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Listen to the latest audio content in Islamic culture, identity, politics and history. This playlist features Islamic individuals having great conversations on relevant topics through a cultural lens. Broadcast from premium podcasts.

Islamic Folklore The Ant Prays For Rain

Jannah Firdaus Mediapro Podcast

5:34 listening | Last month

Islamic Folklore The Ant Prays For Rain

"Once there was a big famine in Palestine it was during the time of the Prophet Prophet. Sulaiman King Solomon. He came out with his people and proceeded to an open place in the desert to pray for the rains to come. Suddenly he saw an and standing on. Its two legs raising. Its hands up towards the sky and saying oh Allah we are but very small among all the creatures we cannot survive without die. Grace please bestow upon US sustenance and do not punish us because of the sins of human beings please send down the reins so that trees can grow farms become green in grains become available and we have our food to eat prophet. Sulaiman knew the language of all animals. He told his people let us go home. The prayer of this end is enough. It then rain too heavily in all the land became green and productive. The end is an intelligent creature. Warm days it collects and stores grain inside the hulls. It knows that during wet and cold months it would not be able to go out to search for food for fear that grain may start growing because of wetness it splits it into two or more pieces at times during Moonlit nights it brings the split grains out of the stores for drying and preservation against decay. The holes under the ground are made very carefully and covered with shelter to prevent the rain water from getting inside the holes the end unlike the other animals can lift a burden twice. Its own weight. It is not a selfish creature. When aunt finds some store of food grains it runs up to its group takes its fellow ants to that place. It shows everyone of them. Its own find of this door. The always behave in this manner. They work in live in cooperation with each other. This shows how the aunt works for the group and how each of them fulfills the needs in livelihood of its fellow beings how shameful it is for a man who has no regard for another man who has no concern for his fellow human beings who could be starving because of want of food. Once while Prophet Sulaiman was traveling together with hosts of men. Gin and birds. They reached valley events. When the chief of these ants witnessed the pomp and the glory with which Prophet Sulaiman and his companions were approaching toward it. He warned all the answers to get into their holes lest they got trampled and crushed unknowingly by the approaching men and Jinn Prophet. Sulaiman smiled at. This warning sounded by the ants chief and ordered his companions to wait till the aunts went inside their holes. None of us should hurt any aunt while passing over their land. He said it said that Prophet Sulaiman addressed the chief of the aunts. And Said How could my people hurt you or your fellow ants when they are floating through air? Don't you know that I am a messenger of God and would never act unfairly? The chief of the ants replied o Messenger of God my cautioning. The ants was not for any hurt that they would suffer but to prevent them getting stray and forgetting the glory of God after seeing year pomp. And show there is a deep meaning. In this event it shows that even the most humble and smallest of creatures has been endowed with the necessary wisdom to live safely and avoid being hurt as far as possible. It also shows how even a small end does have the natural understanding of the true position of Allah. It imparts a lesson. That one should not forget the true might and glory of Allah when one experiences a great power and dignity of any creature in this world thus an aunt is one of the most wonderful small creatures in this World Surinam L. The end in the holy current is a chapter named after this creature over one thousand three hundred years ago. Imam Ali was giving a sermon in Kufa. In which he was describing the beauties of creation in various forms of life he was referring to small creatures in asking men to study. How God made them so small yet so sturdy strong he described the end in these words. Look at an end. How tiny is its body? And how delicate features it is such a small creature that it often escapes the eye and few people care to attach any importance to it. Among the living beings found on this earth. Look at it and study its ways of life how it crawls how it attacks its food how it lifts a grain so many times heavier than its body carries it to its whole how it stores grains and how in summer it gathers in stocks food for

Prophet Sulaiman Sulaiman King Solomon Imam Ali Palestine United States Surinam Grace Kufa
The Wisdom of Solitude: Lessons from the Lives of the Prophets

The Friday Circle Podcast

9:04 listening | Last month

The Wisdom of Solitude: Lessons from the Lives of the Prophets

"This Central Hall of the the The story of that. He was patient he worshiped to Lawson with the Iowa and he had He for good of a lawsuit with And he worshipped unless of hand with and now I wanNA talk more about the West at the end inshallah in a suicide a lawsuit Donna. He says what could I be a you? But if Netanyahu anemic sunny shave volatile be mostly deal. I that that also handled. Honest hid a you an ISA cooled Sultani with Diana and said and remember also a you when he cooled to his Lord indeed shape on has touched me with hardship and tool meant so you set up. He he cool onto the island and he gave a reason for what's happened to him. He Sang that shape on has touched me. Yeah and in each on his touch me with hardship and torment now. Some of the they discuss this and they said how Schon can cause a physical impact. Shaddad can home you physically? But even his west West and He's whispers and the problem is that that causes us also being touched by shape which can need to as what happened with the you. Any Center. AH punishment either but he became repulsive to people. They don't WanNa see him or hear. So we we spoke about Shield Danny You know he classified the site in which it narrates that They will to companion so these are the the the two people I said. There was the wife of a Ubani Sadda- But also two companions that he had two people that did keep in touch with him and one of them said that you. Salaam he must have committed a really bad said he must have done. Something really displeasing to a loss of hand with full loss of hunting with the honor to afflicting with what he's going through the other person who who had this he went and told this to you and this made him very sad and so he's going through this situation with you know he's got this illness he's been left by people all of this and now he has this this makes him feel even less and he goes to relieve himself and his wife used to hold his hand and help him and on his way back unless hunter without a inspired him and to Strike his foot and we'll to began to flow and when you He used that water to cleanse himself. He'd be restored back to health so much. So that in some of the narrations it says that his wife she sold him as she didn't recognize she was looking for her husband. She sees mine. She doesn't recognize him and he says this is me this is are you ready set up. And he had returned back to is healthy He's healthy self heavily now. How long did that go on for? I've mentioned this in a few minutes but this is different narration. Some say seven years some say thirteen years some say eighteen years. There's one says fouteen but the the most you know all the more common almost but the more common opinions I found with thirteen or eighteen. Thirteen or eighteen. Years you buddy. Saddam was in the state that he was in in Charlotte in Charlotte. Leaving this situation that we find ourselves in many many of the people that have cooled virus and having another in an outfit within five seven fourteen days in Charlotte not more than And the the the effects are no way like what we describe. Anybody went through But in Chama after bites it's over for many as we know you know most allies with except the Michaud had the you. Enter them into Bosa in Shaw You set up this. The suffering of his. It went on for years over a decade according to the majority of GonNa unless with added that gave him well fulsome so off the what he'd gone through off the what happened with returned to him. He's family a lesson with the return to him gave him wealth and he once again became wealthy and this was awful years of a USA. Saddam being patient and a you Alyssa being steadfast in worshiping a loss on some of the some of the lessons that we can take from his story festival that patients and not wish it was so beloved. Awesome Hollywood island unless one hundred crazy Many times in the car. One of the lessons that we can take from this is that these are the true real role models for us so With so cool up An children are cool up in looking at and following the lives of people On this planet whether they're in this country on doesn't might just people who really we shouldn't we shouldn't follow their lives. We should know about their lives. Because there's there's no later in unfortunately And people like this like a you by Saddam. They are role models without appraises. His patients would you know who the unless without his is. We found him. Being patients must without testifies to the fact that he was patient meaning. He didn't say a bad thing he didn't think about that. He focused on worshiping a loss of handle at the Anna asking less of handle it to relieve hoping to relieve his suffering and the prophets were given special powers and abilities to kill themselves or other people as another Nessin that we take from this This story if he could he would kill himself. But when the prophets in messages perform miracles or killed people. Did these things. These were things that loss. Hanno with Ireland made happen. It's not something that they could do of themselves. And so even now in the Times that we live we know that the only one the we should be timing too is with. We should turn to him to solve our problems all suffering anything that window looking for any hopes Any dreams that we have the only one that can realize there is a lesson harmless. Nobody else And that's that's such a powerful lesson from this story that if a loss of Hannibal Donnas prophets and messengers had to be patient and worship and made to him. Is that anything or anyone else that we can turn to now. That is going to help us. No because if such a thing they would've told us about that but there isn't the only one the only thing that we can turn to in any time is a muscle and that's why I said at the beginning everything's changed but nothing's changed because these facts have always been the case So he mentioned shape on had harmed and so we he Shift the He talks about how he presents the reality he presents the fact that Chaban had done this team. But that's not to make an excuse and say you know I might for us that we may commit sins and say well. It wasn't me my shape on made me do it now. Okay Tapper Yala. I may talk. I returned to you and in shot I won't help. Strength from you in overcoming shape on his Westwood etc

Saddam Charlotte Times Netanyahu Diana Lawson Bosa Iowa Tapper Yala Schon Donna Shaddad Hannibal Hunter Fouteen Hollywood Island Chama Westwood Michaud Chaban
The Wisdom of Solitude: Lessons from the Lives of the Prophets

The Friday Circle Podcast

10:38 listening | Last month

The Wisdom of Solitude: Lessons from the Lives of the Prophets

"We look at the lives of the prophets to see what we can learn from something. We're supposed to do all the time. Anyway I something that lesson hunting with the other. He wants us to do. That's why he sa- panel with the honor. His put their stories in on We have more detail about them in the highly. And so I wanted to begin by looking at the life of a Ubani Saddam when he says what are you ignore? The Obama who anemia sunny. A little while under Rohani And mentioned a you when he cool to his Lord Indeed. Adversity has touched me. And you are the most messy full Over the muscle said you by the Senate on this Great Prophet of Los Apparently Data. Who many of us have heard of many people love it? They love him so much that they named their children off to the U. Many many a UBIQUONOL massage school. It's families what was so great about this prophet. And what lessons can we take from his life now in in the Times that we're in this situation of where without tells us here in the NBA? He called on a loss of Hanoi Thailand and mentioned a you when he called his Lord. Indeed adversity has touched me. So you buddy. Saddam he says to us about Sapan Donna in Nima Sunny Doda. That has afflicted me something by this happened to me. Then also handle the data in the next Jeopardize the Hoof Akasha abby he indoor The Dallas so we responded to him and removed what afflicted him of adversity will add a now. Who who Miss American or Indiana where they could only live and we gave him back his family and the like there with them as mercy from us and a reminder for the worship of a law so you about this profitable east from the most beloved of creation to Those special human beings that were chosen by a lesson with due to the cleanliness of their hall due to day connection the commitment to a lesson and this great prophet. He's then tested. He's given test that. He can be Shaab that he can take because without a dozen tests. Us doesn't afflicts us with anything that we can't handle you live alone of sin in there was he had a wife. He had children. He added family. He had well he had looks. He had all these things he had a place in society and loss of handle what he tested Ubani Saga by afflicting him with a disease within a an ailment and this caused him to become repulsive to the people he's his skin was was covered in these In this disease and people when they saw him they were repulsed by his life. They didn't want to go near. And so for being this person who was wealthy family Mixed and went about his business went about society about with people as he as we do. He went from that to being somebody who no one wanted to be around. Nobody wants you to see. And he became almost completely cut off. He had His wife who remained him. And there's a evidence from That they were a couple of other people but apart from that you belie Salaam has lost that position that he had amongst you know. Just going about people mixing with them talking to them socializing with that He loses his family and he loses his wealth and of course he's lost his health. Now he doesn't in this area also says you will listen. He says to almost a Muslim. Hi Donna way you if neither a robot who anemic do. He says the. I've been afflicted with adversity. Are you ready? Salaam? Does it make donahue. He just states the fact that I've been afflicted And so powerful that sufficient that was sufficient for a loss of Hannibal at the IDA to know what he wants what he saying and a lust soprano Diana says Though that we answered he's He's plea what he wanted. Even though it's not expressly woods he wanted a lawsuit Hainan with either to alleviate his suffering to fix the situation that he was also colonel. Valla he does the Removes Fiction And obviously he spoke he cool to lessen hand with after say what he was going through with lots of. Hanno with allies names and characteristics that he was looking appeal to at that time. We chose Hamill rocking that you are the most musset full out of those who are masterful. And so this is something that you know the Alabama they often speak about the when you make and you're looking for something from a lesson planning with then use those names those attributes of the loss of Hanuman Island which which linked to the that you're asking for so if it's For example you know we want a lesson hundred dollar to help us We may talk about you. Know we And here you ballet. Salamis looking for balance you have messy upon him and alleviate suffering so he speaks about messy Hanno with either as made his Story reminded fos that no matter what where afflicted we've now specifically in these days they're also people have fallen ill and they're suffering from that. There are those people who've Suffered the loss of livelihood in the same way as Saddam did there are those people who Who are losing family members? They themselves might be fine. Themselves may have gotten better but they have lost family members. So this only things that we may be going through now that Similar to what you really. Saddam expires. a lot of the The impact the effects of the time that we're leaving in the things that we're going through Not even GONNA become a power for a while When things start to settle and the economy in companies et Cetera et CETERA. Start to get back up to speed report. What's going on? We may find a lot. More people are affected their livelihood affected more than we know now because right now he's still a time of uncertainty. So we see we will happens. What's to come but the time that we're in now And the time to come whatever time it may be cool for something which is central to the story of. Are You Ready Center? And that. His patients his sub. We'll talk about that a bit later. what does patients look like? Now in our time patients would be when we were afflicted when something's difficult Is facing us so I do know some brothers who have lost their jobs One of others. He called me yesterday and spoke to me about the fact that he's sees Joel So these people don't know that for a fact now and there's those that don't know that for sure at the moment when something like that happens. There is an inclination forms. You know in some of us for many reasons It may be because of our background. They may be because away from that when something bad happens when something difficult happens the first instinct is to turn to some of those bad things from our background so someone may tend to drugs. Someone may may tend to You know other things other things. I don't mention them in the fear that people think it's okay to time to these things Because it's not a loss without when he speaks about patients and that's why we're talking about. It's not what is patients. Look like that when these things happen when these hardships they strike then a less Hannah what the ISLA expects from us that we tend to him. that's what patients looks like. We turned to him in Dora. We to humidity bad. We tend to him in controlling our our souls and containing ourselves. No not saying not doing things which will be displeasing to handle data and some of us have and some of us. Have you know so The person that I was speaking to that was one of these big fees that my initial reaction was not a good one but not much to handle without food or she and and I reminded the Butler that we can always make you turn into a lesson on it and we should in the doer of told by his own.

Times Ubani Saddam Sapan Donna Barack Obama Senate Hanoi Thailand Dallas Indiana Nima Sunny Doda Salaam NBA Hannibal Shaab Hannah IDA Donahue Hainan Valla Hamill
Lessons From Surah Qaf  Ustadh Irshad Hussain: Patience In This Time Of Crisis

The Friday Circle Podcast

7:04 listening | 2 months ago

Lessons From Surah Qaf Ustadh Irshad Hussain: Patience In This Time Of Crisis

"So shallow. We're going to be taking three key lessons from this raw. They shall. We can reflect on in our lives looking at the current situation around us firstly. Unbelievable that we're in a month ago. If you'd said there were in the majority of the world is going to be on the lockdown with massive changes to our social economical financial structure in in this way it would be unbelievable likewise beginning to. Ceuta about something else that. The disbelievers found unbelievable. That's the day of judgement they said had shown a job. This is a strange thing that would die. Become dust That's far preposition. So so this aspect of denying in here here are in a hair after it was president is present now so so that a lot he says to us that have seen the creation around them and would that they can evidences of how the resurrection wants to focus on. We need to use. We need to be able to look at the world around us to make changes to our lives. So let's as a Falungong summer focus. I've seen the heavens. If trump with him how we have made it how beautified did does know and earth how spread out. I'm throwing mountains. We put opponent every different type of punt and then he says that this is a with Vikram Likud Ogden Muneeb. It's a is a way by which a person he's able to see from blindness to to light and it's a reminder for him for every slave whose Mooney Mooney is one who's going to La going back to his his his his focus in life which is to which is to please allow us to to think how can improve myself. Haakan Puma wishing he's always you looking to make a sentence is returning back to? This is the first lesson. Don't we should focus upon and the second key lesson otake call for us. Today is how a law he informs US IN THIS SURA. In this chapter the porcine will decide. Every Friday morning at Pfizer. To remind himself in the congregation is the is how how how hold us in account for the day of judgement and there's a number of ways he mentioned in the sewer in one thing he says what Insana were not monsters will be here not enough so that very recreated man we know what his own soul whispered himself that there's nothing that we think about except that he knows that he say's colon he doesn't say any word except with him is an angel writing away record everything. Nothing is missing along. And then he talks about death. The thing that we fair it talks about the the blowing of the Great Hoon and then how people were driven unless as that. This is the event that people were in Hoffler on in Hillis of look at half Latin Hazza but today we have exposes he can see clearly and the green a the the agenda is five evil. He will this point lead. Try to save himself. You would say Robin Emma value to WHO I didn't call them to become misguided but he himself was misguided so yes he whispered away yes Austrian wishes away but in today's up to us a choice knowing that there's a there's going to be uncountable Which there's no escape so when he's talking to all the way over to say tim say to them that similar the don't argue in front of me because the water's going forth so he soloist. Say That so him and the Korean for Japan so the Boston fire because for every this believer who was reject food obstinate and arrogant. He knew the truth but he wasn't willing to listen but all this accountability is based on the fact that he doesn't do any zoom. Do any transgression. So this is the second aspect I wish to focus upon. The Accountability of us for that day is going to be perfect and the final key lesson is how to prepare for the digital pursuit and and they're in essence three key versus. Osias to focus on I as an how many people before them did. We destroy who are struggling and they. They're great houses and buildings and the gardens in the world but now they go do snowscape for them unless say he's very in that there is an admonition for the one who hasn't hot so we have a clean heart the we can see our history learned from it because history repeats itself or Cassano. Huish and he'd or he puts forth attentive hair really trying to listen trying to understand so if a person contemplates reflects on life it will help to pay for the day of judgement. Because he's he history repeats itself. Secondly says flustered al-Amaya coon with some bit hungrier. Bec- that have patience upon what they say and grow for you load in the morning and in the evenings so part of preparing for the day of judgement is being patient patient. Even in this time of difficulty. We're we're right now we're going to be. We're going to be stressed in terms of finances. Our social lives all the things that we you should do and there are some people who go to simply Craig by. Let's say be patient

Mooney Mooney Vikram Likud Ogden Muneeb Donald Trump Pfizer President Trump Haakan Puma Japan Falungong TIM BEC Insana LA Craig Robin Emma Huish Hoffler Cassano Hillis Boston
Lessons From Surah Qaf  Ustadh Irshad Hussain

The Friday Circle Podcast

2:08 listening | 2 months ago

Lessons From Surah Qaf Ustadh Irshad Hussain

"Today show. We're going to be discussing the six key themes of Ceuta off. We are living time where this lotto change going on. The world order has changed. The world stopped unless because of this covert nineteen plagued affected us. But it really shows the Have Fragile in our life his Sudoku off reminders. Over Direction again showing. How fragile is undermined us in six key? Themes this SURA. This chapter is early monkey suit on and the process them he would love to recite it every Friday at fragile so if the greatest man that ever walked love to recite it we Friday. That means that in his habit or reciting Friday this great lesson in it for us like I said this sura can split into six main themes verse one to five those who denied life after death then the second part versus eleven is evidence of resurrection that we can see in in life itself on Earth than the third theme was twelve to fifteen reminds us of previous nations denied the resurrection of what happened to them and they themselves in their time so that they were the greatest and they were never going to be distracted. Change will challenged unless showed them how Friday life over destroying them then verse sixteen to Twenty Nine Month old describes us how mankind will be accounted for the day of judgement for the diversion and the Korean who tries to use guide. People now he was saying

It Is Time To Think Of Our Fellow Muslims

The Friday Circle Podcast

5:56 listening | 2 months ago

It Is Time To Think Of Our Fellow Muslims

"Arche. Let's talk about the oppression of we. Nothing about how did nothing look at? China. We're talking about arm Know How many most Chinese ancient mosques some back you know. Centuries the Chinese government demolished completely bulldozed to the ground. Leave the must decide. What about the Chinese brothers and sisters the detention camp this something recent humiliated them to millions of kneecaps foresee poor Alcohol Porter announcer faith. You know there's this stuff they're tortured. Being people are dying in their but this oppression of a blessing sisters in these circuits on though the week is going home for decades decades and decades but we can cited which is why it's come to the stage with a They can put them in these camps and unfortunately when it came to it all of our leaders make quite all the Muslim countries in the world. Shoes say anything. Why because money? Because we can't we're trying to save their own country it would affect our economy. We've got to treat. The China will help us. We need them on. Our side is a political strategic alliance because we have other enemy states we need to allow China. We can't speak out about this with sacrificing them for the greater good essentially Honda. Nobody's willing to boycott wants. His pandemics happen entire world. But it's too late now. The entire global economy country's stance to you will wait about your economy. Now worry about him. I mean not just China. You'd look what's happening in Syria UTICA happening in Gaza to hold what. What have we done really we use on a soggy out about. These issues will always worried about the Charity Commission which shut us down the country's political about becoming known as extremist mosques 'cause we talked about the oppression in other countries. Did we do our duty in those Masada to rather than systems awarded just simply structures in crate? Because what this shows you how Lonnie none of us know your who was all its bitchy. Might ECONOMIC EXTENT. Technology wasn't combined completely taken down a something so tongue of an inch. Invisible to the naked on guts even microscopes. You can't see a virus is taking the world hostage is director is just completely. This was the answer. Nobody knows what to do. It would be flying brexit done. We're GONNA be great year for Britain those weeks ago. What's happened now? It's how it's transcends cultures continents borders where you are everyone's impacted superpowers are not even super powers. Their nothing issues. How Hugh we? All are the arrogance with which we behave towards a lot in his his commandments. We can see it now that we really are itchy. Repetitive can't do anything and wounds is one of the lessons that we really have to take away from this. Learning how to empathize with our offense is on the world deep in Kashmir lockdown since August. We're talking about lockdown. Now they're really not a military occupation. You leave your home. You'd be shot tortured raped. It's all these things happen. King of Gazan. The largest open air prison in the world. This amount amount more. I hear that spreads here. It's GonNa be a bloodbath reading Ghezzi entire world. What will happen to these people who really experienced shortages? They don't know what the next either feet Newcastle to separate from the B. Rosser job because of these civil wars occupations and Mike this whole experience now we get through. This gives us an inkling. We're struggling to deal with this and there's not even a food shortage who pretenders. What they are going into. The next bucket comes around next. Signed up brother sister. Stand up on your bayview once. We remember total crisis of twenty twenty bit harder

China Charity Commission Lonnie Syria Gaza Honda Masada Director Newcastle Hugh B. Rosser Britain Mike
The Day They Closed Our Masjid  Ustadh Fahad Ansari

The Friday Circle Podcast

7:20 listening | 2 months ago

The Day They Closed Our Masjid Ustadh Fahad Ansari

"Yesterday for the past six. The current virus rid nineteen and how sets US particularly with the closure from side to nothing did I can remember. Or markets can remember have had has been so impact from on the entire world as this pandemic if you think about it the previous issues of war terrorism other panicky Bola. They had an impact the shook the world they stopped. The word people have to do this differently. Nothing to schedule seeing at the moment is unprecedented that the entire world had to stop so functioning as it's used to functioning and it doesn't matter which party were you. How wealthier country poor countries is not a word of companies a secular country or the Muslim country or the Hindu cut. It doesn't matter it's affecting everybody. Schooling close pubs bars restaurants cafes cinemas theatres everything shut down sporting events primarily the NBA International to completely shut. Down or is international. Problem is installed. It's absolutely chilling to see what's happening is like a complete lockdown and obviously what affects us of believe with more than anything else you take that which is beloved to us away from below the thing to us a daily basis that we have in our minds as believers is also is a prayer at the place to do that is massage now if the controversial decision and the Austin some who assisting the stay open to discuss supposed writer room. I just want to focus on effective getting involved in the whether it's Roger all my opinion is has no consequence isn't bearing I nobody. I cannot influence the most staying open or being closed in this way. Never to the reality is we have to so. Let's think about this aren't delay. Says not even a leaf light tiny leaf fall off a tree in the middle? Of course loss hundred dollar witted for allow Zapped Leaf for. This doesn't draw full off Alah Willett. He wanted foldout. Whatever the reasons we say as to. Why most needs to have because of risk realities Alon wielded that is most close their doors winded that we cannot print these and therefore we need to reflect as A. Why isn't that position? That's the real question. Read you sit and you go fourteen days in suffice. It's a good time to sit and think about this question just over two weeks ago. I sent a picture of the governor and they had close it off completely so all you could see the white marble and you can see people in the off. Cnet would prey and is quite chilling. Side looking at the reassure us. The Authority said that the clean precautionary. It hoped to be running business as usual in a in a short period of time. And have you started wearing Madan? People Perplex go there for. He was thinking about Hutch. But you know there was a feeling that this is going to be okay. Then what happened last couple of weeks slowly restrictions start coming in non-saudi here in the UK into now local massage. What did it last week? The Friday Levin reduced ten minutes could find Saddam told. Don't come to the mess with children. He don't bring the humming. They sit at any level. This talk this could be dangerous. It's a risk to others who post this weekend. We're supposed to be on the retreat. Study Retreat Have to be constantly. He hoped by joining. You'll have a Mogadishu. He talked a video in paramount's Sanchez yourself. Before you come in wearing a must come in. All of these measures were happening. Guidance was coming out from the different organizations. And Councils about how we should deal with this and then yesterday almost like a domino effect one after the other press releases announcements this massive that losses to. It'll be no Jamak mortar. It'd be no Jeremiah. This Muslim he's Prato and the MOMS were crying. The Tears Trustees breaking down saying this is difficult decision. We've had to make. We didn't take it lightly. Believe believe if we did not take his likely and the reason that this is has taken such a hit. The most is not just a place where we pray. It's not just a place where we go. We worship flight time today through the congregation Salah. No it's much more than that. It's a hub of the community is when we have an education system we have found in. We've mothers for the children. We have classes for adults will ever On we A- circle the Mawlid relearn at the practice our faith. It's a place of its place of celebration. Someone has a newborn child legal to celebrate the most their party. Nick weddings morning. He was last rites leaves. Libya genus pre in a mass shooting. People COME TO SOCIALIZE. How feeding so down because after work softer network late night and then the run they come and they just see some of the brothers in this piece this school. This song This was missing the wellbeing discussed affairs of your mom. Local community problems how to resolve them the visual refund. Raise our brothers and sisters locally locally and get into states. A few days older All those lessons of a lot have been taken away from them.

Prato United States Zapped Leaf Saddam Alah Willett NBA Mogadishu Alon Jeremiah Madan Roger Libya Cnet Austin Writer Nick UK Levin Non-Saudi
Glory Ali: Why Muslim Travel Rocks

The World Nomads Podcast

9:59 listening | 3 months ago

Glory Ali: Why Muslim Travel Rocks

"Runs Muslim slim travel rocks. which is the name we stole the title of this episode Thanks Glory? It's the thought that among other things. She's Muslim family friendly destinations with Muslim friendly services. Mrs And accommodation flurry says you don't have to compromise your faith when you're exploring the world so let's find out wanting spider to launch the site so Muslim Tara walks walks is a blog that I created to encourage and motivate Muslims to travel the world. And you know some people. Ask Me why. Muslims need to be encouraged or inspired to travel the world world. And what I will say to them was Muslims. We have specific faith. Bates needs that. Need to be met so that we can travel and still follow our faith and at the same time it can be challenging when it comes to traveling so I created this website in this space where Muslims can get information of where they can go a eddie destinations. They want to go to where they pray where they can have a good Hallam meal and just enjoy Muslim friendly activities at any destination. You know it's hostile hostile to show up on a non Muslim destination and be greeted with Muslim friendly services than accommodations throughout the world. Is that increasing. Do you think. Glory absolutely one hundred percents I don't even example. So mustn't travelers people ask. Walt what's a difficult genus travels in wasn't travels for the same reason as any any other tourists more than fifty percent of them listen. Travelers travel with their families. They stay longer and spend more and there's also a rise of the solo female traveller which is becoming very popular Muslim. Women have a strong influence when planning a trip a Muslim travelers are one of the largest visited visited markets to the United States but few brands market to them And just to give you idea of how big this travel sectors in two thousand sixteen was is estimated. There was a hundred and twenty. One million mustn't travelers that spend one hundred and forty five billion dollars. It's expected to grow to a hundred and fifty six million travelers spending two hundred and twenty billion dollars. So there's a real confidence in that sector absolutely and it's growing in a lot of anonymous destinations are starting to markets and most travelers for those reasons that I stated before were a lot of the families. These are Muslims family child within families but are not dumping this question on you because I sent it to you willing to consider but I was recently contacted by an Indonesian woman. Who wanted to travel but there was now president within her family? She scared she didn't wait. A stops a center linked to your your cy obviously and she wants to be an inspiration to her children so that they can go off say the world and she wants to do it on her own. As Sir you said Solar women trouble and Solo Muslim famous chapel is on the rise. So what. What advice would you offer her? Well you know. This can be a little controversy the in Assam and I know some friends that I have will not travel without a husband or brother because his Lamad said that you should not travel without a male Guardian Ardian however that was back in the time of Jesus in the prophets and of course you know. The women didn't work and Sunday. The menu is the main supporter of the households of anything happens what you know who would support them But now that's all change and it's pretty safe now to to travel anywhere that you want to go but it's also with in the family so it's up to each individual you know. Luckily for me you know I told my husband. Hey I'm going traveling Over here he's a guy right just as long as I can contact you were good. There's no issues But I also do have younger friends in their twenties who want to travel and their parents give them a hard time because an Islamic woman's aren't supposed to travel by themselves and they're like mom but you know it's a new era and you time we can travel were safe so sometimes they'll come to me and ask me for advice and usually my advice to them. Is You know let your parents know. Tell them this is what I'm going to. You have a plan ahead of time. Make them feel comfortable. I'm going to be at this hotel. Aren't going to be at this fronts house I'm GonNa call you in such and such time And just make them feel comfortable in the more comfortable they feel and see that you are responsible young woman than the last their hesitate so there are lots of challenges. You've got convince your family. You've got to be true to your face. So what are some of the misconceptions both on the part of Muslims in on the pot of non Muslims in the in the travel industry industry. Yeah so so. One of the things we're talking about with women cannot travel alone which is not true. A lot of women travel alone. I travel alone. I'm married but I do a lot of Solo traveling And it's like I was as just to each individual person. So if you want to travel if you're willing to travel with your children I think it's a wonderful idea because I did the same with I children. I made sure that my kids went on. BE -cations every year even if it was a road trip and one of the major reasons. Why did that is because to me? Traveling allows the children to learn much more than skin potentially offer them and traveling abroad particularly helps improve positive character developments and the individual the identity as a towns are able to immerse themselves in other cultures unlike their familiar surroundings so for the one of your audience members and in much before that wants to inspire children. I would say my tips to her is no travel with the kids. Offer that opportunity for them to experience appearance different cultures and societies foods. Maybe they can pick up a different language Also I would set them up with play dates for children from different for backgrounds on. That's a good start even fair just at home set up the play dates with different from different backgrounds. So them when you're able to travel to any even even if you travel within the United States the United States is huge and even she go to stay. It's a it's a different culture. Even our languages is a little bit different. The view is different. You can go to the data we can go to the beach. We can go to the mountains. It's very diverse. Be here so I would always say that you want to like set our plates interact with other children from different cultures. You give your children books that they read regarding The Code Cultural Books Right. I would also try different foods. I used to do that with my kids. I take them out to eat different foods. And 'cause I realized early on with my children that every time we went out wanted chicken nuggets in French fries and I was like. You've got to be kidding me. I'm not taking you to this restaurant and you're going to have chicken nuggets and French fries like just is. Try this the like mom ill. That's green I don't WANNA try. I'm like no no no tell me you don't like it after you tasted it so that todd they started taste in different foods at now. You know they love diff- Larry's a film which is great so we know we all want our children to grow up in a world free from bias in discriminations and we want them to reach the dreams and feel that whatever they want to accomplish in life is hospital so we want them to feel loved and included a never experienced the pain rejection exclusion. But the reality is that we do live in the world in which racism and other forms of vice continues to affect us so discrimination Hertzen. We scars that can last a lifetime affecting goals ambitions like choices and feeling of softwares. So how can we best prepare our children to meet their. The challenges of reap the benefits an increasingly diverse world. Raise these children to celebrate the values diversity and to be proud of their culture so as the the Muslim travel sector grows. And you're very excited about that. I you noticing that there is less kind of attitude toward Muslims as individuals. Yes there is an auto you one thing. When when I first started travel bloggers started during the presidential election here in the United States I don't know if you know about my my background stories. When I started the travel blog I actually wanted to do something because I realized that this whole election was trying to separate raid R. Our nation And so I started the truck walks at all what it can do. WanNa walk but I want combat Islamaphobia at the same time. So so what I realized After the presidential election as the Muslim travel band was that you know instead of our country being divided. It's what you hear on the news all the time we actually came together. I mean I have never been more proud to be an American as a day that we had our Muslim travel bans. Went into a fact doc. Because everyone didn't matter what race so many people came out to the Air Force to support the Muslims that were in the air that we're going to be sent back to another country that wasn't bears and so one of the challenges that I faced myself is when I recently just came from Puerto Rico spent a week and a half Hyphen Puerto Rico But I have to be very cautious so when I travel I always have my passport after I have my birth certificate. Not many people travel with the birthday ticket but I have to travel with Nyberg certificate to prove that I'm American citizen because I don't know if I leave the country if I'm going to be allowed to come back in that possible. It should be. It should be but it's but it's not because during the travel ban. Trump was saying that you want any Muslim to go back to their country and I kept saying I am. I am an American. I was born just because I wear a headscarf doesn't mean that contrary I am an American and so the only way that I feel that I can prove something is if I have my birth certificate with me because my passport in this time doesn't really mean

United States Puerto Rico Bates President Trump Hallam Assam Nyberg Walt Islamaphobia Air Force Donald Trump Lamad Todd Larry
What U.S. Religious Liberty Means — Especially When It Comes To Islam

All Things Considered

5:02 listening | 3 months ago

What U.S. Religious Liberty Means — Especially When It Comes To Islam

"The trump administration is made religious liberty a central theme of this presidency for example the US department of health and Human Services now has a conscience and religious freedom division the president has champion judges who have ruled in favor of people seeking religious exemptions to laws and just last month the White House strengthen protections for kids who want to pray at school as mood and is part of my dean is part of the inclusive America project at the Aspen Institute she is also the author of a book on religious liberty called when Islam is not a religion she told me that president trump's focus marks a change from previous administrations there has been just a more pronounced public affirmation of the positive role of religion in American society the need to protect it often we hear from various government officials whether be Mike Pompeii or president trump or US Attorney General bill Barr or even just sessions when he announced religious liberty task force of the department justice is constant refrain about religion is under threat by secularization threatening forces but on on the left to the protection of religion and the protection of our religious freedom that has become a constant refrain what communities have benefited from the administration's attention to the issue or their religious communities that have essentially been left out yeah so we can then candidate Ted Cruz said that it was he called it the religious liberty of election and he said that it was ultimately about like the person who would be able to defend religious liberty the vast and president trump and Ben Carson I'm ricksantorum all got on the bandwagon said absolutely this is about religious liberty and we're going to protect religious liberty for elected president but at the same time as they were making the statement there also competing with each other to determine who could be the most discriminatory against Muslims whether it be present from suggestions about creating a Muslim registry or about banning Muslims from U. S. which as we know when he has before with that as well or be Ted Cruz's suggestion that we surveil Muslim neighborhoods in the aftermath he brought that up in the aftermath of a terrorist incident or ricksantorum saying that Islam absolutely was different from Christianity fee so that is not ours protected under the first amendment as Christianity is and so there was like this obvious hypocrisy so what you saw was a creation of a hierarchy of faith even within this world of law to me yes I even beyond just the creation of a hierarchy I actually saw denial of a song even being a religion that had access through religious freedom another suggestion that present from brought up during the campaign was to close down mosques when you create such as Turk disparity between types of things that you're willing to protect for quote unquote religion and then say that the most basic of religious freedom rights are not afforded to a particular group of people you know how exactly are you explaining that what's the logic there and it didn't take much to figure out what that is because unfortunately increasingly common talking point among many people in the White House and in that sort of larger network is that Islam is not a religion it is a dangerous political ideology and therefore Muslims don't have religious freedom rights can you think of a policy directive from the trump administration that on paper looks good for religious liberties but in reality has really only been and that positive for evangelical Christians more or less just one group well I think that even in the space of Christianity increasingly you hear this I'll cry from our progressive Christians that they feel that the way that Christianity is being defined and champion tends to only happen from this particular angle and of course a constant concern in the context of specifically the sexuality related culture wars is that the rights of LGBT individuals including all your between the visuals of faith or people who hold different positions on abortion contraception from real religious standpoint are being undermined and to that end I think that is has to come from an understanding that religious liberty is not in some way just to safeguard for traditional religious beliefs it is a secret just for beliefs of a wide diversity anywhere they fall on the political spectrum and again the diverse religious spectrum and so what I hope for and I do see some movement on this for more progressive religious liberty groups to bring to the fore more progressive religious claims and say look religious liberty is for this too my concern is that if the rhetoric in the op in the enforcement of some of these policies continues to be only it's thought through in the frame of traditional religious beliefs then there will be other types of religious claims I won't be as protected I don't really have a concrete examples are not being protected but I do see this increasing sort of urgency from our progressive groups to be like what we have these claims to and because religious liberty protects the range and doesn't privilege one particular interpretation or another that are religious claims are also protected husband Jean thank you so much for speaking with us thank you as a dean is part of the inclusive America project at the aspen institute and the author of the book when Islam is not a

Social Justice and Israel/Palestine with Mira Sucharov and Aaron Hahn Tapper

Jewish History Matters

10:11 listening | 4 months ago

Social Justice and Israel/Palestine with Mira Sucharov and Aaron Hahn Tapper

"Hope that you'll enjoy our conversation as we dive into the connection between scarlet work and the social justice issues of Israel and Palestine. A major major way in which history matters because through history we can better understand pressing issues of the day and as I think it'll come through clearly in our a conversation that as historians and experts we have something to contribute to these conversations to thanks for listening. I'm your hi Erin. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you Jason Thank you. I'm really glad that you guys are here to talk about this book which I was really excited to see and to read through I wanna I wanNA start off by asking. What do you mean by Social Justice and Israel-palestine when you look at the title itself? What is the connection there? And why do you think that it's important to integrate. These two realms in the discussion of social justice on the one hand and the broad set of issues around Israel and Palestine part of our idea was that Israel Palestine conflict is taught as is an informational explanatory lands right through prescriptive questions in what happened in terms of what we mean. By a lens of social justice we we mean an inter our disciplinary perspective places concepts like rights justice and oppression at the forefront and that aims to Dick sexualize Israel-palestine Israel-palestine especially for those who think of this as some sort of Auger. That's been going on forever and we'll go on forever but it it's a conflict that will end. I just like the troubles in Northern Ireland and the horrific stuff in Rwanda in apartheid in South Africa and other conflicts in the world the people in Israel Palestinian or not onto logically different In terms of their humanness than other people conflict. That will end also our goal in terms of approaching this was social justice. Justice is this notion of introducing power to the conversation if we had only included voices of people with particular social identities and now other voices. I don't think that necessarily would have been just. But our attempt is to bring in a variety of voices and introduced concepts jobs related to power dynamics which is goes down the rabbit hole of privileged status access oppression etcetera so it also means bringing in the grassroots spotlighting hot-listing minority identities as rusty Israelis essay. Anat there's an essay on Bedouin. BS courses a grassroots in many ways a grassroots treats movement and really. Were trying to broaden the discussion from what is typically explanatory questions to more prescriptive questions saying what should happen in order for. Israeli people have Palestinian people in the region to experience a sense of justice and the social part is just that we wanted to flag that. It isn't simply a book about illegal intricacies. I have a little bit of a vested interest in the term because during the twenty eleven ten protests in Israel that started on Rothschild Boulevard in Tel Levine. Is released were protesting high cost of living biceps cottage cheese of the price of housing. And they were talking in terms of social justice. Senate Clinical Lt and it became very clear early on that to maintain a broad based movement. It would be bracketing. The question of Palestinians and social justice in purely early economic terms. And we know that here when social justice movements more broadly progressive movement's about social justice thinking not only economically editor of racial justice ethnic justice religious justice justice for every individual and collective. And so we're really trying lick the conversation back towards saying how. How can Israel and the Palestinians live their lives and we as editors have a singular answer to that but we brought together scholars and activists that have very specific the the actors for that very important question and they're engaging with one another on that question? We just had the episode Rachel Harris where we talked about her book about teaching about Israel and Palestine. And there it's very clearly a book about pedagogy a book that is directed at professors teachers. Thinking about how they can teach about the subject and here you're dealing much much more conceptually much more about getting into the issues themselves as opposed to how we teach them when you think about a book like this. Who Do you see as the person who you want to pick it up what you want them to get out of it? I think we intended this book per use in classrooms where the Israel Palestinian dynamic is being taught whether it's Israeli Israeli Palestinian conflict glasser history class or the social dynamics of how Israelis and Palestinians relate with one another so it's really meant for students and the professors who teach awesome. We also seems to make it as readable as possible as accessible as possible to a wide audience. Who aren't necessarily subject specialists and to that end really took care to write very concise intro pieces to each of the eight conceptual chapters showing the reader? What's at stake? AAC each of these major debates. I have an essay that appears Rachel's Book as well in the essay that I wrote in her book is really a precursor to this project which I engaged with Aaron and really. It's a short essay about my own personal struggle of how I had been seeking to keep politics out of the classroom and had been even feeling a little bit frightened of students. What if they brought the a word? I would say appears the night before a particularly contentious topic topic where I was worried. That apartheid come. What do I do in my the the foil for the students do? I need to debate the students that they see the other side. Whatever the other side is depending on what perspective is student is raising and I realized it wasn't really very healthier constructive approach so I think what we really wanted to? The book was to enable a wave for politics it should be able to seep into the classroom in a way that doesn't put the professor on the hot seat but enables the professor to shepherd students through the debates enabling students succeed as many perspectives as they can in contrast to mirror. I was coming up this project from perhaps not in context given that was a precursor newark yet that stage but in any event for about ten years I was part of a not for profit educational organization where we worked with muscles views Israelis Palestinians and everything we did was co taught. CO-DEVELOPED CO design. So I ran the organization with the Muslim Palestinian woman are high school programs with Jews. Muslims awesome were run developed design fifty fifty by twos Muslims etcetera. And so I was coming at this project from a number of years back back so to speak from the vantage point that regardless of attempts by some people to engage in objectivity or neutrality perhaps closer to objectivity than they might otherwise present. Things that it's impossible. I think to teach each about things in the humanities frankly without offering perspectives. Even if you said all right. Here's our issue. And here's three vantage vantage points on the issue. Great probably ten others twenty thirty others so I was already at that place because that was is how I been socialized in. That's my experiences regardless. Yeah I mean I think that what you both have brought up really is a critical issue. You look at this book wishes to say as I read it and as I was thinking about it. It seems to me that the central issue that you're engaging with this fundamental idea and and the way I think about this is that even though this is a book with many authors many contributors are pushing this fundamental central thesis that the politics the issues should be a part of how we engage with Israel and Palestine scholars in a way that some people say I want to avoid the politics I want to avoid the touchy issues and try to achieve some kind of noble dream of objectivity of neutrality etc.. I think part of what. This book is arguing in this ties into to mirror. What you were saying in your essay and Rachel Harris Book as well you have to do with the idea about what is the role of the scholar and how we interact with these issues? Yeah to that. I would add one more specific thing especially in the case the way I've been teaching the courses in my field. Political Science and international relations and in many areas of social science. Generally professors tend to focus on. Why questions or we could call explanatory questions? So why did Israel extended extended olive branch to the PLO nineteen ninety-three. Why did Camp David Two thousand fail and instead of keeping prescriptive questions the questions what should be what shall be? Why should it be this way? Instead of keeping those questions that Bay we wanted to invite space for students to see how scholars activists make those prescriptive arguments particularly as the book has become available for use in my own courses finding consigning op. Ed Science for students to write much more frequently and I'm encouraging students to take the various topics that we covered in the course I which is really pretty united eight until present day and make a prescriptive argument should be. DSP Out Lodge should be various political parties depending on what case they're looking at encountered the US embrace a different view of Palestine within their platforms. I should trump have proved the the embassy to Jerusalem or not and make an argument that necessitates taking into account the arguments of another point of view and really taking those arguments seriously in making a good case whereas in some years I might have read a student paper like that. Oh this is too ideological. This is too opinionated. I no longer separate informed. Well argued opinion. That is derived from a scholarly understanding of the situation. I no longer divorce that argumentation from a more detached explanatory Brian Tori type of

Israel Palestine Professor Rachel Harris Erin Rachel United States Newark Anat Rwanda Senate Ed Science Editor Brian Tori Dick Sexualize Jerusalem BAY
Ayesha Siddiqi Talks Politics, Being American and Celebrating Halloween

#GoodMuslimBadMuslim

8:34 listening | 7 months ago

Ayesha Siddiqi Talks Politics, Being American and Celebrating Halloween

"Coming on our hot topic let's talk about voting because we had a really great conversation before Easter recording about I mean I didn't mention this earlier but I was also really disengaged from the electoral process after trump got elected so I've been training figure out which is really hard to save because this is what I've put my career behind for the past twenty years to get people out to vote and encourage people to turn out to vote but also at the same time either like element of disbelief in the electoral process and I think it's been really complicated to hold both of these truths at the same time like distress but also I need to go vote because I have to go up newer saying something similarly we can't pretend that the system works yeah we can't pretend that people in this country have a full and total right to vote not with gerrymandering not with voter suppression we need to operate within the reality we have while also working towards the reality we need yeah and that's a difficult thing to turn into a useable soundbite right because it's complicated people get orig- myself included you know because it's work the things that have to be done require real labor and effort and both of those compete with everything else people have to do in their lives so I still WanNa hear about like your experience of being outside of the United States for a little bit I started to spend more and more time outside the US and I found that to be the distance to be quite clarifying and useful to me personally glaring how the perspective is so useful so much my life was determined by the US and it's politics and my own emotional investment in something that was increasingly a toxic experience and I'm not anxious per Jason but I was becoming quite anxious and I didn't like what it was doing to me and I had to remind myself how big the world isn't how many different lives are still possible within it and it's the closest I've come to the way people talk about bad boyfriends or bad breakup feels akin to my experience of America I entered into something new with a lot of love in my heart and with an openness that I was losing and ultimately it is my home I became miss it isn't in two thousand fifteen does right before the trump election cycle And I had the most despair around that time and who finally becoming an official citizen of a country that was so committed to its lies about itself that it would allow massacres before it would allow an open ignition of what this country central project is and how it fails it's people spending time outside the US helped ground me and let me find some peace yes distance as very aware of the luxury that the right to just up and leave a country and go to another because you know you're feeling kind of it's that's such an extreme luxury also very diaspora I left and I came back because this is my home and it's where my family is and I was living with a great deal of anxiety and fear over the violence that could be visited upon us look we're some Muslim violence can be visited upon you anywhere fear is not a useful emotion and my time away helped me reconnect with an actually spending some time with my family where they live help me reconnect with fat I moved back to allay this August and I'm very encouraged by all the people in this country that are organized thing in working to make it a more habitable one in speaking family in where you were raised I remember you telling me a fond Wean Memories Oh my first Halloween America and this is the month of fear I'm really curious to hear because you have really fond memories of Wayne and it's such a funny holiday I mean I always say you should live every day like it's Halloween by which I mean I like to take long walks at night and Gandhi nice way to think about Halloween my very first Halloween families first Halloween was shortly after we'd move to America what year is this nineteen ninety-six so we had no concept dove it until when our first nights in our little apartment we Scott into your knock on the door and I was a little kid I realize now in retrospect they're probably just teenagers but to me these very tall individuals dressed very aggressively like monsters smart as right there next to him probably six six years old head of the household it's just a joke I'm sure my take issue with that characterization did you have the candy ready for these monsters that's the thing of course not we had no idea that there is anything expected so we answered the door and both parties on either side of the doorway are confused right there waiting this image of confused monsters staring at US allier waiting we're waiting they're waiting yeah eventually is communicated to us you're supposed to give us candy like Oh okay so he goes inside read that's so funny and you know as a house of two young kids my little brother hadn't been born yet find some crunch bars crunch bars you like in the House so give them the candy and they're like thank you know I think there are minis then they left and we all learned something that day only the exchange expected on Halloween now here's the funny thing it took years for my father in particular to embrace this concept because he loved to give out candy really the idea of his children going door to door begging ono there's a little kid there's still a novelty to being out that late at night and he was so offended at the concept you just I just don't understand why you need to can get you can if you can you can go right now get as much candy as you want bagging and he would he would go out and buy candy and he would get so frustrated that we still Saddam trick or treating and one year we put a pirate how on him and took him with us I think he better understood the appeal then it was just an walk with his kids ends is Johnny sensibilities which I understand entirely now but okay after ask what did you wear like the first time you went trick or treating what was allowed well so most costumes in stores were like very cheaply made and not very attractive being Boccassini appear into be an exotic costume to our white neighbors was our traditional focus on your first year we my sister and I dressed as pirates actually related story bought costumes because that is where the we eventually quest to my father came from and in the years after that I mean once we've done that we weren't as keen. Yeah so you've got you've got it a little easier at the store by I wasn't my parents did not want to spend money on Halloween and we you had the they see clothes but my mom just took the scarf wrapped around my head and called me a gypsy so getting variations of leg taking close interning in two different things princess princess that was the thing so for any like school function requiring a Halloween costume that was it I was like very pleased to show off the intricate embroidery or the fancy silks and I thought like you know very Gauche polyester that might classmates war was I wasn't interested in

Donald Trump
Is the Women's March Only For on White Women?

#GoodMuslimBadMuslim

7:34 listening | 8 months ago

Is the Women's March Only For on White Women?

"We got some interesting things to talk about Zaire Bill. Our friend was invited onto the board of the women's March. She was so happy. Ah I was so happy so happy and then forty eight hours later they kicked off. This is not Zara measor. This is our friends are Balu. Executive Director of the Council of American Islamic Relations in San Francisco's chapter and forty eight hours later woman's March W T.F. You're were instagram and what were your feelings that the woman's March is apparently not for me yeah. The woman's March is saying that we can't advocate for the lives of Palestinians anymore. That's why she was kicked off. I mean like the women's March always has these ridiculous right wing trolls around them that are manipulating all the women that are involved with this but basically what they were doing was they dug into his Arab News Archive of tweets from many many years and Zari Stu tweet extensively and they pulled up all of her Palestinian tweets and they use that as a reason to kick her off the board just so terrible I think like we're just like a we're. We're in this age of culture where people are digging up all these things from past in like you're being held responsible for something that you said a long time ago but it also be like everything's are said is facts you just there was nothing she said that was wrong but because we're in this day and age where it's all about like colliding people's tweets on fire in calling out people. There's no room for reasonable discourse. I mean this goes beyond reasonable discourse of course to me. This is telling me what discourse is period yeah because you're telling me that I can now no longer talk about apartheid existing in Israel which does yeah there are apartheid supporters yeah. You're telling me that I can't talk about that by. Wouldn't you want that kind of diverse perspective on on aboard anyway. That's the whole point of the women's. March is bring together so many radical voices and then have a dialogue and you just kicked a person off the board who is so ready and capable to do that. It's the white women's March. You know that's basically we all know. That's what the subtext is yeah yeah but you know what. I'M NOT GONNA. Give white people that I don't know something about that feels like you don't get to have that. You don't get to like well. I liked about what direction Raja was saying was was that she on her twitter account. You know how they were using the American flag hit job woman as the poster at the women's March okay so you know how on the poster it it said we the people and this is our greater than fear and then one of directions followers edited the bottom and it said submit to fear which is so oh well done well done okay. Here's my beef. There are a lot of women who are white woman who I like an are my friends. I would preferred a label it as the Nancy Pelosi March. It's not the woman's march anymore. It's the Nancy Pelosi March because to me Nancy Pelosi stands as that older generation and that old way of thinking period regardless of what generation you're from that is like moderate conservative trying trying to be Democrat saying things like I'm not GonNa try to impeach Brett Cavanaugh like to me. That's the same person I don't know I think for me. The women's March just seeing everything the taxing hell into starts tour had to leave the women's march on July fifteenth along with two of her supporters Bob Bland and to make a Maori like just the Lynch mob rightly. There's like Internet mob mentality to attack them on the Internet. Get them kicked out of the women's March now they're trying to lake reframe themselves and finally other people to replace them with in Zaire. Bill would have been like amazing perfect there and then they they don't want her because her whatever so it's just like. Zion is being kicked out of the women's. March is like a reason for me to see this movement and say like this isn't for me. This is not a space for me. This isn't a space for Muslim women. Stop fucking using our Muslim women images in your protests. If so clear that you don't want us for our values are if feels like that's what they want. They just want to like a vision of us. They want the symbol of his job and to protect US and save us but they don't actually want us to actually have a voice. I think they want our voice along as it sounds like a moderate conservative would've voice that doesn't support black lives matter that doesn't work against the moderate conservative movement. That's trying to normalize what trump's doing yeah because here's the quote that's making me feel that way. The same article wrote unfortunately Belu's racist tweets do not stand alone. They seem to reflect the views of of most prominent Muslims in America on the left. What the fuck does that mean that human rights violations by Israel against Palestinians Finian's is not okay. That's a left idea. That's a left idea yeah. Apparently that was a stupid article. I mean when you say that like apparently it's not for us. It sounds like that's exactly what they're fine with saying. I don't think that the women's March can really recover from this which is unfortunate because I think like I think about this a lot. In movements we do do so much work to like move people. They really feel like at some point like the women's march was a movement right like everyone showed up on the capital not because of an organization but because they wanted women to be there I think about this about black lives matter and I think about this about the civil rights movement. There's always like you know Oh. Maybe an informant that's like making this shit like fall apart and there's always like government and FBI NCAA and like. I don't want to be conspiracy theorist but there are like it's not a conspiracy when it's like real movements are always being brought down because they don't WanNa see us rise up in. I feel like that's kind of what's happening here and like ah I think we have to deal with that in a real way. Yeah you know because that is of course going to be there tactic. Why wouldn't it? I feel like that's where we are in the women's. March like this is like it's so so clear this organization has fallen victim to this tactic and like I hope that feeling that people had on election day or inauguration day of showing up. I hope people don't like field. He'll dismissed by that feeling that power of being at the protest these are the splits that they're going to continue to try to create is like the question of like split loyalties and you know. Who Do you stand with you know. Are you one of us all the way until they've moved toward fascism yeah dictatorship. This is their job up. This is what they're trying to do. I think we have to be really blunt about that and know that and work really consciously up against it yeah also are we infiltrating in their meetings and like being like saying as they in these this conversation like when you say they the unified dark money right are we going to. They're like men's activist meetings men's rights activists meetings and like being like yeah men's rights and also I wanNA listen to women's sometimes. I don't feel feel like that's my role in this movement but I'm hoping that you know I'm for hire to infiltrate. I don't know if you'll be able to pass us in these spaces. I'll just go with my white husband. Oh yeah well. I mean like literally like you send your husband and your good. No I want to be there. I just don't I don't know you think you won't work. Get Veronica Mars it

Nancy Pelosi Israel Zara Measor Balu Council Of American Islamic Re Zaire Instagram Executive Director Zari Stu United States Twitter San Francisco Bill Bob Bland Raja Veronica Mars America Zion
Stop Parking on our Property (feat. Randa Jarrar)

#GoodMuslimBadMuslim

2:45 listening | 11 months ago

Stop Parking on our Property (feat. Randa Jarrar)

"People who don't know who you are. How would you describe yourself? I could describe myself like the way that people who hate me describe me or I can. Like some of my favorite hate mail things, I've been called a camel Kant, which I would love to be like, the name of my memoir, but I don't think my editor would be into it, 'cause name, I'm a fiction writer primarily. I also write non fiction. I've written a novel and a collection of short stories I teach creative writing at Fresno state, and I am also someone who likes to talk shit and cause problems on. Our favorite kind longtime listeners of good Muslim, bad Muslim, you know that we've given run a good Muslim award in the past. And then we that was a really beautiful day when I found that out, and then we stocked, you, and then I found on Instagram like renders, L, A, I'm needed maker, my friend, totally metoo was like, oh my God. And then we chase rundown favor. Yeah. In the same neighborhood. I love that. And then we became friends, and now she's on our podcast, which is how I feel like I want all of the good Muslim awards to happen like some awards, then I want them to become my friends. Absolutely. I would be so naughty. I would I would be giving them to like people. I thought were sexy. Oh, yeah. We haven't really done that. We've been giving mostly the good Muslim awards to women because I feel like women don't get enough platform. But women can also be sexy. What's that doing? The by one. Yeah. Yeah. They're totally just honorable reason I'm giving these awards. I love the idea of giving awards to Muslim people who usually don't get or words because I don't know. I feel like let's necessary. I agree that I'm so glad that you're on our show. And we've been having a lot of fun since you came to LA, which I'm really excited to jump into talk about. Yes. Either Mubarak aide Movado. We just finished the month of Ramadan. I've been really stressed trying to get back into things post Ramadan. Yeah, I got really sick the week after I'm done, then I was just like okay. I need to get back into being healthy and whatever's. Yeah. And I got like really upset by my family who spending time with over eat. Yeah. Boys happens. But how is your eve? My hate was really interesting because I was in Kuwait. So I went to Kuwait, the last four days of dawn, five days of done. Yeah. It was really interesting. We're the stores open all night. Yes. Stores were open mostly are only at night at one point, I was not fasting. I was on my period and driving with my mom and I started drinking water in the car.

Kuwait Fresno Editor Mubarak Writer LA
Akbar Ahmed Recounts the Train Ride That Changed His Life Forever

Tell Them, I Am

6:06 listening | 1 year ago

Akbar Ahmed Recounts the Train Ride That Changed His Life Forever

"Could you tell me who you are? And what your best known for my name is Ahmed? I am a professor on campus at American University in Washington DC. I'm the chair was slopping studies, and I have over the course of my life, made films, documentaries written books. Being the puck sun, High Commissioner to London the story that we're focusing on is when you were a little kid, and you got on a train during partition could you take me back to that moment. Like what was happening? Well, it was nineteen forty seven it was the height of summer August wishes. Wishes, as you know, many races creeds religions that didn't have that inhabit subcontinent of India, that are two major nations, the Hindus and Muslims. Hundred billions and Muslims cannot fit categorize as minority. We are seventy millions in the northwestern and not eastern zones of India. We constitute a majority of seventy percents against the cost Hindus in these homeland. We want the division of India and the partition of India between two countries. India and Pakistan had been announced very faint memory of an incident, which is a blur. It may have happened. It may not have happened. But I recall a lot of noise, a lot of shouting, it was late at night, again, in the official house in these divisions superintendent houses huge that large lawns, and that literally dozens of officials servants bearing red, the red tunic and the under the and I recall a shouting yelling, and then I just walked out amongst. That's what's happening, then I recall everyone saying, get them in get him in don't, don't tell them. What's happening? And I had some idea that someone had died and someone at thrown someone into the well. Millions of people were seventy given a choice which country, they wish to live in a lot of Muslims in India decided to move to Pakistan, this new country, which Tintri exist, and many Hindus Sikhs living in what was Pakistan wanted to move to India, because people what he didn't were suspicious and fearful of their neighbors, and perhaps, the religious violence that was to come. My father was a senior official in the British railway system, and he opted was called opting, which country do opt for he opted for a Pakistan, and very quickly things began to develop those a lot of writing killing Muslims have been killed. So we had to very quickly, rather my father, I was just a boy for had to scramble to somehow get his small family, my mother three of us into the train and get us across the border. Now, that was simply said than done because everyone wanted to try to catch a train, there was no other transport with his new civilization. There's no airplanes buses stop because of the violence on both sides and not India, this huge swathes of territory was up in violence. It was it was like up into ethnic, and religious violence, and Michelle think of it, something like two million almost two million people died in this mad communal fury. Everyone seem to have gone mad. We were living in Delhi. Delhi was the capital. I have no idea with it was little evening. Have some sense that it may be late in the evening now in the thick of this crisis are train moved from Delhi through the job to the killing fields of the job on its way to the new capital Karachi and the journey was normally particular today's maximum. But because of the situation in the job and the violence, that was taking place on both sides. Remember, it's very important to understand that this is taking place on all sides. This journey took several days. And this is what these do the sides, the two sides that they would slaughter all the passengers on the train except the train driver. So in the train pollen into Karachi, the capital, punks or Delhi? The capital of India, the entire train would be of dead Besseges, except the driver. And my first memory is of being in a compartment in that train going through the killing fields of the job. I remember that color yellowish, because that is the color throughout it was kind of greenish yellow ish his in the Parliament, I remember my father saying again and again his finger on his lip syncing. Don't make a noise. Don't, don't even breathe get under the, the, the but the bottom, and I even thought to myself, then I'm just a little boy, I thought, if someone's looking for us, he's not going to be hard to find us because we have a leg sticking out of hand sticking out. Nanny headed evolve in his hand. He was very peaceful Bannon, always very warm in fiction to everyone is genius seniors, everyone, there's something so horrendous and frightening outside the compartment that my very peaceful father had to have a revolver in his hand. And the train would stop a lot. I remember this distinctly the train would move a little bit. And then suddenly, it would stop the jerk, and that became rather ominous and I would feel a lot of tension because that meant that the people blocking the train not lying to move and it meant that, that was danger.

India Religious Violence Delhi Official Pakistan Karachi Ahmed Washington Dc Commissioner American University Professor London Bannon Michelle Superintendent Parliament
G. Willow Wilson Creator of Kamala Khan

Tell Them, I Am

11:54 listening | 1 year ago

G. Willow Wilson Creator of Kamala Khan

"This episode g willow Wilson, she's a comic book author, and she wrote the first marvel comic with a young Muslim woman as the hero, Kamla, Han aka MS marvel. So when I was in high school, I was kind of a giant Goth. I was the kind of insufferable kid who, who would say that they were not actually cost the Gosper, too pretentious, and that I was above that of. But Nevertheless, I wore the really dark lipstick and like the fish nuts, and the pseudo Victorian jackets, that you could find like buffalo exchange. Yeah. I mean, if you looked up Goss in the dictionary, you would have found a photo of me somewhere. Fortunately, for me around the same time, sort of the late eighties early nineties, this British wave of very literary experimental comics started coming out. And I ran Pedley became obsessed, and one of my absolute favorite series, as was the case for a lot of people was Sandman by Neil Gaiman. Which took a World War, Two era, kind of be list, super hero and turned him into this mythological dream king who goes on adventures with all kinds of different, mythical creatures and kind of deconstructs, western mythology from a really interesting point of view. So, you know, for me as like a fourteen year old fifteen year old mega Goth this was huge and revelatory. Not just the story itself, but the medium of comics. Sandman told a kind of story in comic book form that I didn't really know was possible. It was kind of my first exposure to these more literary more adult kinds of comics, when I was a kid comics were still considered very much a kids, medium, and particularly a boys medium. There were not things that were marketed at girls. There were very few books out there that were adjacent to the superhero world that were marketed to adults so to see a comic book that was very clear and open in its love for that classics Hooper hero story. And yet, at the same time talked about Shakespeare and Chaucer and you know, brought in a very Joseph Cambell kind of U of mythology. Just expanded my understanding of what could be done within the pages of a comic book. I want to take a quick break to tell you about another podcast. I worked on it's called the big one your survival guide. We walk you through what it would be, like, if a major earthquake hit Los Angeles, and we help you understand what you need to know, to survive science and journalism, and immerses you and the experience of being in a huge earthquake. Don't be scared. We help you prepare. You can find it today wherever you listen to this show. Okay. Back to tell them. I am. So as I remember, the first time I found Neil, Gaiman Sandman, I was at the apartment of a friend. Who is I think about two years older than me and had graduated. And they were already living on their own. And so we're, we're very kind of cool and grown up in my eyes. You know, the, the people who live, there had also been giant Goths. So there were clove cigarettes, which were still legal at the time sitting around, and, ashtrays, and that's kind of always what it smelled, like, which I like the smell of. But it had that kind of late nineties, Goth aesthetic, every all the windows were kind of draped in, like, JoAnn fabric in sort of dark colors. It was it was just that kind of place. This apartment had a collective library of all kinds of great stuff, and they were all reading Sandman, and they had they'd just sort of made a rule, you can read whatever you want, but don't take anything out of the apartment. But because their library was so big. I was like, nobody will notice if I just kind of sneaked these back issues out and read them on my own, so I did. And. It was one of those reading experiences that, that kind of sticks out in your mind as being something for which there is a before. And an after he read this book. It made me feel a lot less grubby as a Goth it, oh, it was a very unabashedly Goth comic. And it was kind of cool to see something with such a huge cultural impact that was kind of headlined by this very Goth guy with white makeup, an extremely scruffy kind of Robert Smith, secure hair, and it was kind of a nice affirmation that you could do the stuff. And it you'd be kind of like a mopey teenager. And yet have cool stories that meant something, and that we're all to uplifting, and we're about hope. So, you know, it was in, in that sense. Nice to see Goths doing some kind of artistic service for, for the whiter were. The kind of storyteller that he was was very influential, and then as I got a little bit older. And I I saw him a couple of times back. This is back when he used to tour. I was also very impressed with the way that he approached writing and being a writer and it being a human being. There was one instance, in which I saw him along with a bunch of other really amazing comic book writers, including, I think Peter David, at MIT just a few days, not more than a week after nine eleven. Nine eleven happened just a couple of weeks after my nineteenth birthday at the beginning of my junior year of college. And he you know, I was I was very much a college student, I was kind of going through a late adolescent. What does it all mean phase, I become interested in, in religion and started to sort of rethink what I assumed about life, and purpose and are, are sort of our place in the universe. And like everybody, I think it was it was a tremendous shock. I think particularly people of my vintage kind of elderly millennials or Xeni, all's had never known a time when the US felt really threatened. The Cold War was kind of over, there was a sense that we were separate from the rest of the world or that nothing could ever interrupt. That period of prosperity into which we had been born and so nine eleven just massively shook the foundations of our generational experience and especially being in Boston at Boston University, the feeling of ongoing threat and vulnerability was quite high. Two of the planes had taken off from Logan airport. There are all kinds of rumors circulating that, there were still a terrorist cells in the city. And so it really did feel like a war zone in many ways, and it occurred to me, just sort of walking to class that this is the reality that so much of the rest of the world faces every single day. And somehow we have managed to avoid it for this long. And now here we are just like the rest of the world. as we did for a lot of things during those weeks after nine eleven we kind of hung around to see if this event was actually going to happen because a lot of them were cancelled. And it was clear that, yes, it was going to happen. It was still going on. So we, you know, we decided okay, well, we're not we're not going to give up this, this chance to see all of these amazing authors and artists on stage at the same time. And we decided yeah, we're going to go. We're going to we're going to do it, despite the sort of aura of anxiety and dread. That was kind of hanging over everything. What was interesting to me is the Neil Gaiman was the only one in his kind of opening words who never mentioned nine eleven once everybody on stage when they got up to talk that was what they talked about. It was it was about superheroes in nine eleven. You know, I think one of the people on stage envisioned this world in which wolverine was on the plane with the terrorists, and sort of got up and, and hit them with his finger spikes. And it kind of rubbed me the wrong way because I remember thinking, you know, this is not the time to pretend that are fictional heroes are gonna do us any kind of good. It's too real. It's a nice thought that yes. If we had these amazing heroes who were always in the right place at the right time that they would have saved us, but they didn't. And Neil Gaiman got up and never mentioned nine eleven once he just sort of told a story, I don't even remember what it was that he talked about. But by the end of it for about thirty seconds. We all forgot and in a weird way, I think that prepared us to have them were serious conversation versus the. Yeah. Wolverine would I've got him if you'd have been there, which, which just felt very tried to me. The reason that that stood out to me was because it illustrated, very neatly that for a storyteller in a time of great national tragedy upheaval. The way forward is not always the way through that sometimes we assume we're in a position to attack things head on. And yes, we're gonna fight, whatever it is or or get through whatever it is. And it's, it's very easy to blur the line at that point between storytelling and, and just sort of shallow saber rattling. But what he said at that time illustrated to me that it was possible to speak in a deeper key and not to pretend that you have the answers that you need all the answers. You know, everybody was was in an incredibly tense somber. Reflective mood, and it I think brought a lot of us especially who are about my age. I was eighteen at the time into the realization that we are all mortal that, that, that nothing that we think, is a turtle is eternal, and that the world may be didn't look the way that we had been taught growing up,

Neil Gaiman Sandman Wolverine Gosper Goss Willow Wilson Pedley Kamla Los Angeles Logan Airport Hooper United States Peter David Boston Writer MIT Robert Smith