying your will with the will of Allah

TMV Podcast

05:32 min | 7 months ago

Unifying your will with the will of Allah

"Blessed to be joined by a very good friend of mine said Sane Machi-. He's an Islamic lecturer he's been studying in. Beirut for some years now. Just an all-round quite and. Inspiring and Kind of God centric Guy I think. So. We've been wanting to do content together and we wanted him through some something with the Muslim viable years now but he's always out studying, and then when he comes, he's kind of like lecturing for a few days and then he's back out. But we were able to find some time. and. We. So. Obviously, you hear the conversation that we have but why I really wanted to get him on is that I think there's like a very unique way in which he talks about God and religion. And it's quite an empowering thing. So like even I remember when we were having the conversation I was thinking back to some lecture gave last year I think when he was in London and I had the same kind of thing where it's also simple and it's all just anchored around God I'm so I so I called them up and I said you know, let's let's your podcast and I want you to kind of talk about some of these things and some things you mentioned your lecture series and whatever else and we had like twenty minutes half we mapped out what we're going to discuss. Item we go into go into record. A couple of days AIDS like over a week weeknights and then he's like I was like, oh, she would just recap what we discussed. It acknowledged freestyler. So he kind of just thought at the conversation and and just saw when I loved it to be honest I'm. Always enjoy his company and conversations with him. And that's that's it really If you did actually, if you do enjoy this podcast there is potential opportunity for us to. Record more with a sane so Why as in like message email will ever ask postal social media tiger us. Last No, and let me know and I will be sure to me because in London for a while very short time I'm going to try and. Getting back in if there is a a decent response from people, so please do. Everything without further ado. Here's my conversation with Hossein. Monkey. Saddam Hussein. Thank you very much for for coming on the podcast I I. Think It's worth people nine the background that you me. Quite a few favours now because a few few years ago I was out in in. Lebanon. Yes, and we would you to meet. It's about three years ago and but three to two or three three years ago and you you flopped I mean I had a car accident. This is the second. Comes on an important. Was that and then you've come to London Tovia from London reason you've come to the under every an we've had like brief moments of being able to meet up and chat and whatever but we haven't sat down like this. longtime common. Yeah. It's quite exciting to be honest So. What, begin wherever you want my i. I think social talk about is in the we've allowed to catch up. But let's specify those part that to one side right. So I think for me when when you said Yes to podcast I thought it'd be interesting to talk about quite a few things. So recent you've been talking about you did an election series into what the Prophets yes and stories from the Koran what was was really interesting and and the stuff that she would we wanna do, oh, we're going to be doing more of, but the year before that you were in London and you delivered ten lectures and it was all kind of shaped around the love of God. Yes. And what was quite striking for me personally was that there was something in because I know you personally as well and I I've known you for for a long time before you were studying and everything else, and maybe we'll do another a whole podcast on on the whole journey has been about nine years almost nine ten years. It's been a long time but but there's there's there was something there is something in the way that you when you talk about God and when you're talking about all of these notions of loving God and really embracing. The spirit of Islam and everything else that this is a a really deeper kind of passion. And belief and almost serenity as well in the way that you kind of talks I wanted to I think if we start with that like. What Okay we approach allies a concept and a as a as a topic as you know our. Creator Moss and everything else What is allow mean to you? That's a big I'm sorry for. Jumping from the great question. So I think. Yes. I do use love as the launchpad to talk about a loss upon down and talk to a law SUPERNOVA. But I think that when a human beings especially in young is. When they think of God or the concept of God even in when it comes to parents for example, because when we're young, we don't fully understand the concept of God, but we see in

London Sane Machi Saddam Hussein London Tovia Beirut Lebanon Hossein
Professor Mohammad Fadel Returns to Discuss the Current Political Climate

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

08:01 min | 7 months ago

Professor Mohammad Fadel Returns to Discuss the Current Political Climate

"BOCOM professor frontal a really happy to have you on I know you've been on the show in the past prior to when I joined when we had different co host, but I did over the weekend a that episode I think he was episode thirty, three, thirty, four from summer, two thousand sixteen, and I listened to it just to catch up and hear a little about Your your background and your points of view. Is a super interesting. kind of got me thinking of of all the craziness that that's happened. Since two thousand sixteen, right life has been crazy in general since maybe nine eleven you could say but We've kicked it into high gear since the trump election, and now of course everything that's going going on with the virus of macro level. But It's like I said it's been crazy year. And you explain the rise of trump through economics, and that really that really resonated with me. You were talking about how things have gotten global and whatnot, and because there's more supply and demand you talked about more more more supply of workers may be flat or left Earth's or lower demand of of of jobs in the capital, potentially for the for the lower class. things have only gotten worse right so. Do you see. Do you see that that pattern continuing and potentially leading to more and more extremism or are you? Are you hopeful? Well I mean. covid changed a lot of things. So I mean. So let me back up I. Guess Trump from the beginning. Began to charge reorient trade policies began posing lots of openly protectionist measures. And then Cova conflict celebrated that. And layer on top of that a certain kind of anti Chinese Stanton. That Kobe has reinforced. That was already pre existing. and. So now. Yeah was situation where there's a kind of broad consensus among the political class that something has to be done about China. Now it's not clear what that will mean. In terms of global trade, because the global trading system is highly dependent on Chinese purchase patient, but as you, you know just in the last few months atop has been ratcheting up the pressure on China Army Right now trae closing council it's. Posing greater greater sanctions on Chinese tech firms, etc, odds greater confrontations with China in the in the South China Sea among other things. and then coverted has caused a lot of people that make me. We need to bring back a lot of production of things back to the United States. Now I don't know how realistic that. Ambition is particularly if it's more than a few products that might be viewed as critical in the public health emergency. but the General Point that I made twenty sixteen I think about global economics remains the case today. That is of great benefit in the aggregate to the United States. Particularly United States but at the same time there are a lot of losers from globalization The trump response to bat has been to try to engage protectionism. In a in a certain sense kind of change, the terms of trade in a way that slanted the United States by imposing tariffs on trading partners now United States can get away without just an extent because the united. States has such a leading role in the global economy, no country. Wants to be excluded from the US market. So they are. Willing to go along, and there's very limited steps that they can take in the short term. To retaliate against the US, the problem is. Over the medium to long term. States wants to take that approach to global trade. It's likely that it's going to produce. Reactions, right! You might see a rise of different kind of trading bloc centered around China for example centered around Europe right in which other countries enter into our French trading relationships with each other. To protect themselves in the United States. You also see this going on with the role of the dollar. Nice, as has been very aggressive in using the role of the dollar as the world's reserve currency to impose sanctions, Willy Nilly, all over all over the world thereby effectively. Telling the rest of the world that if you want to trade with us, you can have to adopt our sanctions regimes. and so even places like the EU or trying to build out. Heyman systems that can bypass the dollar right so they can escape the kind of US stranglehold on the global, market! So our costs while twice as there are costs involved to trying to either export you use US economic our to impose its will in terms of geopolitics with the dollar or with Tariffs Charles. Trade. In order to protect US workers. There's a much easier route. which I would like to see A. Dog! And it's possible it could happen. If there's a large enough democratic featuring, remember namely we preserve the gains of the post. World War Two liberalize trading system, but combine it with a much higher level of taxation. That would allow the government to redistribute the gains from International Trade and compensate the losers. What we've had going on the United States since the Reagan Revolution is a double whammy to the working class in that. Global. Association has undermined security jobs on the one hand and I guess conservative. mark pro-market policies domestically destroyed the the welfare state internally. Right. And so. Yeah, you have cheap TV's. Education is unbelievably expensive. Helped expensive. Real estate is on XP. Unbelievably expensive right. So. The most fundamental goods are outside the reach of the average worker, even even professionals right. consumption goes are really cheap an audit it feels like the current administration is doing if you look at the two by two of of what you just laid out right like less less fairness, and Lester is redistribution, more fans, smartest redistribution, globalization versus nationalism that the current administration is going towards nationalism without fairness, and you want to go towards globalization, which is good for everybody in the long run plus Mauri, distribution and fairness. Strategy of trump and Publican party is to. Push back against globalization where the United States does not have apparently advantage by using tariffs. Right. And then imposing. Her fragile trading charms on its trading partners where it does. And then instead of we distribute Gel redistributionist policy to to. Income! WHAT THEY WANNA do is used tariffs to protect its France.

United States China Bocom Donald Trump South China Sea Professor China Army International Trade EU Tariffs Charles Kobe Willy Nilly Europe France Heyman Lester
The spiritual habit of Bismillah

The Rogue Muslim

06:02 min | 8 months ago

The spiritual habit of Bismillah

"Everyone and welcome to another episode of the road, Muslim Polka. This week I am doing a pre check in for the fourteenth spiritual have I have no idea how. How quickly time has gone and. I just. I'm still shocked than stuck to fourteen You know sometimes I think when we try and set ourselves tussle anonymous goal oriented person for me. I was really worried. I was thinking high. Actually follow through this. Can I commit to a night constantly updating on it, but humble home so far going fourteen strong and yeah just. An looking forward to what this next Batch of habits split up to twelve and thirteen, twenty six on. Any. I'm just interested to see where it goes. I was on such a high. Low when now I'm hoping to get into a high with or You know this habit in allowing it to take root in my in my mind, and my and my practice so the while. You don't even know what to do what you do from the. the this next habit is to recite the verse of loss of this Melilla manure him. just before any action I take I think I've mentioned in the past. I have a friend who she's like. She's always reciting before getting up in for holding T! Before, I, don't know opening her laptop everything she does. She just recites it and. I was so fascinated with it and just. I don't think. In the beginning to religious like why are you doing it? What's the point of it and then I think it's just about capacity. Right like we don't were all on this ladder and I don't think anybody should be knocking any. One another's ladders I think there's a hippie around that, but we need to help each other and I think just to consistency in her practice She just. A hundred resonated. We've never talked about and I've never never told her like. Religious of whatever it was just a form of judgement that I had. An judgment comes from when you're not in the place where you feel that you're not doing enough for you. Just don't feel right about your spirituality your web, right. So for me. It's a now at the stage where I think that Oh built a always habits have built this relationship with little bit more meaningful than deeper than it was a year prior and I think this stage where I can start saying this and start incorporating this into my last little wave that actually resonates with me and has meaning to me, not just. Well all do it because she does it or Yeah, I don't know It doesn't burn some. It doesn't feel that I'm being too religious. I involved from that kind of narrative. I think with. The morning. Work on your capacity. The greater that space opens up. Elect gives you more opportunities to connect with him I. Think At least that's what I've learnt so far with this series and being very intentional, and that's the other thing right like I want to have an intentional new around this and I'm hoping that further communicates to me the power being intentional with your Neil. Honest about that is the biggest biggest lesson I've learned this through throughout the series in one in Charlotte take with me for the rest of my life power of having. Intentions to bright and I I think this will hopefully will be. will come through, and what will be interesting. Is that in I am stamping the will of God? The name of God onto every action I do you know? How will I better purify that intention how I better purified that act you know, what will it allow me to consider anything? This is GonNa be an immediate thing. I don't think it's like Bismillah, Herman or human, then all of a sudden my whole. Framework in my understanding of this action has changed or whatever I think that it builds up because morning you seek to go seek got the more you find Gordon. Hopefully, the more I. Got Gotten each act, the more I will find him and and. And what I can do with that act. To have a greeter faculty or if that makes sense so it. Is just such A. It's a I that is very beautiful and that we are constantly encouraged her site I. Think Ed's The prophet. Mohammad Khatami. That anyone who recites Bismillah will record four thousand virtues for him for each letter forgive four thousands of his sin. So I need that. I think we all need that if Tiny's in the buildup. We think they're really having effect, but really a cordless to be blind. and hopefully you with reciting at this spurs hopefully that blindness also decreases right and and God consciousness increases an shaped snus. Gu's way slowly, but surely inshallah

Bismillah Mohammad Khatami Tiny GU Charlotte Gordon Herman
Reverse-Engineering the Impact of the British Establishment on Muslims

TMV Podcast

07:10 min | 8 months ago

Reverse-Engineering the Impact of the British Establishment on Muslims

"Welcome to the team podcast brought to you by the Muslim, vibe. I'm hosting possum. And this I'm Rushton in my introduction because the root. Team members of Muslim vibe team and other associated people in the office are not happy about the fact that I'm recording this for whatever reason. So I'M GONNA keep it brief. I'm joined this week by William Burroughs who is a London based research in sociology. He looks at how young Muslims in Europe and North America, navigate, race, class and gender barriers from a D., colonial and restorative perspective. That right I'm. Just reading off his website. William is a an individual who has. Countries the Muslim vitamin the posses made assume videos for us. I'm going to Lincoln description. We talk about them at all the beginning. We also talk in the podcast about white privilege and the current academic project that he's working on. which kind of looks at reverse engineering? What the British establishment has done to Muslims, and how people are able to, and have successfully on a fullback and space themselves. I'm quite a wide ranging discussion I'm hope you enjoy it. Without further ado, because of the rude people in the office to and not allowing me to speak too much on this. Sound policeman. Harris Michael Mercedes with William. William Thank. You thank you for for joining me on this podcast so I guess some people may be familiar with your face that watching this because we've done what you produced a series of of committing documentaries for us. Around some random topics. I'm trying to think back to how it all came together. So I think you got in touch with US maybe a couple of years ago. And and you had at the time I think we shed one of your videos which around? was like this. Robot version of the of the Muslim influence. Oh, yeah, that was Yeah, what working? I haven't seen that because I. Think it's hard to actually. They got that video struggle to find him for it last. What was that? So basically, it was an experiment in the sense that. You know if I can put things this way Assessor Gist, which is my job. My job is to understand. Why do people do certain things and? It's basically like being a psychologist before crowds for movements trends. But at the same time when I started my mic, my studies I as a Muslim academic. There was something that for me like a religious duty. 'cause you know for example if I talk about the topic. Is Between fifteen thousand and twenty thousand words, a chapter of my book or Article but not everyone has the time to re this and necessarily understand will jog on and stuff so I i. consider you know known as? That's minorities. Jala is not valid until it shed. And you know so. How my question for the DOT words. How do I make it? These topics complex topics accessible for most people, and then I got inspired by. Keynote these like age a-plus videos. And I thought yeah, let's try to do some videos. In a similar way, a very short format with like culture, popular references and stuff, but also did some fictions individual. You mentioned actually was one of these experiments. Where basically it's a it's a stop in fiction where I imagine. What if all these influences that we see on Instagram Youtube? There were actually robots designed by Google facebook a for Muslims to abide by the government's guidelines, so that was the NC. How people would respond to such narrative so this. Would you actually I play like a scientist and? A friend of plays like a robot actuaries ten still out for three minutes, and we use like google voice from Google, translate to for the speech and. It was. I felt like when video came out. It definitely started conversations I'm sure it ruffled a few feathers, but also got people thinking and people talking which I'm sure was your kind of Ame behind that in some sense, and then also and I'll probably try and put a link to all the different video that we discussed in this in the in the description, but does also A. Series. That we did on the most imbibed. Within that we, so we sat down. We kind of Map Tau different conversation topics. We wanted to discuss so things like politics white privilege I was actually another one and look at my note masculinity. An. What was that journey like? Because again I the the kind of brief I. Guess We gave to you is that we want? To have pieces on this one conversations to be had around this, but we don't want him to be kind of light. We WanNa go quite deep, and obviously with your kind of academic background as well. We want to really be able to get hawk. Get to the heart of these conversations. And and I think we kind of did that like that. I remember the the white privilege episode was yourself and Two or three other white Muslims that you had that interview. I'd that will combat I believe as well I they were kind of unpacking and exploring in discussing direction, relative privilege, and whatever else and. It's interesting because there was it was very feedback that one person was asking for example why there was only white people on the documentary on the on the mini documentary that we produced. And I guess what was that whole Jenny like like off of the different mini documentary that we wanNA marriage as well. What was your favorite to record in research and and I think you know although these topics are very important for me. Because all of these topics were more or less part of my journey, not only it's not only topics I research in the university this topics that are impacting on my personal life, the life of my friends, and so on and so on, and you know especially when it comes to things like a me, metoo movements who black lives matter. The problem I felt was that lots of men and lots of white Muslims you know when that people expressed that you have these like global movements, so people feel attacked and they take it personally. and. The thing is a some men and also white Muslim understand what comes from?

William Burroughs Google Rushton Europe London Assessor Gist North America Lincoln Jenny Scientist Michael Mercedes A. Series NC
Reverse-Engineering the Impact of the British Establishment on Muslims with William Barylo)

TMV Podcast

05:33 min | 8 months ago

Reverse-Engineering the Impact of the British Establishment on Muslims with William Barylo)

"William Thank. You thank you for for joining me on this podcast so I guess some people may be familiar with your face that watching this because we've done what you produced a series of of committing documentaries for us. Around some random topics. I'm trying to think back to how it all came together. So I think you got in touch with US maybe a couple of years ago. And and you had at the time I think we shed one of your videos which around? was like this. Robot version of the of the Muslim influence. Oh, yeah, that was Yeah, what working? I haven't seen that because I. Think it's hard to actually. They got that video struggle to find him for it last. What was that? So basically, it was an experiment in the sense that. You know if I can put things this way Assessor Gist, which is my job. My job is to understand. Why do people do certain things and? It's basically like being a psychologist before crowds for movements trends. But at the same time when I started my mic, my studies I as a Muslim academic. There was something that for me like a religious duty. 'cause you know for example if I talk about the topic. Is Between fifteen thousand and twenty thousand words, a chapter of my book or Article but not everyone has the time to re this and necessarily understand will jog on and stuff so I i. consider you know known as? That's minorities. Jala is not valid until it shed. And you know so. How my question for the DOT words. How do I make it? These topics complex topics accessible for most people, and then I got inspired by. Keynote these like age a-plus videos. And I thought yeah, let's try to do some videos. In a similar way, a very short format with like culture, popular references and stuff, but also did some fictions individual. You mentioned actually was one of these experiments. Where basically it's a it's a stop in fiction where I imagine. What if all these influences that we see on Instagram Youtube? There were actually robots designed by Google facebook a for Muslims to abide by the government's guidelines, so that was the NC. How people would respond to such narrative so this. Would you actually I play like a scientist and? A friend of plays like a robot actuaries ten still out for three minutes, and we use like google voice from Google, translate to for the speech and. It was. I felt like when video came out. It definitely started conversations I'm sure it ruffled a few feathers, but also got people thinking and people talking which I'm sure was your kind of Ame behind that in some sense, and then also and I'll probably try and put a link to all the different video that we discussed in this in the in the description, but does also A. Series. That we did on the most imbibed. Within that we, so we sat down. We kind of Map Tau different conversation topics. We wanted to discuss so things like politics white privilege I was actually another one and look at my note masculinity. An. What was that journey like? Because again I the the kind of brief I. Guess We gave to you is that we want? To have pieces on this one conversations to be had around this, but we don't want him to be kind of light. We WanNa go quite deep, and obviously with your kind of academic background as well. We want to really be able to get hawk. Get to the heart of these conversations. And and I think we kind of did that like that. I remember the the white privilege episode was yourself and Two or three other white Muslims that you had that interview. I'd that will combat I believe as well I they were kind of unpacking and exploring in discussing direction, relative privilege, and whatever else and. It's interesting because there was it was very feedback that one person was asking for example why there was only white people on the documentary on the on the mini documentary that we produced. And I guess what was that whole Jenny like like off of the different mini documentary that we wanNA marriage as well. What was your favorite to record in research and and I think you know although these topics are very important for me. Because all of these topics were more or less part of my journey, not only it's not only topics I research in the university this topics that are impacting on my personal life, the life of my friends, and so on and so on, and you know especially when it comes to things like a me, metoo movements who black lives matter. The problem I felt was that lots of men and lots of white Muslims you know when that people expressed that you have these like global movements, so people feel attacked and they take it personally.

Google Jenny Assessor Gist William Scientist A. Series NC
Rest and Revive and Social Media Break - Update

The Rogue Muslim

06:34 min | 8 months ago

Rest and Revive and Social Media Break - Update

"Slum, everyone and welcome back to the road Muslim Poe cost. This week I'm going to be giving an update on the twenty six virtual habit series. You May or may not have noticed. The happen updated. Everyone on just the recent ones and I'm gonNA. Get into that in a bit I just wanted to. Check in with every one of kind of weird to do. Through audio I guess. I JUST WANNA. Say I hope. Everyone's well You know I just had this realization. I mean I've had this realization. Two weeks, but We are almost always St- in A. We have been in lockdown since. So. It's crazy. It's crazy. How is everyone like I'm if if you cool with it? Genuinely just WanNa know how everyone is. You can message me on Instagram or twitter. facebook will email me everything just as Muslim and my email. IS THE ROAD MUSLIM AT DOT COM? Because? These are really Trialing Times and I'm in a space where I'm not asking that dislike. How are you yeah? I'm asking genuinely. How's everyone I'm going to space where I feel that I I may be able to just listen So yeah, if if you, if you basically trying to say here is if you WANNA ear to vent to. And let things out and release. I'm here yeah. I I wouldn't say otherwise because the have been moments, Oh my God where I have just felt this Kinda ties into the. Spiritual Habits series, but I have just felt so. Overwhelmed with how much online communication. In presence we've had to adjust to. Do to out and a first of all I'm very grateful that we live in this age I can't imagine going through pandemic and Nola having. Technology it would have been a lamont difficult, but at the same time you know You Know I. Think one of this is so new, so we don't really know what. Emotions of off feelings of. Telling us because we have to recalibrate, we have to be. Check in more with ourselves in see what exactly is the body in? Mind is telling us than what is a result of and so. There are many times where I'm experiencing something. Experiencing lowness on like I don't understand why like I'm. For, I. Don't know the just. As it relates related something very personal. Is it pandemic? Is it? What is it and so? Maybe it's just like a mix of world. That's right, but I think with the pandemic. They're kind of has an added weight to it, so it can be difficult to descend. What's going on and I know I've talked to so many people on the pandemic has really forced them to Confront many difficult emotions, many difficult experiences out myself included and in a way. It's good you know you. Can any practice so much escapism and. At the same time, it's just difficult, isn't it? It's just so many emotions. Buddy things going on, and you pretend like you're in a pandemic right? You still go when he's still on email. Still attend meetings. He's still perform as if this is flipping normality Say Yes just genuinely. How is everyone You know I have a lot of thought votes on what the future is going to hold and and how how we're GONNA have to. reframe. For the new realities that are going to be experiencing going full now As including the consequences of the pandemic but I am always hesitant to share a here just because. I don't know what your US Snyder. Know what your mind is I don't know with how you feeling I don't want to just. Be like well. This is how it's GonNa. Go out on our out have had You Know I. Don't know where that came from Bay I. Is. What happens when you don't recruit them? Paul costs for so long I mean this is just become some sort of weird therapy session with myself, but you'll have to listen to it I try to recruit the introduction four times. I just kept saying the dumbest things I duNNO I. Transition from that I just hope everyone is safe and well as going on this so much that we're exposed to. A lot of disheartening things that were exposed to that kind of. Relates kind of I. Guess this is the transition transitions into Wapner, the twenty six virtual habit series. It's still going on But at the end I think I did. I had. Oh God honestly ten or twelve. Out At the beginning of the year. And if you should still on Instagram, you had access to the list and I would check off every time. I released episode giving updates. On the habit the lost one that I had written down was to sell off the land. And I just could not do. This was the beginning of. Now! This was mid June I wanNA. Say. and I couldn't couldn't didn't WanNa do it, and so instead of releasing a Pug 'cause I I just put it into an instagram post and Yeah basically what was happening is that. I found myself in a state of spiritual suspension like I wasn't able to move forward and I didn't want to. To put it simply like a didn't want to do this about the Lael I. The need me. It would have been so bad. The near about point would have just been well. For Twenty six, spiritual series,

United States Instagram Lamont Wapner Paul Facebook Nola Snyder Twitter.
Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf Talks Basketball, the National Anthem, BLM and more

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

07:22 min | 8 months ago

Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf Talks Basketball, the National Anthem, BLM and more

"Welcome to episode Ninety Four. Congruence, the American Muslim experience we are very excited to have Mahmoud Abbas the roof on the show today and when I say we it's Preveza and and Myself Omar and sorry co host of the show. But we're super excited. We've been waiting for this episode for for a while. Now as you all know. My who roof is a NBA veteran. and he's got a lot to a lot of great things to to talk to us about. His experiences in the NBA his departure from the NBA. His experience as an American Muslim. And everything all the cool things. He's doing right now on the circuit and the big three and and helping out young kids get healthy and fit, and so on, so we're going to learn all about that. We're going to hear a little about his youth. His NBA experience his life after the NBA in the US abroad all these things I want to cover, and I am excited because my mood of the roof was a childhood hero of mine. I grew up in small town. Watching Washington play? And this is really exciting for me personally so welcome to the show brother Mahmoud. We are really excited. An Omer sorta wasted no time bearing the lead as it were It's been a minute since we've actually been on this show. We had a little bit of a hiatus. as I imagine most of. Most content providers out there just trying to sort of make the most of these sort of. Challenging Times of trying to secure people in trying to find the time in the space to record, so we are really excited and and especially grateful that ma'am. Louis was able to take the time out of his demanding busy schedule to be with us on, so thank you again as an I. Echo, everything, immerse, said not growing up in a small town so much, but you were also sort of NBA hero of mine. I came of age in the nineties when I came of age I. Mean Terms of sort of my My my my obsession with the NBA was back in the nineties I lived in Houston Texas. Texas, so you can imagine memo Ta I. Was Huge Rockets Fan huge Chemo Lodge Fan and was fortunate enough to be there when they want those back to back. Championships way back in the nineties, so certainly your era of the NBA, and as closely as we looked at looked up to a Hakeem, being a local on sort of hero of you're sort of the the other Muslim in the League and so is equally exciting, so but like I said we have a lot to sort of unpack as we like to see on the show but where we like to often like to begin is kind of your origin story so. Maybe tell us about you know Chris Jackson and his life, and you know in and you growing up in the south, and in those experiences were like yeah, and I'm really really interested in hearing first time you touch the basketball, and when you really felt at home with the ball in your hand, and all those things I'm going gonNA. I'm going to be jumping in and asking questions because as you can see, I'm pretty exciting go. Numb note will your Ford. Remind me of missing anything Actually I. Can you want to? Start with that verse. First Time. Just the basketball really was. I was nineteen years old Nights to play Vassallo. My brothers Some reason always ended up playing with. Older older guys in now. When I look back I, said you know that's that was a huge plus for me, because those are the guys issue are fast strong when you finally get to your age group. It becomes easy play. John Age because you've been playing with older gasps. But I remember one day I was outside. Central Elementary. In I was playing game twenty one and this lady. Her real name is miss. Cookie or miss asa letter. What we call him is cooking and she was strong African American women like she. She didn't man screaming at you getting on your back in those days, even spanky. At all be playing and she said listen, she said come in Chris come in. Of course you go over there and I went over there, she said listen try out. I didn't even know that right next to me in the gym. It would try elementary. Right. Of Fourth Great in. I said Miss you'RE GONNA have to ask my mother, she said. Don't worry about it just going out. And because she saw something in me when I was playing I win in. Playing Street Ball I didn't know anything about organized while I. Mean I'm taking it driven through people and I'm making my shots. Coach added me listed son. You, gotTa pass the ball. And make a long story short. My first game in elementary school I remember. This guy named Aaron Ross. I'm nervous. Right man would i. do you follow me? By the end of the game. Of the game coach was giving me ISOS telling him get out my way. I ended up with twenty one points, my first game, and just to see the crowd, and the excitement man I was like man I love this atmosphere. is feels especially a little. You a black kid coming out of the ghetto. You know, mother you. Know File Right A. Grown up in poverty surrounded by drug addiction, mother had an eighth grade education. So you're looking at something, and you get this attention from a skill that you have. And now it's dawning on you the May. This could be something. Right. This could be a way out and so that was like really for me the beginning. That moment when they were screaming and yelling. And it wasn't it wasn't. It wasn't like pure. Not like. Your College College Teammate Shaquille. It wasn't like you were this massive. You know massive Guy Hulking Guy. You're probably based. There probably saw your quickness in your your agility new shooting right that that they that they liked yeah. I was I was born with. Vast which muscles being quick and explosive, but until you meant after that moment. I began to wake up. My regimen was four o'clock in the morning. Then I would wake up at five and for years. My Mother did know this was happening. Because I'm not about down a mother her to cut it off. Work to I mean at. And so I would wait until she left I. Heard the call. Crank the not get up. Get myself written. It's still dark outset at the attack. And I decided at that age of of Nanan Jianye said man. This is what I want to become. Be The best. and. I knew that I'd have to come up with a strategy because I'm small to give myself the best opportunity to do that something. What can you do that? Nobody else or not, too. Many people don't dawn at this aid. And I, just decided man. You GotTa Get Earth.

NBA Basketball Chris Jackson Mahmoud Abbas Texas Omar United States John Age Aaron Ross Nanan Jianye Central Elementary Ford Vassallo Washington Houston Louis Hakeem ASA Shaquille