History

History never repeats itself on this fascinating playlist. Whether you're a history buff or buffoon, these historical tidbits will excite and inspire. Sourced from leading talk radio shows and premium podcasts.

Shape shifters, with Worst Foot Forward

Your Brain on Facts

03:57 min | 13 hrs ago

Shape shifters, with Worst Foot Forward

"The most common example in europe and later america is the werewolf accursed man who turns into a bloodthirsty beast under the full moon. The word where wolf comes from the old english rare for man and wolf for wolf. Dvd players and underworld fans. Please resist the urge to correct this to liken throat. Because they're actually different things. It has a parallel etymology from lucan therapists in the greek for wolf and human but it originally applied not to supernatural. Bc's but to people who thought they were supernatural beasts bc's according to the physician galen when people these days present with animals delusions they may be diagnosed with clinical like hanthropy like throats can transform at will and they have a more specific story than where wolves as an institution do in greek mythology lie cone the king of arcadia who got it in his head. That was not as initiatives people believed and that he was just the right guide approve it in the most popular version of the myth like cohn held a ceremony and feast to honor zeus. Zeus showed up. The main dish on the table was the roasted flesh of cones own son. Nick demus scheme being that would eat nikomas thinking it was pork thus proving. He wasn't all knowing turns out he was rather than kill like own. Outright zeus turned him into a wolf and resurrected the prince who then ascended to the throne but where wolves unlike in throats. There are half a dozen underworld films if you need more of that and even though there are many different werewolf legends in many different cultures. We're going to do our best to stay out of europe and away from wolves today as usual much easier said than done. Let's spin the globe around and see where to stop and stop brazil. The home of the boto and can tato the dolphin-shaped shifter of amazon river folklore during the day. The boto one can tato cavorts in the amazon living. It's best pink dolphin life if you've never seen pictures of pink river dolphin there's a link in the show notes. They're sort of mother. Nature meets lisa frank at night though the boto transforms into a handsome young man who seduces girls gets them pregnant and then pops back to his river. Come morning you will see this pattern of behavior repeatedly today the boto and can tato loves a party. They can't resist inviting themselves. So if you're having a get together in the amazon river basin keep a close eye on your single girlfriends because it's really hard to serve a dolphin with a paternity suit. You should be okay if your party is endorsed. Though boto cantatas may look human but they have a distinct tell they retain their blow holes on the back of their heads and will always wear a hat to hide it asking that handsome stranger to take his hat off inside may be the only way to reveal the bodo and cantata renowned for being charming to the point that partygoers will beg them to stay even as morning encroaches and the bowen can tato needs to get back to the water and they aren't one trick dolphins either they have the power to control storms and can transform humans into an cantatas themselves or afflict them with disease or insanity. Most people who live near the amazon won't go near it between dusk and dawn or won't go in the water alone during the daytime because in cantatas are fond of ducting humans. They fall in love with the children born of their dalliances or just anybody near the river. Who looks like they be good company.

Nick Demus Lucan Amazon River Europe Galen Lisa Frank Boto Arcadia Cohn Tato Zeus America Boto Cantatas Brazil Amazon Bowen
A history of Mountweazels

Everything Everywhere Daily

03:38 min | 5 d ago

A history of Mountweazels

"Suppose. I wanted to start a company that sold maps i hire cartographers and spend a lot of time and money going out and gathering data. Because i'm just documenting something which exists in reality. The end result of all my hard work and investment is going to look just like other maps. That are out there already. So why couldn't i just skip all the effort and copy the maps which already exist. Sure i'll change the font and the colors but fundamentally the end result is going to be the same either way right. This is a big problem for any maker of reference products maps dictionaries and encyclopedias. You can't copyright facts but you can take steps to show that someone is a plagiarist or violating. Copyright they do this via copyright traps copyright traps are nothing more than false information which is putting reference material to catch people who copy their content. If you copy everything without checking you'll copy the false information which will be evidence of plagiarism. Promos famous example was in the nineteen seventy five new columbia encyclopedia. they created an entry for one lillian. Virginia mount weasel. They created a full entry in the encyclopedia for which was totally fiction. According to the entry lillian. Mount weasel was a photographer who was famous for her photos of south. Sierra me walk whatever that is according to the entry quote. Mount weasel died at thirty one in an explosion while on assignment for combustibles magazine unquote while there was no cases of anyone actually copying the mount weasel entry. The term amount weasel is now a term for a copyright trap. there's a million. Mt weasel facebook page and the lillian virginia mount weasel research center website which has fake interviews with people who knew her as well as fake copies of combustibles magazine while this is one of the best known examples of copyright trap. It's hardly the only one. The nineteen forty three edition of webster's twentieth century dictionary had an entry for junk attack spelled j. u. n. g. f. t. a. k. The entry read quote junk noun. Persian bird the male of which only had one wing on the right side and the female only one wing on the left side. Instead of the missing wings the male had hook of bone and the female an eyelid of bone and it was by uniting hook and eye that they were unable to fly each one alone had remained on the ground and quote. There's no pronunciation given so. I'm pretty sure i said it correctly because there is no way to say correctly. The new oxford american dictionary has a definition for the word espa valence. Their definition of the word is the wilful avoidance of one's official responsibilities. The thing is this fake word has actually found some usage and there is now an entry for in which which references the original new oxford american dictionary definition. Personally i think esco valence is a perfectly crumlin word problems. The heaviest users of copyright traps are matt makers in cartography copyright traps are known as trap streets trap streets are fictional street or locations which are used to check to see if someone is copying their map. They're usually very small streets or alleys of no importance as no one actually uses it as an address because it doesn't exist. There isn't too much of a problem if they appear on maps. The state of michigan put fake towns in ohio in their nineteen seventy-eight official roadmap. The towns were beata so spelled beat. Osu and go blue aka go blue. The colors of the university of michigan

Lillian Mount Weasel Lillian Virginia Mount Weasel New Columbia Sierra Virginia Webster Facebook Matt Michigan Ohio OSU University Of Michigan
Space Junk Chronicals

Everything Everywhere Daily

04:27 min | Last week

Space Junk Chronicals

"Since nineteen fifty seven. Humanity has been launching satellites into earth orbit. It's estimated in the last four years almost nine thousand satellites in total have put into orbit for the vast majority of space age. There was never a plan for what would be done with the satellites after their lifetime. They were launched without any thought as to how or if they could ever come down the nine thousand or so satellites. Five thousand are still in orbit. Two thousand our service in three thousand are dead. D satellites are usually quite large. They can vary in size from a bus to a box and they aren't the real problem when it comes to space junk the big problem is debris when you send up a rocket there's all sorts of miscellaneous parts on the upper stage of the rocket that holds the satellite. That will go into orbit with it. This can include metal panels bolts screws and even flakes of paint. You'd think that given how big spaces that space junk might not be a problem as douglas adams noted quote space is big really big. You won't believe how vastly hugely mind. Bogglingly big it is suppose you had a million pennies that would be enough to easily fit in a minivan. Now let's suppose you distributed those pennies all over the world including the ocean and antarctica. Each penny would have one hundred ninety. Seven square miles of space or a single penny would have a square which was fourteen by fourteen miles factor in that the lowest earth orbit is a sphere larger than the earth. And that there's a vertical dimension where we could put pennies at different elevations. Then it would seem that space junk was a big problem if the object just sat there. That's true it wouldn't be a problem however all that junk isn't just sitting there. It's orbiting earth at extremely high speeds. Any piece of space junk is probably travelling at at least seventeen thousand miles per hour when something is traveling that fast no matter how small it is it can cause a great deal of damage. Moreover everything is on a slightly different orbit that means over time these orbits can cross and the longer something remains in orbit the greater the odds that these past will eventually cross and that things will smash together some of the things which are floating around in space include two cameras that got away from astronauts players a screwdriver or wrench a full toolbag garbage bags a lens cap a spatula and microscopic flakes of rocket propellant and that is on top of all the rocket debris and dead satellites if a ship with astronauts were to be hit it could lead to the deaths of the crew if important satellite were to be hid it could lead to a loss of critical communications. Gps signals or observational capabilities. This isn't just a theoretical problem. There have been cases of collisions in space. The space shuttle headed many tiny impacts from debris in space on the seven space shuttle mission. In one thousand. Nine hundred three. The front windshield was hit by a fleck of paint which damaged the window. It looked very similar to what happens when a rocket. your windshield damage. To the shuttle's he tiles was so common that the eventually began flying the shuttle backwards in space so that the engines which weren't used during re entry took most of the damage. The shuttle endeavour was hit by an object so large that its radiator looked like it was hit with a bullet. The international space station has to move on average at least once a year to avoid space debris the soviet cosmos twelve. Seventy five satellite was hit by an object in one thousand nine hundred eighty one which was believed to be the first case of a satellite being destroyed by space junk. Perhaps the worst case occurred in two thousand nine when the kosmos twenty fifty one satellite which was dead smashed into the iridium thirty three satellite at a relative speed of twenty six thousand miles per hour. These collisions and there have been several more only make things worse. In the first case three hundred objects were created from the collision in the second there were suddenly thousands of new objects thrown off on different trajectories in orbit in two thousand seven. The chinese government didn't anti-satellite missile test. That blew up a satellite in space creating tens of thousands of pieces of debris this problem of junk causing collisions which then creates exponentially more junk risk. Something called the kessler syndrome. This hypothesized in nineteen seventy eight by nasa. Scientists david kessler. He proposed that collisions could start a cascade of debris which would cause more collisions and even more debris rinse and repeat.

Douglas Adams Antarctica International Space Station Chinese Government Kessler Syndrome David Kessler Nasa
Franklin Delano Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066

This Day in History Class

04:08 min | Last week

Franklin Delano Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066

"The day was february nineteenth. Nineteen forty two after the japanese bombed pearl harbor a couple of months earlier. The citizens and government of the united states became frantic. They were increasingly distrustful of the mini japanese immigrants in citizens in the country believing they couldn't be trusted to remain loyal to the us over japan. In many people's minds people of japanese descent were threat to national safety and security as a result president. Franklin delano roosevelt signed executive order. Ninety sixty six. Arthur is the secretary of war military commanders to set up military zones that anybody to be evacuated from the executive order was framed as a measure necessary to protect national security during wartime since the country was now vulnerable to attack. But what the order actually did was take advantage of the public's escalating fears of japanese americans involvement in the war and use it to put them in concentration camps. The passing of executive order ninety sixty six was largely precipitated by the bombing of pearl harbor but resentment of foreign nationals japanese immigrants in particular had already been growing steadily by the time. Fdr signed executive order before the nineteenth century. Japan didn't want much to do with europe or its colonies but by the eighteen hundreds japan had begun trading with the united states and japanese. People were immigrating to the us and other places as temporary laborers at the same time. The us was barring other asian nationals from entering the country the chinese exclusion act passed in eighteen eighty two banned immigration from china to the us and prohibited chinese people in the us from becoming citizens the law partly had to do with the high unemployment and low wages in the us which were blamed on chinese laborers but it also had to do with prejudices white americans had against chinese people. All of this is to say that there was a precedent for immigration from asia. By the time the us government began placing limits on the number of japanese people that could come to the us and in nineteen twenty four. The government passed the johnson. Reed act which set immigration quotas and effectively cut off the stream of japanese people immigrating to the states. People who moved to the us from japan could it become citizens although children born to japanese people in the us received birthright citizenship. Even so most of the japanese people who moved to the us settled on the west coast or in hawaii building up their own communities with their own schools and businesses and a lot of these communities. Were doing well. But when the japanese bombed pearl harbor in nineteen forty one in the hopes of destroying us military forces in the pacific. The us was compelled to enter world war two after years of try to avoid being hands on in the conflict. At first there were appeals for people to remain calm but soon enough the government began targeting thousands of foreign nationals who it believed to be a threat. Many of the people who the government considered enemy aliens had done. Nothing that would legitimately earned him the label of enemy regardless they were still sent to camps jails and prisons under suspicions of espionage sabotage and any other activities that could aid to pay in the war and as more people were locked up as the media amplified false reports of japanese threats and as actual japanese military threats posed. The public grew more fearful of japanese people

United States Japan Franklin Delano Roosevelt Pearl Harbor Arthur FDR Us Government Europe China Reed Asia Johnson West Coast Hawaii Pacific
David S. Reynolds on Abraham Lincoln

This American President

06:47 min | 2 weeks ago

David S. Reynolds on Abraham Lincoln

"Our guest. Today is dr david. S reynolds historian who has written extensively on the civil war era. He's won numerous awards including the bancroft prize. And the ambassador book award just to name a few. And he is the author of the book. Abe abraham lincoln in his times professor reynolds. Thank you for being on our show. Great to be here richard. Thank you great. So much is made about president. Lincoln's lack of experience and his many supposed- professional failures prior to winning the presidency. But you seem to push back against this narrative. So what's the real story here. yeah One of the best books on him david. Donald to lincoln one of the better known books actually says very frankly that no president has ever entered the highest office being the least prepare less prepared than than lincoln that is the least prepared ball and on the surface kind of looks that way because he had less than one year of education just primary school education and Thou that was it and He didn't go through any formal formal of self education. Either but what i found is that he had something far more important. A insatiably curious. If he were on the law circuit around illinois he would go to a farmer and say. How does that machine work. And what brand of cow is that and and the pig over there. What can you describe that to me. Very very curious about the world around him And also he loved to read poetry in particular newspaper small so poetry and poetry kind of organized his thoughts and he memorized shakespeare by the page. She didn't do it to impress people but Suddenly suddenly would come out with a shakespearean soliloquy though is on his hard disk his brain and Or burns poem or something like that. So he was a really exposed to different levels of culture so much so that his contemporary emerson said There's one hero who stands out from the rest as somebody who bridges the entire range of experience from the very highest shakespeare of the opera. And all of that to the lowest. He like body humor and grotesque Frontier humor and emerson said he went down as far so the the very dogs believed in him so In a way who's very very open to experience and is that lincoln that i'm really interested in the songs he loved the poems he loved and what really made him a what what was going on inside of him right and you talk about. Lincoln's ran as an era of sensationalism. Violence susannah humor surreal the surreal in the bizarre which i think for anyone that follows politics now is a bit comforting to know that it's it's been like this for a while. So can you expand on just what you meant by that. Well i think there's been interesting sensationalism for a long time in many cultures but the difference was that because of changes in print printing techniques and also distribution techniques. Suddenly this was available to the masses and so the newspapers they used to be used to six hundred suddenly were once the penny papers and they were filled with sensational stories about murders and suicides and oh adultery and all all all this stuff and so yeah. I mean Linking grew up in this kind of culture. Also in popular humor lincoln said it was characterized by grotesque nece and it was a very violent kind of humor of gouging and and scrapping and scraping and a often feature these kind of frontier types. That were just wild men and people get a lotta thrills out of these kind of very very wild escapades in the crockett manuscripts the davy crockett manuscripts almond accents. Helper and p.t barnum. Who was a sensation. He was founded show business and wasn't in the circus business back then but he was in the museum business and he put on sensational displays like a fiji mermaid. Who is this beautiful blonde. Half naked woman had presented that way in in the posters. But actually it was just a a monkey's torso tied to a salmon's tail assistant in some water. And anyway the biggest. The smallest the fattest put things on display so in a way Lincoln had to serve accommodate culture as well because he was sold as as abe. That's book is called the kind of rough frontiers men with his sleeves rolled up and he's wielding an axe in these splitting the rails and by the time that It was advertised that way. It had been many years since. He's splitting rails because he was a respectable lawyer by the time war. Good suits and all of that and it was making a good income but he allowed himself to be sold as a even though he hated the name but he said without names like old. Abe uncle abe Honesty i wouldn't have been elected. I would not have been elected. So he was sort of put on display almost in a barnum barnum like way in eighteen sixty.

Dr David Ambassador Book Award Abe Abraham Lincoln Reynolds Lincoln Emerson Donald Trump Richard Illinois David Fiji Barnum Barnum
Considering German Jewrys History And Legacy With Jay Geller

Jewish History Matters

05:25 min | 2 weeks ago

Considering German Jewrys History And Legacy With Jay Geller

"Welcome to jewish history matters. I'm jason la steak and jay. Geller is joining me on the podcast today to talk about his book. The show alums a history of the german jewish bourgeoisie from emancipation to destruction. It's a fantastic book. That tells the story of german jewry as a whole through the history of one family and in particular the four scholem brothers each of whom followed their own political and historical path gerhard or gershom scholem the zionist who is most widely known for his scholarship on jewish mysticism alongside. His brothers. varner the communist. Reinhold the nationalist and eric the liberal. It's a multilayered approach towards thinking about jews in germany as well as the broader possibilities of history and its contingency the scholem brothers really showcase the myriad possibilities for political and cultural activity of jews in germany prior to the second world war as well as the different outcomes of the jews in germany verner was murdered by the nazis at involed gershom immigrated to palestine and eric and reinhold made their way toss. Australia altogether sketches the outlines of the german jewish cultural and political millea as the diaspora of the jews of germany after the holocaust and so the scholem family is simultaneously an eminent middle class. Jewish berlin family and at the same time. It's also distinctly normal quotidian every day it showcases through this microcosm the whole story of choose in germany in the lead up to the second world war and the holocaust as well as aftermath jay. Geller is the samuel rosenthal professor of judaic studies at case western reserve university's department of history in addition to the show alums which will talk about. Today he has also written jews in post holocaust. Germany nineteen forty five to nineteen fifty three. I'm so excited that jay is able to join us on the podcast today to discuss the show alums and german jewish history in the largest terms the book and the issues that it raises helps us to think through both the history of jews in germany as well as the legacy of german jewish culture on a wider scale. Thanks for listening in. Welcome to the podcast. Thanks thanks for having me. This book is is such a fascinating. Approach the micro history really that is focusing on the four scholem brothers. You know obviously gershom. Scholem is definitely the most well known of these figures who are studying you as a major figure in jewish intellectual history jewish scholarship. But i think that part of what you've done here which is so interesting is to bring forward a handful of people who each represent different pathways through german jewish history and this really illuminates a lot of important issues. Do you maybe want to explain briefly about these different trajectories About these different figures in the show family and what they represent in the eighteen ninety s arthur bitty show-me who are the owners of a print shop berlin had four sons reinhold arish varner and gerhard litter known gershom and in time they viewed the travails of german society and experience the ambiguities of not the difficulties of german jewelry and they chose for different political paths. Brian whole the oldest was a national liberal or right liberal. Eric was a liberal democrat or a left liberal van was a social democrat and later became a communist in gershom of course was zionist so in this one family among these four brothers we see four political paths taken by german jewry in the first decades of the twentieth century raven. These weren't the only pads but they were by far the most common covering most of the political spectrum verner began his career as a socialist but he joined the communist party at the time of the The merger of the independent social democratic party but the communist party and he quickly rose to become the second most powerful member of the german communist party. He was a personal rival of of stalin and the stalinist clique in german communism in the mid nineteen twenty s when stalinist is attempting to take over the other communist parties in the commoner

Scholem Germany Jason La Steak Gershom Gershom Scholem Geller JAY Samuel Rosenthal Eric Verner Varner Reinhold Gerhard Berlin Department Of History Case Western Reserve Universit Palestine Arthur Bitty
This day in history - NAACP founded

This Day in History Class

06:34 min | 2 weeks ago

This day in history - NAACP founded

"The day was february twelfth. Nineteen o nine in new york city. A group of black and white people met to talk about the status of black people in the united states. There were sixty people at the meeting including suffrage is philanthropist journalist clergymen educators and people from other traditions in attendance and some of them have been part of the abolitionist movement. Many of the people there had also been part of the niagara movement which was a civil rights group founded in nineteen o five sociologist activists w. e. d. boys and editor an activist william morris. Trotter the date of this meeting was notable because it was the hundredth anniversary of former us. President abraham lincoln's birth which many found meaningful because. Lincoln issued the emancipation proclamation. But anti black violence was still endemic in the united states. And the people who met in new york on this day. We're committed to fighting racism and discrimination in the us. starting what was sometimes called a new abolition movement. At the time. Jim crow laws enforced racial segregation in the south. Though discrimination on the basis of race was constant throughout the united states thousands of black people were being lynched by white mobs at public events that were made into spectacles and deadly race. Riots were taking place across the country. In the period after the reconstruction era interpersonal and institutionalized racism were plaguing american society but activists reformers in revolutionaries were using and fighting to combat rampant racism and violence in the country in august nineteen. Oh eight there was a violent race riots. In springfield illinois where mobs of white people destroyed the homes and businesses of black people in the community and killed in lynched others author and activist. Ns stransky and her husband. William english walling. A socialist journalist went to springfield to investigate the right and in september. A magazine called the independent published an article by walling titled the race war in the north in the article. He wrote that. People must revive the spirit of abolitionist. Entreat black people social and political equals or else the race war would continue to spread across the country and walling went on to write the following the day. These methods become general in the north. Every hope of political democracy will be dead other weaker. Racist in classes will be persecuted in the north. As in the south public education will undergo an eclipse and american civilization. We'll await either a rapid degeneration or another profounder and more revolutionary civil war which sell obliterate not only the remains of slavery but all other obstacles to a free democratic evolution that have grown up in. Its wake who realizes the seriousness of the situation. And what large and powerful body of citizens is ready to come to their aid. Marie white ovington a social worker and writer heated wallin's call and sent him a letter in support so in january nineteen o nine. She met with walling in social worker. Henry moskovitz at wallin's new york apartment to discuss proposing an organization that would fight for the civil and political rights of black people. So oswald garrison villar grandson of abolitionist. William lloyd garrison wrote the call which was a summons for civil rights activists to form an organization that would advocate for ending racial injustice in america and fight for african americans rights the call was endorsed by sixty people including w. e. b. voice journalist and activist ida b wells philosopher and reformer john. Dewey an activist jane addams and on february toldt nineteen o nine a group including mary turks. Tarot charles edward russell in florence kelly among others breath met for a national conference but they didn't hold their first large meeting until may when they organized as the national negro committee. There was some conflict at that first session as leaders tried to get the more conservative but washington to join in on the meetings also tensions rose between white and black members and the press beer the radical nature of the conference but by nineteen ten members of the committee had formed the national association for the advancement of colored people or in double. Acp the n. Double acp mission was quote to promote equality of rights and to eradicate cast a race prejudice among the citizens of the united states to advance the interests of color citizens to secure for them impartial suffrage and to increase their opportunities for securing justice in the courts education for the children employment according to their ability and complete equality before law the organization established is national office in new york city in named a board of directors and president moorefield story at this time w e b d boys was the only black executive in the organization but that same year two boys started the crisis a journal offered discussion on race relations politics and black life and present it black intellectual and artistic work in double. Acp members went on to challenge segregation laws. Stage boycotts start anti lynching campaign in lobby and advocate for new legislation the end ps methods aren't loved by people who use more direct action tactics but the organization did make gains in the movement for black civil rights and is still going today.

United States Stransky William English Springfield President Abraham Lincoln Wallin William Morris Trotter Marie White Ovington Jim Crow Henry Moskovitz New York City Oswald Garrison Villar Walling New York Ida B Wells Lincoln Mary Turks Charles Edward Russell Florence Kelly
The Code of Hammurabi

Everything Everywhere Daily

06:03 min | 2 weeks ago

The Code of Hammurabi

"Hemmer robbie was the king of the babylonian empire from approximately seventeen ninety two to seventeen fifty bc. Just to put that into perspective. This was over a thousand years. Before the city of rome was even founded as babylon emperors went hammurabi was pretty successful when he rose to power babylon was still a relatively minor player in the region and when he died he had conquered most of potato along both the tigris and euphrates rivers. The region was almost entirely in. What is today modern iraq. Like any good king win. Hammurabi wasn't conquering nearby kingdoms. He was passing laws and making sure that his kingdom ran smoothly and efficiently. It is believed that hamurabi sent out scholars to the various kingdoms. He conquered to collect the various laws of all realms and then collected them into a uniform code of laws for everyone. The result of this was the code of hammurabi which is believed to be two hundred and eighty two laws regarding any number of different infractions. Crimes and disputes the laws were inscribed on a stone and clay tablets and spread around the kingdom. The stele which was found in one thousand nine hundred one is exceptionally well. Preserved the object itself is a hard blackstone known as diorite. it's shaped like a giant human finger at the top is an image of hammurabi receiving the laws from the babylonian god chumash. There is then a preface which states the following quote and who in bell called me by name hamurabi the exalted prince who feared god to bring about the rule of righteousness in the land to destroy the wicked and evil doers. So that the strong should not harm the week. So that i should rule over the black headed people like chamo- and enlighten the land to further the well being of mankind unquote about six hundred years later. The was taken by the king of elam. Shrek know if you've ever watched the two thousand two movie the emperor's club with kevin kline. You'll remember that should noonday was as the example of someone that no one remembers except that i just mentioned him in podcast and he was in a movie under the reign of Dante was believed that he erased two three dozen of the laws. Originally written by hamurabi researchers have been able to recreate the deleted laws by finding other clay tablets. That had the law's written on them sometime after that it was buried as ancient things tend to do and it was rediscovered in one thousand nine hundred one. So what does the code of hammurabi say. Many of the laws are examples of what is known in latin as lex talionis which is a law where the punishment is similar to the crime. You might know better as an eye for an eye. For example law one hundred ninety six states quote if a man destroy the eye of another man they shall destroy his. I if one break a man's bone they shall break his bone unquote however the rules were different depending on what social class. You're in for example. I didn't read the entirety of law. Ninety six just now the rest of it is as follows quote if one destroy the eye of a freeman or break the bone of a freeman. He shall pay won gold meena if one destroy the eye of a man slave or break a bone of a man slave. He shall pay one half his price unquote so the social status of the victim of a crime was a consideration in the law. If some of this sounds familiar. That's because it's very similar to the laws that are in the bible in the book of leviticus the code of hammurabi was written well before the book leviticus so it's quite possible if not probable that some of the laws from leviticus were adopted from babylonian laws the final version of leviticus was written after the jewish babylonian exile. So it's in fact very possible. There are laws in the code deal with commerce divorce rent liability and even medical malpractice there even laws dealing with contracts and the issuing of receipts. It's true that most of the laws are of a rather brutal. If x than wide variety with punishments ranging from drowning burning severing hands gouging out is that cetera. Most of these type of laws are no longer on the books in most countries. Obviously however there are some surprisingly forward thinking laws for something that was written down thirty seven hundred years ago for example law one hundred forty nine states quote. If this woman does not wish to remain in her husband's house then he shall compensate her for the dowry that she brought with her from her father's house and she may go unquote that is basically an ancient version of no fault divorce. However there was one concept that was in the code of hammurabi which was revolutionary and is still with us today. That is the concept of being innocent until proven guilty. In fact these are the very first law's written down in the code. Here are the first three laws in the code of hammurabi quote law one if anyone in snare another putting a ban upon him but he cannot prove it then let he that ensnared him be put to death law to if anyone bringing accusation against a man and the accused goto the river and leap into the river if he sink in the river his accuser shall take possession of his house but if the river prove that the accused is not guilty and he escaped unhurt then he who had brought the accusation shelby put to death while he who leapt into the river shall take possession of the house that had belonged to his accuser law three if anyone bringing accusation of any crime before the elders and does not prove what he has charged you shall if a capital offence charged put to death unquote so basically they had really harsh perjury laws and they made it really hard to pass frivolous lawsuits. So while i don't think anyone would really wanna live under the code of hammurabi today. It's an important part of humanity's legal history old hammer. Arby's two hundred and eighty two law's written in stone with a very first step in creating a system which has led to the one hundred and seventy five thousand two hundred and sixty pages of the united states code of federal regulations today

Hammurabi Hemmer Robbie Hamurabi Lex Talionis Kevin Kline Elam Rome Iraq Dante Bell Goto Shelby Arby United States
Democracy As We Know It

The Experiment

05:14 min | 2 weeks ago

Democracy As We Know It

"The life of maryland newkirk and on november six twenty twenty after a long battle with cancer. She was fifty six. She survived by her husband three siblings and three kids including her son van. Who's a senior editor at the atlantic. I'm a mom's oldest child. I am required under law to only speak good things when a life comes to an end we the ones who are left behind. We're left with a story a really a bunch of different stories like for van. There were small stories about the way. His mom looked really playing a tie or what she cared about. Walden your church. How she treated people who was an incredibly patient what she struggled with the stress rising off her but he but when van took a minute to pull back to really zoom out on the time line of his mom's life he could see this bigger story about the country. She lived in one of the things. I like to think about is the fact that when she was born it was by no means guaranteed that she would be granted the right to vote and that right to vote would be protected looking back on her life ban sees a story about democracy and it's different than the one he was taught so i was always taught that america was founded explicitly as democracy. You know you go to school. And you're taught that this was the biggest hit in global democracy since the athenians but really to me. I have been more and more convinced that the only true phase of what might even be somewhat called. Democracy in america has been america's voting writer and my mother has seen every single day van says contrary to what you might have been told real. Democracy in america hasn't been here that long. It's only been here for fifty six years this week. Van newkirk tells the short story of democracy by taking us through the life of the woman who saw the whole thing his mom. I'm julie longoria this experiment. A show about our unfinished country as van tells it his mom was born just one year before our democracy started a mother was born in sixty four. I understand that family. Storytelling often embellished. So you have to work a little bit too well. I've not yet gotten the fact checkers on some of this. But as the story goes a mother was born in greenwood mississippi. She went home in a cardboard box. That is the legend. I believe it's probably one of those. Cardboard bassin has which not that uncommon. But yeah you know they were poor and on the way home you know drove pass headquarters of civil rights organizations staging freedom summer but that's also will be known as the summer of civil rights because of the mississippi freedom summer project it was one of the main flashpoints in the civil rights movement and there were staging it out of headquarters in greenwood mississippi where she was born dan. He say what you want. I say i wanna reddish the vote. A lot of what they were trying to do was to register black people to vote to send into mississippi that stomach upwards of one thousand teachers ministers lawyers and students from all around the country and they did that in part by bringing lots and lots of volunteers. Lots and lots of white volunteers around the country to come down to mississippi. I hope we can reach the lives as many people as possible in idealistic the constitution the bill of rights. And i think it's important for everybody to have these every was met with incredible amounts of violence so about two three weeks after that. My house was five close. Been tony one of rise. Black little beaming. They should expect possibly somebody. She was born in the middle of all this. You know a time. When greenwood was a very contentious place to live for

VAN Walden Your Church America Newkirk Van Newkirk Mississippi Julie Longoria Maryland Atlantic Greenwood Cancer DAN
Tamara Payne (Ep. 12, 2021)

In Black America

02:50 min | Last week

Tamara Payne (Ep. 12, 2021)

"From the university of texas at austin k. Ut radio this is in black america. We've found his information was necessary. We started the reports ten years the call and ten years ago the economic impact that that multicultural consumers were having on the. Us economy really was not a topic of conversation and yet we recognize back. Then i think lakpat about nine hundred sixty seven billion dollars worth of power people's in the billion and we saw that that was the central enough to warrant and to garner attention from client because we also recognize that the growing population of blacks and the growing population of hispanics and the growing population of asian american. And we're going to continue to grow in a way that would for sure have impact on the country. She oh gray. Senior vice president of consumer insights and engagement with nielsen was started a decade ago to give insight into the unique consumption and purchasing habits of african americans has now grown into an industry resource to help brands better understand and reached ethnic consumers. According to the power of the black community from moment to movement the tenth annual report and nielsen diverse in chosen series on african american consumers african american influence on the academy and pop culture continue drive the only significant moments in history but dr changes across industries and digital platforms. Some of the key findings include african. americans are limiting the amount of time. They are spitting out in public due to covid. Nineteen and african. americans are nearly three times as likely to take to social media to show support for their favorite companies and brands jonniaux hanson junior. And welcome to another edition. A black america on this week's program nielsen tests. Annual african american. Consumer report was show grace and black america. Wanted to make sure that we have a few insights and here that pertain specifically to how african americans have been impacted by covert by the social unrest. And how companies are reacting to that and or how they can continue to connect with african americans. If they're doing so for the first time or is they are expanding their outreach programs how to make sure that it's it's relevant for them and their needs so we we have a report. That's chock full of information that your listeners can download as usual at nielsen dot com slash african americans and that's an i. e. l. s. e. n. dot com slash.

America Nielsen University Of Texas Austin Jonniaux Hanson Grace
The Case for Sweatpants

The Experiment

03:00 min | Last week

The Case for Sweatpants

"Looking for a job dressed or do tastefully. Not expensive. you know. Clothing is actually the first visual impression. Other people have it some. Say it's a key to how do we appear to others to communicate only looked. there are good investment. I anton good nice to meet you not to be a complete creep right now and we've never actually met in person because of the pandemic but i question for you is what are you wearing. I am wearing sort of a shapeless dress. Slash top emmanuel is a staff writer at the atlantic. She tries to explain who we are. As americans through material things like beauty products kitchen appliances and the clothes we wear or don't wear like there's no way to say this without some. Are you wearing pants. I am not not wearing pants and lately. She's been spending a lot of time thinking about pants or not pants per se but what pants have to say about us. I think that fashion is a social language. When i was in high school in two thousand three it was the first time that i had had a super steady paycheck. What i wanted to do was buy a coach bag. I wanted to be the type of person who carried cam bag. The costs a couple of hundred dollars. That just seemed like the most sophisticated adult thing that i could do based on my conception of what sophisticated adults did in suburban atlanta so funny. The coach bag was so the thing in suburban miami florida as well it was like the pinnacle. Yeah at some point. It was sort of like i have psychoanalyze myself. I understand that my desire for these things. It was definitely like a striving impulse kind of thing you know. Even if you haven't spent a lot of time thinking about stuff like this close speak. They can at least try to tell people things like. I'm rich or i met a funeral. We've set up almost like these laws in american life about who gets to wear white at certain events or what it means to wear pink but in this time when many of us are barely seeing each other a man has been thinking about how the rules change which brings us back to pants. I think the The clothing item of the pandemic sweatpants again with sweat pence comfortable. You know the message sending out to the world with these sweatpants. You telling the

Emmanuel Atlantic Atlanta Miami Florida
The Carrots & Sticks Edition

The Promised Podcast

07:50 min | Last week

The Carrots & Sticks Edition

"Twenty twenty one judo grand slam sponsored by the international judo federation the i j f in which four hundred and thirty judokas one hundred and seventy eight women and two hundred and fifty. Two men representing sixty three countries spread over. Five continents will compete in fourteen weight categories. That's seven each for the women and for the men in hopes of attaining metals. Honor and national. Pride the competitor's come from everywhere from angola to them and everywhere in between and i know what you're thinking you're thinking but angola and zambia share a border. There is literally nowhere in between the two of them but in a broader sense. If in a less accurate one. And gonna begins. With an a and zambia with z and it is beautiful that countries beginning with letters so far apart in the alphabet can meet peaceably here in tel aviv in stark contrast by the way to their invariably tense meetings along their own one thousand kilometer border as listeners who need the journal of borderlands studies will already know all too well from the distressing recent essay. They will have read. They're entitled the consolidation of the angola. Zambia border colon. Violence forced displacement smugglers and savimbi. But i digress of the four hundred and thirty judokas taking part. In the event it is fair to say that one stands out above all the others and he is saieed me a the twenty nine year old former iranian champion who went ordered by government last year to concede his semifinal match at the tokyo world championships rather than compete against the israeli world. Champion sergey. Mookie refused and defected to germany eventually taking mongolian citizenship just over a year ago in the eighteen months since he defected. Sullied malawi has become fast friends with saggy. Mookie who said in a radio interview this week quote. This is a great message to the world. This judo is something that can bring even iran closer to israel. It simply shows how sports can bring people together and break boundaries end quote and there is every possibility likely could really that malawi and mookie will face one another on the mat during the grand slam. Finally having the match they could not have back in japan now because no regular flights landing these days at what remains a mostly closed. Ben gurion airport the eye af chartered planes to fly that you don't get into israel from four spots around the world athletes who have not yet had two shots of a vaccine plus a week which is most of them had to show too negative test results one from seventy two hours before their flight. Another from forty eight hours before when they landed at ben gurion airport. They were tested yet again. And then whisked away to the hilton intel. Vive the whole of which was booked by the i'd af to build the judokas with guards stationed in front of the revolving doors to keep athletes from sneaking out into the city. 'cause we'll be judokas and to keep curious tel-aviv types from sneaking in to get a peek at the competitors despite these pretty serious precautions those who criticized the decision to let the grand slam go forward at all in these pandemic minister of housing mayor. Porush and member of knesset eastern isler both of the ultra orthodox judaism party put out a statement that said among other things quote it is unthinkable that a citizen of israel is forced to go through a great and exhausting mess of bureaucracy to get into the country at the same time that foreign athletes enter easily in their multitudes as though there were no corona pandemic in the world the clerks of the state of israel apply a double standard against people who have the appearance of being deem on the one hand the state embraces the athletes of secular culture and on the other hand it rejects and piles difficulty upon difficulty for heidi citizens. Who asked to come here for basic humanitarian reasons like attending the funeral of a loved. One end quote indeed. The promise podcasts. Own preliminary research has shown that of the four hundred and thirty not even one of them is ultra orthodox. Not even one a fact that his inexplicable except in light of systemic discrimination on the part of the ministry of secular culture and secular sports and of course the idea f who organizes charter debts. But do they have no no. I say q. E. d still arguably. Nothing captures the ironic spirit of this city. We love so well tel aviv. Better than four hundred and thirty judokas gathering from the four corners of the earth from angola to mbia to show the world that pandemic something like the prophecy of isaiah will be fulfilled and the lion. Shell lie with the lamb the iranian shell e ponce nagy the israeli and the golan. Shell cacak these ambien with us. In the studio is a woman who's lovely writing is always an ippon. I refer of course to alison happen. Summer allison is written for political the new republic foreign policy the jerusalem post ata the ford and many other of your very best papers magazines. She is a columnist for our at. You have heard on. Npr pri in the bbc and you have seen her on. I twenty four television. And al jazeera tv alison holds a world centre ward for journalism recognizing excellence reported and a simon rocked our award for excellence and covering zionism and israel. Alison how are you doing. I'm good but i wish i was in the snow in jerusalem with my son lis- tel aviv centric cheerleaders. Like you take hit every time. It snows in jerusalem and they become the cool city rain. We don't take any says the man who is considering moving to boston also with us here in our studio and we are so delighted again is a woman whom i d f may well have had in mind when they set out what they call the judo. Moral code quote courage. Respect modesty sincerity friendship honor and politeness. Obviously i am talking about sally. Ed sally is the resource development director and also one of the elected leaders of the grassroots political movement standing together about which more later sally abbott has been an activist. She was a teen focusing on feminist struggles. And on children's rights she has written for the nation and recently interviewed noam chomsky for majority magazine. Sally how are you doing. I'm great thank you. I'm actually very mad that i'm missing the snow. And we're getting all the wets mess dirty bus messier. I know even had yesterday and hail is being in tel aviv. You know oh. I don't know there's still something about being in tel aviv. I would still rather be here than jerusalem with us now also also with us in the capsule studio reserved for the semi vaccinated right behind us through the wall is a man whom the great saddam yamada might have had in mind when he said of judo and of life itself quote to gain mastery. You must unite the qualities of spirit strength technique and the ability to take the initiative and quote. I refer naturally to ohio delta zubeida. You heard his voice before. Ohio it'll be is a book reviewer for our ad. He rates for offscreen magazine and lately has written fiction for granted in the past hosted a weekly show on halloween. Tv on arts and culture in israel. He's admired for his genius loved for his warm human decency and envied for his effortless. Cool ohad how're you doing. I just can't get over the fact that it's called ju- dough and there are no holiday. Judokas like i know. I'm i'm kind of angry about that. I have to tell you there are places that you would think discrimination would not enter but it's everywhere. It's just everywhere. Yeah yeah now answer me. My name is no renato. Meet to boast but i had my once in a decade colonoscopy this past week and when i saw dr afterwards we want to hear more and i'm sitting behind you behind you so you can see how it's hard a little bit hard not to both about his so i saw the doctor afterwards and he said quote the inside of your colon

Angola Ben Gurion Airport Zambia International Judo Federation Mookie Israel Journal Of Borderlands Studies Savimbi Malawi Aviv Hilton Intel Porush Knesset Eastern Isler Ultra Orthodox Judaism Party TEL Tel Aviv Ministry Of Secular Culture An E. D
The US and the UK Almost Went to War over a Pig

Ridiculous History

07:48 min | 7 hrs ago

The US and the UK Almost Went to War over a Pig

"Just simplify and just call it war pig. You know what. Actually i am sold on that. And and since our better third super producer. Casey peg room is on adventures today. Classes out man. And you know. I gotta tell you. I think super producer. Casey program would super approve of the title war pig. Because i don't know if you noticed but he is a devout ozzy osbourne Fanatic are you kidding. It's like the only thing he talks about off just won't shut up about you. Know ironman ironman rate song of all time black sabbath. He's always like he's always pulling the actually's about black sabbath and he's like. Did you know they were actually a blues band. I and casey. I know and actually it wasn't. It was a dove. That ozzy bit the head off of not a not a rat. I obviously we are totally putting words in subaru easter. Casey peg rooms mouth But i imagine that he feels okay about black sabbath. Maybe i us some ozzy's latter day stuff got a little samey but i think his legacy is safe overall. He's also the father the weird kind of drunk uncle of reality television. Well you know one thing. I will say about k. C. is As funny 'cause future. Casey is editing. This one thing i will say about him is a lot of people. Don't know this but all of casey's many tattoos are direct references to black sabbath. So if you ever meet casey in person and you wanna get on his good side ask him about his and god forbid you meet him in a dark alley my friends and by the way. Casey is editing this and presumably rolling his eyes really hard right now We love you casey. We're just we're just giving you a hard time But you know Speaking of reality television The list today story has the kind of like early. Makings of the kind of drama. We absolutely live for in reality. Tv you know. It's got the conflict. It's got the simmering resentment you know. It's got the overreaction and ultimately got the kind of Not not too much of a spoiler alert but the kind of anti-climactic ending. Yes yeah if this were an episode of reality tv it would literally be called the pig episode and we could call it in war pig. But this is also known as the pig war or The san juan boundary dispute. This is weird. You're kidding about the pig episode. That is an official title of this This story as well. Yeah that's correct this. This is a weird one so a folks. You may be aware of the time that the uk went to war with what would become known as the united states in what we call the revolutionary war. But did you know the us and the uk almost went to war again. A due to a series of ridiculous events that began in eighteen. Fifty nine on an island called san juan island. San juan island has nothing to do with puerto rico at all. It is a chunk of land located between the us and vancouver island at the time. This place was home to settlers from the us and two british employees of the hudson bay company. What on earth you guys talking about. You may ask. Where's the pig Will will tell you about this. Strange series of events by the way you may have heard of the hudson bay company. They occupied Some kind of rarefied space in in the business world in that they were around in the eighteen hundreds and continues to be around today. They started off as a for trading company and then in two thousand six still a thing. were acquired by the well known entrepreneur american businessman jerry sucker for one point. One billion dollars It originally was a canadian owned company and that is very much the case in today's story. That's right that's right. So let's let's take a closer look at san. Juan island stood would way way way way way way way way. Before the arrival of europeans san juan island had its own thriving community and culture. It had a temperate climate. The soil was great. Had tons of resources marine timber especially and this bountiful land appealed to spain. Great britain and the us each of these empires each of these forces explored and charted and mapped to named the islands while they were staking. Overlapping claims to oregon county oregon county. You'll recognize day. As the present states of washington oregon idaho and then parts of montana wyoming and british columbia as well. I know you might be saying wait. Spain spain's in the mix will spain scan in the mix in terms of the name of the island but they had abandoned their claims by eighteen. Eighteen i think that's right They took off and left it to the english and the americans who formed a joint in eighteen eighteen. Which you know. It seemed nice enough at the time but to me the idea of joint occupation Between former bitter rivals Does seem to not necessarily have the longest term prospects In my opinion seems like somebody would have red flagged that but you know i guess it was a lucrative enough Deal that it made sense for both of them to play nice and apparently they were able to do that. They lived in relative harmony You know with Subjects of each shire. America doesn't have subjects citizens of the us and subjects of the british empire jointly occupied this land farming for grazing right Because again the the soil is very rich so it made for some good livestock grazing as well And also if you look at a map of this area and this is something we'll dive into a little bit later and stage show. You'll see that. San juan island in particular has a lot of strategic values. So of course you want. If you're the uk or the us at this time you want to control that spot you know resources aside you want to be able to be a gatekeeper. They're for transport so pension start to mount as he said no yes there are trade agreements. Yes there's heavy investment Between both of these nations both these countries but over oregon county the us forces think the british presence is offensive. Inherently profoundly fundamentally so because they're laboring under the concept of manifest destiny.

Casey Peg Casey San Juan Island Hudson Bay United States Ozzy Osbourne Oregon County Ozzy Jerry Sucker Spain Juan Island Europeans San Juan Island UK San Juan Vancouver Island Puerto Rico Great Britain Wyoming
CLASSIC: The Future of Drones

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

01:44 min | 8 hrs ago

CLASSIC: The Future of Drones

"Corporations direct access to our brains our point we no longer just consumers. At what point do we become their product. Listen to tomorrow's monsters on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts. I can't believe it years ago. You guys we did. An episode called the future of drones i. How long ago did we do. This wouldn't remember. It's gotta be twenty fourteen when he went thirteen. Maybe i don't know it was a long long time ago. I think drones were hot back then. The targeted killing was becoming a big big thing in the military. But then you know here just stateside at least in this case. The public was starting to see a lot. More drones in the air and companies. Were getting excited about it too. And we had the really like futurist saying this is going to be amazing for everyone. And then we had the dystopia. Ian futurists say this is another step on the path to An ai run hell scape and you don't. It's weird because we made this episode so long ago when so many things have happened since that the if anything this episode might be called like the scary presence of drones Interesting to see how much we got right. Oh boy it's dangerous game folks play along at home. Here is the future droughts from. Ufo's to ghosts and government cover ups histories witted with unexplained events. You can turn back now. Learn the stuff they don't want to. Now

Apple IAN
The Weather Underground Bombs the Capitol (1971)

This Day In Esoteric Political History

06:57 min | 11 hrs ago

The Weather Underground Bombs the Capitol (1971)

"My name is. Jody advocates this day march. Second nineteen seventy one. Afam was set off on the ground floor of the us capital causing extensive damage and opening. what capitol police. Chief james powell said appeared to be a serious crash in the already weakened in front of the building The bombing took place on march first. I should clarify but we do. In this episode. On my second now the bombing we would come to learn. Was the work of the weather underground. The leftist militant group that came out of the nonviolent protest movements of the sixties. The group got its name from a bob dylan lyric. You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows. They originally called the weatherman and then they changed their name to the weather underground. So let's talk about the bombing at the capitol. This era of political violence in the early seventies and maybe we can get into a little compare and contrast between leftists political tactics of the seventies and leftist political tactics of today. So let's to talk about and here as always is nicole. Hammer of hello nikki. Hey jodie and kelly carter jackson of wellesley. Hello kelly. hey there so let's start with the bombing itself. Kelly you wanna paint the scene of what went down on march first nineteen seventy-one. Yes sure so. Fortunately there are no deaths and there are no injuries with this explosion. Took place on the senate side. The building in an unmarked. Men's washroom and it happens about one thirty in the morning and interestingly enough there actually tipped off you know guards are giving a call about less than an hour before the bombing actually happens to warm then think lou because it also happened at one thirty in the morning. The building is not filled with people or senator or congressman at the time But when the explosion happened. It's a pretty big deal and the w. o. r. The weather underground organization took credit for the bombing said that it was in retaliation for the us bombing and raid in hanoi And this really sparks a number of violent incidences that are happening all through this period related to the war unrest You know waves against capitalism and socialism and things of that nature. You can see how this would be pretty unsettling for senators even though it happened at this early hour in the morning with aren't people around but this really is part of the social space where senators work It's their washroom. It's an unmarked when that's usually used by the senators. It's next to their barbershop back in the day. They could get their haircut while they were Sending and yet at the same time. I think it's really important point that this was a bombing that was aimed at sending a message rather than injuring people are killing people. And this was true of a lot of the this kind of terrorist violence in the nineteen seventies that it really was about the terror rather than the killing And you would get. I mean this is true. For ira bombings in britain although not exclusively like they often call ahead of time and give people a heads up morning to show that they could hurt people if they wanted to. They weren't going to do it in this case. And what was your sense of the reaction in the moment to this bombing Was the message sent in the way that you think it was intended. You know. I think the people were discomfited on there was a sense that there was growing restlessness and violence and of course is coming off the back of the nineteen sixties. Where there had been all these political assassinations There was foreign terrorism. That was happening at the same time plane hijackings and so. I think that it fed into this broader sense of a instability and yet at the same time i mean you listen to the news reports. And they're not exactly tearing their hair out over this. There is a kind of almost ironic nece to the way that they talk about. What's happening in part. I guess because it doesn't cause so much damage and it certainly doesn't cause death and so there's a little bit of A little bit of emotional distance from the terror. Yeah because no one is harmed It gets minimalized. I think in a lot of ways. But i think had at had the destruction even bigger not just the loss of lives or injuries but the destruction bigger also might have caused more of a Response or greater response. But there's a lesson here. I think of how violence can get normalized And certainly i think remembering that in this era As you were alluding to. Nicki i mean there's a great book about hijackings plane jacking. In this era planes we're getting hijacked like all the time and bombs. Were going off fairly often. And so you know. Political assassinations thinker. A different class but the sort of like quote unquote routine violence or drumbeat of ozzy. You you do get normalized to it. And i think you start at. It's important to remember that. There was an era in american history where that was the case and not. Just this era and kelly. I mean you you know you think about these areas all the time and so. I wonder if you have thoughts. Comparing this era to other eras of where just political violence is in the air. Well i mean there's barely a decade that ever passes american when there's not intense amounts of political violence for me in particular the eighteen fifties. You have these violence that are happening. All throughout the antebellum period but even if we were to point to recent memory you know in the past several years. We've had mass shootings on one a week or one. Every to weaken there was a numbness that came with those Mass shootings as well. Yeah and i think that the other context of violence for this conversation is the vietnam war. I mean we tend to separate out state-sanctioned violence when we're talking about political violence but part of the argument that the weather underground was making was that they were bringing the war home that just as the. Us was exercising this intense amount of violence abroad. That they were going to do as they were going to turn that violence in word on the united states and in this case fomento a violent revolution but there is this way that state violence refracted across the society and leads to more types of violence whether it's police violence whether it's military violence. I mean those things have an effect. I think the context of the vietnam wars important to understanding why they're so much instability in why there's a turned even more violence in this period. Sure and i mean the weather underground you know. Very explicitly was an anti war effort. That then started to align itself with other efforts at home but the vietnam war was the organizing principle around that group. So let's talk a little bit more about that group. And kelly looted to it a little bit but the shift from the sixties into the seventies the different kinds of antiwar efforts the amount of violence just paint that picture a little bit about

Chief James Powell Hey Jodie Kelly Carter Jackson Hello Kelly Weather Underground Organizati Capitol Police Jody Bob Dylan Wellesley United States Nikki Nicole Hanoi LOU Kelly Senate IRA Britain Nicki Ozzy
Part One: How The U.S.A. Murdered Panama

Behind the Bastards

08:09 min | 13 hrs ago

Part One: How The U.S.A. Murdered Panama

"Corporations direct access to our brains our point we no longer just consumers. At what point do we become their product. Listen to tomorrow's monsters on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts. Were warring my. I'm i'm robert evans hosted by into bastards. Podcast that's the worst people in all of history and consequently combat an awful lot of war crimes which is what we're going to be talking about today more or less with our special guests the air horns the air horns nine eight or nine airports chelsea. Are you doing today. I do in a day. It's all right little little cold and snowy out here in new york now. Got the Cut the lovely Brooklyn weather. But i i have at least a at least. They have a power in some kind of functioning functioning emergency services and and water and basic essentially. All those light yankee thing yeah this carpetbagger luxuries that we don't have down in texas. All we need is to freeze to death. Yeah and if we don't freeze to death to be built tens of thousands of dollars for several days of natural gas because that's how freedom looks. I'm in texas by the way Chelsea what do you know. What are you know about panama What i know about panama panama thinking about i usually think of teddy roosevelt and steam shovels. So your party. My animal yeah. That's that's that's what i usually think of I don't know much about the actual. I don't know much about it beyond like imperialism colonialism capitalism national strategy and engineering that is a lot of the history of panama. And that's we're going be talking about today today Are bastard is the united states of america. A little time for your mida heard of. I don't know In specifically we are talking about the relationship between the united states of america in panama. Which is one of the most abusive relationships in the entire history of geopolitics. It's really outstanding. Hey that's a nice. It's got there. Be a shame if america were to happen to it. North america So this this was all inspired when a friend advised me to take a look at a documentary called the panama deception which was made in like nineteen ninety four and is quite good and so i decided to start looking a little deeper into the history of panama. I found a book length. Study on the history of us panamanian relations and about two articles and my god it is. It is chelsea. It is as fucked up as i dunno sophie. What's something fucked up I'm like a bed lashed to the ceiling. I mean that makes sense. I was gonna say when people put their beds in their closets and then like then they can't get into a get stock and then you just it's just like you have no bed or caused. Yeah it's as fucked up as a bed closet chelsea why i usually. I usually think of somebody who like Uses the toilet and then doesn't slash comeback three or four days later Yeah you could say choked on coffee you could. You could say that. The history of us panamanian relations would be embodied as like if panama is like a small apartment in the us is a guest at a party in that apartment. The us has just like continuously leaving upper deckers for the last hundred and fifty years or so just just just shit in the water tank. That's that's america as regards panama. It also drinking all of their beer. It's good stuff just really good stuff So panama's one of those countries. You can look on a map and immediately know is just kind of completely fucked in a historic sense right. It's a beautiful place but in terms of geopolitics it's just doomed because of where it is in the world. It's sorta like how you can look at ukraine with its fertile soil in this position like right between the middle east eastern europe and western europe and be like boy. I bet those people got their shit fucked up constantly because other folks needed wheat panama's in the same kind of position their northern neighbor is costa rica and their southern neighbor is columbia. The nation is the bridge between central and south. America and more to the point is the narrowest landmass in central america. So if you wanted to say dig. A big trench through a country to let people travel from the atlantic ocean to the pacific ocean without sailing around an entire extra continent. It's basically the best place to do. It and people realized that pretty much as soon as they found panama in the seventeen hundreds and eighteen hundreds travelers. Who wanted to go from new york. To san francisco would generally go by way of panama. So if you were trying to get to like doing the new york to san francisco route traveling through the middle of the united states. Just you you would. You would probably die horribly right. We all played oregon trail or some version of that. So your best bet was to sail down to panama from new york. Then spend like three days going across panama. On the back of a borough and then ceo from panama's pacific coast up to san francisco. That was how you did like with from east coast to west coast back in the day And i think if things were still that way brentwood probably be cheaper in los angeles. So you've got this. You've got this perfectly situated country and from kind of the beginning of the united states being a thing american or us leaders are looking down there and being like boy. I bet we can fuck and cut. Cut a hole in the middle of that country and that would really make it. Easier for us to colonize north america So like most of latin america panama was owned by spain. For centuries and spain used its resources to buy gold for the various kings and spices to make better pie in eighteen twenty one panama freed itself from. Its now ailing colonial master. There was a strong independence movement and the isthmus but they were overruled by the folks who wanted to join the grand columbia federation so he had panama like columbia. A whole bunch of central and south america separates from spain in eighteen. Twenty one and a bunch of guys in panama are like. Hey you know it'd be rad. If we were our own country but more of them are like you know it would probably be a better idea if we were part of columbia. 'cause we're tiny in colombia's real big and they're probably just gonna take us over if we're if we're not if we don't get on board the columbia train. It's the story as old as time now. Panama subsequently tried to free itself from columbia and eighteen. Th they they they of different independence attempts in the eighteen thirties up to eighteen forty but it never quite worked out and the region's separatist tendencies were boosted by the fact that they were very isolated. There were no roads connecting them to columbia. There were a couple of cities and towns in. Panama was not heavily populated and they didn't really trade with colombia. They mainly traded with the caribbean and Other parts of like south america rather than their countrymen in bogota from the beginning of panama american saw the misses something to exploit in eighteen forty six. The usa signed the bid lack treaty with colombia. And this basically in the treaty the us promised to protect colombia's control over panama. In exchange for access to any future canal that might be dug through the country. So we were like. Hey hey columbia. You know you guys are new country. You don't have much of a military yet. This place places realized invaluable will will take. We'll protect it for you. We're a big country. We've got a whole lot of developed. We got ships and everything you do. You just chill out. Let us protect panama. And if someone happens to build a canal there we get free access to it. You know surely a deal without any sort of alterior motives to it. That will never be abused by the united states. Right wasn't the united states at the time still considered by the rest of world to be a young upstart with. Oh yeah Like in comparison compares to the european powers of the time like well. Yeah france in france and spain for the usa in this period is younger than nancy. Pelosi

Panama USA Robert Evans Columbia New York Texas Teddy Roosevelt San Francisco Brooklyn Spain Sophie Apple North America Grand Columbia Federation Colombia Western Europe Atlantic Ocean Pacific Ocean Ukraine Costa Rica
The Cassandra

I Spy

06:04 min | 13 hrs ago

The Cassandra

"This is spy show from foreign policies. Were spies it turned out. This guy had wormed his way into the center of the communist command for the saigon area and the data he had access to all their secrets. This guy t you hackel from. Our standpoint was the walking equivalent of having a spy in hitler's bunker from foreign policy. Welcome back to spy on each episode. We get one former intelligence operative to tell the story of one operation. I'm margo martindale frank. Snap was a cia analyst based in saigon during the vietnam war in april of nineteen seventy five. He discovered that north vietnamese forces were preparing. Large-scale attack on saigon snap wrote reports about the coming offensive based on information from his best source a communist defector named t. You hackel but the higher ups refuse to believe it. When the attack began later that month americans conducted a frenzied evacuation leaving behind many vietnamese allies and marking a humiliating end to the war. This is snap story about the fall of saigon. Early april nineteen seventy five four weeks before the end. The ambassador graham martin and the cia station. Chief tom bogor or convinced for various reasons that either we could win the war with what we had left or that we could negotiate a surrender and the question was what we're our best assets telling us. The first guy that we needed to check in with was a hanoi source. I had been for the past two years exclusively responsible for debriefing and briefing. This asset he came into saigon snuck into saigon. Ci caterers laid on a big sumptuous lunch. To make up for the slim pickings he had to endure in hanoi. And so we opened up in. What he said simply was this. The communists are on a blood sat. They are going to go for military victory in the shortest possible time. Well there seemed to be an absolute thumbs down on the idea that we could ingratiate our way out of this madness. After talking to the source. I raised to the embassy to let my immediate superior. Tom po. garneau. What i learned and i briefed ambassador martin. I had been doing this job now. For the past three years. I had risen to become the ambassadors chief briefing officer. I was extremely close to him. I had once dated his daughter and survived. The break-up to remain in the ambassador's good graces. The chief. Tom bogor and i were very close. Because bogart love to use me to spy on martin and martin us made us by on pogo. So i take this report back to the embassy. And i tell pogo what's going on paul. Gar didn't like it at all. He didn't like to hear the communists weren't a blood sent and that there was probably no chance for negotiations so he tried to minimize this intelligence and he proceeded with the idea that we could somehow soccer the other side into negotiations now. Graham martin. Didn't mike this message either. He didn't want to hear that. The communists were barreling their way in martin had convinced himself with the help of his military advisers at the defense at shays office that saigon could rally the forces that had been salvaged from the communist offensive up north that they could build a defense line just north of saigon forty miles out whole the north vietnamese advance there until the monsoons intruded to slow the communist down bogged them down and they would be in a position to fight again another day so both of them were absolutely averse to evacuation planning because evacuation planning could bring on chaos and confusion chaos and confusion would make it impossible to negotiate a settlement on saigon's terms so i took away from this meeting boy. We're in trouble. And we should accelerate manning for an evaluation. We should start reducing the american community which was about six thousand strong that included businessmen back acuras contractors spokes diplomats. Whatever we should begin reducing this number so that we would have only small chopper loads in the end and time was absolutely of the essence because we have the entire north vietnamese army with an a drive hours. Dr downtown side. So if we didn't begin planning for an evacuation right

Hackel Saigon Graham Martin Margo Martindale Frank Chief Tom Bogor CIA Hanoi Tom Po Ambassador Martin Tom Bogor Hitler Martin Vietnam Garneau Shays Office Bogart Soccer Confusion Paul
Last attempted assassination of Queen Victoria / First test flight of the Concorde - March 2

This Day in History Class

04:49 min | 14 hrs ago

Last attempted assassination of Queen Victoria / First test flight of the Concorde - March 2

"Through the second half of the twentieth century. One focus was supersonic airliners or aircraft that could carry passengers in november of nineteen sixty two for a and france signed a treaty to jointly develop a supersonic transport the british aircraft corporation and the french company iro spots ya'll were responsible for creating the airframe rolls royce and francis national society for the study and construction of aviation engines. Were in charge of developing the jet engine. Construction of two prototypes began in france and england in nineteen sixty five four olympus five ninety three turbojet engines powered the aircraft engine produced thirty eight thousand pounds of thrust it had double delta wings and a droop nose for better landing ability. The concorde was shown to the public for the first time into lose france in nineteen sixty seven. The soviet union's t one forty. Four was the first commercial supersonic transport. It took its first flight. On december thirty first nineteen sixty eight by this point the concord with merely ready for its maiden flight as well poor. Weather conditions caused a couple of test flights to be canceled but on march first nineteen. Sixty-nine pilot andre turcotte flew the concorde owino from duluth. The plane was in the air for twenty seven minutes before it landed using a braking parachute and reverse thrust the t you one forty four also went into commercial service before the concord in december of nineteen seventy five still airlines around the world placed orders for the concord. The did face some setbacks before it could enter commercial service. The jet was extremely loud. So people who live near airports voiced concerns about the level of noise the concord generated and nineteen seventy three oil crisis led airlines to drop their concord. Court orders but in the end seven concourse entered service with the british airways and seven with air france on january twenty first nineteen seventy six to concourse took off on the planes. I commercial supersonic flights with ticketed passenger was from british airways and it left heathrow airport in london and headed to bahrain. The other was from air france and left paris. Orly airport bound for brazil with the stop in senegal. The concord began completing daily flights from europe to the us. The jet reduced flight times greatly. It had a maximum cruising speed of mach two point. Oh four or more than twice the speed of sound. The airlines continued operating safe. Passenger flights of the concorde for years but in two thousand one caught on fire just after taking off and the crash killed one hundred. Thirteen people concord. Were temporarily taken out of service and returned to service by two thousand and one. The airlines did not recover from the incident. The concorde took its last commercial flight in two thousand and three the to you. One forty four had made its last flight in one thousand nine hundred nine though. There are companies. Planning to revive supersonic transport there are no supersonic airliners in commercial service. Today i'm code and hopefully you know a little more about history today. He did yesterday. Singer best history means to us. At t d. I h podcast on facebook instagram and twitter. Email still works. Send us a note at this day. At iheartmedia dot com. Thanks for listening. And we'll see you again tomorrow. More podcasts from iheartradio. Visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. It's women's history month in kohl's is proud of the talented women who make a difference every day at kohl's like the women who make up their kohl's diversity design council a group that includes female designers who developed a special product line promoting the empowerment of women but kohl's is inches elevating this generation of women there elevating the next generation to kohl's invested one hundred thousand dollars in the smart girls program part of the boys and girls clubs of america to help club members navigate adolescence. Learn more at kohls dot com for the ones who know. Safety isn't a catchphrase. It's a culture and the ones who helped make sure everyone makes it home safe for the safety minded who watch was backs grainger. Offers supplies and solutions were every industry has well safety and training to keep your facility safe and your people safer call click grainger dot com or just stop by grainger for the ones who get it done.

France Francis National Society For T Concord Andre Turcotte British Airways Heathrow Airport Orly Airport Olympus Soviet Union Duluth Kohl England Senegal Bahrain Iheartradio Brazil Kohl's Diversity Design Counci Paris London
281 | Run and Gun

Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

10:20 min | 14 hrs ago

281 | Run and Gun

"London to study economics and trade and diego did just that and plenty more. He learned english and made friends. Who would give him the idea for his smuggling empire because along the way he came to see that if there's one thing big international shipping companies like it's making money hand over fist while dodging government oversight and government tax collectors and in that business diego was about to become an international superstar. In fact he had a plan to do some club or dealing that would see him set up a smuggling network that criss crossed the atlantic after diego wrapped up five years of studying business in london and arrived back home in spain. He saw his competitor's making quite a pretty penny all under the table he saw wealthy american buyers paying big money for illegal spanish oil and wine on the black market if was really dialed into just how much smuggling was going on. You would've known that. Other shipping companies were dodging taxes and pocketing prophets. Not just on wine and oil but on all kinds of spanish merchandise even cloth and raisins and diego wanted in on that game so after his father jose died diego rallied his brothers and set his plan in motion burst. He helped some businesses across the pond. I new ways to sell their own products like lumber and even prefabricated houses. Those were shipped to spain. Diego even set up a successful gambit to smuggle american wheat flour from philadelphia to northern spain. And then back across the atlantic to cuba. It dodged authorities and kept things out of sight. The documents aren't quite clear after all smugglers. Don't usually want a paper trail but we can easily guess that the shipping lanes from spain to havana were a little more open than the lanes from philadelphia to cuba. And that wasn't all there were also luxury goods going the other way to working with the family business in massachusetts diego and his brothers shipped across fine european silk in unprecedented amounts wealthy americans with a taste for the opulence of distant shores. Were getting a little something special. And all under the radar and american money was getting back to diego's spanish banks just the way he wanted but then things took a turn because other orders started to come in and they weren't just silk now diego's scripps partners wanted something far darker guns you see. His american contacts had been shipping and weapons from other places in europe not least the city of amsterdam but a recent crackdown had dried that up. It sent them looking for a new contact to get weapons of war into their hands and diego's contacts in. Boston realized that he had a talent for doing business. While ducking the law. They offer diego and his brother's an enormous sum of money to become merchants of death. We don't know whether or not this may feel guilty. But we do know that he was the man for the job. He hesitated i. He told his massachusetts contacts that guns in spain while they were only made the government even so he didn't want to lose the deal. He told them that he had found stockpile of over one thousand handguns and three hundred rifles. That had just been manufactured for the spanish army. If his american buyers wanted them they could probably get them out of the country and of course the sounded just like what diego's contact wanted so he got his hands on the weapons with ammunition to follow. He was now officially a gun runner. It didn't take long for his guns to be put to use. Though in fact the same year he sent that first shipment. There was an open gun battle in massachusetts even without his name in the headlines diego's illegal firearms. Were all over the international news. That didn't stop him though over the next few years. His family trading company would ship across thirty thousand rifles. Five hundred thousand bullets and twelve thousand grenades in more than two hundred pieces of artillery. In fact diego was so successful. Making business contacts for selling illegal weapons. In america years later spain would make him the ambassador to the united states because the people of massachusetts in philadelphia. Well they were fighting the british government and diego day gardell key was the smuggler who provided guns for the first battles of the american revolutionary war. this episode was made possible by proactive. We all have stress in our lives from little too. Big stressors and stress can cause acne or make existing outbreaks worse. Don't let acne stress you out. Get that clear. Skin feeling with proactive. Proactive combines gentle skin care with clinically proven. Acne fighting ingredients to treat your skin. It's the first combination therapy system that started skin-care revolution. And they have three different systems. Designed for your skin type. Each system is made of clinically proven ingredients and tested by dermatologists. Meaning there's a three step system designed just for you and with their subscription plans you can have clear skin consistently without heading to the store right. Now is a great time to try proactiv for our podcast listeners. You can get a special limited time. Offer it by going to proactive dot com slash curiosities. Subscribe today. and you'll receive proactive. Hydrating duo as a free gift. That includes four hydrogel masks and the green tea moisturizer. Best of all you'll get free. Shipping again visit proactive dot com slash curiosities to take advantage of this special offer. Now that's proactive. Dot com slash curiosities. Subscribe to consistently clear skin. According to some figures of speech. Getting numerous people involved in a project can spell doom for its completion. Too many cooks spoil the broth the more chickens in the coop the more poop and the fewer the eggs and of course a camel is a horse designed by a committee. All those phrases have some truth to them and at last idiom is particularly appropriate discussing project like the bristol. Brab is on as world war. Two raged across england germany and beyond the british aircraft industry decided to put all of its effort behind manufacturing combat planes with their focus dedicated to one pursuit that left a gaping hole in another demographic civilians after all the war would one day and without a commercial airline industry for public use britain would fall behind the competition especially the united states so the government formed a committee to be led by a man named john more bras. First baron brand is on tara a name as large as the plane that would share it under the barons leadership. The bravo's on committee developed a report in which five plane designs were. Studied and four were recommended for construction. They varied in size and range with some beans smaller. Puddle jumpers and others a bit larger in scale however. It was the type one that captured. Everyone's imagination the type one would be a massive transatlantic capable of carrying three hundred passengers across the ocean but the committee was worried that first class travelers would dislike flying for hours with little room to spread out instead they opted for sixty first class seats and plenty of room. In fact comfort with such a priority there were plans to include a movie theater. and cocktail lounges. Well the bristol. Brab is on burying the model name of type. One six seven boasted fuselage of one hundred eighty feet long an enormous wingspan of two hundred thirty feet. In length. for comparison the boeing seven. Forty seven has ranged in wing spans from one hundred ninety feet to two hundred twenty four and it was to be powered by a bristol. Centaurus eighteen cylinder radial engines capable of producing over twenty six hundred horsepower. Each this plane wasn't just going to be the largest to ever take to the skies. It was also going to be the most technologically advanced. They'd featured servoz and sensors to prevent the wings from bending during turbulence engineers. Outfitted it with high pressure hydraulics and electric engine controls. A first for modern aircraft at the time. But erin you might say that is a lot of airplane and it was probably heavy and you wouldn't be wrong. But a unique faction process was developed to use that least amount of metal necessary all over the wings body thus reducing its overall weight. The original plan had been to build a total of eight of these planes. Little hangers were even constructed to house them but only one was ever fully made. The bristol is on had its maiden in early. September of nineteen forty nine after working out some kinks with the steering. It soared over bristol. England for about twenty five minutes at an altitude of three thousand feet and top speed of one hundred sixty miles per hour. The british press dubbed her the queen of the skies and that was just about the nicest thing anyone had or ever would say about it. The bristol bribe's on was heavy. Slow and unresponsive. It was also costly to build maintain and operate at a time when airlines were focused less on comforts and more on carrying as many passengers as possible at one time so in the brand is on finally went on sale. Nobody bought it three point. Four million pounds mostly down the drain but all wasn't lost. Many of the new technologies that had gone into building it were used on more successful planes later on plus john more bribe's on a pilots in his own right had done the impossible. He'd managed to get to pigs to fly during his lifetime. There was the type one six seven that bore his name and in nineteen o nine. He carried an actual live pig in a basket tied to the wing struts of his own by plane. And if that's not curious. I don't know what is i. Hope you've enjoyed today's guided tour of the cabinet of kyrie. Aussies subscribe for free on apple podcasts. Or learn more about the show by visiting curiosities. Podcast dot com. The show was created by me. Erin minke in partnership with how stuff works. I make another award. Winning show called lor which is a podcast book series and television show and you can learn about it over at the world of lor dot com until next time

Diego Spain Philadelphia Massachusetts Diego Scripps Partners Massachusetts Cuba Gardell London Criss Spanish Army Bristol United States Brab Havana Baron Brand Jose Amsterdam
Is the Free Radical Theory of Aging Wrong?

Stuff You Should Know

07:33 min | 14 hrs ago

Is the Free Radical Theory of Aging Wrong?

"Welcome to the podcast. I'm josh in this chuck and there's jerry and we're all looking vibrant and healthy and just so alive and sexy nemecs stuff you should know. Jerry's code is shining. she's got the high pro glow. Do you remember that. I do You know we give our dogs the This salmon juice comes in a squirt bottle. Whoa it's i like salmon skin oil and makes coat shiny and it smells like salmon skin which i love. That's cool you me. Straight up cuts salmon with the skin on for moma like she. That's what she has his cooked food for a love salmon skin. It's the best thing ever. It's so good. I just love love Like raw salmon chuck. I like that too. I like it smoke to Sure sure what else injectable salmon stick it in my neck end up with kind of like a requiem for a dream thing going on. That's right But you know this all dovetails in anti-oxidants. I think it does. Because i think if you eat a lot of raw salmon especially good stuff you know nothing grown in a toxic sewage dump. You're gonna live a really really long time and we've known it for a very long time that if you eat healthy food you're probably going to age a lot better Or a lot more. You're going to stay a lot healthier as you age than say you would if you just ate junk for the whole time. It seems like a no brainer but along the way a lot of people have stopped to ask exactly why that might be ram and we should say shoutout to book Which has an entire chapter chapter eight on aging. It's called aging colon. Do we gotta in. It's pretty good one. If if i do say so. I think the first line of that chapter says avoid sewer salmon. That's precisely right. I mean that's just some of the best advice anyone could ever give anybody shirt so a lot of people are seeing have stopped an athlete. Why why you know. Why would food help you. And obviously we need food for fuel but it turns out that especially in the nineties. A lot of food kind of hit the scene. Well the food was already there but they were promoted a different way. Thanks to some some recent findings that decided that food that are high in antioxidants. would help you age a lot. Better possibly prolong your life and prevent certain kinds of age related diseases. Everything from cancer to neuro. Degenerative diseases like alzheimer's just for meeting the food you eight and it all seemed to have something to do with those antioxidants and that concept took off like a rocket and it's still around today actually. Yeah and this is when listeners. You're saying god. Are josh shotgun us now. That sciences antioxidants aren't good too and we. Well let's just hang onto that you'll find out by the end of the episode. Yeah that's the people to stick around. That's the big reveal. Let's give them some mcgovern's chuck Yeah well the the point of the whole intro. Here though is that it was a big marketing. Blitz everything from blueberries to a kale. I mean good lord. We had kale rammed down our throat like figuratively and literally the past decade plus vitamins multivitamins victim and vitamin c. Beta carotene just all of these superfoods green tea of course which we talked about. Yeah and we're not seeing these things aren't good for you. And he's all great great things to eat But they were being touted as being high in antioxidants and it will help you age and it will help you combat something that everyone just heard the words free radicals in in consumer said want like the sound of those Yeah exactly let's. Let's kill them even though we don't understand them right. Someone literally shoved down your throat once if you've never gone to that restaurant. No kale shove. Kale me crazy. That explains a lot. It's kills fine but kale chips donate more than like ten of them. You'll get sick to your stomach. Yeah so The the you you hit upon this whole point. It's not so much antioch are good for you. It's that free radicals are bad for you. That was the premise of this whole thing in the nineties and this idea of free radicals is rooted in some really deep science and had a lot of scientific backing for a really long time. And i guess to kind of to get a little bit of this out. There like way overshot itself. There was a really good sensible hypothesis in the scientific community ran with it and then they started doing studies and it wasn't entirely just scientific community. it was largely those same marketers. Who were making money off these superfoods. You know that they could slap a label on there now. It just got over hyped before before the data was fully in and my for my money though like once the data sir coming in it got even more interesting. But let's just go back to the beginning of all this. Because like i was saying. Free radicals formed the basis for this whole thing. And there's this whole idea that it's called the free radical theory of aging and it turns out that the guy who came up with this was a an md but he became. He became interested in all of this when he was a biochemist working for shell oil Developing things like pesticides strips the the no peice strip very famous kind of Pesticides strip the united states was developed. By this guy named dr denham. harman Back in the fifties and also in the fifties he came up with that free radical theory of aging. Yes he was working at shell and one of the things that he was doing at the time was working on chemical additives. That would you know they found out that. Sulfur and phosphorus were getting spoiled. These compounds were breaking down in the oil. And they were really degrading over time because the free radical chain reactions and they learned back then and this is pretty amazing for the mid nineteen fifties There was something called Free radicals these reactive particles that would take electrons from other atoms and then those atoms would then say well. Wait a minute. I'm i'm outta whack now. I want to steal some electrons get back in balance again so it started this chain reaction where each neighbor was getting their electrons stolen and in the case of oil this sulfur and phosphorus would just continue to break down until it was just gross. It was basically worthless so he studying this stuff. He reads an article in the ladies home journal called tomorrow. You may be younger. And he was like wait a minute and he was like. I'm studying these free radicals. it's breaking down oil. We have cells in our body We know that that the atomic bomb x-rays and all that kind of radiation really increases the free radicals in your body and you should see somebody after atomic bomb and he put two and two together and he's like this is it. This is why were aging.

Salmon Chuck Degenerative Diseases Alzheimer's Josh Chuck Jerry Mcgovern Dr Denham Cancer Harman United States Ladies Home Journal
Episode 337: Henry Cavendish (Entry 197.JB2825)

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

06:45 min | 14 hrs ago

Episode 337: Henry Cavendish (Entry 197.JB2825)

"A remember growing up thinking that was kind of a personality type. Yeah and as a kid. I think you're very aware of sinus. Because unless you're like the one percentile most outgoing kid you're pure shy in some ways right. You're shy of new people. Your side adults. Were you shy. I feel like i was shy of grownups. I remember hiding behind some curtains in our living room. One time my parents had friends over. And i did not want to be on display as far as my family's story agra goes. I was not shy at all. My mom said that. When i was a an infant or toddler age child i would try to meet the eyes of every person in the grocery store and if one of them would meet my eyes i would bat my eyelashes and try to get them to come over and a young bill. Clinton tickle me under the chance to albertsons to all. The moms always loved grownups. I think if if there's any place. I was shy. It was with other kids in the sense of like a group of kids playing over there. I have no idea how to approach them how to behave. Yeah i feel like when we talk about the tr- just the foundational traumas of childhood. We always focus too much on the family like it really is just the terror of what some other kid on the playground might do. Yeah he might. Just what if you just said something mean earn. Knock you over for no reason to. That's more dangerous than almost for most of us than anything. That could happen at home. So i think a lot of people. That's the those are the foundational child experience. I didn't relate to other little boys. I would go try and talk to them and i don't know if you remember all the way back to where your son was a little boy. Little boys don't wanna talk. They want to do something truck noises. They wanna hit you. Knock you down so i would go try and talk to them and i was never successful until i figured out that the girls were my friends. Yeah it's a lot that's a lot easier. Its own kind of terror to that continues to govern my life. I just feel like shyness. Now i think of it as a symptom. It could be any number of things like my daughter has. She was always a super outgoing kid. That would just march up to any little any little kid on the playground and they'd be best friends in five minutes and then she'd cry on the car on the way home because she'd never see them again but she kind of has a real anxiety about dealing with adults to the point like she doesn't want to order restaurants. She's like you order for me. I don't want to have to choose. And i don't want to talk to the server you know. He's pretty good with us. Oh yeah like you know with. She's if anything. She's overconfident with people she knows. Yeah but there's that or there's just kind of an introver- introvert kind of personality. We you and i both have this degree where we can work a room. But that's not how we recharge. Yeah that's right. Well i feel like these days or at least in the last ten years. Shyness has become almost a political designation. Right there are people who are adults and identify as as super shy and that dictates how they live their lives who their friends okay with the extroverts have rammed the culture for so long. I think it's okay to have them be the ones for a change in that everybody online just jumping to be the first run to announce you know what i'm actually wait for it. An introvert a. Who would have guessed that you didn't see that county extroverts so there's the end and there's just varying places on severe. Maybe what our parents would have thought of as severe shyness. We now would diagnosis different locations on a spectrum of of of autism similar behaviors where there's actually something neurologically different about the way the person handles sociality and social cues right. I mean it's there is such a thing as a librarian. Someone has to sit in a quiet room. Far i've said this before. But when i worked in tech i was surrounded by people who had chosen a job where they would never have to see anyone. Yeah least of all a user of the thing they're working on you know what's interesting. Is that some of the most introverted people. I know who formerly worked in offices before the pandemic in conversation with them. I've always kind of open with boy. You must love the pandemic because you don't have to deal with people anymore and i've heard multiple very shy. Introverted people say actually. I had plenty of solitude before because i made sure of it. My work life was the only place i interacted with people. And i miss it right there. Ideal was not zero interaction. They had cleverly managed the kind of interaction they wanted. Yeah and then and now the virus that little bit of like standing next to the microwave in the employee break room. It was enough to interacting with colleagues. Because i've been very lucky to have the pandemic privilege of just to live with some people. I like right and that kind of blunts it because they were most of the people i would see on a normal day you know. Can you imagine. And i'm sure this is true for millions of people. They don't like their home right. They have a bad dad or a bad room. Mater very like alcoholic mother whatever or brick wall instead of view. You know they look forward to just you know decompressing for a few hours in a a bar a club or a restaurant or a bookstore. Right they have a cot in a in a in a single room occupancy hotel and this has been a night that's the place they retreat to for the least amount of time possible and then this yeah. I do feel lucky about about that. Do you know people who are maybe performative. Or bordering on exhibitionist in some professional field. That are kind of painfully shy in person. Oh a lot yeah. That's not uncommon. Not at all in the early day in the you know back when rock and roll was a very different thing you know. Rock musicians and sex workers had a lot of overlap. Socially and i knew a lot of women in their twenties that were making a living performative lee. As as you know dancers or or other kind of burlesque performers and a lot of them were not especially social but had figured out a way to Behind glass or on a stage you know be i mean the the most social

Albertsons Clinton Autism
The Kardashians | Break The Internet | 4

Even the Rich

04:24 min | 14 hrs ago

The Kardashians | Break The Internet | 4

"A little birdie told me that this podcast has swearing okay. that sounds like a little snitch. It's twelve th two thousand. Fourteen kim kardashian is at her home in hidden hills. California she sitting on the couch opening her male her long black hair trails over her shoulders as she sorts through the pile. John johnke john not junk excitedly. Kim grabs a long white envelope. She's been waiting for this. She sticks her long manicured nail under the sealed flat and not one but two sleek shiny magazine slip out. Kim believe it. Her shoot for paper magazine has finally been released. They love the photo so much that they decided to go with two different covers. Kim puts them side by side. They're similar. kim stands on a wooden crate with her hair up in a fancy top. Not she's wearing these vintage long. Black silk gloves an an endless strand of mickey modo pearls. wrap around her neck but that's where the similarities end. The first cover is risque and sensual not safe for work kim's naked body glisten with oil as she holds her glittery dress just below her but which is the focal point of the shot. She faces away from the camera but twists around with a smirk. Though stealing a glance at the photographer the second cover is more subdued. But a lot more zany this time. Kim's wearing the glittery black dress she stands profile arching her back and sticking out her derriere. She left while popping. Open a bottle of champagne. The golden liquid streams upwards an over her head pouring into a cocktail glass delicately balanced on her digitally extended behind. Cam loves both covers by it. She likes the second one. Just a smidge more. It was john. Paul vowed idea and kim has been dying to work with him. Has work has a tendency to as vogue puts it blur the boundaries between publicity and high art. He's the reason she signed on to do the cover of paper magazine. She isn't even making a dime off the gig weight. She's not getting anything while. The accompanying article discusses her new coffee table book. That's about to be released. So that's some free publicity for her. But kim isn't even thinking about that right now. She's transfixed by the photos and ecstatic over how they turned out. She's used to serious fashion editorials. But these photos are campy. They're fun. Kim smirks as she reads the caption splayed across both covers right under her. Perky dairy air are the words break. The internet and kim wants to see if she can do just that so she pulls out her phone and opens twitter. she starts to scroll. Both covers have just been released online ahead of the magazine. Heading newsstands and hashtag break. The internet is already trending. of course it is. She beans as she reads tweets from her fans. They love the photos. They're saying the covers are already iconic and kim looks beautiful scrolling kim's face falls the words racist and cultural appropriation flash across the screen. Here we go. Yup cam tries to focus. But the room is spinning. She needs to piece together. Why people are angry a minute ago. She was on top of the world now. She's being accused. Racism and people are asking him to explain herself actually more demanding it but that just isn't something chemist prepared to do so she puts down her phone and hopes it blows over so far in her career. Kim has stayed mum on politics and social issues. She and her family have opened up their lives to the world but kept their views private. And that's worked for them in the past but with the cultural climate changing staying on the fence is getting harder and harder to more and more people. Kim's public image is starting to feel tone deaf and passe and kim's going to have to choose between keeping up with the times or watching her fame pass her by snacks. We all love him. We all crave him even when we just ate lunch. Or i don't know maybe

KIM John Johnke John Hidden Hills Paper Magazine Kim Kardashian Kim Smirks California Paul John Twitter
In the Driver's Seat: Olive Ann Beech

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:46 min | 14 hrs ago

In the Driver's Seat: Olive Ann Beech

"Hello from wonder media network. I'm jenny kaplan. And this is encyclopedia will manteca. today's trailblazing. woman shaped the skies. She was indispensable to the success of one of the biggest aircraft companies history though the names of her male contemporaries in the aviation world are more. Well known there's no denying the merit of one of his nicknames. The queen of the aircraft industry. Today we're talking about the life and legacy of olive. Ann beech all loop was born olive. An miller a rural farmhouse in waverly kansas on september. Twenty fifth nine hundred ninety three. She was the youngest of four girls. Her parents suzanna and franklin were from ohio and of humble working class stock olives. Mother was the head of the house. She was in charge of raising livestock. All the family property was in her name and she made most of the decisions from a young age. Olive also took on major responsibilities. She had her own bank account by the time she was seven and by the age of eleven. All of was writing the family checks. Olives family moved to wichita kansas in nineteen seventeen. We're all of skipped high school with her financial acumen. She instead went straight to business and secretarial college when she graduated. She found work as an administrative assistant to an electrical contractor in augusta kansas. By the age of twenty one all was working in. Wichita is a bookkeeper and secretary for the nascent aircraft company. Travel air founded by clyde cessna. Lloyd steverman and walter beach. All loop was ambitious eager to learn everything she could before long. She was handling all of the company's correspondence and financial transactions and was promoted to office manager and personal secretary. Walter beach walter was said to have a love for practical jokes. Legend has it. He wants invited olive to fly with him. A two seat open cockpit by plane hoping to scare her with some fancy air tricks in the air rolled the plane upside down hooping to look back and see the terror on all of space when to his horror. He looked back and saw an empty seat when he landed. He headed to olives parents home to break the news of a terrible accident to his wilder. Meant all of was the one to open the door. When he knocked she had hidden in the cockpit. And when walter landed snuck out and raced home to prank him in return

Jenny Kaplan Ann Beech Kansas Suzanna Waverly Clyde Cessna Lloyd Steverman Walter Beach Franklin Walter Beach Walter Wichita Ohio Olive Augusta Travel Walter
Edward Teach: Blackbeard Pt. 1

Dictators

07:20 min | 16 hrs ago

Edward Teach: Blackbeard Pt. 1

"May twenty second seventeen eighteen. The people of charleston south carolina then known as charlestown gazed out into the harbor in confusion. Four ships one large frigate and three sloops sailed into the harbor that afternoon but didn't dock instead. They formed an arc near the harbour entrance almost like a barrier. After some time a pilot boat captain decided he and his men were going to go. Investigate grabs the ship got caught on the sandbar and needed to tow the pilot. Boat made its way to the frigate. When it pulled up alongside it. The crew was held and promptly held at gunpoint. The pilot realize these men holding cutlasses and flint block pistols were pirates. The armed men parted down the middle making way for their captain as the pilot and his crew gazed upon him. There is widened in uttar fear before them stood a giant of a man with a dark braided beard. He was dressed in a bright red. Velvet coat flashy black pants and buckled. Shoes it was at that moment that the pilot knew who had taken siege of the bay. Captain edward teach the most feared pirate in the atlantic. The man everyone along the coast new as blackbeard. Welcome to dictators as spotify original from podcast. I'm richard and i'm kate. You can find all episodes of dictators and all other spotify originals from park cast for free on spotify this season on dictators. We're exploring some of history's most famous pirate leaders. Although democracy prevailed in the choosing of a pirate captain many of these larger than life men held onto power grew tyrannical. Means this week we begin our tale about the most notorious pirate in history. Edward teach commonly known as blackbeard. We'll explore blackbeard's mysterious origins as he went from obscure crew member to fear some pirate captain. Earning a reputation as the devil incarnate. Next week we'll dive into blackbeard's treachery as he portrays the bulk of his crew. In order to save himself and how a self serving governor was determined to put an end to blackbeard's reign of terror. Coming up we'll set sail. This episode is brought to you by landrover. Don't follow the crowd blaze your own trail in the twenty twenty. One range rover sport with its iconic. Muscular silhouette six exhilarating powertrains and control of terrain response to with dynamic program. It's a performance. Suv like no other contact. Your local land rover retailer today to schedule a test. Drive land rover above and beyond. This episode is brought to you by cbs. These days even short trip can feel like of big deal. that's why. Cvs delivers prescriptions. And essentials right to your front door for free. Cvs healthier made easier. Not all prescriptions eligible for delivery restrictions apply visit cvs dot com slash delivery for details. This episode is brought to you by. Cvs health if someone you love is at risk of a fall. The symphony medical alert system by cvs. Health can help support their safety at home. With twenty four seven emergency response monitoring it helps keep an eye on their wellbeing when you can't be their terms and conditions apply learn more about symphony at cvs dot com slash symphony or. Find it at your nearest cvs health hub known. The golden age of piracy in the caribbean is generally broken into two periods. The buccaneers of the mid sixteen hundreds and the post spanish war of succession period of the seventeen tens and twenties in the era of the buccaneers. In which french british and dutch sailors brought hellfire to the spanish galleons. No man was more successful than kept in henry morgan but in the second period. The quintessential sif was a man commonly known as blackbeard though. We only terrorize the sees of north america for a brief period. Blackbeard left a legacy. Unlike most he was everything. Hollywood could have dreamed of a ruthless tyrannical and treacherous cutthroat. The caribbean and the coast of north. America shuddered at the site of his ship. The queen's revenge and other ships almost always surrendered the moment. His flag was raised and yet for a man who was widely believed to be the devil incarnate. Much of what we know about. Blackbeard is a complete mystery. A tale whose lines have become blurred between fact and myth. The foundation of what we know comes from captain. Charles johnson in seventeen twenty four johnson wrote a book entitled a general his of the robberies and murders of the most notorious pirates. The book many of the famous pirates. We know today a veritable who's who of see roads. However there is a bit of a problem charles. Manson is widely believed to be a pseudonym and in the nearly four centuries since his book was written no one has been able to pin down his true identity. His stories have been notoriously. Difficult to corroborate the mystery behind the book clouds the truth about the people he described. None of whom are more famous than blackbeard. The man known as blackbeard was born edward. Teach sometime around sixteen eighty at least. That's the consensus no. Berthier has ever been officially established and many records have listed his real name as either thatch or tash even more mysterious is a theory that none of the names were real. in fact. Some have speculated that. Blackbeard used teach and thatch as pseudonyms presumably to hide his real identity from the authorities. The mysteries of teaches origins extend to where he was born as. Well some say he was born in the american colonies. Virginia philadelphia north carolina and jamaica are all given as possibilities but according to captain charles johnson teach hailed from bristol. England and to most historians bristol is the likely place because it was one of england's busiest ports considering the teach made a reputation as a skilled seamen and captain growing up in a port town makes sense allegedly teaches. Father died when the boy was in his early teens. His mother remarried and teach and his stepfather shared

CVS Blackbeard Captain Edward Charlestown Uttar Buccaneers Charleston South Carolina Confusion Atlantic Caribbean Kate Edward Henry Morgan Richard CBS Charles Johnson Berthier North America Hollywood
The Halo, Part 2

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

05:12 min | 16 hrs ago

The Halo, Part 2

"To blow your mind. My name is robert lamb. And i'm jim mccormick and we're back with part two of our talk about halos in the nimbus and the orioles the glory that glows behind the figur- whether that's a christian sane or who wa wa the terrible or did we end up last week. Actually talking about lucia doors at all. I think we did very briefly partially because we were in in the process of putting together a weird house cinema episode on santo film Yeah the question came up. Are there any halos. Used with lucia designs with the idea being that. Yeah there are. A number of different catholicism themed lucia doors so after we recorded i did look into it a little bit. I looked at some of the usual suspects and looked on lucia wicky and looked at photos. I didn't notice any halo motifs in the mass for the most part like nothing. Nothing like Like actually physically emerging and position above the head. You know you see a lot of crosses et cetera. The best example i did find though was legiter named angel. Zule one of at least four different doors. Use that name. And this particular mass depicts an entire angel like a like a christmas topper angel on the front of the mask and that angel has a halo so it's position so that the angels head in halo appear more or less in the center of the forehead. So i assume this is technically not a ruto. I guess so I don't know anything about this guy but it looks like a technical mask. You know if you have an angel like that You know it's it's gotta be but then again he could easily turned rudo and become a fallen angel. Specialty loses that mask. Oh yeah i mean a bad angel can be really bad when you get angels of death. You've got you've got Remember a particularly haunting miklos read not poem called the terrifying angel where he then angel appears to him and advises him to remove his own skin. Yeah there's a. There are a number of different lucia. there have been a few different Angels of death. Angel de la more to There's one i remember seeing on tv. That did not really have any any kind of Angelic themes in his outfit. But i did run across on lou wicky and old foe from a magazine that has showed a guy with a halo motif again on the forehead almost like a third i but that's the only thing that could really find in terms of Dudes like this with with halos now. Another thing that comes to mind though you know we were talking a little bit about halos and angels and Certainly art. But i started thinking more and more about films and i can't think of a single example of of an angelic being presented ends a horror film or supernatural film in which they have a halo like i was thinking like what are some of the the angel visitation seems that. Come to mind. And i thought of i thought bill paxton's film. Frailty who has a great angel visitation seen like a hallucination that emerges in his mind. But there's no halo now. I might be remembering that wrong. I thought that the angel and that it doesn't have like a ring halo around the head or anything specifically concentrated on the head. But i did recall a kind of like full body. Glow am i definitely definitely has a low to it and there is. There's a lot of like Heavenly architecture going on a buffet but in terms of something more instantly. Recognizable was a halo. Not so much. Likewise thinking back to the prophecy films with christopher walken lot of lot of lot of lot of angels in that lot of angel wings and you can think of various things that were clearly influenced by that you know we have angels and fallen. Angels popping up and filmmakers will go nuts giving them big big feathery wings. But i don't think they ever really include the halo and it's kind of interesting. Because i guess it comes down to the fact that it's easy to think of it as such a cliche thing but at the same time it is so weird atlanta and there's so many ways to depict it you'd think you would you would see more of it. I don't know i. I'd love to hear from folks out there who have encountered really cool halos genre pictures Because i'd love to. I'd love to see it now in the last episode. Did you bring up the idea of cinna bite from like the clive barker. Verse with with a halo. I can't remember if we if we did. But i started looking into it after the podcast and I think there's an comic hellraiser comic book. There's a there's a cinnabon named halo but he doesn't really have a halo now. There was a A clive barker figure todd mcfarlane toys For the tortured souls line and this guy this particular guy agonised has kind of surgery has a surgical halo around his head like a halo and then he also has what i think is like a human face. Maybe his own human face position behind him That also seems to mimic Halo iconography so very sin abide s character. So i'm this seems to come close.

Lucia Robert Lamb Jim Mccormick Lucia Wicky Angel De La Lou Wicky Orioles Miklos Angels Bill Paxton Angel Christopher Walken Cinna Clive Barker Atlanta Todd Mcfarlane